independent and unofficial
Prince fan community site
Wed 11th Dec 2019 9:23pm
Welcome! Sign up or enter username and password to remember me
Forum jump
Forums > Prince: Music and More > Prince's memoir "The Beautiful Ones" (29 October) (part 3)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Page 4 of 13 <123456789>Last »

This is a "featured" topic! — From here you can jump to the « previous or next » featured topic.

Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Reply #90 posted 10/30/19 5:29pm

mnfriend

mnfriend said:

Dear moderators, I have but a sense of humor.

From the new book, copied from page 273, lest anyone think I am off topic:

"Let's Go Crazy"

This handwritten version adds another foreboding line to the preacherly monologue that opens the song:

"So u better try to be happy 'cause one day the sun may set for good."


And this is why I think a fan wants to buy this book. In my short time with it, I read 1 handwritten page of Prince being open, honest, intelligent introspective about himself - it is the WAY he puts his own thoughts together, word selection, sentence structure- Like his song writing. His.
Thank you.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #91 posted 10/30/19 6:55pm

mnfriend

Okay my last comment, it's on topic, with no spoilers:

word to the wise, do not read/ look at book, and then listen to 'Purple Rain', unless you need a good cry.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #92 posted 10/30/19 7:31pm

flipper123

Thank God it's out at last.

Now all the the childish "I have it already na-nana-na-na" crap can stop
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #93 posted 10/30/19 8:46pm

PeggyO

I love the pictures of his mother as a young woman. I can see her in Prince.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #94 posted 10/30/19 8:58pm

Lovejunky

avatar

[Edited 10/30/19 20:58pm]

[Edited 10/30/19 21:34pm]

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #95 posted 10/30/19 9:37pm

Lovejunky

avatar

I got mine from K Mart on the Morning of 29th here in Australia...

read it in one sitting....

Dan is a wonderful writer....

overall a bitter sweet experience....

Hes gone, and there are things we will never know...

He did drop one huge Bombshell though...

Love you Pwince....

Is there going to be another thread where we can actually discuss content

and that one big bombshell ?

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #96 posted 10/30/19 11:21pm

MarcelS67

mantaray31 said:



MarcelS67 said:


Looks like I'll just have to wait for a couple of days, the book is not yet available neither in the store or online yet here.


Anyway, does anybody know whats up with the two versions (different publisher?) first one is:


  • 9780399589652

Second one is:


  • 9781780899176

Book covers look slightly different too.


[Edited 10/30/19 10:46am]




They are for Random House US and Random House UK respectively. I happened to order the UK version from a Swedish site and now it says "delivery date unknown" while the US version can be delivered in a few days...


I hope the UK version is not cancelled...



Ah thanks for clearing that up, we have to be patient I presume.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #97 posted 10/31/19 1:25am

blackmoondaugh
ter

I received my copy on the 28th, finished it the same evening and haven't been able to stop thinking about certain parts of it. Firstly, it feels weird that his memoir exists at all. It seemed unbelievable when he announced the project three years ago and it still seems that way to me now. I never thought that I would ever be privy to facsimiles of handwritten pages containing some of his life's most intimate memories. This is Prince--a man who seemed to delight in the myths we created about him; who gave few interviews if any at all during certain eras of his career; who told us that everything we needed to know about him could be unearthed in his music. So even after reading the book, I was left to ponder the impetus for him to share the narrative of his life with us and it made me sad and inspired at the same time. Sad because of the circumstances in which he left and seemed prepared to leave this plane of existence and inspired because he left us with the same exhuberance to create as he did when he was here. From Dan Piepenbring's account, he seemed so hyped to author many more books.

