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Forums > Music: Non-Prince > has anyone read this book? ...is He in it???
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Thread started 08/01/18 11:21am

luvsexy4all

has anyone read this book? ...is He in it???

41IFM2mq68L._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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Reply #1 posted 08/01/18 7:16pm

TrivialPursuit

I can't imagine Bullock would write a book with Bowie's name on the front and not include him inside.

This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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Reply #2 posted 08/03/18 9:22am

luvsexy4all

TrivialPursuit said:

I can't imagine Bullock would write a book with Bowie's name on the front and not include him inside.

i meant prince

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Reply #3 posted 08/03/18 9:28am

TrivialPursuit

luvsexy4all said:

TrivialPursuit said:

I can't imagine Bullock would write a book with Bowie's name on the front and not include him inside.

i meant prince


You didn't say that. But if you really want to know, read it. Give us a review.

This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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Reply #4 posted 08/03/18 10:27am

purplethunder3
121

avatar

KIRKUS REVIEW

.

An encyclopedic look at the lives of formative Western LGBT musicians and performers.

From the acclaimed British biographer of Florence Foster Jenkins (2016, etc.) comes a sweeping overview of LGBT musicians from both sides of the Atlantic who have had a pivotal influence on recorded music. Bullock argues that while the “LGBT community has spent over 100 years pioneering musical genres and producing some of the most lasting and important records of all time…far too many LGBT musicians have seen their stories ‘straight-washed’ or completely brushed under the carpet.” Turning the spotlight on modern creators of popular music, the author presents the struggles and triumphs of gifted artists who paved the way in the realms of pop, punk rock, folk, and disco, noting how “LGBT people were there as jazz gestated” and “in the maternity ward during the birth of the blues.”

.

Fans looking for ribald details from the lives of gay pop idols like Freddie Mercury, Elton John, Boy George, and Dusty Springfield won’t be disappointed, but it is Bullock’s bringing to light more hidden stories, like those of Alberta Hunter, Ma Rainey, or jazz pianist Tony Jackson, and his close historical examination of queer performative movements that make the book compelling. The author calls as much attention to the private lives of these gifted, often closeted musicians like Little Richard—the song “Tutti Frutti” originally described anal sex between men—as to their impact on their genre and later artists like David Bowie. Particularly powerful is the story of Wendy Carlos, a path-breaking inventor of the synthesizer and collaborator on the soundtracks of A Clockwork Orange and The Shining, whose work not only introduced the disco sound, but, with Bob Moog, helped make the equipment affordable. Born in 1939, Carlos underwent gender reassignment surgery in 1972 and found the public reaction to her revelation in the late 1970s to be “amazingly tolerant.”

.

Well-researched and brimming with intrigue, Bullock’s comprehensive study not only makes the work of scores of musicians sing anew; it also demonstrates how the pendulum of acceptance can swing from era to era.

-- https://www.kirkusreviews...de-me-gay/

[Edited 8/3/18 10:27am]

Don't believe what you hear
Don't believe what you see...
I know that the tide is turning 'round
So don't let the bastards grind you down!
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Reply #5 posted 08/03/18 4:13pm

djThunderfunk

avatar

luvsexy4all said:

TrivialPursuit said:

I can't imagine Bullock would write a book with Bowie's name on the front and not include him inside.

i meant prince


With the capitol H in "He", I thought you meant Jesus.

But anyway, why would Prince be in a book about gay musicians?

We were HERE, where were you?

4 those that knew the number and didn't call... fk all y'all!
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Reply #6 posted 08/03/18 6:32pm

TrivialPursuit

djThunderfunk said:

But anyway, why would Prince be in a book about gay musicians?


Actually, the book is about LGBT music. Plenty of straight musicians have made music embraced by the LGBTQ community.

This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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Reply #7 posted 08/04/18 11:03am

luvsexy4all

djThunderfunk said:

luvsexy4all said:

i meant prince


With the capitol H in "He", I thought you meant Jesus.

But anyway, why would Prince be in a book about gay musicians?

who was it that covered jack u off....

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Reply #8 posted 08/04/18 12:52pm

djThunderfunk

avatar

luvsexy4all said:

djThunderfunk said:


With the capitol H in "He", I thought you meant Jesus.

But anyway, why would Prince be in a book about gay musicians?

who was it that covered jack u off....


I don't know. Who covered Jack U Off?

We were HERE, where were you?

4 those that knew the number and didn't call... fk all y'all!
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Reply #9 posted 08/04/18 7:44pm

TrivialPursuit

djThunderfunk said:

luvsexy4all said:

who was it that covered jack u off....


I don't know. Who covered Jack U Off?


Robyn

Pansy division

to name a couple.

This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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Reply #10 posted 08/04/18 9:43pm

djThunderfunk

avatar

TrivialPursuit said:

djThunderfunk said:


I don't know. Who covered Jack U Off?


