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Thread started 02/12/17 2:02am

Heidi

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Figuring out Prince's personality type (MBTI)

There is a personality type test, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), which classifies personality types into 16 "types".

Jung created some of the best known psychological concepts, including the archetype, the collective unconscious, the complex, and synchronicity. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a popular psychometric instrument, has been developed from Jung's theories.

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The typology model regards personality type as similar to left or right handedness: individuals are either born with, or develop, certain preferred ways of thinking and acting. The MBTI sorts some of these psychological differences into four opposite pairs, or "dichotomies," with a resulting 16 possible psychological types.

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The four type preferences are:

  • Attitudes:
    • Extraversion (E) / Introversion (I)
  • Functions:
    • Sensing (S) / iNtuition (N)
    • Thinking (T) / Feeling (F)
  • Lifestyle:
    • Judging (J) / Perception (P)
The 16 different types are often referred to by an abbreviation of four letters, the initial letters of each of their four type preferences (except in the case of iNtuition), for instance: ISTJ (Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Judging)

Now my question: which MBTI type would Prince be ? I think figuring out his "type", may go a long way in explaining why he wasn't able to seek help for his pain / addition issues when he needed it. And also other aspects about his life (attraction to certain type of woman, people he worked with, etc).

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You can find the MBTI test + the detailed personality profiles in the link below :

http://northernlightscdc....s-test.pdf

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ps: I recommend to anyone to try this test for themselves, it was very accurate for me and I took some great learnings from it.

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Reply #1 posted 02/12/17 2:15am

Heidi

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I have found an online version of the MBTI test :

http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/jtypes2.asp

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And then you can look up the profile, in the detailed descriptions here (from page 6 onwards):

http://northernlightscdc.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Fund_-Module-10_Personaility-types-test.pdf

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Reply #2 posted 02/12/17 2:25am

Heidi

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I realise I am talking to myself now in this thread (I'm sure that my MBTI profile also acknowledges for this trait wink ), but my guess is that Prince was an ENTJ.

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ENTJ - Extraverted iNtuitive Thinking Judging

The Executive

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ENTJ’s generally have the following traits:

> Driven to turn theories into plans

> Highly value knowledge

> Future-oriented

> Natural leaders

> Impatient with inefficiency and incompetence

> Want things structured and orderly

> Excellent verbal communication skills

> Dislike routine, detail-oriented tasks

> Self-confident

> Decisive

.

ENTJ Strengths

> Genuinely interested in people's ideas and thoughts

> Enthusiastic and energetic

> Take their commitments very seriously

> Fair-minded and interested in doing the Right Thing

> Very good with money

> Extremely direct and straightforward

> Verbally fluent

> Enhance and encourage knowledge and self-growth in all aspects of life

> Able to leave relationships without looking back

> Able to turn conflict situations into positive lessons

> Able to take constructive criticism well

> Extremely high standards and expectations (both a strength and a weakness)

> Usually have strong affections and sentimental streaks

> Able to dole out discipline

.

ENTJ Weaknesses

> Their enthusiasm for verbal debates can make them appear argumentative

> Tendency to be challenging and confrontational

> Tend to get involved in "win-lose" conversations

> Tendency to have difficulty listening to others

> Tendency to be critical of opinions and attitudes which don't match their own

> Extremely high standards and expectations (both a strength and a weakness)

> Not naturally in tune with people's feelings and reactions

> May have difficulty expressing love and affection, sometimes seeming awkward or inappropriate

> Can be overpowering and intimidating to others

> Tendency to want to always be in charge, rather than sharing responsibilities

> Can be very harsh and intolerant about messiness or inefficiency

> Tendency to be controlling

> May be slow to give praise or to realize another's need for praise

> If unhappy or underdeveloped, they may be very impersonal, dictatorial, or abrasive

> Tendency to make hasty decisions

> Make explode with terrible tempers when under extreme stress

.

Read the detailed profile in the northernlights-link in my post above.

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Reply #3 posted 02/12/17 2:28am

NorthC

I'm an INFP!
[Edited 2/12/17 2:29am]
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Reply #4 posted 02/12/17 2:32am

Heidi

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Oh additionally, it would be interesting to also know the profiles of the people on the org - maybe there is a specific type of preference for us purple army kooks ? lol

.

