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Thread started 02/01/12 8:59am

smoothcriminal
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Black history month!

Why is there no thread on this?

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
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Reply #1 posted 02/01/12 11:02am

PANDURITO

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Nine hours into the month and still no thread? Why? bawl

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Reply #2 posted 02/01/12 2:27pm

luv4u

Moderator

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moderator

Saw this thread. Making it a sticky cool

Edmonton, AB - canada

"hush nubbits" !
REAL MUSIC by REAL MUSICIANS - Prince
"I kind of wish there was a reason for Prince to make the site crash more" ~~ Ben
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Reply #3 posted 02/01/12 2:42pm

smoothcriminal
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luv4u said:

Saw this thread. Making it a sticky cool

woot! My first sticky!

Another historical piece.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
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Reply #4 posted 02/01/12 4:37pm

luv4u

Moderator

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moderator

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this ........

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html

Edmonton, AB - canada

"hush nubbits" !
REAL MUSIC by REAL MUSICIANS - Prince
"I kind of wish there was a reason for Prince to make the site crash more" ~~ Ben
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Reply #5 posted 02/01/12 5:22pm

SavonOsco

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luv4u said:

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this .....



http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html



That was an amazing read...that should be a separate thread of it's own...
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Reply #6 posted 02/01/12 5:28pm

SavonOsco

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PANDURITO said:

Nine hours into the month and still no thread? Why? bawl



Aww Pandy, sarcasm?...not here...not now...Smh...
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Reply #7 posted 02/01/12 5:54pm

NastradumasKid

PANDURITO said:

Nine hours into the month and still no thread? Why? bawl

Really Pandurito, really? confused confused I be wondering about you sometimes.

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Reply #8 posted 02/01/12 6:39pm

smoothcriminal
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luv4u said:

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this ........

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html

This is great.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
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Reply #9 posted 02/01/12 7:30pm

babynoz

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luv4u said:

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this ........

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html

Thanks Luv.

"Information is abundant, but wisdom is scarce."
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Reply #10 posted 02/02/12 2:36am

noimageatall

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Amazing that as far as we've progressed there are still 'firsts' to achieve... neutral

But I congratulate him! clapping

January 27, 2012

United Airlines Names First African American Region Chief Pilot

by Alexis Taylor
Special to the AFRO

Captain James Simons, Jr. was named United Airlines’ first African-American region chief pilot for United Airlines Jan. 20, and will lead the Northeastern Region of the world’s largest airline company.

Simons, a United pilot for 22 years, will oversee 1,450 pilots flying for the airline. Beginning in 2007, he served as assistant chief pilot for the Northeast Region, based at Dulles International Airport in northern Virginia. The region is one of the airline’s five U.S. divisions, each overseen by a chief pilot.

A member of the Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals (OBAP), a non-profit founded in 1976 to advance and support minority participation in aviation, Simons also serves on the Governance and Board Development Committee for the organization.

“I appreciate OBAP,” Simons said in a press release. “And I want to get more African Americans into management.”

Simons is a 1978 graduate of the United States Air Force Academy, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in international affairs. In the Air Force, Simons worked as an instructor pilot and was responsible for pilot evaluations in the Combat Training School.

Simons joined United in 1989, and credited all the Black pilots who came before him for making his success possible. Captain Louis Freeman, the first African American pilot to be hired by a major American carrier, began working for Southwest Airlines in 1980, eventually becoming the first Black chief pilot in the country with the same company in 1992. Simons also credited Captain Bill Norwood, who was the first African-American captain to secure a position with United Airlines.

“This is a humbling experience. I learned a lot from Louis Freeman and Bill Norwood,” Simons said in a press release.

In addition to managing the pilots, Simons will also be responsible for pilot scheduling, managing and planning the use of funds not only for Dulles International Airport, but John F. Kennedy International Airport and LaGuardia Airport of New York City, Newark Liberty International Airport of New Jersey, Baltimore/Washington Thurgood Marshall Airport, and Reagan National Airport in Washington D.C.

“We are proud of Captain Simons' achievement and applaud United Airlines for its commitment to promoting minority men and women to executive positions in the aviation industry,” Cheryl Chew, Executive Director of OBAP, said in a release.

