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Thread started 06/13/19 12:34pm

SoulAlive

Madonna's new album 'Madame X'

madonna-madame-x-cover.jpg

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Reply #1 posted 06/13/19 12:35pm

SoulAlive

Looks like the other thread is over,so here's the new one smile

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Reply #2 posted 06/13/19 12:48pm

SoulAlive

Screenshot_2019-06-12-17-49-11.png.eebcb

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Reply #3 posted 06/13/19 1:17pm

StrangeButTrue

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Eu quero as faixas bônus agora

if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #4 posted 06/13/19 1:24pm

SoulAlive

Album Review: Madonna’s ‘Madame X’

Despite some lyrical missteps, she's passionate and satisfyingly unconcerned with mass consumption on her best album since “Confessions on a Dance Floor.”

Album Review: Madonna’s... Variety

Here’s a little-known pop-diva fact: Madonna used to have nightmares about Whitney Houston. In a 1995 “Primetime Live” interview, she described a dream she had in which she learned that her greatest ’80s chart rival’s then-latest single, “Exhale (Shoop Shoop),” had replaced hers, “You’ll See,” at No. 1. Meanwhile, in another room, her music teacher was humming Houston’s hit. Cue cold sweat. (Dreams don’t always come true: In real life, “You’ll See” never made it past No. 6.)

If Madonna is still watching the charts like a hawk, even in her sleep, she’s clearly no longer obsessed with ruling them. In a 36-year recording career that has found the 60-year-old walking more tightropes than the average A-list pop superstar, Madonna has delivered her most uncompromising musical statement yet with her 14th album, “Madame X.”

The rebel heart she claimed to have in the title of this album’s 2015 predecessor is beating more loudly and passionately than ever before. Freed from the need to be number one with a bullet, Madonna finally has released an entire album that lives up to her reputation as one of pop’s greatest risk-takers.

The first single, “Medellín,” is a deceptively lovely opening statement that only hints at the fire raging just ahead. The comparisons that have been made to an earlier Madonna single, “La Isla Bonita,” aren’t far off, but “Medellín,” named for Colombia’s second-largest city, has sharper edges, and its Latin swirl is more jagged. Colombian reggaeton rapper Maluma adds sexual tension to the mix, and when Madonna sings “Ven conmigo, let’s take a trip,” she sounds as inviting as she did cooing about the tropical island breeze in 1987.

After that, true weirdness sets in. “Dark Ballet” and “God Control” are ambitious and sprawling, the closest Madonna may ever come to her own “Bohemian Rhapsody.” “Dark Ballet” goes from piano ballad to electro-gospel dirge to something that could pass for Edvard Grieg’s “In the Hall of the Mountain King” on mushrooms. It’s a pretty daring musical move to make only two songs in.

And then, re-enter Madonna, political rabble-rouser, the woman we first caught a glimpse of on 2003’s “American Life.” Although she never name-drops on “God Control,” which veers from mournful to hopeful to defiant in the space of its six minutes and 30 seconds, the song is emblazoned with the spirit of anti-Trump. “This is a wake-up call,” she sings under a shimmering strobelight groove, not long after admitting, “I think I understand why people get a gun.” Not that she’s really about to join the right-to-bear-arms troops; as she later raps, “The only gun is in my brain.”

“God Control” sets the primary doom-and-gloomy, politicized lyrical mood of “Madame X.” Her head may be locked and loaded, but that doesn’t mean she’s about to give Michelle Obama a run for her eloquence. Lyrically, Madonna’s political manifestos are no more sophisticated than they were 16 years ago. Her activism may be in the right place, but jejune clichés like “Open your mind” (on “Future”), “Life is a circle” (on “Extreme Occident”) and “Died a thousand times” (on “Rise”) go low when she should be aiming higher.

“Killers Who Are Partying” epitomizes Madonna’s trouble with words. “I know what I am, and I know what I’m not,” she sings, as if all too aware that she’ll be excoriated and nailed to the cross for swerving way outside of her lane with lyrics like “I will be gay, if the gay are burned / I will be Africa, if Africa is shut down / I will be poor, if the poor are humiliated.”