I am an ISTJ. cool

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Reply #5 posted 02/12/17 2:47am

jayseajay

Heidi said:

I realise I am talking to myself now in this thread (I'm sure that my MBTI profile also acknowledges for this trait wink ), but my guess is that Prince was an ENTJ.

.

ENTJ - Extraverted iNtuitive Thinking Judging

The Executive

.

ENTJ’s generally have the following traits:

> Driven to turn theories into plans

> Highly value knowledge

> Future-oriented

> Natural leaders

> Impatient with inefficiency and incompetence

> Want things structured and orderly

> Excellent verbal communication skills

> Dislike routine, detail-oriented tasks

> Self-confident

> Decisive

.

ENTJ Strengths

> Genuinely interested in people's ideas and thoughts

> Enthusiastic and energetic

> Take their commitments very seriously

> Fair-minded and interested in doing the Right Thing

> Very good with money

> Extremely direct and straightforward

> Verbally fluent

> Enhance and encourage knowledge and self-growth in all aspects of life

> Able to leave relationships without looking back

> Able to turn conflict situations into positive lessons

> Able to take constructive criticism well

> Extremely high standards and expectations (both a strength and a weakness)

> Usually have strong affections and sentimental streaks

> Able to dole out discipline

.

ENTJ Weaknesses

> Their enthusiasm for verbal debates can make them appear argumentative

> Tendency to be challenging and confrontational

> Tend to get involved in "win-lose" conversations

> Tendency to have difficulty listening to others

> Tendency to be critical of opinions and attitudes which don't match their own

> Extremely high standards and expectations (both a strength and a weakness)

> Not naturally in tune with people's feelings and reactions

> May have difficulty expressing love and affection, sometimes seeming awkward or inappropriate

> Can be overpowering and intimidating to others

> Tendency to want to always be in charge, rather than sharing responsibilities

> Can be very harsh and intolerant about messiness or inefficiency

> Tendency to be controlling

> May be slow to give praise or to realize another's need for praise

> If unhappy or underdeveloped, they may be very impersonal, dictatorial, or abrasive

> Tendency to make hasty decisions

> Make explode with terrible tempers when under extreme stress

.

Read the detailed profile in the northernlights-link in my post above.

I very much doubt P was an extravert - by all accounts he needed and did spend a *lot* of time by himself, and he had pretty clear social anxiety/awkwardness/shyness. My guess is INFJ... https://www.16personaliti...ersonality

Not like I love my guitar....
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Reply #6 posted 02/12/17 3:03am

kapo74

Interesting approach. I have done this test years ago. I am INTJ.

I always perceived Prince to be an introvert, maybe even autistic. Asperger's or something like that, genius but a bit weird. He was radiant on stage, but shy in one-on-one, or unfamiliar situations. And he had his own take on things, kind of a dictator/director. His way, or the high way. But he was also very much into charity, compassionate.

When using the test, what answers did you fill out on Prince's behalf?

-edit- By the way, it is highly unethical for psychologists to judge a non-patient. So maybe we shouldn't be profiling Prince. Even though some of his traits were quite obvious.
[Edited 2/12/17 3:05am]
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Reply #7 posted 02/12/17 3:05am

FullLipsDotNos
e

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kapo74 said:

Interesting approach. I have done this test years ago. I am INTJ. I always perceived Prince to be an introvert, maybe even autistic. Asperger's or something like that, genius but a bit weird. He was radiant on stage, but shy in one-on-one, or unfamiliar situations. And he had his own take on things, kind of a dictator/director. His way, or the high way. But he was also very much into charity, compassionate. When using the test, what answers did you fill out on Prince's behalf?

I'm also INTJ and I have Asperger's. And I totally believe Prince was neuroatypical. Meh, thinking about it, he would've made an amazing husband for me neutral

full lips, freckles, and upturned nose
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Reply #8 posted 02/12/17 3:33am

Heidi

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FullLipsDotNose said:

Meh, thinking about it, he would've made an amazing husband for me neutral

There's plenty around here who feel this way. shhh

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Reply #9 posted 02/12/17 3:45am

Heidi

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As far as introvert-extravert is concerned, within the framework of MBTI, does not mean "shy, quiet, keeps to himself".

