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Thread started 02/03/17 11:31pm

motherfunka

How the Black Album got its name

Prince

Lovesexy Afterhsow

Hamburg, Germany

August 31, 1988

I’m going 2 tell u a story, it’s just between me and U. U going 2 listen? Once upon a time in the land of Sinaplenty, there lived a little brother named Camille. Now Camille, oh he was the baddest mother fucker in the world. U understand? Camille wasn’t afraid of nobody. Now somebody in Camille’s mind told him, “Say man, you’re the baddest mother fucker in the world. Why don’t u put out the baddest album in the world? Fuck ‘em. U know, all these people running around talking about making love. Fuck it. Just put out an album, sex with no feeling. Everyone knows, lets just fuck.” So Camille sat down and he said, “Ughhhhhh, Eric come on and blow the horn a little bit, just toot a little bit. Eric, come one give me something.” See he said, “I aint’ scared of nobody if I got that. Can’t nobody fuck with that.” Alright? So u got all these people running around talking about making love. I’ll do that and say yeah I wanna’ fuck. Ok, so that’s what Camille did. He sat down and made this album, right. It was bad. He looked at it and he said, “It’s so bad I ain’t even gonna’ put a name on the mother fucker.” No, no, wait. Get 2 that mentality. It’s sooooo bad, I ain’t even put a name on it. U just hold it. U understand? U just taste it. Right. U got it?

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Reply #1 posted 02/04/17 1:20am

bluegangsta

avatar

Because it's a black album.

Always cry 4 love, never cry 4 pain.
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Reply #2 posted 02/04/17 3:17pm

Adorecream

avatar

[Snip - luv4u]

Prince - Love4oneanother
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Reply #3 posted 02/04/17 7:01pm

1725topp

Adorecream said:

[Snip - luv4u]

*

The SOTT/Lovesexy Bands may have been ethnically less diverse than the Revolution, but they were much better musicians, to which three of the members of the Revolution, including Wendy, have admitted. Next, your "Kunta Konsciousness" remark is demeaning to any African person who has ever wanted to become more connected to one's African or African-American heritage. Three, Prince's music also crossed over because he purposely lied about his race, even when he, himself, couldn't even keep the lie straight. From January to March 1981 in three separate magazines (Rolling Stone, Los Angeles Times, and New York Daily News), Prince changed the racial construct of his parents in each interview, which proves he was lying because he knew that his music would not get played on pop and rock radio stations if he was considered black. So, while Prince did fight against both black and white people from limiting him, he also participated in perpetuating the notion of black artists being limited by he, himself, at first, refusing to be bold enough to say to everyone, "I'm an African American, and I'm going to play whatever music I like." Yet, it's also either racist, self-hating, or just hypocritical of you to then infer that Prince was disingenuous when he attempted to reconnect with his black roots later in his career. So, which is it? Was Prince disingenuous for lying about his race to appeal to white listeners, or was he disingenuous for wanting to reconnect with his black listeners

*

I find it interesting that on this site Prince is only accused of being disingenuous when he's seeking to embrace his black roots, which, I think, says more about the people on this site than it does about Prince. How is it somehow more authentic for Prince to love Joni Mitchell or the Beatles than for Prince to love James Brown or George Clinton? To be clear, I'm not saying that it's more authentic for him to love either more, but it's just interesting that on this site a lot of people seem to have issues when Prince decides to address issues specific to the African-American community as if his doing this offends their socio-political or artistic sensibilities. It’s almost like many folks on this site are declaring, “Prince, you can be our erotic ethic nymph, but don’t you dare discuss issues of white supremacy!” I'm just glad that as an African American, I love Prince for the entirety of his musical pie chart and never desired that he limit himself to just one slice of his pie chart.

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Reply #4 posted 02/04/17 7:04pm

Iamtheorg

avatar

bluegangsta said:

Because it's a black album.

They all are though lol

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Reply #5 posted 02/05/17 3:43pm

laurarichardso
n

The only people who thought that Prince was white at the Lovesexy period were people who were having a serious eye problem. He was a lightskin black guy who lived in a state that had snow for more than half the year. How dark was he going to be?

In addition, SOTT is a very black album. I remember reading that was upset at going to nightclubs and not hearing his music but I also think he realized that it comes with moving up in the music industry.

Also Susan Rogers said the Black Album music was party music for Sheila E birthday so I doubt a lot of thought went into the project.