Perhaps the most salient theme that P writes about besides creative ownership is the power of imagination and "visualization" in his memoir. This book resides among a lifetime of examples that demonstrate his uncanny ability to conceptualize something and bring it to fruition. According to Piepenbring, the memoir germinated out of an idea for a lyric/photo book(!). The treatment for Purple Rain was initially entitled "Dreams" and despite all odds, became the cornerstone for his most commercially successful work. I think it was Steve Parke who wrote about part of P's creative process in his photo book in which they spent many hours just spitballing ideas of cool ways to promote or present his music to his audience and then saw those ideas come to life in real time. A former associate (I don't remember who it was now) said P told her he wanted to form an all female rock band and a few years later, 3rdeyegirl was born. It made me think of that interview he did in the 90's(?) in which he said half-jokingly that he "willed" his entire career into being. The mantra he had emblazoned on his bedroom wall, "Everything U Think Is True" has perhaps never been truer for anyone else, at least as far as music is concerned.

The part of the book that is most empowering to me is where he lets us know that we all have the ability to create the life that we want to live and create the communities that we want to live in. There is something very uplifting and gracious in the way that he decided to peel back the curtain of his life (the beginning of which was difficult, if not traumatic) in part, to tell us that we always have the power to chart our own destiny as well. (He mentions "free will" in the book. I have no idea how his interpretation of "free will" reconciles with the ideology of fate in the Bible, but that's another thread.)

By now, I've heard so many anecdotes by former associates about the human being P was that it has begun to tarnish my immaculate picture of who Prince the icon was, but in a healthy way. I've heard enough rehearsal bootlegs of him working on songs, I've seen rehearsal footage of him leading his various bands, and I've read enough testemonies of his work ethic to understand why he chafed at the word "magic" when it was used by white critics to describe him or his music. Once, I pictured Prince as the magical embodiement of effortless cool and preternatural virtuosity, but the beautiful ones "always smash the picture, always everytime".

Did anybody else read too much into the fact that his handwriting in cursive looks almost identical to his mother's?

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #98 posted 10/31/19 2:45am

funksterr

blackmoondaughter said:

I received my copy on the 28th, finished it the same evening and haven't been able to stop thinking about certain parts of it. Firstly, it feels weird that his memoir exists at all. It seemed unbelievable when he announced the project three years ago and it still seems that way to me now. I never thought that I would ever be privy to facsimiles of handwritten pages containing some of his life's most intimate memories. This is Prince--a man who seemed to delight in the myths we created about him; who gave few interviews if any at all during certain eras of his career; who told us that everything we needed to know about him could be unearthed in his music. So even after reading the book, I was left to ponder the impetus for him to share the narrative of his life with us and it made me sad and inspired at the same time. Sad because of the circumstances in which he left and seemed prepared to leave this plane of existence and inspired because he left us with the same exhuberance to create as he did when he was here. From Dan Piepenbring's account, he seemed so hyped to author many more books.

Perhaps the most salient theme that P writes about besides creative ownership is the power of imagination and "visualization" in his memoir. This book resides among a lifetime of examples that demonstrate his uncanny ability to conceptualize something and bring it to fruition. According to Piepenbring, the memoir germinated out of an idea for a lyric/photo book(!). The treatment for Purple Rain was initially entitled "Dreams" and despite all odds, became the cornerstone for his most commercially successful work. I think it was Steve Parke who wrote about part of P's creative process in his photo book in which they spent many hours just spitballing ideas of cool ways to promote or present his music to his audience and then saw those ideas come to life in real time. A former associate (I don't remember who it was now) said P told her he wanted to form an all female rock band and a few years later, 3rdeyegirl was born. It made me think of that interview he did in the 90's(?) in which he said half-jokingly that he "willed" his entire career into being. The mantra he had emblazoned on his bedroom wall, "Everything U Think Is True" has perhaps never been truer for anyone else, at least as far as music is concerned.

The part of the book that is most empowering to me is where he lets us know that we all have the ability to create the life that we want to live and create the communities that we want to live in. There is something very uplifting and gracious in the way that he decided to peel back the curtain of his life (the beginning of which was difficult, if not traumatic) in part, to tell us that we always have the power to chart our own destiny as well. (He mentions "free will" in the book. I have no idea how his interpretation of "free will" reconciles with the ideology of fate in the Bible, but that's another thread.)