.

In the context of MBTI, this is what is meant by introversion-extraversion:

Extraversion (E)

I like getting my energy from active involvement in events and having a lot of different activities. I'm excited when I'm around people and I like to energize other people. I like moving into action and making things happen. I generally feel at home in the world. I often understand a problem better when I can talk out loud about it and hear what others have to say.

.

Introversion (I)

I like getting my energy from dealing with the ideas, pictures, memories, and reactions that are inside my head, in my inner world. I often prefer doing things alone or with one or two people I feel comfortable with. I take time to reflect so that I have a clear idea of what I'll be doing when I decide to act. Ideas are almost solid things for me. Sometimes I like the idea of something better than the real thing.

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The idea of introversion-extraversion is more about where your energy comes from: from being around/working with other people or from working alone or with few people. Coming up with ideas or solving issues by being inspired and working with others, or taking the time to be alone to have creative ideas/resolving issues.

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To be fair, in Prince's case, just looking at his collaborations and the way in which he created music, the argument can be made for both introvert and extravert.

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Reply #10 posted 02/12/17 4:56am

gandorb

Interesting idea. I used to administer the MBTI many years ago and people tended to feel that it captured them more than any other personality test. I do think that Prince had elements of both Introversion and Extroversion, which is not unusual. On the test, each trait is also rated on how strong you lean to either dichotomy. My guess is that he would have landed about in the middle of the I-E trait because he would have endorsed items on both sides, which would have cancelled each other in the scoring. If I remember correctly, it seems that having both sides of the dichotomy could either be detrimental (identity diffusion, confusion) or helpful (providing flexibility). It fits with Prince that he would have both sides, as he showed a duality in so many other areas as well (sex vs, religion, feminine vs. masculine, feminist and at times not at all, etc).Perhaps his complexity is partly what fed his genius wink .

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Reply #11 posted 02/12/17 10:57am

purplethunder3
121

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I hate these kind of personality tests which try to put people in tidy little boxes which they ultimately don't fit in...

"Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything." --Plato
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Reply #12 posted 02/12/17 1:42pm

nisibee

INTJ here as well. Interesting that there are a few of us around fams.

Also kinda feel like P was neuroatypical...

"There's something on the tip of my tongue got a taste 4 sin..."
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Reply #13 posted 02/12/17 1:58pm

nisibee

I'd say INFP, at least in his later years.

INFPs generally have the following traits:

> Strong value systems

> Warmly interested in people

> Service-oriented, usually putting the needs of others above their own

> Loyal and devoted to people and causes

> Future-oriented

> Growth-oriented; always want to be growing in a positive direction

> Creative and inspirational

> Flexible and laid-back, unless a ruling principle is violated

> Sensitive and complex

> Dislike dealing with details and routine work

> Original and individualistic - "out of the mainstream"

> Excellent written communication skills

> Prefer to work alone, and may have problems working on teams

> Value deep and authentic relationships

> Want to be seen and appreciated for who they are

The INFP is a special, sensitive individual who needs a career that is more than a job. The INFP needs to feel that everything they do in their lives is in accordance with their strongly-felt value systems, and is moving them and/or others in a positive, growth-oriented direction. They are driven to do something meaningful and purposeful with their lives. The INFP will be happiest in careers that allow them to live their daily lives in accordance with their values, and that work towards the greater good of humanity. It's worth mentioning that nearly all of the truly great writers in the world have been INFPs.

[Edited 2/12/17 14:00pm]

"There's something on the tip of my tongue got a taste 4 sin..."
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Reply #14 posted 02/12/17 2:05pm

purplethunder3
121

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I wonder if Jung would have preferred Tarot cards... hmmm

"Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything." --Plato
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Reply #15 posted 02/12/17 2:09pm

jaawwnn

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Definitely a Gemini amirite??