1725topp said:

Adorecream said:

[Snip - luv4u]

*

The SOTT/Lovesexy Bands may have been ethnically less diverse than the Revolution, but they were much better musicians, to which three of the members of the Revolution, including Wendy, have admitted. Next, your "Kunta Konsciousness" remark is demeaning to any African person who has ever wanted to become more connected to one's African or African-American heritage. Three, Prince's music also crossed over because he purposely lied about his race, even when he, himself, couldn't even keep the lie straight. From January to March 1981 in three separate magazines (Rolling Stone, Los Angeles Times, and New York Daily News), Prince changed the racial construct of his parents in each interview, which proves he was lying because he knew that his music would not get played on pop and rock radio stations if he was considered black. So, while Prince did fight against both black and white people from limiting him, he also participated in perpetuating the notion of black artists being limited by he, himself, at first, refusing to be bold enough to say to everyone, "I'm an African American, and I'm going to play whatever music I like." Yet, it's also either racist, self-hating, or just hypocritical of you to then infer that Prince was disingenuous when he attempted to reconnect with his black roots later in his career. So, which is it? Was Prince disingenuous for lying about his race to appeal to white listeners, or was he disingenuous for wanting to reconnect with his black listeners

*

I find it interesting that on this site Prince is only accused of being disingenuous when he's seeking to embrace his black roots, which, I think, says more about the people on this site than it does about Prince. How is it somehow more authentic for Prince to love Joni Mitchell or the Beatles than for Prince to love James Brown or George Clinton? To be clear, I'm not saying that it's more authentic for him to love either more, but it's just interesting that on this site a lot of people seem to have issues when Prince decides to address issues specific to the African-American community as if his doing this offends their socio-political or artistic sensibilities. It’s almost like many folks on this site are declaring, “Prince, you can be our erotic ethic nymph, but don’t you dare discuss issues of white supremacy!” I'm just glad that as an African American, I love Prince for the entirety of his musical pie chart and never desired that he limit himself to just one slice of his pie chart.

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Reply #6 posted 02/05/17 3:58pm

QueenofCardboa
rd

avatar


lurking

"I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose voters," Donald Trump
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Reply #7 posted 02/06/17 4:46pm

tab32792

1725topp said:

Adorecream said:

[Snip - luv4u]

*

The SOTT/Lovesexy Bands may have been ethnically less diverse than the Revolution, but they were much better musicians, to which three of the members of the Revolution, including Wendy, have admitted. Next, your "Kunta Konsciousness" remark is demeaning to any African person who has ever wanted to become more connected to one's African or African-American heritage. Three, Prince's music also crossed over because he purposely lied about his race, even when he, himself, couldn't even keep the lie straight. From January to March 1981 in three separate magazines (Rolling Stone, Los Angeles Times, and New York Daily News), Prince changed the racial construct of his parents in each interview, which proves he was lying because he knew that his music would not get played on pop and rock radio stations if he was considered black. So, while Prince did fight against both black and white people from limiting him, he also participated in perpetuating the notion of black artists being limited by he, himself, at first, refusing to be bold enough to say to everyone, "I'm an African American, and I'm going to play whatever music I like." Yet, it's also either racist, self-hating, or just hypocritical of you to then infer that Prince was disingenuous when he attempted to reconnect with his black roots later in his career. So, which is it? Was Prince disingenuous for lying about his race to appeal to white listeners, or was he disingenuous for wanting to reconnect with his black listeners

*

I find it interesting that on this site Prince is only accused of being disingenuous when he's seeking to embrace his black roots, which, I think, says more about the people on this site than it does about Prince. How is it somehow more authentic for Prince to love Joni Mitchell or the Beatles than for Prince to love James Brown or George Clinton? To be clear, I'm not saying that it's more authentic for him to love either more, but it's just interesting that on this site a lot of people seem to have issues when Prince decides to address issues specific to the African-American community as if his doing this offends their socio-political or artistic sensibilities. It’s almost like many folks on this site are declaring, “Prince, you can be our erotic ethic nymph, but don’t you dare discuss issues of white supremacy!” I'm just glad that as an African American, I love Prince for the entirety of his musical pie chart and never desired that he limit himself to just one slice of his pie chart.

i agree wholeheartedly with this post!

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Reply #8 posted 02/07/17 12:49am

mediumdry

Adorecream said:

the album was alegendary bootleg, but sold very poorly on official release and itw as well below the quality on SOTT and Lovesexy.

.

Quality less than Sign Of The Times? Maybe...

.

Less than Lovesexy? Uh.. no, very few of his albums are (including post 2000)

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Reply #9 posted 02/07/17 1:12am

darkroman

It had no cover, just a black sleeve as it was supposed to be a surprise album with no promotion.

.

The Beatles were the inspiration for the phrase as they had the White Album.

.

lol

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Reply #10 posted 02/07/17 1:49am

iZsaZsa

From the story, I think it's because there's no love on it.
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Reply #11 posted 02/07/17 3:39am

Adorecream

avatar

mediumdry said:

Adorecream said:

the album was alegendary bootleg, but sold very poorly on official release and itw as well below the quality on SOTT and Lovesexy.

.

Quality less than Sign Of The Times? Maybe...

.

