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Forums > Politics & Religion > Rachel Dolezal is back. Says she is trans-black.
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Reply #90 posted 04/06/17 8:29am

jjhunsecker

avatar

2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said:

JJ, Do you remember this interview on Oprah about the real-life experience, about the white guy who took some life-threatening pills, to see what it was like to be Black, and after the experiment and experience, he was so traumatized by it, he sought therapy? Everything this guy experienced during that experiment, were real-life situations, that many Blacks have dealt with, at some point in their lives, and still in present day. I can literally say, that guy walked in the shoes of Blacks for the limited time he was part of that experiment. Now I can accept and respect this guy's reason for doing that as genuine, but compared to Rachel's reasons, I can't see her claim or reason to be as genuine as his, but good luck to her. https://www.google.com/am...lomon/amp/
Joshua Solomon (c. 1974- ) was a White American university student who made himself look Black in 1994 to see what it would be like. He was going to do it for about four months and visit different parts of the country. He only lasted a week. We know of at least three other “Black like me” cases: 1947: Ray Sprigle 1959: John Howard Griffin 1969: Grace Halsell Griffin is the famous one: he wrote “Black Like Me” (1960). When Solomon read his book in high school he knew right then that he wanted to try it himself. Solomon grew up in Silver Spring, Maryland and had plenty of Black friends: Whenever something went down, they always said it was racism. Education, jobs, crime, poverty, social misunderstandings – they blamed everything on color. “It’s a white man’s world,” they would say. But he did not believe his black friends: … secretly, inside, I’d always felt that many black people used racism as a crutch, an excuse. Couldn’t they just shrug off the rankings of ignorant people? He did not believe Langston Hughes or Cornel West either. So he went to a doctor who gave him pills to turn his white skin brown. The doctor warned him that it could lead to liver damage. Solomon shaved the hair off his head but dressed the same, acted the same, talked the same. He had the same money and education. It was just his brown skin and bald head that were different (pictured above). After about a month of taking pills his skin was dark enough for the doorman at his brother’s place in Baltimore to be rude and suspicious. He travelled to Washington, DC, Atlanta and, like Griffin, Gainesville, Georgia. As a White man he looks and smiles at White people and they smile back. But as a Black man whites look away, lock their doors, assume he is dangerous or up to no good. Shopping while Black: One time a white person did not look away: I went to a nearby drugstore, a white employee followed me around the store. At the drink refrigerator, I turned suddenly and stared right at her, letting her know that I knew what she was doing – shadowing me as if I were a potential thief. I’d hoped to embarrass her, but she didn’t flinch. She stared right back, hands on her hips. The police would stop him even though he was just walking down the street minding his own business. Restaurants would tell him they were full, even when they were not, restaurants where nearly everyone sitting down was – White. White respect and friendliness that he took for granted was gone. Instead Whites regarded him with disdain, even fear. He met a homeless White man, blond hair, blue eyes, who had almost nothing in this world: even he looked down on Blacks! By his second day in Gainesville he was in tears. It was just too much! He went back home to let the pills wear off and turn white again. *Clicks heels three times.*
[Edited 4/6/17 5:59am]

Very interesting...I vaguely remembered that story . It would be interesting if some of the usual folks on here had their eyes opened as well in such a manner of the realities of minority lives, and just didn't think we're complaining about nothing, and need to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps and other such cliches ...

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Reply #91 posted 04/06/17 8:45am

2freaky4church
1

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The dude was painted black. Dolezal is white.

Black women do tend to be treated better than men.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #92 posted 04/06/17 8:53am

purplepoppy

free2bfreeda said:

i'm still searching my feelings about r. dolezal. so i decided to look at her positive contributions. here are a few selections of her artworks i've chosen. if you wish to view more just click on the link. imo her artwork is a view of her inner passion as a person trying to fit into her personal perspectives.

: http://racheldolezal.blogspot.com/

Rachel Dolezal artworks

ass22.jpgPariah+Poster+proof-1.jpg7_Dolezal_R.JPGsoulprot.JPGIMG_4121.jpg59630013.JPG

see more: http://racheldolezal.blogspot.com/

[Edited 4/6/17 7:11am]

These are nice. May have been a way to reach more folks just by relying on her talent and choice of subject matter. Letting that stand for what she values.

