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Forums > Prince: Music and More > Prince's memoir "The Beautiful Ones" (released on 29 October) - The New Yorker has published the introduction
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Reply #120 posted 09/07/19 4:30am

MMJas

avatar

mnfriend said:

MN Star Tribune seems surprised they didn’t get the scoop: http://www.startribune.co...559478242/ (Just a repeat of the New Yorker story. The New Yorker story/ introduction to the book stands alone. Guess Prince could trust this writer, seems he kept his cards breasted until the right time) [Edited 9/6/19 20:41pm]

Wow. They say it's an "unlikely story".

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Reply #121 posted 09/07/19 4:43pm

BartVanHemelen

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Hamad said:

BartVanHemelen said:

.

Oh really? Then obviously he did a bunch of interviews with magazines like Jet and Ebony in the 1980s, right? Oh wait...

Oh stop it you kiss2

.

If I was wrong, you'd be able to counter what I said with evidence. Meanwhile, I can simply point to the Rolling Stone interviews and MTV interview etc.

© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
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Reply #122 posted 09/07/19 4:48pm

BartVanHemelen

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jdcxc said:


Hamad, there are way more Black writers, musicians and artists who agree with u. And Prince has ALWAYS worked closely with Black journalists (invited entire NABJ to Paisley), DJ’s and music industry insiders...talk to Cynthia Horner or The Electrifying Mojo.

.

So to prove me wrong, you mention ONE event from 2015, and one DJ, and you namedrop a person without pointing to any evidence. That's "always"? Again: prove me wrong. List all those times where Prince helped out black-owned businesses in the 1980s. I can point to his exclusive interview with MTV, or his exclusive interviews with Rolling Stone.

© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
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Reply #123 posted 09/07/19 5:17pm

violetcrush

BartVanHemelen said:

jdcxc said:


Hamad, there are way more Black writers, musicians and artists who agree with u. And Prince has ALWAYS worked closely with Black journalists (invited entire NABJ to Paisley), DJ’s and music industry insiders...talk to Cynthia Horner or The Electrifying Mojo.

.

So to prove me wrong, you mention ONE event from 2015, and one DJ, and you namedrop a person without pointing to any evidence. That's "always"? Again: prove me wrong. List all those times where Prince helped out black-owned businesses in the 1980s. I can point to his exclusive interview with MTV, or his exclusive interviews with Rolling Stone.

He did mix it up between black and white publications/businesses prior to his "crossover" in 1984 (Right On, Rock & Soul, Soul Teen), and to be fair, he did not do much of anything with the press between 1983-1990. He did do a pretty extensive interview with Ebony published July 1986 - may be because he had been getting flack in the press for moving away from his soul/funk roots. He also did the pretty extensive radio interview with Mojo after the birthday show which was great, but also very local.

*

But yes, his biggest interviews were with Rolling Stone and MTV in 1985.

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Reply #124 posted 09/07/19 5:18pm

Hamad

avatar

What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?

Read it with me again: "black ownership". Isn't his own business black-owned to begin with? Wasn't the whole Paisley Park black-owned? Prince was BLACK wasn't he? wink You're the one who's barking about MTV & Rolling Stones etc but what does that have to do with my initial statement? Being a champion of black ownership starts at home, and he started with himself & his legacy. Whether he helped other black owned businesses or not is another subject entirely, but since you brought it up, we have seen how many people came out of the woodwork talking about Prince' charity work which he never advertised. So where does that leave your precious evidences? By all means stick with them and stfu.

If you're looking to argue for the sake argument, go to the nearest mirror you can find. Otherwise we can do this all night. Not only that you're wrong, but you're a gas-lighting idiot on top of that.

[Edited 9/7/19 17:43pm]

Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #125 posted 09/07/19 5:31pm

violetcrush

leadline said:

As I mentioned before for those folks that say Prince knew he was going to die, or had nothing left to accomplish, this article shows he had grand future plans way beyond this book. Definitely not the actions of someone who knows they are checking out in a few months.

I would tend to agree - or at the very least, he thought he had enough time to complete the book.

*

This is why I have always laughed at the ridiculous notion by some that "Prince was so broken-hearted from Vanity's passing that he just could not live any longer" or that he "followed her into the afterlife." Okay, sure.