Less than Lovesexy? Uh.. no, very few of his albums are (including post 2000)

Lovesexy is in my top 5, that is a GREAT album, it is one big party, how can anyone not like it. Classic after classic.

Prince - Love4oneanother
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Reply #12 posted 02/07/17 4:38am

BartVanHemelen

avatar

laurarichardson said:

Also Susan Rogers said the Black Album music was party music for Sheila E birthday

.

Or rather that's what you think you remember, whereas in fact only three of the eight tracks fit that description:

.

http://www.princevault.co...e=Le_Grind

.

Le Grind, along with Bob George and 2 Nigs United 4 West Compton, was recorded for a birthday party Prince was hosting for Sheila E. on 11 December 1986.

.

The rest? Three of them weren't recorded until months after that birthday party:

.

http://www.princevault.co...Dead_On_It

.

basic tracks were recorded in March 1987 at Prince's Galpin Blvd Home Studio, Chanhassen, MN, USA (during the same set of sessions that produced Cindy C. and Nine)

.

http://www.princevault.co..._R_In_Love

.

initial tracking took place in early October 1987 at Paisley Park Studios, Chanhassen, MN as the final track recorded for "The Black Album"

.

One of them was recorded months earlier than the first session mentioned above:

.

http://www.princevault.co...ifragisexy

.

initial tracking took place in mid-September 1986 at Prince's Galpin Blvd Home Studio, Chanhassen, MN, USA

.

And one of them had been part of previous projects:

.

http://www.princevault.co...unky_Place

.

Initial tracking took place on 28 October 1986 at Sunset Sound, Hollywood, CA, USA (the day after a re-recording of Feel U Up, the same day as Rebirth Of The Flesh, two days before Good Love). The track was included as the eighth and final track on the 5 November 1986 configuration of the Camille album (credited to the pseudonym Camille), which was later aborted. A few weeks later, it was included as the third track on the second disc as the album developed into the triple-album Crystal Ball on the 30 November 1986 configuration.

.

© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
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Reply #13 posted 02/07/17 6:42am

RodeoSchro

avatar


Clearly Prince had seen this classic scene from this classic movie:

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's paladin
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Reply #14 posted 02/07/17 5:30pm

laurarichardso
n

BartVanHemelen said:

laurarichardson said:

Also Susan Rogers said the Black Album music was party music for Sheila E birthday

.

Or rather that's what you think you remember, whereas in fact only three of the eight tracks fit that description:

.

http://www.princevault.co...e=Le_Grind

.

.

And one of them had been part of previous projects:

.

http://www.princevault.co...unky_Place

.

Initial tracking took place on 28 October 1986 at Sunset Sound, Hollywood, CA, USA (the day after a re-recording of Feel U Up, the same day as Rebirth Of The Flesh, two days before Good Love). The track was included as the eighth and final track on the 5 November 1986 configuration of the Camille album (credited to the pseudonym Camille), which was later aborted. A few weeks later, it was included as the third track on the second disc as the album developed into the triple-album Crystal Ball on the 30 November 1986 configuration.

.

I am repeating what she just said out her own mouth on the Michael Dean podcast. If you want to be believe Princevault over the person who was in the studio with him go ahead. Not sure why some website is more accurate then the people who were around at the time but this is Prince org were actual comment by real people and court documents mean nothing.

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Reply #15 posted 02/08/17 7:40am

Iamtheorg

avatar

laurarichardson said:

BartVanHemelen said:

.

I am repeating what she just said out her own mouth on the Michael Dean podcast. If you want to be believe Princevault over the person who was in the studio with him go ahead. Not sure why some website is more accurate then the people who were around at the time but this is Prince org were actual comment by real people and court documents mean nothing.

hmmm

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Reply #16 posted 02/27/17 12:01pm

Vannormal

avatar

Anyone remember The Black Album Band, who covered the whole album just a couple of days/weeks? later ?

I heard this re-recorde album on a German radio station some time later. Strange but fun !

Like to hear it again.

-

Then, about the real one: I remember that somewhat end '87, early '88 they played the whole original Pirnce album on Veronica’s Countdown Café, a program on a Dutch radio station. Too cool to be true. I still remeber like it was yesterday. It was late at night, and I had my ears glued to the speakers of my ghettoblaster !

I recorded the whole broadcast on a cassette, and still have it somewhere. Now and then a DJ jingle was heard over the tracks saying in a dark voice "The Black Album".

I've listened so much to this cassette, and I thought these DJ Jingles were part of the music recorded by Prince. I took some time before I could lay my hands on a first (fake) copy of the album. I even payd 5000 Bfr for that one (similar to todays 125 EURO!). Still have that one lying around too.

-

So when I hear songs from the Black Album, I still hear those DJ jingles in my head. smile

Ah memories.