By now, I've heard so many anecdotes by former associates about the human being P was that it has begun to tarnish my immaculate picture of who Prince the icon was, but in a healthy way. I've heard enough rehearsal bootlegs of him working on songs, I've seen rehearsal footage of him leading his various bands, and I've read enough testemonies of his work ethic to understand why he chafed at the word "magic" when it was used by white critics to describe him or his music. Once, I pictured Prince as the magical embodiement of effortless cool and preternatural virtuosity, but the beautiful ones "always smash the picture, always everytime".

Did anybody else read too much into the fact that his handwriting in cursive looks almost identical to his mother's?

yessir!

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #99 posted 10/31/19 2:46am

funksterr

PeggyO said:

I love the pictures of his mother as a young woman. I can see her in Prince.

My favorite part of the book too!

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #100 posted 10/31/19 3:02am

funksterr

I haven't really read the book yet but just flipping through it. The mindgames/dickishness with the writer was my favorite part. Tried to get dude fired! 'I trust you, you have power now. Tell your bosses blah blah blah' biggrin biggrin


 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #101 posted 10/31/19 6:31am

BartVanHemelen

avatar

Slate review: https://slate.com/culture...-ones.html

.

EW (Entertainment Weekly) review: https://ew.com/book-revie...ew-review/

.

Vulture distills some stories from the book: https://www.vulture.com/2...takes.html

.

Europe1 item on the book (in French): https://www.europe1.fr/em...ce-3928505

.

Le Point review (in French): https://www.lepoint.fr/cu...4489_3.php

.

Article in Belgian newspaper Het Nieuwsblad on the making of the book (in Dutch): https://www.nieuwsblad.be...0_04693536

.

RTBF / Classic21 review (in French): https://www.rtbf.be/class...d=10355075

.

AFP (Agence France Presse) review: https://www.france24.com/...-own-words

.

France Culture review (in French): https://www.franceculture...tobre-2019

.

WebWire article on the making of the book (mainly a long quote by Chris Jackson): https://www.webwire.com/V...aId=249276

© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #102 posted 10/31/19 6:41am

Giovanni777

avatar

Why is anyone concerned with spoilers? When an album came out, we all wanted the reviews... we talked about it. We should freely discuss this book here.

"He's a musician's musician..."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #103 posted 10/31/19 6:48am

BartVanHemelen

avatar

Kirkus article on the book: https://www.kirkusreviews...takeaways/

.

Rock & Folk review in French: https://www.rocknfolk.com...-pop/39605

.

Crooner review (in French): https://www.crooner.fr/20...nd-prince/

.

© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #104 posted 10/31/19 7:50am

PeggyO

blackmoondaughter said:

I received my copy on the 28th, finished it the same evening and haven't been able to stop thinking about certain parts of it. Firstly, it feels weird that his memoir exists at all. It seemed unbelievable when he announced the project three years ago and it still seems that way to me now. I never thought that I would ever be privy to facsimiles of handwritten pages containing some of his life's most intimate memories. This is Prince--a man who seemed to delight in the myths we created about him; who gave few interviews if any at all during certain eras of his career; who told us that everything we needed to know about him could be unearthed in his music. So even after reading the book, I was left to ponder the impetus for him to share the narrative of his life with us and it made me sad and inspired at the same time. Sad because of the circumstances in which he left and seemed prepared to leave this plane of existence and inspired because he left us with the same exhuberance to create as he did when he was here. From Dan Piepenbring's account, he seemed so hyped to author many more books.

Perhaps the most salient theme that P writes about besides creative ownership is the power of imagination and "visualization" in his memoir. This book resides among a lifetime of examples that demonstrate his uncanny ability to conceptualize something and bring it to fruition. According to Piepenbring, the memoir germinated out of an idea for a lyric/photo book(!). The treatment for Purple Rain was initially entitled "Dreams" and despite all odds, became the cornerstone for his most commercially successful work. I think it was Steve Parke who wrote about part of P's creative process in his photo book in which they spent many hours just spitballing ideas of cool ways to promote or present his music to his audience and then saw those ideas come to life in real time. A former associate (I don't remember who it was now) said P told her he wanted to form an all female rock band and a few years later, 3rdeyegirl was born. It made me think of that interview he did in the 90's(?) in which he said half-jokingly that he "willed" his entire career into being. The mantra he had emblazoned on his bedroom wall, "Everything U Think Is True" has perhaps never been truer for anyone else, at least as far as music is concerned.