The Chicago-based United Airlines merged with Continental Airlines in 2011 and employs 86,000 men and women and operates 702 aircraft.

http://www.afro.com/secti...ryid=73876

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
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Reply #11 posted 02/02/12 4:17am

noimageatall

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February 01, 2012 | 1:30 PM

President Barack Obama Pays Tribute to Black Women

President Obama Issues Proclamation
Today, in honor Black History Month, President Barack Obama has issued a proclamation highlighting the importance of the month-long celebration while paying special tribute to African-American women.

The president announced that his year's theme is "Black Women in American Culture and History."

"From the literary giants who gave voice to their communities to the artists whose harmonies and brush strokes captured hardships and aspirations, African-American women have forever enriched our cultural heritage," he writes. "Today we stand on the shoulders of countless African-American women who shattered glass ceilings and advanced our common goals."

POTUS also makes special mention of the nameless African-American women who are the backbone of our communities. He says African-American women are preparing the "next generation for the world they will inherit."

"I call upon public officials, educators, librarians, and all the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities," ended the proclamation.

How are you paying tribute to African American women this month?



"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
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Reply #12 posted 02/02/12 4:53am

smoothcriminal
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noimageatall said:

Amazing that as far as we've progressed there are still 'firsts' to achieve... neutral

My thoughts exactly!

Look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/w...can_firsts

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
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Reply #13 posted 02/02/12 6:40am

2elijah

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THanks for creating this thread 'smoothcriminal'. Love it!

LOL
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Reply #14 posted 02/02/12 6:42am

smoothcriminal
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2elijah said:

THanks for creating this thread 'smoothcriminal'. Love it!

Thank you! It's great that we have threads like this to remember and celebrate.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
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Reply #15 posted 02/02/12 7:00am

2elijah

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This guy is awesome. I wish we had more educators like him so dedicated to uplifting and empowering students. Love his philosophy. He is also a CNN Education contributor to "Perry's Principles' and was featured in CNN's 'Black in America' documentary.

DR. STEVE PERRY

Visit Dr. Perry online at www.Dr-StevePerry.com and on Facebook and Twitter @DrStevePerry.

• Founder of Capitol Preparatory Magnet School
• Best Selling Author of "Man Up"
• Education Contributor on CNN

http://premierespeakers.c..._perry/bio

To read more, go to link

Steve Perry

Dr. Steve Perry’s heart pumps passion and produces positive change. His career has taken him from directing a grassroots organization in Chester, PA to a full scholarship at the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Work, back to his hometown of Middletown where he ran a homeless shelter, became a candidate for state representative and published his first of four books…then he turned 26.

Dr. Perry is in a hurry to transform the community. He was born into his family’s third generation of poverty on his mother’s 16th birth. He believes that the success of a life is determined by where you end, not where you start.

In 1998 Dr. Steve Perry founded ConnCAP, the Connecticut Collegiate Awareness Program, at Capital Community College. The program sent 100% of its low-income first generation graduates to four-year (Edited for Compliance)

[Edited 3/3/12 16:32pm]

LOL
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Reply #16 posted 02/02/12 7:04am

2elijah

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smoothcriminal12 said:

2elijah said:

THanks for creating this thread 'smoothcriminal'. Love it!

Thank you! It's great that we have threads like this to remember and celebrate.

...and also to show that one who chooses to identify as 'Black or African American' does not mean there are 'limits' to one's human capabilities, i.e., goals, dreams, achievements, etc., in this life. biggrin

LOL
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Reply #17 posted 02/02/12 7:07am

smoothcriminal
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2elijah said:

smoothcriminal12 said:

Thank you! It's great that we have threads like this to remember and celebrate.

...and also to show that one who chooses to identify as 'Black or African American' does not mean there are 'limits' to one's human capabilities, i.e., goals, dreams, achievements, etc., in this life. biggrin

nod

Just right around where I live! woot!

Vancouver celebrates Black History Month

For the first time in its history, the City of Vancouver has officially proclaimed February as Black History Month and will partner with the celebration’s organizers to host a number of events throughout the coming weeks.