Brand new boogie without the hero.
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Reply #93 posted 04/06/17 9:33am

TrivialPursuit

2freaky4church1 said:

The dude was painted black. Dolezal is white.

Black women do tend to be treated better than men.


I finally watched that video in this thread. She really has her story down. She knows all the right ways to say "black" or "challenge society" or whatever, to sound like she's got her shit together. She's really trying to change something - she thinks. To me, it supports what I said about her before. She doesn't know herself, but she sure to fuck has her story down. She's lost.

This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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Reply #94 posted 04/06/17 9:44am

2freaky4church
1

avatar

Loni Love has been funny on this.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #95 posted 04/06/17 12:31pm

morningsong

free2bfreeda said:

maybe rachel is working on a screen play.

there was a film back n a day called 'black like me' by

John Howard Griffin.jpg

^^^ John Howard Griffin < read about J H Griffin here

it was a strange take on being black from a white perspective. Griffin actually colored his skin to experience being black.

Black Like Me (1964) is an American drama film based on the book Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin, who passed as an African-American man for six weeks in 1959 in the Deep South, to report on life in the segregated society from the other side of the color line. The screen play was co-written (with Gerda Lerner) and the film was directed by Carl Lerner. The film stars James Whitmore, Sorrell Booke, and Roscoe Lee Brown

Plot

John Finley Horton (James Whitmore) is a white journalist who artificially darkens his skin and passes for a black man in the deep South, from New Orleans to Atlanta, where he encounters racism from both white and black people.

i feel to continue to villify r dolezal rather than try to understand her is kinda unfair.



While I agree with you to a degree. She shouldn't be villified, but I don't think it should always be on black people to accept everything with opened arms.

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Reply #96 posted 04/06/17 2:13pm

jjhunsecker

avatar

morningsong said:

free2bfreeda said:

maybe rachel is working on a screen play.

there was a film back n a day called 'black like me' by

John Howard Griffin.jpg

^^^ John Howard Griffin < read about J H Griffin here

it was a strange take on being black from a white perspective. Griffin actually colored his skin to experience being black.

i feel to continue to villify r dolezal rather than try to understand her is kinda unfair.



While I agree with you to a degree. She shouldn't be villified, but I don't think it should always be on black people to accept everything with opened arms.

I certainly wouldn't villify her, because she thought she was doing good for people. I do think she needs to see a shrink

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Reply #97 posted 04/06/17 2:15pm

morningsong

jjhunsecker said:

morningsong said:



While I agree with you to a degree. She shouldn't be villified, but I don't think it should always be on black people to accept everything with opened arms.

I certainly wouldn't villify her, because she thought she was doing good for people. I do think she needs to see a shrink



I don't see the harm in that.

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Reply #98 posted 04/06/17 3:33pm

free2bfreeda

jjhunsecker said:

I certainly wouldn't villify her, because she thought she was doing good for people. I do think she needs to see a shrink

according to her early life experiences, i'd agree that she may (perhaps) need some psycholological counseling and/or therapy.

thus she could better come to terms with her issues before she maywell implode. she's been carrying alot of baggage since 2015 (and earlier).

~

now to look into her future:

the following upcoming event in south africa for r. dolezal is either going to strengthen or break her self image.

1.The US race activist Rachel Dolezal, who identifies as black despite being born white, is to visit South Africa to talk about her experience.

Ms Dolezal will be the special guest at an event intended to promote a dialogue for a "non-racial" South Africa.

: http://www.bbc.com/news/w...a-39515744

2. Dolezal will be coming to South Africa on April 19 for a meeting on nonracial South African society dialogue.

: http://connect.citizen.co...ing-to-sa/

the reaction tweets here are something to check out.

[Edited 4/6/17 16:17pm]

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #99 posted 04/06/17 4:08pm

morningsong

free2bfreeda said:

jjhunsecker said:

I certainly wouldn't villify her, because she thought she was doing good for people. I do think she needs to see a shrink

according to her early life experiences, i'd agree that she may (perhaps) need some psycholological counseling and/or therapy.

thus she could better comes to terms with her issues before she maywell implode. she's been carring alot of baggage since 2015 (and earlier).

~

now to look into her future:

the following upcoming event in south africa for r. dolezal is either going to strengthen or break her self image.