The part of the book that is most empowering to me is where he lets us know that we all have the ability to create the life that we want to live and create the communities that we want to live in. There is something very uplifting and gracious in the way that he decided to peel back the curtain of his life (the beginning of which was difficult, if not traumatic) in part, to tell us that we always have the power to chart our own destiny as well. (He mentions "free will" in the book. I have no idea how his interpretation of "free will" reconciles with the ideology of fate in the Bible, but that's another thread.)

By now, I've heard so many anecdotes by former associates about the human being P was that it has begun to tarnish my immaculate picture of who Prince the icon was, but in a healthy way. I've heard enough rehearsal bootlegs of him working on songs, I've seen rehearsal footage of him leading his various bands, and I've read enough testemonies of his work ethic to understand why he chafed at the word "magic" when it was used by white critics to describe him or his music. Once, I pictured Prince as the magical embodiement of effortless cool and preternatural virtuosity, but the beautiful ones "always smash the picture, always everytime".

Did anybody else read too much into the fact that his handwriting in cursive looks almost identical to his mother's?

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #105 posted 10/31/19 8:02am

PeggyO

blackmoondaughter said:

I received my copy on the 28th, finished it the same evening and haven't been able to stop thinking about certain parts of it. Firstly, it feels weird that his memoir exists at all. It seemed unbelievable when he announced the project three years ago and it still seems that way to me now. I never thought that I would ever be privy to facsimiles of handwritten pages containing some of his life's most intimate memories. This is Prince--a man who seemed to delight in the myths we created about him; who gave few interviews if any at all during certain eras of his career; who told us that everything we needed to know about him could be unearthed in his music. So even after reading the book, I was left to ponder the impetus for him to share the narrative of his life with us and it made me sad and inspired at the same time. Sad because of the circumstances in which he left and seemed prepared to leave this plane of existence and inspired because he left us with the same exhuberance to create as he did when he was here. From Dan Piepenbring's account, he seemed so hyped to author many more books.

Perhaps the most salient theme that P writes about besides creative ownership is the power of imagination and "visualization" in his memoir. This book resides among a lifetime of examples that demonstrate his uncanny ability to conceptualize something and bring it to fruition. According to Piepenbring, the memoir germinated out of an idea for a lyric/photo book(!). The treatment for Purple Rain was initially entitled "Dreams" and despite all odds, became the cornerstone for his most commercially successful work. I think it was Steve Parke who wrote about part of P's creative process in his photo book in which they spent many hours just spitballing ideas of cool ways to promote or present his music to his audience and then saw those ideas come to life in real time. A former associate (I don't remember who it was now) said P told her he wanted to form an all female rock band and a few years later, 3rdeyegirl was born. It made me think of that interview he did in the 90's(?) in which he said half-jokingly that he "willed" his entire career into being. The mantra he had emblazoned on his bedroom wall, "Everything U Think Is True" has perhaps never been truer for anyone else, at least as far as music is concerned.

The part of the book that is most empowering to me is where he lets us know that we all have the ability to create the life that we want to live and create the communities that we want to live in. There is something very uplifting and gracious in the way that he decided to peel back the curtain of his life (the beginning of which was difficult, if not traumatic) in part, to tell us that we always have the power to chart our own destiny as well. (He mentions "free will" in the book. I have no idea how his interpretation of "free will" reconciles with the ideology of fate in the Bible, but that's another thread.)

By now, I've heard so many anecdotes by former associates about the human being P was that it has begun to tarnish my immaculate picture of who Prince the icon was, but in a healthy way. I've heard enough rehearsal bootlegs of him working on songs, I've seen rehearsal footage of him leading his various bands, and I've read enough testemonies of his work ethic to understand why he chafed at the word "magic" when it was used by white critics to describe him or his music. Once, I pictured Prince as the magical embodiement of effortless cool and preternatural virtuosity, but the beautiful ones "always smash the picture, always everytime".

