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Forums > Music: Non-Prince > Rapper Too Short: We Have to Admit Drake Is “Beatles, Michael Jackson” Right Now
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Reply #60 posted 11/14/18 1:34pm

StrangeButTrue

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The mystery to me will always be how he is considered a rapper. Can someone post a rap song he did? Where there isn't like autotune singing?

if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #61 posted 11/14/18 3:37pm

MickyDolenz

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Tontoman22 said:

His sales are crazy, and the market is so different with digital sales. Singles today sell 5, 6 million easy. In the US market, just go and look at his certifications for this year. In that particlualr market he has two singles that have sold over 7 million, this year. A bunch that have sold 2 to 3 million, other that have sold 1 million.... and those are just random singles, from the album; but that's how music is sold today. They are selling more music than ever. As far as the certification game, we already know that many artist are not properly certified... past & present. Certifications are not and have never been mandatory. I completely agree, what this generation will regard him as; in terms of their music and their time. It's their generations superstars...

That's because some labels avoided reporting sales to pay as little in royalties to their artists. If the artist doesn't know how much they sold, then they can't complain about not getting enough money. Record clubs like Columbia & RCA (12 albums for a penny!) did not count as sales, nor did cutouts sold for a cheap price. Some record stores that sold used stuff would not accept items from record clubs. The labels also have to request and pay for RIAA certifications. Sort of like getting a star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame has to be paid for. Gold & platinum certifications/awards isn't just something the RIAA gives out just to do it like a trophy. As far as singles being more popular today, many millennials grew up with digital downloads. Technically an "album" is a physical object like a record, tape, & CD. Without the physical object, music on the internet, Ipod, phone, tablets is just a bunch of songs. People don't have to listen to the entire album there, just stream/download the songs they like.

The labels sabotaged themselves in the 1990s when they phased out the physical single to force people to buy an album on CD. They also made CDs more expensive than records/tapes when a CD was cheaper & faster to make than the others. It didn't help that around this time artists decided they wanted to fill up the entire 80 minutes of a CD. That's just about the length of the average movie. Pre-1990s the average album lasted 30-45 minutes, because that's all records could hold before losing sound quality. An album didn't take a lot of time to listen to, unlike a 1990s era album. A double CD album was the equivalent of a 3 or 4 record set. Anything longer than that became a double or triple album. Because the physical single was gone by the late 1990s, (other than a few songs that came out on 12" maxi remix singles) people had to buy an album for a few songs. That's why when Napster was invented, it really took off. Consumers no longer had to pay a bunch of money to get the 2 or 3 songs they really wanted. That was the beginning of the demise of album sales. The only recent act who had blockbuster physical sales like acts from 1970s - 1990s is Adele.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #62 posted 11/20/18 10:39am

datdude

hell.fuckin'.naw.

ain't no "thugs" rushing home to watch an "event video" from that "moist ass canadian"

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Reply #63 posted 11/20/18 4:42pm

nd33

StrangeButTrue said:

The mystery to me will always be how he is considered a rapper. Can someone post a rap song he did? Where there isn't like autotune singing?



Let me preface this by saying that I love golden era rappers, but perhaps he’s called a rapper because people can’t bring themselves to call such someone who needs auto tune on every single word that comes out of their mouth, a singer.

It’s not really singing, or rapping. It’s some kind of garbage vibrations.
Music, sweet music, I wish I could caress and...kiss, kiss...
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Reply #64 posted 11/21/18 2:31am

LittlePurpleYo
da

The only thing we have to admit is Too Short's use of hyperbole.

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Reply #65 posted 11/21/18 7:05am

StrangeButTrue

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LittlePurpleYoda said:

The only thing we have to admit is Too Short's use of hyperbole.

.