2. Dolezal will be coming to South Africa on April 19 for a meeting on nonracial South African society dialogue.

: http://connect.citizen.co...ing-to-sa/

the reaction tweets here are something to check out.



Now this would be interesting to see.

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Reply #100 posted 04/06/17 4:18pm

free2bfreeda

i'm still not making a judgement call on r dolezal at this point.

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #101 posted 04/06/17 4:54pm

2elijah

avatar

2freaky4church1 said:

The dude was painted black. Dolezal is white.



Black women do tend to be treated better than men.


Don't agree with your last statement. Too general.

Anyway, the guy that did the experiment is white, and wanted to experience what it was like being Black. The experience traumatized him. He didn't claim to be Black after the experience. The difference with Rachel, she is a white woman, who wants to be Black, and making an effort to change her racial identity. Nothing abnormal or wrong with anyone being curious about her claim or decision. At the end of the day, the decision will be left up to Rachel.
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Reply #102 posted 04/06/17 5:00pm

free2bfreeda

ya'll all know me by now. i had to go directly to the source to make sure it's real.

: http://www.thenewage.co.z...th-africa/

~

C8tx9FOWAAA9Si2.jpg:large

i hope they will have a video of her presentation available to view post the dialog

[Edited 4/6/17 17:03pm]

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #103 posted 04/06/17 5:19pm

2elijah

avatar

jjhunsecker said:



2elijah said:


jjhunsecker said:


JJ, Do you remember this interview on Oprah about the real-life experience, about the white guy who took some life-threatening pills, to see what it was like to be Black, and after the experiment and experience, he was so traumatized by it, he sought therapy? Everything this guy experienced during that experiment, were real-life situations, that many Blacks have dealt with, at some point in their lives, and still in present day. I can literally say, that guy walked in the shoes of Blacks for the limited time he was part of that experiment. Now I can accept and respect this guy's reason for doing that as genuine, but compared to Rachel's reasons, I can't see her claim or reason to be as genuine as his, but good luck to her. https://www.google.com/am...lomon/amp/
Joshua Solomon (c. 1974- ) was a White American university student who made himself look Black in 1994 to see what it would be like. He was going to do it for about four months and visit different parts of the country. He only lasted a week. We know of at least three other “Black like me” cases: 1947: Ray Sprigle 1959: John Howard Griffin 1969: Grace Halsell Griffin is the famous one: he wrote “Black Like Me” (1960). When Solomon read his book in high school he knew right then that he wanted to try it himself. Solomon grew up in Silver Spring, Maryland and had plenty of Black friends: Whenever something went down, they always said it was racism. Education, jobs, crime, poverty, social misunderstandings – they blamed everything on color. “It’s a white man’s world,” they would say. But he did not believe his black friends: … secretly, inside, I’d always felt that many black people used racism as a crutch, an excuse. Couldn’t they just shrug off the rankings of ignorant people? He did not believe Langston Hughes or Cornel West either. So he went to a doctor who gave him pills to turn his white skin brown. The doctor warned him that it could lead to liver damage. Solomon shaved the hair off his head but dressed the same, acted the same, talked the same. He had the same money and education. It was just his brown skin and bald head that were different (pictured above). After about a month of taking pills his skin was dark enough for the doorman at his brother’s place in Baltimore to be rude and suspicious. He travelled to Washington, DC, Atlanta and, like Griffin, Gainesville, Georgia. As a White man he looks and smiles at White people and they smile back. But as a Black man whites look away, lock their doors, assume he is dangerous or up to no good. Shopping while Black: One time a white person did not look away: I went to a nearby drugstore, a white employee followed me around the store. At the drink refrigerator, I turned suddenly and stared right at her, letting her know that I knew what she was doing – shadowing me as if I were a potential thief. I’d hoped to embarrass her, but she didn’t flinch. She stared right back, hands on her hips. The police would stop him even though he was just walking down the street minding his own business. Restaurants would tell him they were full, even when they were not, restaurants where nearly everyone sitting down was – White. White respect and friendliness that he took for granted was gone. Instead Whites regarded him with disdain, even fear. He met a homeless White man, blond hair, blue eyes, who had almost nothing in this world: even he looked down on Blacks! By his second day in Gainesville he was in tears. It was just too much! He went back home to let the pills wear off and turn white again. *Clicks heels three times.*

[Edited 4/6/17 5:59am]

Very interesting...I vaguely remembered that story . It would be interesting if some of the usual folks on here had their eyes opened as well in such a manner of the realities of minority lives, and just didn't think we're complaining about nothing, and need to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps and other such cliches ...