Robyn

Pansy division

to name a couple.


Ok. Not sure what that has to do with the topic or my comments.

We were HERE, where were you?

4 those that knew the number and didn't call... fk all y'all!
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Reply #11 posted 08/05/18 3:33am

Purplegarden

No but I want to, I listen to a lot of music by gay artists (Boy George, George Michael, Erasure, Jimmy Somerville, Sylvester, Sir Elton John, Freddie Mercury etc) and have always been fascinated how either they had to suppress their sexuality early in their careers (Mercury, Elton) or were forced out (George Michael). Like with the Black Experience, music was one way for marginalised social groups to get mainstream acceptance, and unlike African Americans who really edged into the mainstream with music by the 1960s, it was not really until the mid 1980s that gay and bisexual artists crossed into that mainstream. (Even later for Lesbians, as Tracy Chapman and Melissa Etheridge were only mainstream at the end of the 1980s and KD lang a bit later).

.

I have not read the book, but I would hardly consider DB a gay icon, he was one of the greatest artists in history, but really he borrowed the gay thing as gimmick, coming out in 1972, yet he was married and was forever chasing women. There was some tattle tales about him have some gay encounters in the 1960s with his manager and hanging around gay guys like Freddie Buretti and others, but in reality he was bi curious on a good day. Plus I know he loved the occasional bit of transvestisism, but drag is not limited exclusively to gay men, and of course by 1983 when Bowie announced he was straight and always had been, never really projecting any real gayness again.

.

I don't mind it but have many gay friends who are anti Bowie because of this and that is sad as Bowie is so talented. (I am a gay bear, by the way). I think even today, openly gay artists have a hard time and it still a fringe thing, especially in the USA but not so much in the UK where being gay is almost normal now. Being gay in the UK/Western Europe is almost not an issue anymore.

.

Sounds fascinating, I would love to hear wht you have to say about this book. I hope it focusses on icons as well as overtly LGBT+ artists. People like Barbra Streisand, Shirley Bassey, Bette Middler, Cher and others also have a tremendous legacy that we grab on to.

This is the place where emotions grow. 24 Feelings all in a row, its alright, its alright
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Reply #12 posted 08/05/18 12:30pm

TrivialPursuit

djThunderfunk said:

TrivialPursuit said:


Robyn

Pansy division

to name a couple.


Ok. Not sure what that has to do with the topic or my comments.


Didn't you ask who covered "Jack U Off"? Those are people who did. Or am I missing something in the thread (cuz it's been known to happen LOL).

This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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Reply #13 posted 08/05/18 4:22pm

djThunderfunk

avatar

TrivialPursuit said:

djThunderfunk said:


Ok. Not sure what that has to do with the topic or my comments.


Didn't you ask who covered "Jack U Off"? Those are people who did. Or am I missing something in the thread (cuz it's been known to happen LOL).


lovesexy4all brought that up, not me. I still have no idea why.



[Edited 8/5/18 16:22pm]

We were HERE, where were you?

4 those that knew the number and didn't call... fk all y'all!
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Reply #14 posted 08/05/18 5:05pm

Hamad

avatar

Actually a gay writer/musician's take about Prince & his music would be an interesting read.

Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #15 posted 08/05/18 5:58pm

djThunderfunk

avatar

Hamad said:

Actually a gay writer/musician's take about Prince & his music would be an interesting read.

In what way?

We were HERE, where were you?

4 those that knew the number and didn't call... fk all y'all!
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Reply #16 posted 08/05/18 6:34pm

purplethunder3
121

avatar

djThunderfunk said:

Hamad said:

Actually a gay writer/musician's take about Prince & his music would be an interesting read.

In what way?

It would be interesting to read how Prince's music influenced a gay writer/musician from their point of view... Maybe Hamad could write it... smile

Don't believe what you hear
Don't believe what you see...
I know that the tide is turning 'round
So don't let the bastards grind you down!
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Reply #17 posted 08/05/18 7:07pm

Hamad

avatar

purplethunder3121 said:



djThunderfunk said:




Hamad said:


Actually a gay writer/musician's take about Prince & his music would be an interesting read.




In what way?



It would be interesting to read how Prince's music influenced a gay writer/musician from their point of view... Maybe Hamad could write it... smile



You said it beautifully nod
Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #18 posted 08/06/18 11:07am

luvsexy4all

djThunderfunk said:

TrivialPursuit said:


Didn't you ask who covered "Jack U Off"? Those are people who did. Or am I missing something in the thread (cuz it's been known to happen LOL).


lovesexy4all brought that up, not me. I still have no idea why.



[Edited 8/5/18 16:22pm]

they implied it was a gay song..the pansy division...if u saw the vinyl single

[Edited 8/6/18 11:41am]

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Reply #19 posted 08/06/18 11:36am

djThunderfunk

avatar

falloff

We were HERE, where were you?

