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Reply #90 posted 09/04/19 12:01pm

icecreamcastle
777

The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.”

He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.
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Reply #91 posted 09/04/19 12:14pm

Genesia

avatar

icecreamcastle777 said:

The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.” He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.


So the Ebony interview was in 2015 and the time period of this article is the very start of 2016. Even for Prince, that is not a overlong period of time to stay on message.

We don’t mourn artists because we knew them. We mourn them because they helped us know ourselves.
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Reply #92 posted 09/04/19 1:36pm

clay

The saddest part to read was that he was sick of the guitar. At least for that time being. Not sure if his illness played a part of that. Sitting at a piano is much less of a strain. The guitar being such an extension of his voice and spirit, to be sick of it is quite sad



Strive said:

It made me sad to read that article. The last months (or years?) of his life were a haze, searching for the next thing that would excite him, that was so far away from Jehovah's teachings.
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Reply #93 posted 09/04/19 1:42pm

ChocolateBox31
21

avatar

icecreamcastle777 said:

The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.” He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.

Prince(r.i.p) also said in that Ebony interview he wanted to work with Morris again. Then he brought Morris and his group back to PP that January which really touched Morris. Which I'm sure he will get more deep into in his upcoming book.

"4 all of us, life is death without adventure,& adventure only comes 2 those who are willing 2 b daring & take chances." prince AMA's 1985
“When eye say, ‘eye own “Purple Rain,” eye sound like Kanye.” He paused.“Who eye consider a friend.”
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Reply #94 posted 09/04/19 1:43pm

Hamad

avatar

icecreamcastle777 said:

The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.”

He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.


I guess those are the same folks who are still on that “Prince is mixed” trip. That Ebony interview was one of his best and if Miles Marshall Lewis didn’t write anything else, that interview would’ve been all the credential he needed. I also love the fact that Prince was always a champion for black ownership, especially when it comes to music & intellectual properties.
Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #95 posted 09/04/19 2:44pm

BartVanHemelen

avatar

Hamad said:

Prince was always a champion for black ownership, especially when it comes to music & intellectual properties.

.

Oh really? Then obviously he did a bunch of interviews with magazines like Jet and Ebony in the 1980s, right? Oh wait...

© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
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Reply #96 posted 09/04/19 3:37pm

Hamad

avatar

BartVanHemelen said:

Hamad said:

Prince was always a champion for black ownership, especially when it comes to music & intellectual properties.

.

Oh really? Then obviously he did a bunch of interviews with magazines like Jet and Ebony in the 1980s, right? Oh wait...

Oh stop it you kiss2

Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #97 posted 09/04/19 6:29pm

PeggyO

I like that Prince was considering Prince bloggers to collaborate with him. I wonder if he considered any orgers? I bet he did.

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Reply #98 posted 09/04/19 6:31pm

ChocolateBox31
21

avatar

PeggyO said:

I like that Prince was considering Prince bloggers to collaborate with him. I wonder if he considered any orgers? I bet he did.

I bet he did to. wink

"4 all of us, life is death without adventure,& adventure only comes 2 those who are willing 2 b daring & take chances." prince AMA's 1985
“When eye say, ‘eye own “Purple Rain,” eye sound like Kanye.” He paused.“Who eye consider a friend.”
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Reply #99 posted 09/04/19 8:15pm

PeggyO

ChocolateBox3121 said:

PeggyO said:

I like that Prince was considering Prince bloggers to collaborate with him. I wonder if he considered any orgers? I bet he did.

I bet he did to. wink

i have always had a strong candidate...a musician, witty writer, super knowledgeable.

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Reply #100 posted 09/05/19 12:34am

dodger

icecreamcastle777 said:

The book would allow him to seize the narrative of his own life. Once, he said, he’d seen one of his former employees on TV saying she thought it was her God-given duty to preserve and protect the unreleased material in his vault. “Now, that sounds like someone I should call the police on,” he told me. “How is that not racist?” People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself. “I still have to brush my own teeth,” he said.” He was talking about Susan Rogers. He said the same thing in that 2015 Ebony Interview that was taken down. Some people on here love saying he was crazy and incoherent in that interview. Looking at this article he’s still repeating some of the same stuff he talked about in that interview. He never backpedaled on what he had to say about Susan Rogers or the song The Beautiful Ones connection to Vanity. This just shows that The Ebony Interview was one of the realist interviews Prince ever did.