Did anybody else read too much into the fact that his handwriting in cursive looks almost identical to his mother's?

Yes, he was a master 'manifestor.'

I have studied handwriting analysis for many years and there is a strong similarity between his cursive handwriting and his mother's. Both are artistic, rhythmic, very emotional, (strong rightward slant) and passionate. Check out Vanity's handwriting; it is very similar to both of them.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #106 posted 10/31/19 8:45am

BartVanHemelen

avatar

BartVanHemelen said:

Belgian magazine Humo has an interview with Dan Piepenbring (BEWARE: likely SPOILERISH): https://www.humo.be/humo-...ft-gegeven

.

Now, I've read this. And quite frankly, I doubt the veracity of large sections of this. Because a lot of this interview is completely unlike other Piepenbring interviews. I've regularly suspected Serge Simonart to enhance his interviews with quotes from other interviews and/or by adding a lot of stuff to his own questions that he never asked that way. Quite frankly I'd be amazed if the tape of this interview contained the same words as they are written down here, because I cannot imagine Piepenbring expressing some of these thoughts.

.

If you've read it, please do not use this thread to discuss the most salacious bits; start separate ones for those. I'm including the link here since this is an interview that is part of the publicity wave for the book, and Piepenbring does discuss the book and its contents.

.

But again: some parts of this interview sound wildly out of character for Dan when you compare them to the dozens of other interviews he's done or to the introduction of the book.

.

Some excerpts (in Dutch):

.

De bottomline is volgens mij wat hij tegen z’n tourmanager Alan Leeds zei: ‘Je hebt geen idee wat het met me doet als weer eens een pseudo-artiest die niet eens zijn eigen songs schrijft toch een hit scoort.’ Ik bespeurde ook competitie met Bruce Springsteen. Het irriteerde Prince dat hij met hem werd vergeleken. Prince liet duidelijk voelen dat hij zichzelf beter vond dan Bruce, en niet onterecht: Prince arrangeerde z’n eigen platen, Bruce niet; Prince kon dansen, Bruce niet; Prince lanceerde de carrière van een dozijn andere artiesten, Bruce niet; Prince was sexy, Bruce een stuk minder; Prince beheerste een dozijn instrumenten, Bruce slechts één of twee; Prince kon alle stijlen aan, Bruce enkel rock en blues. Morris Day vertelde me hoe Prince ooit Bruce op het podium riep en hem zijn gitaar in de handen duwde. Bruce improviseerde een riff, maar hij is geen sologitarist, dus dat klonk niet echt indrukwekkend. Waarop Prince zijn gitaar terugvroeg en er vervolgens zelf een stomende solo op speelde, suggererend: kijk, dit instrument komt wel tot leven wanneer het wordt bespeeld door een échte artiest. Competitief? You bet. Maar ik voelde goed aan dat Prince zou dichtklappen als ik al zo vroeg in het proces te opzichtig zou hengelen naar anekdotes.

.

[...]

.

Hij hintte er die eerste ontmoetingen ook op dat er een nog onverteld verhaal school achter het niet uitbrengen van ‘The Black Album’ en de rol van zangeres Ingrid Chavez daarin. Hij had het over ‘Blue Tuesday’, een dag waarop hij met Ingrid een soort mystieke ervaring had gehad, al dan niet onder de invloed van drugs, die hem had doen besluiten alles om te gooien. Hij sprak over ‘spooky electric’, een duistere energie.

.

[...]

.

HUMO: Welke kamer van Paisley Park maakte de grootste indruk op jou?

.