-

Now, time to go and search for that The Black Album Band version. biggrin

“My body reeks with lust, I will rape you if i must.”
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Reply #17 posted 02/27/17 3:36pm

bluegangsta

avatar

Vannormal said:

Anyone remember The Black Album Band, who covered the whole album just a couple of days/weeks? later ?

I heard this re-recorde album on a German radio station some time later. Strange but fun !

Like to hear it again.

Now, time to go and search for that The Black Album Band version. biggrin

That sounds very interesting! I would love to hear that!

Always cry 4 love, never cry 4 pain.
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Reply #18 posted 02/27/17 3:57pm

Starrdust505

1725topp said:

Adorecream said:

[Snip - luv4u]

*

The SOTT/Lovesexy Bands may have been ethnically less diverse than the Revolution, but they were much better musicians, to which three of the members of the Revolution, including Wendy, have admitted. Next, your "Kunta Konsciousness" remark is demeaning to any African person who has ever wanted to become more connected to one's African or African-American heritage. Three, Prince's music also crossed over because he purposely lied about his race, even when he, himself, couldn't even keep the lie straight. From January to March 1981 in three separate magazines (Rolling Stone, Los Angeles Times, and New York Daily News), Prince changed the racial construct of his parents in each interview, which proves he was lying because he knew that his music would not get played on pop and rock radio stations if he was considered black. So, while Prince did fight against both black and white people from limiting him, he also participated in perpetuating the notion of black artists being limited by he, himself, at first, refusing to be bold enough to say to everyone, "I'm an African American, and I'm going to play whatever music I like." Yet, it's also either racist, self-hating, or just hypocritical of you to then infer that Prince was disingenuous when he attempted to reconnect with his black roots later in his career. So, which is it? Was Prince disingenuous for lying about his race to appeal to white listeners, or was he disingenuous for wanting to reconnect with his black listeners

*

I find it interesting that on this site Prince is only accused of being disingenuous when he's seeking to embrace his black roots, which, I think, says more about the people on this site than it does about Prince. How is it somehow more authentic for Prince to love Joni Mitchell or the Beatles than for Prince to love James Brown or George Clinton? To be clear, I'm not saying that it's more authentic for him to love either more, but it's just interesting that on this site a lot of people seem to have issues when Prince decides to address issues specific to the African-American community as if his doing this offends their socio-political or artistic sensibilities. It’s almost like many folks on this site are declaring, “Prince, you can be our erotic ethic nymph, but don’t you dare discuss issues of white supremacy!” I'm just glad that as an African American, I love Prince for the entirety of his musical pie chart and never desired that he limit himself to just one slice of his pie chart.

nod Thank You 1725topp!

[Edited 2/27/17 15:58pm]

Come now, isn't life a little better with a pair of good shoes? - Prince 1985
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Reply #19 posted 02/27/17 4:30pm

muleFunk

avatar

1725topp said:

Adorecream said:

[Snip - luv4u]

*

The SOTT/Lovesexy Bands may have been ethnically less diverse than the Revolution, but they were much better musicians, to which three of the members of the Revolution, including Wendy, have admitted. Next, your "Kunta Konsciousness" remark is demeaning to any African person who has ever wanted to become more connected to one's African or African-American heritage. Three, Prince's music also crossed over because he purposely lied about his race, even when he, himself, couldn't even keep the lie straight. From January to March 1981 in three separate magazines (Rolling Stone, Los Angeles Times, and New York Daily News), Prince changed the racial construct of his parents in each interview, which proves he was lying because he knew that his music would not get played on pop and rock radio stations if he was considered black. So, while Prince did fight against both black and white people from limiting him, he also participated in perpetuating the notion of black artists being limited by he, himself, at first, refusing to be bold enough to say to everyone, "I'm an African American, and I'm going to play whatever music I like." Yet, it's also either racist, self-hating, or just hypocritical of you to then infer that Prince was disingenuous when he attempted to reconnect with his black roots later in his career. So, which is it? Was Prince disingenuous for lying about his race to appeal to white listeners, or was he disingenuous for wanting to reconnect with his black listeners

*

I find it interesting that on this site Prince is only accused of being disingenuous when he's seeking to embrace his black roots, which, I think, says more about the people on this site than it does about Prince. How is it somehow more authentic for Prince to love Joni Mitchell or the Beatles than for Prince to love James Brown or George Clinton? To be clear, I'm not saying that it's more authentic for him to love either more, but it's just interesting that on this site a lot of people seem to have issues when Prince decides to address issues specific to the African-American community as if his doing this offends their socio-political or artistic sensibilities. It’s almost like many folks on this site are declaring, “Prince, you can be our erotic ethic nymph, but don’t you dare discuss issues of white supremacy!” I'm just glad that as an African American, I love Prince for the entirety of his musical pie chart and never desired that he limit himself to just one slice of his pie chart.

Nothing else needs to be said!

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