In her defense, it would be a somewhat unfair crucifixion. Madonna wasn’t always a rich, white woman. She came from nothing and triumphed, against all odds, in an industry ruled by predatory alpha males. Just because she now lives in the penthouse doesn’t mean she doesn’t remember what it felt like to be the girl from the gutter, or that she can’t express empathy and solidarity without pity.

Thankfully, the Midas touch of her old collaborator Mirwais still sparkes. He shares “Madame X” production credits with Mike Dean, Diplo, Billboard, Jason Evigan and Jeff Bhasker, and they’ve crafted solid state-of-the-art backdrops for Madonna’s musings. The electro gurgles, worldbeat flourishes and Madonna’s still-effective vocal presence (occasionally courtesy of AutoTune) make these 15 songs sing.

“Madame X” is best, though, not when it goes all CNN on us but when it plays primarily like a musical travelogue, taking us to magical mystical places so fascinating that we might not even notice the stormclouds overhead. The electronic cha-cha swing of “Medellín” sounds like it was sun-kissed on the Cartagena coast before taking the love train south. “Batuka,” one of the album’s highlights, kicks off with Burundi-ish drumming and settles into a tribal rhythm that beats like Paul Simon’s “Graceland” relocated from Africa to South America.

The lyrical conceit of “Killers Who Are Partying” might have stopped it dead in its tracks if it weren’t for the fado flourishes that flutter over it like a ribbon of darkness. No one will ever mistake Madonna for fado legend Amalia Rodrigues, but if she were singing in Portuguese, “Killers” wouldn’t sound so out of place on a Madredeus album. She’s been spending a lot of time in Lisbon, and the Portuguse influence is all over “Madame X.”

She and Brazilian pop superstar Anitta perform “Faz Gostoso” mostly in Anitta’s native tongue, and the reggaeton jam is the best of the album’s five vocal mash-ups. Anitta offers a far more interesting female counterpoint to Madonna than her previous distaff collaborators Britney Spears (on “Me Against the Music”) and Nicki Minaj and M.I.A. (on “Give Me All Your Luvin’”).

Despite frequent forays into foreign languages (Spanish and Portuguese), “Madame X” isn’t all musical exoticism. The white-girl hip-hop of “Crave” wouldn’t sound out of place on Ariana Grande’s latest album, and if it weren’t for the line “I’ll bend my knees for you, like a prayer” (one of several musical nods to the 30-year-old smash), “Crazy” could be a lost J.Lo ballad, which is not a good thing.

“Like a Prayer” is the strongest musical antecedent here, but “Madame X” is packed with meta-Madonna moments. In addition to the lyrical “Prayer” nod on “Crazy,” “God Control” and “Batuka” feature backing choirs right out of the “Prayer” outro, while “Future” quotes “Don’t Tell Me” from 2000’s “Music.” “Extreme Occident” moves the self-referencing inward, chronicling Madonna’s journey from “the far right … to the far left” and “from the Midwest … to the Far East.” It’s a tad clunky, but then the singer’s trajectory has been, too.

Not surprisingly, when introspective Madonna gives in to the dance diva within, “Madame X” is a smoother ride. If pop radio were more hospitable to galloping robo-pop techno punctuated by mariachi horns and sung by women over 50, “Come Alive” might be an anthem of the summer. And for those who miss her confessions on a dance floor, “I Don’t Search, I Find” is pure ’90s disco bliss, the album’s only non-stop party.

But you likely won’t hear any of this playing on a radio near you. That’s what makes “Madame X” Madonna’s best album since “Confessions on a Dance Floor.” She’s confessing again, but this time, she’s not interested in editing herself for mass consumption. “Bitch I’m Loca” she announces on the album’s second Maluma duet (not to be confused with “Bitch I’m Madonna” from “Rebel Heart”). She’s not kidding, and her crazy is an incredible sound.

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Reply #5 posted 06/13/19 1:31pm

TrivialPursuit

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SoulAlive said:

Looks like the other thread is over,so here's the new one smile


It's about to lock tomorrow anyway, so this is the new one in every way.