*

Of course he was very upset about her passing, and paid tribute to her in a very loving and respectful way. but based on this article, it seems it was "business as usual" for him immediately following that concert in Sydney. He was excited about the book.

*

It also seems, in typical Prince fashion, that he gave this guy the "run around" about subject, topics, logistics, and everything else in between. This dude has stamina!

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Reply #126 posted 09/07/19 5:58pm

violetcrush

Hamad said:

Mystery is a word for a reason indeed. The fact that this autobiography was unfinished, will add the intrigue to his already enigmatic persona, which will encourage people to pay closer attention to the music. After all, didn't he once said everything people need to know about him is in "his music"? He definitely embodied mystery all his life and anyway perhaps its better that somet hings were left unsaid. less is more thats what I think.

He absolutely did state "if you want to know about me listen to my music." He put all of his feelings, opinions and life experiences into his songs. He communicated to specific people in his songs.

*

Once I listened to his first P&M show at PP on January 21st, 2016 I was floored. He was literally telling his story with both words and his songs chronologically from 3 rys old through Purple Rain on that first night. It was a verbal and musical auto-biography. Just beautiful, emotional, and heartfelt.

*

Interesting that just one week later he contacted the publishers about his idea of writing his memoir.

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Reply #127 posted 09/07/19 6:03pm

Hamad

avatar

BartVanHemelen said:

Hamad said:

Prince was always a champion for black ownership, especially when it comes to music & intellectual properties.

.

Oh really? Then obviously he did a bunch of interviews with magazines like Jet and Ebony in the 1980s, right? Oh wait...

Highlighted. Where did I mention Ebony, Jet, MTV or Rolling Stones? Where did I mention anyone except him? Totally random & unnecessary. Your obsessive & obnoxious fetish to correct folks even when there's no argument blinded your senses. Refrain from addressing me from now own please.

Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #128 posted 09/07/19 6:07pm

Hamad

avatar

violetcrush said:

Hamad said:

Mystery is a word for a reason indeed. The fact that this autobiography was unfinished, will add the intrigue to his already enigmatic persona, which will encourage people to pay closer attention to the music. After all, didn't he once said everything people need to know about him is in "his music"? He definitely embodied mystery all his life and anyway perhaps its better that somet hings were left unsaid. less is more thats what I think.

He absolutely did state "if you want to know about me listen to my music." He put all of his feelings, opinions and life experiences into his songs. He communicated to specific people in his songs.

*

Once I listened to his first P&M show at PP on January 21st, 2016 I was floored. He was literally telling his story with both words and his songs chronologically from 3 rys old through Purple Rain on that first night. It was a verbal and musical auto-biography. Just beautiful, emotional, and heartfelt.

*

Interesting that just one week later he contacted the publishers about his idea of writing his memoir.

Indeed nod there's much subtlety to unravel, and that's from what has been released officially. Let alone the stuff that ended up shelved in the vault.

Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #129 posted 09/07/19 6:09pm

poppys

Hamad said:

What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?

Read it with me again: "black ownership". Isn't his own business black-owned to begin with? Wasn't the whole Paisley Park black-owned? Prince was BLACK wasn't he? wink You're the one who's barking about MTV & Rolling Stones etc but what does that have to do with my initial statement? Being a champion of black ownership starts at home, and he started with himself & his legacy. Whether he helped other black owned businesses or not is another subject entirely, but since you brought it up, we have seen how many people came out of the woodwork talking about Prince' charity work which he never advertised. So where does that leave your precious evidences? By all means stick with them and stfu.

If you're looking to argue for the sake argument, go to the nearest mirror you can find. Otherwise we can do this all night. Not only that you're wrong, but you're a gas-lighting idiot on top of that.


Agree. Find anything that says Prince was against black ownership. smh

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Reply #130 posted 09/08/19 1:33pm

kindofblue

On a sidenote: The evening Dan Piepenbring describes as his first meeting with Prince is also the last time Prince talked to Morris Day. On Jan 29, 2016, both Morris Day and The Time and Judith Hill played @ Paisley Park after dark.