The proclamation was made by Mayor Gregor Robertson on January 31 at City Hall, at a special event hosted by park board commissioner Constance Barnes, who helped organize the month’s festivities.

“I said, ‘I don’t want to just go in and read a proclamation,’ ” said Barnes, the daughter of Emery Barnes, a B.C. NDP MLA who, in 1994, became the first black person to be elected speaker of a provincial legislature. “I want the room packed with brown faces and black faces and tan faces,” Barnes continued. “Every colour of the brown spectrum, I want in that audience. And I want energy!”

The proclamation was presented to Nalda Callendar, executive director of the National Congress of Black Women Foundation, to mark the organization’s 20th anniversary.

“The history here goes back hundreds of years,” Barnes reflected. “Rosemary Brown [B.C. NDP MLA, the first black woman elected to a Canadian legislature, in 1972] was a good family friend. Harry Jerome [1964 Olympic bronze medallist in the 100-metre sprint] used to get out and run with my dad. Ernie King, who was a great jazz artist; Willie Fleming, who played with the B.C. Lions: these are people who all brought great things to the history of Vancouver. Either sports, or music, or the arts.…Those are the kind of people that, as a child, I was around and watched contribute to the community.”

Among the events the city has partnered in this month are film screenings and performances at the Vancity Theatre. A screening of Mighty Jerome, a documentary tribute to Harry Jerome, will also be screened at a free event at the Vancouver Public Library on February 27.

Community event listings for Black History Month can also be found on the City of Vancouver website.

http://www.straight.com/article-596271/vancouver/vancouver-celebrates-black-history-month

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
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Reply #18 posted 02/02/12 7:13am

2elijah

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smoothcriminal12 said:

2elijah said:

...and also to show that one who chooses to identify as 'Black or African American' does not mean there are 'limits' to one's human capabilities, i.e., goals, dreams, achievements, etc., in this life. biggrin

nod

Just right around where I live! woot!

Vancouver celebrates Black History Month

For the first time in its history, the City of Vancouver has officially proclaimed February as Black History Month and will partner with the celebration’s organizers to host a number of events throughout the coming weeks.

The proclamation was made by Mayor Gregor Robertson on January 31 at City Hall, at a special event hosted by park board commissioner Constance Barnes, who helped organize the month’s festivities.

“I said, ‘I don’t want to just go in and read a proclamation,’ ” said Barnes, the daughter of Emery Barnes, a B.C. NDP MLA who, in 1994, became the first black person to be elected speaker of a provincial legislature. “I want the room packed with brown faces and black faces and tan faces,” Barnes continued. “Every colour of the brown spectrum, I want in that audience. And I want energy!”

The proclamation was presented to Nalda Callendar, executive director of the National Congress of Black Women Foundation, to mark the organization’s 20th anniversary.

“The history here goes back hundreds of years,” Barnes reflected. “Rosemary Brown [B.C. NDP MLA, the first black woman elected to a Canadian legislature, in 1972] was a good family friend. Harry Jerome [1964 Olympic bronze medallist in the 100-metre sprint] used to get out and run with my dad. Ernie King, who was a great jazz artist; Willie Fleming, who played with the B.C. Lions: these are people who all brought great things to the history of Vancouver. Either sports, or music, or the arts.…Those are the kind of people that, as a child, I was around and watched contribute to the community.”

Among the events the city has partnered in this month are film screenings and performances at the Vancity Theatre. A screening of Mighty Jerome, a documentary tribute to Harry Jerome, will also be screened at a free event at the Vancouver Public Library on February 27.

Community event listings for Black History Month can also be found on the City of Vancouver website.

http://www.straight.com/article-596271/vancouver/vancouver-celebrates-black-history-month

Cool!

LOL
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Reply #19 posted 02/02/12 11:26am

ScarletScandal

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wow. This still goes on?

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Reply #20 posted 02/02/12 11:35am

smoothcriminal
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ScarletScandal said:

wow. This still goes on?

Ignoring this comment...