4 those that knew the number and didn't call... fk all y'all!
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Reply #20 posted 08/13/18 7:15pm

Tontoman22

Purplegarden said:

No but I want to, I listen to a lot of music by gay artists (Boy George, George Michael, Erasure, Jimmy Somerville, Sylvester, Sir Elton John, Freddie Mercury etc) and have always been fascinated how either they had to suppress their sexuality early in their careers (Mercury, Elton) or were forced out (George Michael). Like with the Black Experience, music was one way for marginalised social groups to get mainstream acceptance, and unlike African Americans who really edged into the mainstream with music by the 1960s, it was not really until the mid 1980s that gay and bisexual artists crossed into that mainstream. (Even later for Lesbians, as Tracy Chapman and Melissa Etheridge were only mainstream at the end of the 1980s and KD lang a bit later).

.

I have not read the book, but I would hardly consider DB a gay icon, he was one of the greatest artists in history, but really he borrowed the gay thing as gimmick, coming out in 1972, yet he was married and was forever chasing women. There was some tattle tales about him have some gay encounters in the 1960s with his manager and hanging around gay guys like Freddie Buretti and others, but in reality he was bi curious on a good day. Plus I know he loved the occasional bit of transvestisism, but drag is not limited exclusively to gay men, and of course by 1983 when Bowie announced he was straight and always had been, never really projecting any real gayness again.

.

I don't mind it but have many gay friends who are anti Bowie because of this and that is sad as Bowie is so talented. (I am a gay bear, by the way). I think even today, openly gay artists have a hard time and it still a fringe thing, especially in the USA but not so much in the UK where being gay is almost normal now. Being gay in the UK/Western Europe is almost not an issue anymore.

.

Sounds fascinating, I would love to hear wht you have to say about this book. I hope it focusses on icons as well as overtly LGBT+ artists. People like Barbra Streisand, Shirley Bassey, Bette Middler, Cher and others also have a tremendous legacy that we grab on to.

Being considered a gay icon would have to do with your timeline and geographical location at the time. What was going on at the time. Example in the 70's in North America Bette Midler and Barry Manilow starting out playing in the gay bathhouse in New York. Donna Summer was the back beat to the gay rights movement taking place at the time. David Bowie and his glam rock faze caught the attention and lent itself to the decadence of the decade (of the 70s). Where many in the big cities loved to glam up for the clubs.

[Edited 8/13/18 19:20pm]

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Reply #21 posted 08/13/18 8:13pm

ThePanther

avatar

Lots of pop-type singers/stars have been gay throughout popular music history, of course. There's a theory that 'queerness' is sort-of inherent to singing and performing in general. Little Richard and Joan Jett, baby!

But in addition to those (sometimes flamboyant) pop-singers, let's also take a moment to remember the alt. / indie-band gay/queer/bi/whatever singers and musicians: Michael Stipe from R.E.M., Bob Mould from Hüsker Dü, Feloni, Tracy Chapman, the Indigo Girls, Tegan and Sara (well, they were indie!)... countless others.

I agree that people like David Bowie, and Mick Jagger to a smaller extent, were straight artists playing with 'gay chic' imagery / fashion, etc. in the 1970s. But I don't think that was a bad thing at all. Nowadays, it would seem a bit like cultural appropriation, but back in the '70s being openly gay and mainstream was nearly impossible. I think such major (straight) guys pushing the limits of what was acceptable and making genderless and 'queer' fashion more acceptable to the mainstream was a positive thing.

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Reply #22 posted 08/14/18 7:55am

luvsexy4all

He's NOT in it....btw

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Reply #23 posted 08/14/18 9:44am

TrivialPursuit

luvsexy4all said:

He's NOT in it....btw


That's a lie.

He's mentioned in the first couple of sentences in Chapter One. Go to Amazon and "Look Inside". Search the word "Prince" with your browser.

The book was written after his death because it mentions losing him and Bowie.

This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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Reply #24 posted 08/15/18 1:01pm

luvsexy4all

TrivialPursuit said:

luvsexy4all said:

He's NOT in it....btw


That's a lie.

He's mentioned in the first couple of sentences in Chapter One. Go to Amazon and "Look Inside". Search the word "Prince" with your browser.

The book was written after his death because it mentions losing him and Bowie.

why intentionally mislead???? his music is not part of the book

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Reply #25 posted 08/15/18 1:35pm

TrivialPursuit

luvsexy4all said:

TrivialPursuit said:


That's a lie.

He's mentioned in the first couple of sentences in Chapter One. Go to Amazon and "Look Inside". Search the word "Prince" with your browser.

The book was written after his death because it mentions losing him and Bowie.

why intentionally mislead???? his music is not part of the book


You said, "he's NOT in it". Clearly, he's mentioned at least once. That's all.

This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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