100% agree, because, prior to Joshua Solomon's experiment, he had dismissive views towards his Black friends' experiences with racial prejudice, similar to the dismissive views, some here are known to express, when discussions of race takes place here. One can say Joshua Solomon actually 'walked in the shoes of Blacks', just by the racial prejudice, he experienced through that experiment.
[Edited 4/6/17 17:22pm]
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Reply #104 posted 04/06/17 6:19pm

HuMpThAnG

avatar

2elijah said:

Lmao! She could never improve things for Blacks because she does not and will never walk in our shoes, have our experiences,no matter how much face paint she puts on or what she changes her name to. If a Black person dyes their hair blond, do they now claim to be White? Absolutely not. She is doing nothing but portraying self-hatred. If she wants to 'improve things' with racial issues in America, then she should work on educating her own people about the fallacy of white supremacy, and the evil it has caused on so many groups. Self-hatred is not a way to 'improve things'. [Edited 4/4/17 10:29am]

and there it is

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Reply #105 posted 04/06/17 7:03pm

morningsong

free2bfreeda said:

ya'll all know me by now. i had to go directly to the source to make sure it's real.

: http://www.thenewage.co.z...th-africa/

~

C8tx9FOWAAA9Si2.jpg:large

i hope they will have a video of her presentation available to view post the dialog

[Edited 4/6/17 17:03pm]



I'd be interested. I know the views there are slightly different than here in the States.

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Reply #106 posted 04/06/17 7:13pm

free2bfreeda

Chancellor said:

Trans-Black is an acceptable term..So it is written, so it shall be done....

u speak in terms in acceptance to the following phrase "everything must change, nothing stays the same."

"so it is written, so it shall be done," is a was used in well known film from the 50's. the words have much power imo.

one could ascertain that this person r. dolezal will go down or up in history as (possibly) a generation shifter, or a continual inspiration for comedians.

it's a wait and see situation at the point.

however

i wonder how many times the word "trans-black" will be discussed, dissected, explicated, analyzed and etc by various peoples.

like the:

a. cocktail before dinner, cuisine eating restaurant crowds

b. redbean, rice, well cooked neckbones and cornbread homefolks

c. beer drinking, pizza pub middleclassers

d. lower income fast food table patrons

e. top quaility top drawer breakfast, lunch and dinner university students

f. sushi, veggie, green tea health food eaters via the le bi ga tr & ga - ers.

~

the many now and the many tomorrowers are gonna be discussing the hell out of this issue.

as for me,

i'm still watching the direction she's leading herself towards in front of the many

dove

have you had a chance to check out the foloowing video?

Published on Apr 1, 2017

On CNN'S Smerconish show, Michael Smerconish speaks to Rachel DOLEZAL about her journey and on her new book.

or

rachel dolezal will come of as a supreme inspiration for comedians as in the flollowin:

r. dolesal comedic impression. maya rudolph is the late minnie ripperton's daughter

giggle

[Edited 4/7/17 8:53am]

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #107 posted 04/07/17 6:43am

2elijah

avatar

HuMpThAnG said:



2elijah said:


Lmao! She could never improve things for Blacks because she does not and will never walk in our shoes, have our experiences,no matter how much face paint she puts on or what she changes her name to. If a Black person dyes their hair blond, do they now claim to be White? Absolutely not. She is doing nothing but portraying self-hatred. If she wants to 'improve things' with racial issues in America, then she should work on educating her own people about the fallacy of white supremacy, and the evil it has caused on so many groups. Self-hatred is not a way to 'improve things'. [Edited 4/4/17 10:29am]

and there it is


She'd be better off doing what Jane Elliot and Tim Wise does, if she wants to focus on contributing or improving race relations in this country or outside of it. Tim Wise and Jane Elliot did not have to change, deny/denounce, or have to apologize or have any guilt about their racial identities, in order to expose or educate others, about the history/truths of racism and their involvement/contributions in improving race relations. I respect them for that. Rachel's reason for changing her racial identity is a personal choice, and has nothing to do with changing or improving race relations.
[Edited 4/7/17 12:05pm]
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Reply #108 posted 04/07/17 8:12am

free2bfreeda

i found the following related pov very interesting

.

celebrity opinions from 2015

: https://www.bustle.com/ar...c-backlash

~

Former pro-basketball star and bestselling author Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who has written extensive...n struggle, also threw his weight behind the Spokane-area activist, explaining that the extensive work and exhaustive research she had put into defending the black community made up for any possible scandal that her actions may have caused.