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
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Reply #21 posted 02/02/12 10:40pm

noimageatall

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http://www.washingtonpost...story.html

Don Cornelius took ‘Soul Train’ audience on a pioneering trip through black music and culture

NEW YORK — In an era when Beyonce and Jay-Z are music royalty, when Barack Obama is the nation’s chief executive, and when black stars in the cast of a TV show are commonplace, it may be hard to grasp the magnitude of what Don Cornelius created once he got his “Soul Train” rolling.

Yes, the syndicated series delivered the music of Earth Wind & Fire, the Jacksons, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder into America’s households, infusing them with soul in weekly doses. Yes, it gave viewers groovy dances and Afro-envy, helping get them hip to a funky world that many had never experienced, or maybe even suspected.

  • ( Gus Ruelas / Associated Press ) - Los Angeles Police Department officers stand guard out front the home of Don Cornelius, 75, creator and television host of the landmark television show “Soul Train”, after he was found shot dead in his Los Angeles home on Wednesday morning in his Los Angeles home, Feb. 1, 2012. Cornelius shot himself to death Wednesday morning, at his home in Los Angeles, police said.
  • ( Chris Pizzello, File / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a Sunday, June 28, 2009 file photo, Don Cornelius is seen at the 9th Annual BET Awards, in Los Angeles. Cornelius, creator of the long-running TV dance show “Soul Train,” shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.
  • ( John Hayes, File / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a Thursday, Feb. 27, 1997 file photo, television producer Don Cornelius holds a plaque on the Hollywood Walk of Fame after the unveiling of his star in Los Angeles. Cornelius, creator of the long-running TV dance show “Soul Train,” shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.
  • ( / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a 1995 file photo, producer Don Cornelius celebrates his 25th season of the syndicated music show “Soul Train, in Los Angeles” Cornelius shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.

( Gus Ruelas / Associated Press ) -

“Most of what we get credit for is people saying, ‘I learned how to dance from watching “Soul Train” back in the day,’” Cornelius told Vibe magazine in 2006. “But what I take credit for is that there were no black television commercials to speak of before ‘Soul Train.’ There were few black faces in those ads before ‘Soul Train.’

“And what I am most proud of,” he added, “is that we made television history.”

“Soul Train” (which went on for 35 seasons) didn’t make history just by influencing the music charts. It served as a pop-culture preview and barometer of fashion, hairstyles and urban patois.

By some measure, “Soul Train” was the equivalent of Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand,” although belatedly. Arriving on the wave of the Civil Rights Era, it premiered 13 years after “Bandstand” went national, then took a while longer to attract local stations to air it and advertisers to support it.

From there, it became a Saturday afternoon ritual as soul and rap artists (and white artists, too, including Elton John and David Bowie) showed off their latest releases while kids responded on the dance floor.

“When you come up with a good idea, you don’t have to do a whole lot,” Cornelius told The New York Times in 1996 in describing his show’s formula. “The idea does it for you.”

On “Soul Train” (”the hippest trip in America,” the announcer proclaimed, “across the tracks of your mind”) the host, of course, was Cornelius, but to describe him as the black Dick Clark is somewhat misleading. (A bit like calling Pat Boone the white Little Richard, as David Bianculli noted in his “Dictionary of Teleliteracy.”)

For Cornelius, the difference was in the execution, as he told The Associated Press in 1995.

“If I saw ‘American Bandstand’ and I saw dancing and I knew black kids can dance better; and I saw white artists and I knew black artists make better music; and if I saw a white host and I knew a black host could project a hipper line of speech — and I DID know all these things,” then it was reasonable to try, he said.

On his show, Cornelius was the epitome of cool, with a baritone rumble that recalled seductive soul maestro Barry White, and an unflappable manner all the way through the hour to his trademark sign-off: “We wish you love, peace, and SOUL.”

He laced his show with pro-social messages directed at his black audience.

On a 1974 program, he interviewed James Brown about the tragedy of violence in black communities (”black-on-black crime looks very bad in the sight of The Man,” Brown said sorrowfully). Then he brought on a 19-year-old Al Sharpton, already a civil rights activist, who presented Brown with an award for his music.