Morris talked about the event here: http://ew.com/music/2017/...ay-prince/

“We knew each other for so long, it was like a family. There’s no perfect relationship. We had business disagreements and stuff like that, but anytime we saw each other, we talked and chopped it up like we just talked the day before.” They were in touch on and off throughout Prince’s final years, and Day is grateful they had one last chance to connect before his death: In January of 2016, Prince called Day and invited him to come to Paisley Park and perform with the Time. “We hung out a little bit before the show, and hung out for a little while after the show,” he says. “The fact that I got to go and hang out with him a couple months before his passing — that is one of the most standout memories for me.”


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Reply #131 posted 09/08/19 1:55pm

rogifan

I'm not sure what magazine interviews have to do with black ownership. And why just focus on the 80s?

Paisley Park is in your heart
#PrinceForever 💜
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Reply #132 posted 09/09/19 8:25am

RobotFix

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icecreamcastle777 said:

The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.” He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.






Prince should've been grateful to Susan Rogers, who began the process of curating his vast recordings. Since his passing, in interviews, she's celebrated him and defended his legacy. To the end, unfortunately, he was supercilious and unforgiving.

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Reply #133 posted 09/09/19 10:23am

barnswallow

Note: I've been trying to excise 'should' from my vocabulary... but that's just been a personal goal since I don't think it serves me well.

I was trying to remember where I'd read recently about differing interpretations of an action from black/white perspectives... I can't remember. But, I did find this from a novel I'm reading, p. 93 of

'Sag Harbor' by Colson Whitehead:

The day our electricity went out, NP sauntered in late, wearing a fresh Jonni Waffle shirt his mother had washed for him. His mother was no weekend parent. She was a teacher by profession, and dashed out to Sag, packed for the summer, as soon as the final school bell of the year started ringing. He said hi to Nick, slapped my hand, and then looked at my hair and, with a glance at Martine, said, "You sure you want to leave it all exposed like that? You want a hat?"

I said, "Shut up, bitch." I'd been experimenting with "bitch," trying it out every couple of days. Going well so far, from the response.

Nick flicked NP's arm with his finger. "Why you got to instigate something all the time?" he asked.

NP headed straight for the soda machine and shouted out, "Martine, you get enough Pistachio this time?" winking at us over his fake diligence.

The Head-Patting Incident had occurred the week before, after a post-lunch rush. It was a hot day, steaming, riling the natives. The waffle-cone supply was low when the rush hit, and of everybody on shift, I was known as a clutch waffle-roller, knocking them out at an enviable rate when the pressure was on, not that such a skill was worthy of envy, but you get the point, I got the job done without sacrificing quality and with few rejects. The rush ended on a brutal note when a family of six, mom and dad and their nattering brood in every species of khaki shorts - Sansabelt, pleated, hip-hugging elastic - decided it would be neat if they all had banana splits. Which were our absolute bane beause everyone thought the banana split was very exotic and so they eyeballed every step of the construction process and traded notes afterward, with one of the group inevitably complaining when their split had a smidgen less fudge than their companions'.

Eventually, the family beat it out the door. The guys behind the counter, and me in my waffle perch, began to relax. Martine emerged from the back and, observing my accomplishment, the stack of cones, said, "Great job, Benji, those are some real cones you got there," and he patted me on the head. Two bounces.

I stiffened. I think I heard NP's jaw drop. Martine was out the door with his briefcase.

What the," I said.

NP came around the counter. "Yo, Martine just patted you on the head like you were a pickaninny."

"I'm not his --" I started.

"White man patted me on the head like a pickaninny, I'd kick his ass, shit."

"Martine is black," Nick said. "He was just saying, 'Good job, brotherman.' "

"That's some racist shit right there," NP said. "Pat a black man on the head."

There has been far too little research done in the area of what drives white people to touch black hair. What are the origins of the pet, pat, bounce their fingers in the soft, resilient exuberance of an Afro, a natural, a just-doin'-its-own-thing jumble of black hair? It's only hair -- but try telling that to that specimen eyeing a seductive bonbon of black locks, as the sweat beads on their forehead and they tremble with the intensity of restraint, their fingers locked in a fist in their pocket: I cannot touch it, but I must. A black-hair fondler has a few favorite questions that they like to ask when they fondle. "How do you comb it?" "How do you make it do that?" "How do you wash it?" With a pick; just does it; shampoo. Jerkoff.