Piepenbring: Zijn slaapkamer: een grote ruimte waar bijna alles wit was, alsof er ooit een sneeuwstorm had gewoed en die sneeuw nooit was gesmolten. Alle muren waren kaal op één opschrift na: ‘Everything you think is true.’ Het leek een tempel, kitsch en puur en minimalistisch tegelijk. Daar stond ook een draaitafel met twee gigantische luidsprekers en een stapel vinylplaten. De laatste die hij gespeeld had was ‘I Want You’ van Marvin Gaye. Ook de aangrenzende grote badkamer was leeg, op een enorme stenen badkuip en een vracht kaarsen na. Na zijn dood ben ik zijn enorme kleedkamer binnengewandeld. Dat was bizar, omdat al die kleren geparfumeerd waren: toen ik binnenkwam, overspoelde die geur me, alsof hij nog in die kamer aanwezig was.

.

[...]

.

Wat me nu te binnen schiet is een notaboek uit de periode van ‘Purple Rain’, waarin hij naast zwaarwichtige songteksten ook heel wat grapjes had genoteerd: ‘Hij was zo oud dat het nummer van zijn verzekeringspolis 3 was.’ Had hij die oneliners bedoeld als dialogen voor personages zoals Christopher Tracy in de film ‘Under the Cherry Moon? Of waren het aanzetten tot bindteksten tijdens optredens? Ik stuitte ook op aantekeningen voor ‘The Dawn’, de werktitel voor wat ‘Graffiti Bridge’ zou worden. Hij had iets met de zonsopgang als metafoor, het aanbreken van een nieuw tijdperk. Ook later, in de jaren 90, zei hij tijdens optredens dingen als: ‘Welcome to the dawn.’

.

[...]

.

Hij is een aantal keer verraden. Door zijn vader, door zogenaamde vrienden en vertrouwelingen, door muzikanten, door medewerkers van Paisley Park, door advocaten… Zijn kapster Kim Berry, die nu haarlokken van hem verkoopt die ze stiekem heeft gehamsterd: dat zou Prince geháát hebben! Hij was trots en schermde zijn privacy zozeer af dat niemand te dicht mocht komen. En hij had zelf zo’n imago van onfeilbaarheid en ongenaakbaarheid geschapen dat hij misschien bang was dat iemand zou ontdekken dat hij ook maar een gewone, kwetsbare sterveling was.

.

[...]

.

Na de dood van Prince kreeg ik een rondleiding door The Vault, de kluis waar behalve duizenden tapes ook persoonlijke spullen rondslingerden. Er lag kinderspeelgoed, en een prachtig lederen fotoalbum waarin Prince en Mayte het opgroeien van hun kind wilden documenteren, maar het was leeg gebleven – een gruwelijk simpel beeld dat hun tragedie perfect vatte. Maar hij heeft het wél bewaard.

.


© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #107 posted 10/31/19 10:05am

yello1

BartVanHemelen said:

BartVanHemelen said:

Belgian magazine Humo has an interview with Dan Piepenbring (BEWARE: likely SPOILERISH): https://www.humo.be/humo-...ft-gegeven

.

Now, I've read this. And quite frankly, I doubt the veracity of large sections of this. Because a lot of this interview is completely unlike other Piepenbring interviews. I've regularly suspected Serge Simonart to enhance his interviews with quotes from other interviews and/or by adding a lot of stuff to his own questions that he never asked that way. Quite frankly I'd be amazed if the tape of this interview contained the same words as they are written down here, because I cannot imagine Piepenbring expressing some of these thoughts.

.

If you've read it, please do not use this thread to discuss the most salacious bits; start separate ones for those. I'm including the link here since this is an interview that is part of the publicity wave for the book, and Piepenbring does discuss the book and its contents.

.

But again: some parts of this interview sound wildly out of character for Dan when you compare them to the dozens of other interviews he's done or to the introduction of the book.

.

Some excerpts (in Dutch):

.