“You can’t deny that Dolezal has proven herself a fierce and unrelenting champion for African-Americans politically and culturally,” wrote Abdul-Jabbar in a Time op-ed on Sunday. “Bottom line: The black community is better off because of her efforts.”

~

Whoopie Goldberg

“If she wants to be black, she can be black,” said Goldberg. She continued:

Look, just like people say, "I feel like a man, I feel like a woman, I feel like this." She wants to be a black woman, fine. Everything that comes with that she is prepared for. Okay.
~
D.L. Hughley – He said that Black women can’t complain about Rachel Dolezal if they dye their hair and get colored contacts.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

another article from 2016

Why Rachel Dolezal's Transracialism is Good For America

While the outing of former NAACP leader Rachel Dolezal's as a white woman has angered many, there is an argument to made that her attempt to live as a black woman is actually a step forward for race relations in America, and a positive for the black community that has long suffered from damaging stereotypes.

APR 14, 2016


~
Dolezal has been extremely active in the black community, working as a the President of the Spokane NAACP and working diligently to advance black causes. At Howard, her art focused on the black experience and racial reconciliation, and from the looks of her personal website, she appears to be extremely talented.

It is impossible to look at her art and not see a heartfelt connection to African American culture - a connection that appears to be well understood by those who know her. The New York Times spoke with Ronald Potter, a brother-in-law of Spencer Perkins, who taught religion at Belhaven in Jackson, Miss. where Dolezal went to school. Potter's description of Dolezal is fascinating:

He described Ms. Dolezal as someone who was “extremely” socially conscious, much more so than the other students seemed to be. The first time he met her, he said, she reminded him of “a black girl in a white body,” like “hearing a black song by a white artist.”

Rachel Dolezal's cultural and racial appropriation is not conventional, but it is worth remembering that she has not misrepresented or denigrated the African American experience. She has not portrayed herself as a negative stereotype of an African American, and has used her talents to further causes that are hugely beneficial to the African American community. When Dolezal resigned from the NAACP, she said:

Many issues face us now that drive at the theme of urgency. Police brutality, biased curriculum in schools, economic disenfranchisement, health inequities, and a lack of pro-justice political representation are among the concerns at the forefront of the current administration of the Spokane NAACP. And yet, the dialogue has unexpectedly shifted internationally to my personal identity in the context of defining race and ethnicity.

dove

by highlighting the positive contributions r dolezal has rendered, one could ask, is it not possible that she IS doing her best to be real from her heart sans her physiological makeup?

while so many focus on her not walking her own walk or talking her own talk as a white woman, why can't anyone focus on how hard she has worked on trying to make things better while on (black) watch.

sure her attempts might be perceived as a mis configuration of logic, however at least she has done something rather that nothing.

i may be in agreement with some of what is said by those who critisize r. dolezel, but do i see those critics doing anything to make a positive social change for black/african americans?

one can walk the walk and talk the talk, but if they do nothing in their (black) walk then i say gtf outta heah.

until one backs up their critcisms with some tangible action(s), then they are exposing a fraudulent profile and emitting a lot of bull. imo.

rolleyes

just sayin'

[Edited 4/7/17 8:55am]

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #109 posted 04/07/17 8:17am

2freaky4church
1

avatar

Excuse me for this silly topic. Trump is trying to start a war. God makes me sick.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #110 posted 04/07/17 12:53pm

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

2freaky4church1 said:

Excuse me for this silly topic. Trump is trying to start a war. God makes me sick.

God makes you sick? Humm? I guess he makes us all sick as he made germs... interesting


I wonder if i can claim that identity as a bacteria? I could be the first trans-phylum !

and a person on death row can say their are a bald eagle and thus can not be executed!

Anyone for banning the AR15 must be on the side of the criminal as once banned only criminals will have them.
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Reply #111 posted 04/07/17 1:17pm

purplepoppy

OnlyNDaUsa said:

2freaky4church1 said:

Excuse me for this silly topic. Trump is trying to start a war. God makes me sick.