A good starting point for such a study might be a metropolitan preschool, where the races are forced to mix with each other. Let the camera roll. The hours of footage, capturing the white schoolteacher's pats of her charges' nappy heads -- good-morning hello, after-recess howdy, end-of-day farewell -- will be a fruitful avenue of research. It's an ancient curiosity, no doubt, one that finds its first full expression during slavery. The contact of the two races on a daily basis, on New World soil, as they breathe its strange air. Picture the slavehoder as he surveys his property, both animate and inanimate, walking between the rows of the slave shacks, the field niggers standing at attention. He passes a young boy with bright eyes, round cheeks . . . and an irresistible 'Fro, untamed, almost flirtatious. Is it. . .can it be. . .winking at him? He will pet his property and pet is the correct verb, for these are animals before him.

I had punched a white classmate or two or three, some boys and a girl, in the stomach or the eye, during my early elementary-school years for inappropriate 'Fro-touching. "I just wanted to see what it felt like." I punched them according to my father's lessons. In each case, the principal called our house that evening, my mother answered, my father listened to one side of the conversation, came to a boil, asked for the phone, and then schooled Mr. Aletta in the finer points of black history, patiently, inexorably. That was a long time ago.

NP started a campaign. In slow moments he'd whisper, "It's like lamb's wool," with a tone of wonder in his voice.

When I returned form my ten-minute break, he'd squeak excitedly, "I love its kinky texture."

And also, "It springs back so fast."

And merely "Nappy!" if he was feeling pithy.

Nick said, "He's black, I'm telling you," and that's how things went for a time. What had been Martine's intent? Caught between NP's indictment that I'd been punked, and Nick's vision of racial solidarity. I was in the middle, bending as usual in the direction of whatever breeze was blowing through me that day. The day our electricity went out, I inclined toward NP and his vision of eternal, unending race warfare.

What are you going to do about it? What are you ever going to do about anything?

As an aside, do you think that Colson Whitehead would be a good person to be involved in the Prince documentary as a writer? At the end of 'The Underground Railroad', for which he won the National Book Award, he writes in the Acknowledgments: "David Bowie is in every book, and I always put on Purple Rain and Daydream Nation when I write the final pages; so thanks to him and Prince and Sonic Youth."

[Edited 9/9/19 10:26am]

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Reply #134 posted 09/09/19 1:49pm

violetcrush

RobotFix said:



icecreamcastle777 said:


The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.” He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.








Prince should've been grateful to Susan Rogers, who began the process of curating his vast recordings. Since his passing, in interviews, she's celebrated him and defended his legacy. To the end, unfortunately, he was supercilious and unforgiving.


Exactly. If not for Susan he may not have even had a Vault. She was the one who began organizing his tapes in ‘83. Yes, Prince was not helpless, and yes he knew what to do. However, by the state of his Vault it seems he just chose not to bother, and that is very sad.
*
I also wish someone would find that interview. If she did use the term “God-given right” it may have been a purposeful exaggeration. More than likely she was just expressing her concern about the condition of the Vault and the importance of preserving his music.
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Reply #135 posted 09/09/19 2:24pm

poppys

^^ But why does anyone think it's their business to "preserve his music" in the first place? If he never had a vault, there would still be the music he did give - and a lot less bitching. It's like the actual person creating the stuff is lost on you guys. He is a commodity to you now, and the commodity is the most important thing. More, more more. It really is a sickness - picking another human apart down to the bones, even in death.

Anyway, this is off-topic to the thread, there are open threads right now discussing this.

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Reply #136 posted 09/09/19 2:26pm

violetcrush

icecreamcastle777 said:

The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.” He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.

Prince connected one lyric form The Beautiful Ones to Vanity in that Ebony article, which was "the beautiful ones you always seem to lose", and his connection to that lyric was that she had quit the film. This completely makes sense. Even the lyric, "the beautiful ones always smash the picture" makes sense in connection with Vanity. However, the rest of the lyrics do not.