De bottomline is volgens mij wat hij tegen z’n tourmanager Alan Leeds zei: ‘Je hebt geen idee wat het met me doet als weer eens een pseudo-artiest die niet eens zijn eigen songs schrijft toch een hit scoort.’ Ik bespeurde ook competitie met Bruce Springsteen. Het irriteerde Prince dat hij met hem werd vergeleken. Prince liet duidelijk voelen dat hij zichzelf beter vond dan Bruce, en niet onterecht: Prince arrangeerde z’n eigen platen, Bruce niet; Prince kon dansen, Bruce niet; Prince lanceerde de carrière van een dozijn andere artiesten, Bruce niet; Prince was sexy, Bruce een stuk minder; Prince beheerste een dozijn instrumenten, Bruce slechts één of twee; Prince kon alle stijlen aan, Bruce enkel rock en blues. Morris Day vertelde me hoe Prince ooit Bruce op het podium riep en hem zijn gitaar in de handen duwde. Bruce improviseerde een riff, maar hij is geen sologitarist, dus dat klonk niet echt indrukwekkend. Waarop Prince zijn gitaar terugvroeg en er vervolgens zelf een stomende solo op speelde, suggererend: kijk, dit instrument komt wel tot leven wanneer het wordt bespeeld door een échte artiest. Competitief? You bet. Maar ik voelde goed aan dat Prince zou dichtklappen als ik al zo vroeg in het proces te opzichtig zou hengelen naar anekdotes.

.

[...]

.

Hij hintte er die eerste ontmoetingen ook op dat er een nog onverteld verhaal school achter het niet uitbrengen van ‘The Black Album’ en de rol van zangeres Ingrid Chavez daarin. Hij had het over ‘Blue Tuesday’, een dag waarop hij met Ingrid een soort mystieke ervaring had gehad, al dan niet onder de invloed van drugs, die hem had doen besluiten alles om te gooien. Hij sprak over ‘spooky electric’, een duistere energie.

.

[...]

.

HUMO: Welke kamer van Paisley Park maakte de grootste indruk op jou?

.

Piepenbring: Zijn slaapkamer: een grote ruimte waar bijna alles wit was, alsof er ooit een sneeuwstorm had gewoed en die sneeuw nooit was gesmolten. Alle muren waren kaal op één opschrift na: ‘Everything you think is true.’ Het leek een tempel, kitsch en puur en minimalistisch tegelijk. Daar stond ook een draaitafel met twee gigantische luidsprekers en een stapel vinylplaten. De laatste die hij gespeeld had was ‘I Want You’ van Marvin Gaye. Ook de aangrenzende grote badkamer was leeg, op een enorme stenen badkuip en een vracht kaarsen na. Na zijn dood ben ik zijn enorme kleedkamer binnengewandeld. Dat was bizar, omdat al die kleren geparfumeerd waren: toen ik binnenkwam, overspoelde die geur me, alsof hij nog in die kamer aanwezig was.

.

[...]

.

Wat me nu te binnen schiet is een notaboek uit de periode van ‘Purple Rain’, waarin hij naast zwaarwichtige songteksten ook heel wat grapjes had genoteerd: ‘Hij was zo oud dat het nummer van zijn verzekeringspolis 3 was.’ Had hij die oneliners bedoeld als dialogen voor personages zoals Christopher Tracy in de film ‘Under the Cherry Moon? Of waren het aanzetten tot bindteksten tijdens optredens? Ik stuitte ook op aantekeningen voor ‘The Dawn’, de werktitel voor wat ‘Graffiti Bridge’ zou worden. Hij had iets met de zonsopgang als metafoor, het aanbreken van een nieuw tijdperk. Ook later, in de jaren 90, zei hij tijdens optredens dingen als: ‘Welcome to the dawn.’

.

[...]

.

Hij is een aantal keer verraden. Door zijn vader, door zogenaamde vrienden en vertrouwelingen, door muzikanten, door medewerkers van Paisley Park, door advocaten… Zijn kapster Kim Berry, die nu haarlokken van hem verkoopt die ze stiekem heeft gehamsterd: dat zou Prince geháát hebben! Hij was trots en schermde zijn privacy zozeer af dat niemand te dicht mocht komen. En hij had zelf zo’n imago van onfeilbaarheid en ongenaakbaarheid geschapen dat hij misschien bang was dat iemand zou ontdekken dat hij ook maar een gewone, kwetsbare sterveling was.

.

[...]

.