100%

Some of the comments on here attributing his Ebony interview to meds, because certain parts didn't fit their own narrative, were well out of line.

It was refreshing to see him being so open and honest and not speaking in riddles as per.

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Reply #101 posted 09/05/19 12:45am

dodger

BartVanHemelen said:

Hamad said:

Prince was always a champion for black ownership, especially when it comes to music & intellectual properties.

.

Oh really? Then obviously he did a bunch of interviews with magazines like Jet and Ebony in the 1980s, right? Oh wait...



[Off topic snip - luv4u]

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Reply #102 posted 09/05/19 1:53am

Hamad

avatar

dodger said:



BartVanHemelen said:




Hamad said:


Prince was always a champion for black ownership, especially when it comes to music & intellectual properties.

.


Oh really? Then obviously he did a bunch of interviews with magazines like Jet and Ebony in the 1980s, right? Oh wait...



[Off topic snip - luv4u]


.




He didn’t berate me, the miserable grumpy twat just wanted an excuse to argue with one more person seeing that he already argued with everyone in this site within the past 24 hours. My statement was clear though, “music” being the operative word, Prince advocated black ownership for the past 20+ years & that person’s statement has nothing to do with mine. As much as he wanna bark about research like he does to everyone here, it’s simply not needed because what I said is common knowledge lol
Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #103 posted 09/05/19 2:04pm

jdcxc

Genesia said:



2freaky4church1 said:


"There was nothing false in the way he spoke to me, and nothing false in the way he spoke during his darkest moments. I can’t think less of him for hiding his pain. He was living on his own terms. To expect anything more of him would have been to expect magic. "



touched




I don't think he was "hiding" anything. Do you talk about your pain with strangers? (If you do, please stop.)



I found it interesting that he corrected “Flu like symptoms.” Possibly a bit of honesty before his eventual coming to terms with his addiction in the memoirs?
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Reply #104 posted 09/05/19 2:19pm

jdcxc

Hamad said:

dodger said:



BartVanHemelen said:




Hamad said:


Prince was always a champion for black ownership, especially when it comes to music & intellectual properties.

.


Oh really? Then obviously he did a bunch of interviews with magazines like Jet and Ebony in the 1980s, right? Oh wait...



[Off topic snip - luv4u]


.




He didn’t berate me, the miserable grumpy twat just wanted an excuse to argue with one more person seeing that he already argued with everyone in this site within the past 24 hours. My statement was clear though, “music” being the operative word, Prince advocated black ownership for the past 20+ years & that person’s statement has nothing to do with mine. As much as he wanna bark about research like he does to everyone here, it’s simply not needed because what I said is common knowledge lol


Hamad, there are way more Black writers, musicians and artists who agree with u. And Prince has ALWAYS worked closely with Black journalists (invited entire NABJ to Paisley), DJ’s and music industry insiders...talk to Cynthia Horner or The Electrifying Mojo.
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Reply #105 posted 09/05/19 6:37pm

ChocolateBox31
21

avatar

Prince’s d.j., Pam Warren, known as Purple Pam......

purplepam.jpeg


"4 all of us, life is death without adventure,& adventure only comes 2 those who are willing 2 b daring & take chances." prince AMA's 1985
“When eye say, ‘eye own “Purple Rain,” eye sound like Kanye.” He paused.“Who eye consider a friend.”
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Reply #106 posted 09/05/19 10:11pm

loveletter

avatar

questions for Mr. Dan Piepenbring

1. during your conversations with Peter Bravestrong how did you address him?

2. If Mr. Johnson was under the direction of Mr. Bravestrong. Were U, as well?

3. also what differences did u notice between the 2, Mr. Nelson and Mr. Bravestrong.

Hello God,

within this loveletter

Special Thanks 2 Paisley Park and The DownLoad Society
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Reply #107 posted 09/06/19 1:33am

WhisperingDand
elions

avatar

Hamad said:

dodger said:

[Off topic snip - luv4u]

He didn’t berate me, the miserable grumpy twat just wanted an excuse to argue with one more person seeing that he already argued with everyone in this site within the past 24 hours. My statement was clear though, “music” being the operative word, Prince advocated black ownership for the past 20+ years & that person’s statement has nothing to do with mine. As much as he wanna bark about research like he does to everyone here, it’s simply not needed because what I said is common knowledge lol

Well, I mean, you did initially quantify it with the word "always" and are now breaking it down semantically to "for the past 20+ years."