*

When asked directly about Susannah Melvoin in that Ebony interview he evaded a direct response, and gave two completely opposite answers - one, stating that he was not writing about anything "carnal" - the lyrics were of a spiritual nature, and then two, stating that he was writing the rest of the lyrics for the scene in the film. Those two responses are not even remotely similar.

*

Then, at his January 21st 2016 P&M show, just before playing The Beautiful Ones he clearly and slowly said to the audience, "sometimes singers have the courage to tell you...and if they are male, don't let them lie to you. We ALL write songs to "cop" girls." That new and surprising statement from him completely aligns with what has always been written about this song - that Prince was trying to get Susannah to choose between him and her boyfriend at that time.

*

Prince was just pissed off that several of the 80's associates had contributed to the recent Biographies that had been released during that time - specifically Alan Light's book, because he and Alan were friends for many years, so I'm sure Prince read his book. To me it couldn't be more obvious.

*

This was his "realist" interview?? His last comment about comparing himself to another popular musician (I forget the name) who didn't have people around him, because he was too good, and then saying "it be quiet around here" was very sad to me, and also very transparent. I think he was a very lonely guy.

[Edited 9/9/19 14:27pm]

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Reply #137 posted 09/09/19 2:54pm

poppys

^^ UGH

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Reply #138 posted 09/09/19 4:10pm

violetcrush

poppys said:

^^ But why does anyone think it's their business to "preserve his music" in the first place? If he never had a vault, there would still be the music he did give - and a lot less bitching. It's like the actual person creating the stuff is lost on you guys. He is a commodity to you now, and the commodity is the most important thing. More, more more. It really is a sickness - picking another human apart down to the bones, even in death.

Anyway, this is off-topic to the thread, there are open threads right now discussing this.


It has nothing to do with “picking apart” Prince. It is an opinion about how he spoke about someone who worked her ass off for him during his most prolific period, and also cared enough and had the foresight - even back then - to try to catalogue and also preserve all of his unreleased music, which is now probably greater than the music that was actually released. She was a friend who cared about his music and his legacy - as much or possibly more than he actually did.
*
Everyone has opinions about everyone’s statements and/or actions. Prince, like any other well known celebrity/public figure just gets a larger volume of opinions - many positive and some critical. Additionally, this site is a forum to do exactly that - express opinions. The “Estate” and “Death Investigation” threads are clear examples.
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Reply #139 posted 09/09/19 5:13pm

Hamad

avatar

Why was the Ebony interview taken down btw?

Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #140 posted 09/09/19 6:13pm

violetcrush

Hamad said:

Why was the Ebony interview taken down btw?


Prince personally had it pulled within hours of its release.
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Reply #141 posted 09/09/19 6:34pm

ChocolateBox31
21

avatar

poppys said:

^^ But why does anyone think it's their business to "preserve his music" in the first place? If he never had a vault, there would still be the music he did give - and a lot less bitching. It's like the actual person creating the stuff is lost on you guys. He is a commodity to you now, and the commodity is the most important thing. More, more more. It really is a sickness - picking another human apart down to the bones, even in death.

Anyway, this is off-topic to the thread, there are open threads right now discussing this.

You'll NEVER win with that person. They think they know EVERYTHING!

"4 all of us, life is death without adventure,& adventure only comes 2 those who are willing 2 b daring & take chances." prince AMA's 1985
“When eye say, ‘eye own “Purple Rain,” eye sound like Kanye.” He paused.“Who eye consider a friend.”
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Reply #142 posted 09/09/19 6:37pm

mnfriend

Here is the Ebony interview.

My head is spinning a bit,
‘Look at Me, Look at U’
‘When She Comes’

are referenced, I read them, his poetry... Can’t find words, except I’m a little dizzy, lol.

I was looking for a quote of his that makes me laugh from that talk, haven't pulled it up in a long time. Yes I remember the take it down/ don’t post any links/ whatever it all meant
However,
reading it today,
it is the same P flow intro book.
https://m.facebook.com/no...788385046/
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Reply #143 posted 09/09/19 6:43pm

mnfriend

Oh! He uses the word ‘magic’ Intro to new book has paragraphs with Prince asking his music not to be described with this word ‘magic’
For me personally, it is easy to use ‘magic’ as a common adjective, verb or noun, I get it.