Google says he is 5'7'', Prince was 5'3'' so he isn't even that short either. wink

if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #66 posted 11/22/18 12:45pm

joelmarable

When these rappers start playing instruments writing songs with a fucking verse bridge and chrous,i will call them musicians then,hell i havent made it and can play and out write all of them,comparing rap to beatles,he should be ashamed of himself,really?
stickman
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Reply #67 posted 11/27/18 9:08am

Cinny

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nd33 said:

StrangeButTrue said:

The mystery to me will always be how he is considered a rapper. Can someone post a rap song he did? Where there isn't like autotune singing?

Let me preface this by saying that I love golden era rappers, but perhaps he’s called a rapper because people can’t bring themselves to call such someone who needs auto tune on every single word that comes out of their mouth, a singer. It’s not really singing, or rapping. It’s some kind of garbage vibrations.


Don't waste your breath. I have been bitching about this since Nelly debuted.

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Reply #68 posted 11/27/18 7:00pm

MickyDolenz

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Bone Thugs & Nate Dogg was doing sing song rapping in the 1990s. It probably started with the Force MDs in the early 1980s or maybe Pigmeat Markham's Here Comes The Judge in the 1960s.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #69 posted 11/28/18 1:15pm

Cinny

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MickyDolenz said:

It probably started with the Force MDs in the early 1980s


I absolutely always go back to them. Beyonce is really doing the same thing, singing with a rap flow.

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Reply #70 posted 12/03/18 1:15am

BlaqueKnight

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Why is this even a conversation?

You lost me with "Rapper Too $hort says"

I don't value his opinion on music.

Drake is a very popular artist who makes music for the current generation of masses in an era where the most popular music is chosen in boardrooms, douded over by analysts, filtered for buzzwords and melodic hooks compiled by stastical analytical data, serves as background to gym routines, corporate commercials and in general, does not have the meaning that it used to. It functions primarily as a tool for consumerism.

I said this day was coming years ago on this site.

We're here.

The music of today is not meant to stay with you forever. Its meant to hold you over until you are fed the next batch of forgettable melodies, hooks and lyrics that have been data-mined from masses of social media accounts and processed into a list of words and familiar sounds made to appeal to you.

[Edited 12/3/18 1:16am]

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Reply #71 posted 12/03/18 3:28am

Graycap23

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BlaqueKnight said:

Why is this even a conversation?

You lost me with "Rapper Too $hort says"

I don't value his opinion on music.

Drake is a very popular artist who makes music for the current generation of masses in an era where the most popular music is chosen in boardrooms, douded over by analysts, filtered for buzzwords and melodic hooks compiled by stastical analytical data, serves as background to gym routines, corporate commercials and in general, does not have the meaning that it used to. It functions primarily as a tool for consumerism.

I said this day was coming years ago on this site.

We're here.

The music of today is not meant to stay with you forever. Its meant to hold you over until you are fed the next batch of forgettable melodies, hooks and lyrics that have been data-mined from masses of social media accounts and processed into a list of words and familiar sounds made to appeal to you.

[Edited 12/3/18 1:16am]

yep.

FOOLS multiply when WISE Men & Women are silent.
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Reply #72 posted 12/03/18 2:59pm

uPtoWnNY

BlaqueKnight said:

Why is this even a conversation?

You lost me with "Rapper Too $hort says"

I don't value his opinion on music.

Drake is a very popular artist who makes music for the current generation of masses in an era where the most popular music is chosen in boardrooms, douded over by analysts, filtered for buzzwords and melodic hooks compiled by stastical analytical data, serves as background to gym routines, corporate commercials and in general, does not have the meaning that it used to. It functions primarily as a tool for consumerism.

I said this day was coming years ago on this site.

We're here.

The music of today is not meant to stay with you forever. Its meant to hold you over until you are fed the next batch of forgettable melodies, hooks and lyrics that have been data-mined from masses of social media accounts and processed into a list of words and familiar sounds made to appeal to you.