[Edited 2/12/17 14:10pm]

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Reply #16 posted 02/12/17 2:11pm

Iamtheorg

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You shouldnt assume about someone you dont know and shouldnt reduce the reliability and validity of the tests by putting it out there in public.

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Reply #17 posted 02/13/17 12:25am

Heidi

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nisibee said:

I'd say INFP, at least in his later years.

[...]

YEs you are right, I do think people can change over the years. I'm gonnahave a look at INFP profile.

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Reply #18 posted 02/13/17 12:37am

purplethunder3
121

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Personality Tests Are Popular, But Do They Capture The Real You?

Jeannie Phan for NPR
Jeannie Phan for NPR
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Twelve years ago, I tried to drive a stake into the heart of the personality-testing industry. Personality tests are neither valid nor reliable, I argued, and we should stop using them — especially for making decisions that affect the course of people's lives, like workplace hiring and promotion.

But if I thought that my book, The Cult of Personality Testing, would lead to change in the world, I was keenly mistaken. Personality tests appear to be more popular than ever. I say "appear" because — today as when I wrote the book — verifiable numbers on the use of such tests are hard to come by.

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Personality testing is an industry the way astrology or dream analysis is an industry: slippery, often underground, hard to monitor or measure. There are the personality tests administered to job applicants "to determine if you're a good fit for the company"; there are the personality tests imposed on people who are already employed, "in order to facilitate teamwork"; there are the personality tests we take voluntarily, in career counseling offices and on self-improvement retreats and in the back pages of magazines (or, increasingly, online).

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I know these tests are popular because after the book was published, most of the people I heard from were personality-test enthusiasts, eager to rebut my critique of the tests that had, they said, changed their lives.

The Personality Myth

We like to think of our own personalities, and those of our family and friends, as predictable, constant over time. But what if they aren't? What if nothing stays constant over a lifetime? Explore that enigma in the latest episode of the NPR podcast Invisibilia.

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Actually, it was just one test they were talking about: the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. If you've ever made a new acquaintance who, after conversing with you for a minute, says, "Are you an INTJ? Because my sister-in-law is an INTJ and you remind me of her, and as an ESFP I'm obviously your opposite, but as long as we know that, we can get along and work together really well," you've met an MBTI convert. The MBTI is a secular religion, and no amount of scientific evidence will dissuade its true believers. I have tried, and have repeatedly been told that it's clearly my fill-in-a-four-letter-personality-type-here nature that makes me so skeptical.

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After a number of encounters of this sort, I developed a tolerance and even an affection for type-obsessed fans of the MBTI. Sure, their instrument is a Carl Jung-inspired load of nonsense engineered to make everyone who takes it feel good about themselves. On the other hand, insight often turns up in unlikely places. Wherever you find illumination, I began to tell the type disciples I met, you should seize it.

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But the one manifestation of personality testing to which I have never been able to accommodate myself is the administration of tests to captive audiences: students and employees required to place themselves in boxes for an administrator's convenience. If my marshaling of scientific evidence against the test failed to change many minds, I hope that the narrative in which that evidence is embedded makes my larger point: that human beings are far too complex, too mysterious and too interesting to be defined by the banal categories of personality tests.

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Indeed, the creators of major personality tests are themselves a colorful bunch of characters whose tests were largely reflective of their own idiosyncrasies. In researching and writing their life stories, I came to believe that personality tests tell us less about the individuals who take them than about the individuals who devised them:

  • There's Hermann Rorschach, the Swiss psychiatrist who turned a parlor game into the iconic inkblot test — the results of which were for decades taken very seriously in courtrooms and mental hospitals.
  • There's Henry Murray, the patrician (and married) professor who developed the Thematic Apperception Test with the help of his lover, who worked alongside him at his Harvard clinic.
  • There's Starke Hathaway, the Midwestern psychologist who included questions about test-takers' religious beliefs, sex lives and bathroom habits in his influential instrument, the Minnesota Multiphasic Per... Inventory (MMPI).
  • And, of course, there's Isabel Myers, the Pennsylvania housewife who was inspired to turn Jung's cryptic writings into a personality test accessible to all. Her mother, Katharine Briggs, helped with this endeavor, and at first the test was called the Briggs-Myers Type Indicator; the order of the names was reversed starting in 1956.