God makes you sick? Humm? I guess he makes us all sick as he made germs... interesting


I wonder if i can claim that identity as a bacteria? I could be the first trans-phylum !

and a person on death row can say their are a bald eagle and thus can not be executed!

Man, you really need medication today.

Brand new boogie without the hero.
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Reply #112 posted 04/07/17 1:33pm

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

purplepoppy said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

God makes you sick? Humm? I guess he makes us all sick as he made germs... interesting


I wonder if i can claim that identity as a bacteria? I could be the first trans-phylum !

and a person on death row can say their are a bald eagle and thus can not be executed!

Man, you really need medication today.

oh i now identify as a siberian orchestra!

Anyone for banning the AR15 must be on the side of the criminal as once banned only criminals will have them.
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Reply #113 posted 04/08/17 8:31am

Dasein

free2bfreeda said:

i found the following related pov very interesting

.

celebrity opinions from 2015

: https://www.bustle.com/ar...c-backlash

~

Former pro-basketball star and bestselling author Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who has written extensive...n struggle, also threw his weight behind the Spokane-area activist, explaining that the extensive work and exhaustive research she had put into defending the black community made up for any possible scandal that her actions may have caused.

“You can’t deny that Dolezal has proven herself a fierce and unrelenting champion for African-Americans politically and culturally,” wrote Abdul-Jabbar in a Time op-ed on Sunday. “Bottom line: The black community is better off because of her efforts.”

~

Whoopie Goldberg

“If she wants to be black, she can be black,” said Goldberg. She continued:

Look, just like people say, "I feel like a man, I feel like a woman, I feel like this." She wants to be a black woman, fine. Everything that comes with that she is prepared for. Okay.
~
D.L. Hughley – He said that Black women can’t complain about Rachel Dolezal if they dye their hair and get colored contacts.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

another article from 2016

Why Rachel Dolezal's Transracialism is Good For America

While the outing of former NAACP leader Rachel Dolezal's as a white woman has angered many, there is an argument to made that her attempt to live as a black woman is actually a step forward for race relations in America, and a positive for the black community that has long suffered from damaging stereotypes.

APR 14, 2016


~
Dolezal has been extremely active in the black community, working as a the President of the Spokane NAACP and working diligently to advance black causes. At Howard, her art focused on the black experience and racial reconciliation, and from the looks of her personal website, she appears to be extremely talented.

It is impossible to look at her art and not see a heartfelt connection to African American culture - a connection that appears to be well understood by those who know her. The New York Times spoke with Ronald Potter, a brother-in-law of Spencer Perkins, who taught religion at Belhaven in Jackson, Miss. where Dolezal went to school. Potter's description of Dolezal is fascinating:

He described Ms. Dolezal as someone who was “extremely” socially conscious, much more so than the other students seemed to be. The first time he met her, he said, she reminded him of “a black girl in a white body,” like “hearing a black song by a white artist.”

Rachel Dolezal's cultural and racial appropriation is not conventional, but it is worth remembering that she has not misrepresented or denigrated the African American experience. She has not portrayed herself as a negative stereotype of an African American, and has used her talents to further causes that are hugely beneficial to the African American community. When Dolezal resigned from the NAACP, she said:

Many issues face us now that drive at the theme of urgency. Police brutality, biased curriculum in schools, economic disenfranchisement, health inequities, and a lack of pro-justice political representation are among the concerns at the forefront of the current administration of the Spokane NAACP. And yet, the dialogue has unexpectedly shifted internationally to my personal identity in the context of defining race and ethnicity.

dove

by highlighting the positive contributions r dolezal has rendered, one could ask, is it not possible that she IS doing her best to be real from her heart sans her physiological makeup?

while so many focus on her not walking her own walk or talking her own talk as a white woman, why can't anyone focus on how hard she has worked on trying to make things better while on (black) watch.

sure her attempts might be perceived as a mis configuration of logic, however at least she has done something rather that nothing.

i may be in agreement with some of what is said by those who critisize r. dolezel, but do i see those critics doing anything to make a positive social change for black/african americans?

one can walk the walk and talk the talk, but if they do nothing in their (black) walk then i say gtf outta heah.

until one backs up their critcisms with some tangible action(s), then they are exposing a fraudulent profile and emitting a lot of bull. imo.

rolleyes

just sayin'

[Edited 4/7/17 8:55am]



Thank you for posting this. I want to respond to it, but will have to actually spend some time
thinking about it before I do so.