(From Ebony article I just posted)
Prince: No, no. Keyboards a little, just parts. I’m getting in the habit of that now. I did it on one album a long time ago. I love schooling musicians on just one track. “You are gonna do a masterpiece today. You just gotta listen.” And when they get it, it’s so fun, because you see them go through what I go through. It’s magic, you know? You gotta feel that you did something magical. It all blends, and you get everybody to calm down and listen to when they’re playing and get outside of themselves, like they’re listening to the record rather than playing it.
[Edited 9/9/19 18:44pm]
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Reply #144 posted 09/09/19 6:48pm

mnfriend

Okay. I remember the Ebony 2015 interview
Prince saying he was celibate for a number of years,
with a punchline ‘then along comes Saturday’ or something

So, it’s been cleaned up? Sanitized?

Then don’t forget to wash the song titles and lyrics. Good grief.
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Reply #145 posted 09/09/19 7:32pm

mnfriend

I found the Prince quote that made me laugh.

Reply #12 posted 01/08/17 3:22pm
mnfriend

(In the old days, you hooked up with some of your female collaborators.)

"I just see beauty in everybody now. When you're a kid, you go, "She's the finest. I want to be with her only." And then you hook up with her and you realize that's not the case 'cause here comes, you know, Saturday. [Laughs hard]"




*disclosure re: Ebony article, I do not know what exactly is true anymore,
as far as missing paragraphs, etc.
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Reply #146 posted 09/09/19 7:51pm

violetcrush

ChocolateBox3121 said:



poppys said:


^^ But why does anyone think it's their business to "preserve his music" in the first place? If he never had a vault, there would still be the music he did give - and a lot less bitching. It's like the actual person creating the stuff is lost on you guys. He is a commodity to you now, and the commodity is the most important thing. More, more more. It really is a sickness - picking another human apart down to the bones, even in death.

Anyway, this is off-topic to the thread, there are open threads right now discussing this.



You'll NEVER win with that person. They think they know EVERYTHING!



lol says the person whose usual response to any member’s information or opinion is:
LIES!!!!
lol
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Reply #147 posted 09/09/19 7:53pm

violetcrush

mnfriend said:

Okay. I remember the Ebony 2015 interview
Prince saying he was celibate for a number of years,
with a punchline ‘then along comes Saturday’ or something

So, it’s been cleaned up? Sanitized?

Then don’t forget to wash the song titles and lyrics. Good grief.


I thought it was the RS interview where he stated he was celibate?
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Reply #148 posted 09/09/19 10:11pm

icecreamcastle
777

violetcrush said:

icecreamcastle777 said:

The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.” He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.

Prince connected one lyric form The Beautiful Ones to Vanity in that Ebony article, which was "the beautiful ones you always seem to lose", and his connection to that lyric was that she had quit the film. This completely makes sense. Even the lyric, "the beautiful ones always smash the picture" makes sense in connection with Vanity. However, the rest of the lyrics do not.

*

When asked directly about Susannah Melvoin in that Ebony interview he evaded a direct response, and gave two completely opposite answers - one, stating that he was not writing about anything "carnal" - the lyrics were of a spiritual nature, and then two, stating that he was writing the rest of the lyrics for the scene in the film. Those two responses are not even remotely similar.

*

Then, at his January 21st 2016 P&M show, just before playing The Beautiful Ones he clearly and slowly said to the audience, "sometimes singers have the courage to tell you...and if they are male, don't let them lie to you. We ALL write songs to "cop" girls." That new and surprising statement from him completely aligns with what has always been written about this song - that Prince was trying to get Susannah to choose between him and her boyfriend at that time.

*

Prince was just pissed off that several of the 80's associates had contributed to the recent Biographies that had been released during that time - specifically Alan Light's book, because he and Alan were friends for many years, so I'm sure Prince read his book. To me it couldn't be more obvious.

*

This was his "realist" interview?? His last comment about comparing himself to another popular musician (I forget the name) who didn't have people around him, because he was too good, and then saying "it be quiet around here" was very sad to me, and also very transparent. I think he was a very lonely guy.