[Edited 12/3/18 1:16am]

worship

....and there it is

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Reply #73 posted 12/03/18 8:47pm

woogiebear

"Biiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitch!!!!"- Too $hort

cool

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Reply #74 posted 12/04/18 10:51am

Cinny

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BlaqueKnight said:

Why is this even a conversation?

You lost me with "Rapper Too $hort says"

I don't value his opinion on music.

Drake is a very popular artist who makes music for the current generation of masses in an era where the most popular music is chosen in boardrooms, douded over by analysts, filtered for buzzwords and melodic hooks compiled by stastical analytical data, serves as background to gym routines, corporate commercials and in general, does not have the meaning that it used to. It functions primarily as a tool for consumerism.

I said this day was coming years ago on this site.

We're here.

The music of today is not meant to stay with you forever. Its meant to hold you over until you are fed the next batch of forgettable melodies, hooks and lyrics that have been data-mined from masses of social media accounts and processed into a list of words and familiar sounds made to appeal to you.


Damn!

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Reply #75 posted 12/11/18 3:05pm

AnnaSantana

Am I wrong in saying that shattering billboard chart records today means absolutely nothing today, like it did in MJ's and Beatles day?

Because it feels that way to me, like ok so he's breaking all kinds of Billboard records...so what? That means nothing anymore.

finger DONALD TRUMP
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Reply #76 posted 12/12/18 6:56am

motown1958

“BlaqueKnight:

Why is this even a conversation?

You lost me with "Rapper Too $hort says"

I don't value his opinion on music.

Drake is a very popular artist who makes music for the current generation of masses in an era where the most popular music is chosen in boardrooms, douded over by analysts, filtered for buzzwords and melodic hooks compiled by statistical analytical data, serves as background to gym routines, corporate commercials and in general, does not have the meaning that it used to. It functions primarily as a tool for consumerism.

I said this day was coming years ago on this site.

We're here.

The music of today is not meant to stay with you forever. It’s meant to hold you over until you are fed the next batch of forgettable melodies, hooks and lyrics that have been data-mined from masses of social media accounts and processed into a list of words and familiar sounds made to appeal to you.”

Well said!

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Reply #77 posted 12/13/18 10:34pm

MotownSubdivis
ion

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BlaqueKnight said:

Why is this even a conversation?


You lost me with "Rapper Too $hort says"


I don't value his opinion on music.


Drake is a very popular artist who makes music for the current generation of masses in an era where the most popular music is chosen in boardrooms, douded over by analysts, filtered for buzzwords and melodic hooks compiled by stastical analytical data, serves as background to gym routines, corporate commercials and in general, does not have the meaning that it used to. It functions primarily as a tool for consumerism.


I said this day was coming years ago on this site.


We're here.


The music of today is not meant to stay with you forever. Its meant to hold you over until you are fed the next batch of forgettable melodies, hooks and lyrics that have been data-mined from masses of social media accounts and processed into a list of words and familiar sounds made to appeal to you.

[Edited 12/3/18 1:16am]

Oh how I've missed you. Perfect summation.
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Reply #78 posted 12/14/18 7:05am

Empress

BlaqueKnight said:

Why is this even a conversation?

You lost me with "Rapper Too $hort says"

I don't value his opinion on music.

Drake is a very popular artist who makes music for the current generation of masses in an era where the most popular music is chosen in boardrooms, douded over by analysts, filtered for buzzwords and melodic hooks compiled by stastical analytical data, serves as background to gym routines, corporate commercials and in general, does not have the meaning that it used to. It functions primarily as a tool for consumerism.

I said this day was coming years ago on this site.

We're here.

The music of today is not meant to stay with you forever. Its meant to hold you over until you are fed the next batch of forgettable melodies, hooks and lyrics that have been data-mined from masses of social media accounts and processed into a list of words and familiar sounds made to appeal to you.

[Edited 12/3/18 1:16am]

Agreed!

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Forums > Music: Non-Prince > Rapper Too Short: We Have to Admit Drake Is “Beatles, Michael Jackson” Right Now