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Reply #114 posted 04/08/17 10:39am

2freaky4church
1

avatar

No, Only, you are still a typical white guy.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #115 posted 04/08/17 10:47am

free2bfreeda

Dasein said:

free2bfreeda said:

dove

by highlighting the positive contributions r dolezal has rendered, one could ask, is it not possible that she IS doing her best to be real from her heart sans her physiological makeup?

while so many focus on her not walking her own walk or talking her own talk as a white woman, why can't anyone focus on how hard she has worked on trying to make things better while on (black) watch.

sure her attempts might be perceived as a mis configuration of logic, however at least she has done something rather that nothing.

i may be in agreement with some of what is said by those who critisize r. dolezel, but do i see those critics doing anything to make a positive social changea for black/african americans?

one can walk the walk and talk the talk, but if they do nothing in their (black) walk then i say gtf outta heah.

until one backs up their critcisms with some tangible action(s), then they are exposing a fraudulent profile and emitting a lot of bull. imo.

rolleyes

just sayin'

[Edited 4/7/17 8:55am]



Thank you for posting this. I want to respond to it, but will have to actually spend some time
thinking about it before I do so.

ur welcome and thx Dasein. (the original entire post edited for saving bytes sake)

dove

(i need to clarify the embolded statement in that 2elijah is one of the most dedicated and is totally factual knowledge wise in her quest to educate the ignorant.

imo she is dedicated in doing her best to make things better, i.e., " to make a positive social changes for black/african americans." i've learned so much from her post within the p&r form.)

[Edited 4/8/17 11:01am]

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #116 posted 04/08/17 11:13am

Horsefeathers

avatar

Ridiculous comparisons such as have been made right here are why I struggle with this. Because I still think it minimizes or delegitimizes more legit (IMO) trans issues. I can totally buy her positive contributions and think she means well and say she can FEEL like anything she wants. I don't think she's a bad person or any kind of race traitor, and I don't care who welcomes her as black. She's just not trans anything to me even if a well intended, racially aware, good-works-doing not trans person.

Maybe alternative white.

(Too soon?)
Murica: at least it's not Sudan.
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Reply #117 posted 04/08/17 11:31am

Horsefeathers

avatar

Maybe I don't really get to have an opinion on her one way or the other. I don't say that sarcastically. I'm reading and following and trying to look beyond my visceral reaction which is no. I'm not personally offended or offended on behalf of anyone else. It's just a visceral no.
Murica: at least it's not Sudan.
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Reply #118 posted 04/08/17 8:02pm

SeventeenDayze

What a joke. I wish that I as a black woman could be "trans-racial" when it suited me. Yeah, job interviews, interactions with police, etc. The fact that she's desperately trying to co-opt black identity speaks volumes of her WHITE PRIVILEGE! Just imagine a black person trying this mess. Geez.

Trolls be gone!
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Reply #119 posted 04/09/17 2:57am

midnightmover

She revealed in the BBC interview that her lie (and that's what it was - a lie) began when she found black people assumed that she was black because she spoke on black issues. That was what made her realize that she could easily present herself as black. That confirms what I said about this at the time. Dolezal was just exploiting the foolishness of millions of Americans who define the term "black" so broadly that it's almost meaningless. In a way she's done people a favor by exposing this.

The fact that she got a well paid and prestigious job as a leader of the NAACP tells you an awful lot. Even people working in the race profession in America have got their heads totally up their asses and are giving jobs to white people fraudulently claiming to be black. G. K. Butterfield (is that his name?) has also got a great, well-paid job speaking about the black experience even though he's white.

These white fraudsters are taking jobs away from black people. Those jobs should not be going to white people but blacks are allowing it to happen because so many of them still believe in the ridiculous "one-drop" idea that makes them define "black" way too loosely. Maybe Kim Kardashian is black. After all she's married to a black man, right? Might as well give her a pass too.

“The man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them, inasmuch as he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors.”
- Thomas Jefferson
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Forums > Politics & Religion > Rachel Dolezal is back. Says she is trans-black.