Reality is a lot of that sentiment seemed to only exist to Prince (as far as direct evidence is concerned) after the 80s concluded, which I think was all b0rt was trying to emphasize.

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Reply #108 posted 09/06/19 1:52am

Hamad

avatar

WhisperingDandelions said:



Hamad said:


dodger said:

[Off topic snip - luv4u]




He didn’t berate me, the miserable grumpy twat just wanted an excuse to argue with one more person seeing that he already argued with everyone in this site within the past 24 hours. My statement was clear though, “music” being the operative word, Prince advocated black ownership for the past 20+ years & that person’s statement has nothing to do with mine. As much as he wanna bark about research like he does to everyone here, it’s simply not needed because what I said is common knowledge lol

Well, I mean, you did initially quantify it with the word "always" and are now breaking it down semantically to "for the past 20+ years."

Reality is a lot of that sentiment seemed to only exist to Prince (as far as direct evidence is concerned) after the 80s concluded, which I think was all b0rt was trying to emphasize.



And? Sure, errors & mistakes are liable to happen even in the .org (*sharp dramatic gasps!*) and I have no problem taking responsibility for my own should it happen, after all we exchange ideas as a community. I don’t care what he’s trying to emphasize, civility won’t kill him or you. Don’t try to rationalize his habitual assholery, if you can tolerate it & “decode” what he’s trying to say underneath all that pile of douchbagness, good luck, I personally won’t wink

Reality is none of us have the definitive version of the truth & nobody is the gatekeeper either. So, be civil or be gone.
Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #109 posted 09/06/19 5:14am

BartVanHemelen

avatar

© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
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Reply #110 posted 09/06/19 5:27am

Cloudbuster

avatar

BartVanHemelen said:

https://www.newyorker.com...-of-prince


Thank you.

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Reply #111 posted 09/06/19 6:58am

poppys

People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself.

^^THIS is what Prince thought about people trying to Nanny and scold regarding what he should do with his work. HIS work which belonged to him. There are other artists who have destroyed entire swaths of their own work, on purpose. So what? Nobody here created anything to keep or destroy.

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Reply #112 posted 09/06/19 7:36am

Vannormal

avatar

BartVanHemelen said:

Vannormal said:

Does that means extra essays and Prince's quotes & interviews puzeled together from over the years as one book... I wonder.

-

.

The contents of the book have been known for months -- https://www.apnews.com/0c...8b284f044b -- and are detailed on the book's official page -- https://www.penguinrandom...399589652/ . Why do you lot find it so hard to do any research, or even click links?

-

Oh yes, that's so true.

But we have you !

Isn't that just great and convenient ?! wink

No serious;

You are a walking wonder on this earth when it comes to all perfectly detailed and informed Princely information feed.

And don't get me wrong, I really really appreciate that.

I think most of us here do that.

No matter how much of a prick most think you are.

I for one am always happy with your posts, positive or negative.

Keep up the good work. smile

-

"...no matter what, all will be fine, always."
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Reply #113 posted 09/06/19 7:48am

Cloudbuster

avatar

poppys said:

People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself.

^^THIS is what Prince thought about people trying to Nanny and scold regarding what he should do with his work. HIS work which belonged to him. There are other artists who have destroyed entire swaths of their own work, on purpose. So what? Nobody here created anything to keep or destroy.


Well, no. That was the problem. For most of his life the music that he was most well known for didn't belong to him. Even now, in retrospect, many of the manoeuvres that he pulled during his fight with WB seemed unnecessary. He didn't appear to have the best negotiating head on his shoulders at that point and the result was that he alienated people, including many fans, and ended up pissing in his own shoes. He came across as a haughty multi-millionaire who people could no longer relate to as his fight for artistic freedom came across in such a muddled way. That he'd signed a seemingly hugely rewarding deal just a few months before left him looking ridiculous. With the slave/name-change stunt he became a laughing stock and too few people cared enough to try to figure out what he was actually making a case for. A real shame but the finger pointed in only one direction and it wasn't at WB. They were actually very generous to him and he thanked them by behaving like a spoilt brat. He really should have tried to handle things in a much more level headed way.

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Reply #114 posted 09/06/19 8:39am

poppys

Cloudbuster said:

poppys said:

People were always casting him—and all black artists—in a helpless role, he said, as if he were incapable of managing himself.