Na de dood van Prince kreeg ik een rondleiding door The Vault, de kluis waar behalve duizenden tapes ook persoonlijke spullen rondslingerden. Er lag kinderspeelgoed, en een prachtig lederen fotoalbum waarin Prince en Mayte het opgroeien van hun kind wilden documenteren, maar het was leeg gebleven – een gruwelijk simpel beeld dat hun tragedie perfect vatte. Maar hij heeft het wél bewaard.

.


Thank U Bart !..one of the best interviews ...Can U post the full interview?

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #108 posted 10/31/19 11:25am

luv4u

Moderator

avatar

moderator

yello1 said:

BartVanHemelen said:

.


Thank U Bart !..one of the best interviews ...Can U post the full interview?


Just a paragraph with a link. The org does not have written permission to post the interview in it's entirety.

Edmonton, AB - canada
Mod Goddess of the SNIP & BAN Making Moves - OF4S
Ohh purple joy oh purple bliss oh purple rapture!
REAL MUSIC by REAL MUSICIANS - Prince
"I kind of wish there was a reason for Prince to make the site crash more" ~~ Ben
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #109 posted 10/31/19 4:00pm

mnfriend

A bit of Dutch to English:

There was also a turntable with two giant speakers and a stack of vinyl records. The last one he had played was "I Want You" by Marvin Gaye. 

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #110 posted 10/31/19 4:35pm

PennyPurple

avatar

Mine arrived today. Can't wait to dig in.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #111 posted 10/31/19 5:57pm

TheTruth123

Prince is a great author. His grammar is not always perfect but that doesn’t matter in this case. He explains things in a very simple way so that anyone can take his words in. Like a good preacher who describes things at a fourth grade level for all ears. But when he has something important to describe like a certain feeling or thought, he uses a more complicated word that is best understood if looked up in the dictionary to get the full meaning of what he is saying.
[Edited 11/1/19 3:23am]
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #112 posted 10/31/19 6:00pm

TheTruth123

I want to say something about his statement that, “… there’s some part of your heart you should never give away. “

He didn’t mean it in a way that he couldn’t fully love someone. He meant that there is a part of us that belongs to God only. To yourself. It is what allows us to remain an individual.

It is only in a slow, deep and contemplative reading of this book and looking at things in context and in the order he wrote it from the beginning, that I can understand what he is trying to convey.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #113 posted 10/31/19 7:30pm

donnyenglish

Do we post spoilers on this thread or not?

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #114 posted 10/31/19 7:40pm

WhisperingDand
elions

avatar

donnyenglish said:

Do we post spoilers on this thread or not?

I don't think so. I'd love a spoiler-zone thread, though. I don't get down with this modern day chicken little freak out over any tangential spoiler or fragment of a spoiler. It's out, let's go.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #115 posted 10/31/19 8:13pm

PeggyO

I finished reading the book and want to talk about a few things but want to wait a few days for others to read it so the conversation is fuller.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #116 posted 10/31/19 8:35pm

TheTruth123

There no Book Discussion yet? Well, if this isn’t the place to talk about the book, I think we should have one too. This is The Org. If anyone should have one it should be us.
The world is watching. Let’s go.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #117 posted 10/31/19 9:25pm

ISaidLifeIsJus
tAGame

avatar

TheTruth123 said:

There no Book Discussion yet? Well, if this isn’t the place to talk about the book, I think we should have one too. This is The Org. If anyone should have one it should be us. The world is watching. Let’s go.



I have a lot to say...so go for it!


pimp2

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #118 posted 10/31/19 10:20pm

callimnate

avatar

TheTruth123 said:

Princes a great author. His grandma is not always perfect but that doesn’t matter in this case..........

lol lol lol lol

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #119 posted 11/01/19 12:52am

mELdOURADOsELV
AGEM

Yah, go for it!

Would like to read what y'all have to say..

hammer omfg eyepop hmmm
mushy
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Page 4 of 13 <123456789>Last »
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)

This is a "featured" topic! — From here you can jump to the « previous or next » featured topic.

« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > Prince: Music and More > Prince's memoir "The Beautiful Ones" (29 October) (part 3)