About the album: I tend to not read reviews before I listen to something. I don't want other's influences or opinions on my filter. I like some of the new stuff she's put out in recent weeks, other stuff I can do without. Videos are videos, but I want to hear a record and its concepts in full before making a bigger judgment call. I think every album has a stinker track on it and sometimes it ends up being a single. So I wait for the whole picture.

I think of the movie Moulin Rouge which had a trailer that was really dark and seedy looking. None of it looked appealing to me at all. It wasn't until I was camped out at a dude's house (sleep over date) while he was at work and I popped in the DVD and was mesmerized by it. It was an example of how a teaser of sorts can actually ruin the product as a whole.

So I'm not trying to listen to the new stuff more than once (except that first single, which is catchy). It's hard because I want new Madonna music. But I'm just biding my time...

This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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Reply #6 posted 06/13/19 2:11pm

SoulAlive

fans are starting to receive the physical copies that they ordered love

3B34B363-3DD4-408A-8F07-416C80FECB46.jpeg

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Reply #7 posted 06/13/19 2:49pm

SoulAlive

in a new interview,Madonna reveals that there are videos for "God Control" and "Batuka",so it's likely that these songs will be the next two singles.

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Reply #8 posted 06/13/19 3:12pm

StrangeButTrue

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I’m glad our Purple hero gets a shoutout on Funana.
if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #9 posted 06/13/19 3:29pm

SoulAlive

StrangeButTrue said:

I’m glad our Purple hero gets a shoutout on Funana.


What exactly does she say?
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Reply #10 posted 06/13/19 4:38pm

StrangeButTrue

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Full name check PRN, twice. https://m.youtube.com/wat...kxNKXiPldI
if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #11 posted 06/13/19 4:44pm

StrangeButTrue

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That’s the “Amen break” on Funana, correct?
if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #12 posted 06/13/19 4:52pm

SoulAlive

StrangeButTrue said:

Full name check PRN, twice. https://m.youtube.com/wat...kxNKXiPldI


hey,that’s a cool song smile

“We need Whitney,we need James Brown

we need...Prince Rogers Nelson”

Nice bonus track!
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Reply #13 posted 06/13/19 4:57pm

SoulAlive

I got about 5 more hours to go until my iTunes digital copy will appear smile time goes by so slowly for those who wait,lol
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Reply #14 posted 06/13/19 5:09pm

StrangeButTrue

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The break is actually Clyde Stubblefield Funky Drummer not the amen, my b.
if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #15 posted 06/13/19 9:27pm

SoulAlive

“God Control” is disco heaven music I just heard it!
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Reply #16 posted 06/13/19 9:33pm

StrangeButTrue

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The whole album is magical. In the sky where she oughta be at.
if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #17 posted 06/13/19 9:50pm

SoulAlive

StrangeButTrue said:

The whole album is magical. In the sky where she oughta be at.


Yes,it really is.This just might be her boldest album yet! The songs go in so many directions.
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Reply #18 posted 06/13/19 9:57pm

SoulAlive

“I Don’t Search,I Find” is a pure early 90s throwback.She attempted this style with “Living For Love”,but this is a much better song.
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Reply #19 posted 06/13/19 9:59pm

SoulAlive

those swirling violins on “God Control”.....WOW!! I am loving this!
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Reply #20 posted 06/13/19 11:03pm

SoulAlive

first impressions: when Madonna said that this new album was inspired by living in Lisbon,Portugal,she wasn’t lying biggrin this album ventures into so many different territories and Latin music styles.It’s such a refreshing change of pace for her! This album is exactly the “futuristic world music album” that Mirwais said it was.Some fans won’t like it.They won’t appreciate the different sounds and beats.But I love it.Madonna’s evolving again.I’ll have a more in-depth review soon.
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Reply #21 posted 06/14/19 12:59am

DaveT

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It better be waiting for me on the door mat this evening when I get in from work!!