Myers typed herself as an INFP (that is, introverted-intuitive-feeling-perceiving). Having spent many months poring over her letters and journal entries, reading the recollections of those who knew her and reporting on the way she turned an obscure psychological theory into a personality test that has been taken by millions of people worldwide, I can tell you that a string of four letters doesn't come close to capturing the fascinating complexities of this woman. If Myers imagined that her multitudes could be contained by four pseudo-Jungian descriptors — well, that was her limitation. We don't have to make it ours.

"Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything." --Plato
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Reply #19 posted 02/13/17 1:24am

NorthC

I don't take these tests too seriously, but it's a fun way to spend a few minutes and there's always something that you recognize about yourself.
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Reply #20 posted 02/13/17 1:28am

purplethunder3
121

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NorthC said:

I don't take these tests too seriously, but it's a fun way to spend a few minutes and there's always something that you recognize about yourself.

The same with a deck of Tarot cards. wink

"Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything." --Plato
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Reply #21 posted 02/13/17 1:31am

NorthC

purplethunder3121 said:



NorthC said:


I don't take these tests too seriously, but it's a fun way to spend a few minutes and there's always something that you recognize about yourself.

The same with a deck of Tarot cards. wink


Or horoscopes.
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Reply #22 posted 02/13/17 3:32am

Heidi

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C'mon ... if you take it seriously and take the time to reflect and be honest while you fill in the questionnaire, the profile that comes out is quite accurate*. MBTI isn't the 10 questions personal profile in the back of a magazine. MBTI is quite widely used and supported by psychologistst and frequently used in the corporate world within the context of career development and assessment.

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* the profile was higly accurate for me, but then I scored quite high on certain scales. I imagine if you score somewhat in the middle of the scales, the profile will be less accurate.

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PurpleThunder and NorthC, before comparing it to Tarot cards and Horoscopes, did you actually try the test for yourself ?

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Reply #23 posted 02/13/17 3:34am

NorthC

As shown in my first reply, yes I did.
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Reply #24 posted 02/13/17 5:47am

Heidi

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Yes, I see you did. Was the profile then accurate for you personally ?

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Reply #25 posted 02/13/17 1:58pm

NorthC

Like I said, there's always something you recognize about yourself... And there's always questions you're not really sure of and that you might answer differently next time... So it's never 100 % correct and PurpleThunder was right in pointing out that...
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Reply #26 posted 02/19/17 4:26pm

mbdtyler

I've taken the test a few times over the years and have gotten both INFP and INFJ. From what little I've learned about Prince in the last year, he definitely seems like an introvert.

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Reply #27 posted 02/19/17 6:15pm

AnonymousFan

He's an INFJ.

He's definitely an introvert - wants to be alone the majority of the time, very private, never completely open with any one person.

prince

He's definitely NOT an S. He's a very heavy Ne user. This is best exhibited when he's on Tavis and other times when he's talking about the what could and what should be. It's very evident whenever he starts talking about the future of the music industry. He talked about things being intterrelated all the time. Very idealistic and very motivated to leave a mark.

prince

He's an F - I don't see it being possible that he's a T. Though he didn't always show it - or tried not to, it was very obvious that he felt things pretty deeply and it's very much evident from the stories of people interacting with him that he was super in-tune to how other people were feeling. Always saying the right thing at the right time, knowing how to get to somebody, being very disarming (when it seems impossible to be that way when you're Prince), making people comfortable around him. He also seemed to really dislike discord and seemed to shut people out to avoid getting riled up (percieved as him just being mean and cold).

prince

From how strict and particular he was not just with his band, but seemingly with his everything. He's most likely a J. Very structured, very organized. I'm pretty sure he was also pretty serious about every detail of his shows outside of the music. Extremely goal oriented. It took a great deal of the J traits just to get Paisley Park up and running how he wanted it. He seemed to always know what was next on his agenda.

The ONLY reason so many places type him as an ISFP is because that's what they type Michael Jackson.

[Edited 2/19/17 18:59pm]

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