[Edited 9/9/19 14:27pm]

.

Violetcrush said: "Then, at his January 21st 2016 P&M show, just before playing The Beautiful Ones he clearly and slowly said to the audience, "sometimes singers have the courage to tell you...and if they are male, don't let them lie to you. We ALL write songs to "cop" girls." That new and surprising statement from him completely aligns with what has always been written about this song - that Prince was trying to get Susannah to choose between him and her boyfriend at that time."

.

You really said that shit with a straight face??? That has to be the dumbest interpertation I ever heard, considering Prince never even told Susannah that the song was about her... (He did say he told Vanity though...) You got a whole lot to say, yet Prince was STILL pointing to Vanity as the inspiration behind the song at his 2016 P&M show as it shows in this article. That my dear is the point that's being made.

[Edited 9/9/19 23:10pm]

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Reply #149 posted 09/10/19 2:18am

violetcrush

icecreamcastle777 said:



violetcrush said:




icecreamcastle777 said:


The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.” He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.


Prince connected one lyric form The Beautiful Ones to Vanity in that Ebony article, which was "the beautiful ones you always seem to lose", and his connection to that lyric was that she had quit the film. This completely makes sense. Even the lyric, "the beautiful ones always smash the picture" makes sense in connection with Vanity. However, the rest of the lyrics do not.


*


When asked directly about Susannah Melvoin in that Ebony interview he evaded a direct response, and gave two completely opposite answers - one, stating that he was not writing about anything "carnal" - the lyrics were of a spiritual nature, and then two, stating that he was writing the rest of the lyrics for the scene in the film. Those two responses are not even remotely similar.


*


Then, at his January 21st 2016 P&M show, just before playing The Beautiful Ones he clearly and slowly said to the audience, "sometimes singers have the courage to tell you...and if they are male, don't let them lie to you. We ALL write songs to "cop" girls." That new and surprising statement from him completely aligns with what has always been written about this song - that Prince was trying to get Susannah to choose between him and her boyfriend at that time.


*


Prince was just pissed off that several of the 80's associates had contributed to the recent Biographies that had been released during that time - specifically Alan Light's book, because he and Alan were friends for many years, so I'm sure Prince read his book. To me it couldn't be more obvious.


*


This was his "realist" interview?? His last comment about comparing himself to another popular musician (I forget the name) who didn't have people around him, because he was too good, and then saying "it be quiet around here" was very sad to me, and also very transparent. I think he was a very lonely guy.


[Edited 9/9/19 14:27pm]



.


Violetcrush said: "Then, at his January 21st 2016 P&M show, just before playing The Beautiful Ones he clearly and slowly said to the audience, "sometimes singers have the courage to tell you...and if they are male, don't let them lie to you. We ALL write songs to "cop" girls." That new and surprising statement from him completely aligns with what has always been written about this song - that Prince was trying to get Susannah to choose between him and her boyfriend at that time."



.







You really said that shit with a straight face??? That has to be the dumbest interpertation I ever heard, considering Prince never even told Susannah that the song was about her... (He did say he told Vanity though...) You got a whole lot to say, yet Prince was STILL pointing to Vanity as the inspiration behind the song at his 2016 P&M show as it shows in this article. That my dear is the point that's being made.









[Edited 9/9/19 23:10pm]


You are quite ridiculous as well. Vanity had just passed away. PRINCE WAS EULOGIZING HER AND HONORING HER LIFE. What do you think he would have done if he had found out Susannah had passed that day?? You think he would have just ignored it, and said nothing about what she meant to him?? Nope, don’t think so. In fact, I bet he would have been forthright about her connection to the rest of he song.
*
AGAIN, Prince specifically stated how and where Vanity was connected to TBO in that ridiculous Ebony interview that you are constantly clinging to.
*
Prince made the new statement about the inspiration for the REST of the song ALMOST A MONTH BEFORE VANITY PASSED. He was clearly stating he wrote the song to “get” a girl that night. I’m glad he opened up that way too. He didn’t have to specifically name anyone. It was obvious what he meant, because the fans that were there already knew the long held backstory.
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