I've heard the album is very "different" ... I just hope its a "different" that I'll enjoy.

www.filmsfilmsfilms.co.uk - The internet's best movie site!
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Reply #22 posted 06/14/19 1:14am

SoulAlive

DaveT said:

It better be waiting for me on the door mat this evening when I get in from work!!

I've heard the album is very "different" ... I just hope its a "different" that I'll enjoy.

it is VERY different smile this ain't no Rebel Heart or MDNA,that's for sure.

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Reply #23 posted 06/14/19 1:15am

SoulAlive

"Crazy" makes me smile smile it's such a cool little song.

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Reply #24 posted 06/14/19 2:41am

Matthaus

StrangeButTrue said:

Eu quero as faixas bônus agora

Também falo português smile

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Reply #25 posted 06/14/19 3:16am

PURPLEIZED3121

she really is bloody legend! - loving this album so far...just letting it flow from start to finish.

Another artist who has earnt the right to do what the fuck she wants whe she wants.

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Reply #26 posted 06/14/19 4:36am

robertgeorge

The best Madonna album I have heard in ages. I am calling it, though I am still listening to it. Was disappointed by the single, but finding a lot of quality on this album. Some new directions, and those that repeat earlier paths are catchy.

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Reply #27 posted 06/14/19 4:54am

PURPLEIZED3121

StrangeButTrue said:

Full name check PRN, twice. https://m.youtube.com/wat...kxNKXiPldI

love that track, alas it's not on my Tidal deluxe issue though.

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Reply #28 posted 06/14/19 7:34am

StrangeButTrue

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https://www.rollingstone....ew-847737/

.

Rob Sheffield can suck it but I'm glad Rolling Stone is using the saxophone pic - I love it.

if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #29 posted 06/14/19 10:46am

SoulAlive

interesting review from AllMusic.....

AllMusic Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

4/5

https://www.allmusic.com/album/madame-x-mw0003274282

Madame X is the rare album from a veteran artist that puts earlier records in a different light. Ever since the 1980s, the conventional wisdom about Madonna claimed she brought trends from the musical underground for the purpose of pop hits, but Madame X -- a defiantly dense album that has little to do with pop, at least in the standard American sense -- emphasizes the artistic instincts behind these moves. The shift in perception stems from Madonna embracing a world outside of the United States. While she's been an international superstar since the dawn of her career, Madonna relocated to Lisbon, Portugal in 2017, a move that occurred two years after Rebel Heart -- an ambitious record balanced between revivals of old styles and new sounds -- failed to burn up any Billboard chart outside of Dance singles. These two developments fuel Madame X, an album that treats America as a secondary concern at best. Madonna may address the political and social unrest that's swept across the globe during the latter years of the 2010s, but her commentary is purposely broad. Perhaps Madonna errs on the side of being a little bit too broad -- on "Killers Who Are Partying," she paints herself as a martyr for every oppressed voice in the world -- yet this instinct to look outside of her experience leads her to ground Madame X in various strains of Latinx sounds, trap, and art-pop, music that not only doesn't sound much like the American pop charts in 2019, but requires focused attention in a manner that makes the songs not especially friendly to playlisting.

Madame X has its share of colorful neo-disco numbers and shimmering chill-out tracks, but they're painted in dark hues, and they're surrounded by songs so closely cloistered, they can play like mini-suites. Case in point is "Dark Ballet," an ominous number that descends into a sinister, robotic rendition of Tchaikovsky's "Dance of the Reed Flutes" section from The Nutcracker -- an allusion that recalls not the future, but the dystopian horror show of A Clockwork Orange. Such darkness hangs heavy over Madame X, surfacing fiercely in the clenched-mouth phrasing on "God Control," but present even on the bobbing reggae of "Future." The murk does lift on occasion -- "Come Alive" gains levity from its clustered polyrhythms -- but the somber tenor when combined with fearless exploration does mean Madame X can be demanding listening. The rhythms are immediate, but the songs aren't, nor are the opaque productions. While this thick, heady confluence of cultures and sounds may demand concentration, Madame X not only amply rewards such close listening, but its daring embrace of the world outside the U.S. underscores how Madonna has been an advocate and ally for left-of-mainstream sounds and ideas throughout her career.

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