^^THIS is what Prince thought about people trying to Nanny and scold regarding what he should do with his work. HIS work which belonged to him. There are other artists who have destroyed entire swaths of their own work, on purpose. So what? Nobody here created anything to keep or destroy.


Well, no. That was the problem. For most of his life the music that he was most well known for didn't belong to him. Even now, in retrospect, many of the manoeuvres that he pulled during his fight with WB seemed unnecessary. He didn't appear to have the best negotiating head on his shoulders at that point and the result was that he alienated people, including many fans, and ended up pissing in his own shoes. He came across as a haughty multi-millionaire who people could no longer relate to as his fight for artistic freedom came across in such a muddled way. That he'd signed a seemingly hugely rewarding deal just a few months before left him looking ridiculous. With the slave/name-change stunt he became a laughing stock and too few people cared enough to try to figure out what he was actually making a case for. A real shame but the finger pointed in only one direction and it wasn't at WB. They were actually very generous to him and he thanked them by behaving like a spoilt brat. He really should have tried to handle things in a much more level headed way.


Again, so what? Have you ever personally known any really talented artists? Most of them are nuts. Doesn't mean they need (or want) a Nanny. Everything you said is after the fact industry/pissed off fan overview stuff.

I was speaking in a broad sense that without his output as an artist - from the get - there would be none of this opinion jockeying. Personally, I don't give a rat's ass what he really should have done. That's your problem, not his, or mine. This thread is supposed to be about an article about a book, btw. Plenty of psychoanalysis in countless other threads.

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Reply #115 posted 09/06/19 9:02am

Cloudbuster

avatar

poppys said:.


Again, so what? Have you ever personally known any really talented artists? Most of them are nuts. Doesn't mean they need (or want) a Nanny. Everything you said is after the fact industry/pissed off fan overview stuff.

I was speaking in a broad sense that without his output as an artist - from the get - there would be none of this opinion jockeying. Personally, I don't give a rat's ass what he really should have done. That's your problem, not his, or mine. This thread is supposed to be about an article about a book, btw. Plenty of psychoanalysis in countless other threads.


lol

Thanks for the delightful retort. "His work which belonged to him" remains for the most part a falsehood, however.
Arrivederci.

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Reply #116 posted 09/06/19 11:01am

poppys

Cloudbuster said:

poppys said:.


Again, so what? Have you ever personally known any really talented artists? Most of them are nuts. Doesn't mean they need (or want) a Nanny. Everything you said is after the fact industry/pissed off fan overview stuff.

I was speaking in a broad sense that without his output as an artist - from the get - there would be none of this opinion jockeying. Personally, I don't give a rat's ass what he really should have done. That's your problem, not his, or mine. This thread is supposed to be about an article about a book, btw. Plenty of psychoanalysis in countless other threads.


lol

Thanks for the delightful retort. "His work which belonged to him" remains for the most part a falsehood, however.
Arrivederci.


Ta-ta. I've noticed this a lot lately. If you don't like what someone else says, the mocking laugh emoticon works for any occasion.

Interesting you said for the most part - a truly ruthless businessperson would have closed that loophole. Historically, artists are the most exploited creators of the new. Even Michelangelo had to answer to the Pope.

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Reply #117 posted 09/06/19 12:35pm

jfenster

ChocolateBox3121 said:

PeggyO said:

I like that Prince was considering Prince bloggers to collaborate with him. I wonder if he considered any orgers? I bet he did.

I bet he did to. wink

yeh.... with all THAT baggage

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Reply #118 posted 09/06/19 4:58pm

mnfriend

The intro from the New Yorker struck me true, too.
We can ‘hear’ Prince.
The other ‘announcements’ of the book, of course, met with skepticism because of all the money makers out there.
This line struck me personally-
‘He’d inspired them to write, he said, and they might inspire him, too.’
(About his fans reviews)
I will be purchasing the book.
[Edited 9/6/19 16:59pm]
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Reply #119 posted 09/06/19 8:39pm

mnfriend

MN Star Tribune seems surprised they didn’t get the scoop:


http://www.startribune.co...559478242/


(Just a repeat of the New Yorker story. The New Yorker story/ introduction to the book stands alone. Guess Prince could trust this writer, seems he kept his cards breasted until the right time)
[Edited 9/6/19 20:41pm]
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Forums > Prince: Music and More > Prince's memoir "The Beautiful Ones" (released on 29 October) - The New Yorker has published the introduction