But Cornelius never let preaching get in the way of “Soul Train’s” hipness — or of his own.

Standing by Mary Wilson of the Supremes on another edition, he sported a slim black suit that flared into bellbottoms, a grey shirt with white polka dots, and a huge afro.

“What do you do for kicks?” he asked Wilson, who mentioned bowling as one hobby, but said how much she wanted to dance with Cornelius on “Soul Train.”

“You can dance with me,” Cornelius replied. “But not on television.”

[Edited 2/2/12 22:48pm]

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
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Reply #22 posted 02/02/12 10:43pm

smoothcriminal
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noimageatall said:

http://www.washingtonpost...story.html

Don Cornelius took ‘Soul Train’ audience on a pioneering trip through black music and culture

NEW YORK — In an era when Beyonce and Jay-Z are music royalty, when Barack Obama is the nation’s chief executive, and when black stars in the cast of a TV show are commonplace, it may be hard to grasp the magnitude of what Don Cornelius created once he got his “Soul Train” rolling.

Yes, the syndicated series delivered the music of Earth Wind & Fire, the Jacksons, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder into America’s households, infusing them with soul in weekly doses. Yes, it gave viewers groovy dances and Afro-envy, helping get them hip to a funky world that many had never experienced, or maybe even suspected.

  • ( Gus Ruelas / Associated Press ) - Los Angeles Police Department officers stand guard out front the home of Don Cornelius, 75, creator and television host of the landmark television show “Soul Train”, after he was found shot dead in his Los Angeles home on Wednesday morning in his Los Angeles home, Feb. 1, 2012. Cornelius shot himself to death Wednesday morning, at his home in Los Angeles, police said.
  • ( Chris Pizzello, File / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a Sunday, June 28, 2009 file photo, Don Cornelius is seen at the 9th Annual BET Awards, in Los Angeles. Cornelius, creator of the long-running TV dance show “Soul Train,” shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.
  • ( John Hayes, File / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a Thursday, Feb. 27, 1997 file photo, television producer Don Cornelius holds a plaque on the Hollywood Walk of Fame after the unveiling of his star in Los Angeles. Cornelius, creator of the long-running TV dance show “Soul Train,” shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.
  • ( / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a 1995 file photo, producer Don Cornelius celebrates his 25th season of the syndicated music show “Soul Train, in Los Angeles” Cornelius shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.

( Gus Ruelas / Associated Press ) -

NEW YORK — In an era when Beyonce and Jay-Z are music royalty, when Barack Obama is the nation’s chief executive, and when black stars in the cast of a TV show are commonplace, it may be hard to grasp the magnitude of what Don Cornelius created once he got his “Soul Train” rolling.

Yes, the syndicated series delivered the music of Earth Wind & Fire, the Jacksons, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder into America’s households, infusing them with soul in weekly doses. Yes, it gave viewers groovy dances and Afro-envy, helping get them hip to a funky world that many had never experienced, or maybe even suspected.

“Most of what we get credit for is people saying, ‘I learned how to dance from watching “Soul Train” back in the day,’” Cornelius told Vibe magazine in 2006. “But what I take credit for is that there were no black television commercials to speak of before ‘Soul Train.’ There were few black faces in those ads before ‘Soul Train.’

“And what I am most proud of,” he added, “is that we made television history.”

“Soul Train” (which went on for 35 seasons) didn’t make history just by influencing the music charts. It served as a pop-culture preview and barometer of fashion, hairstyles and urban patois.

By some measure, “Soul Train” was the equivalent of Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand,” although belatedly. Arriving on the wave of the Civil Rights Era, it premiered 13 years after “Bandstand” went national, then took a while longer to attract local stations to air it and advertisers to support it.

From there, it became a Saturday afternoon ritual as soul and rap artists (and white artists, too, including Elton John and David Bowie) showed off their latest releases while kids responded on the dance floor.

“When you come up with a good idea, you don’t have to do a whole lot,” Cornelius told The New York Times in 1996 in describing his show’s formula. “The idea does it for you.”

On “Soul Train” (”the hippest trip in America,” the announcer proclaimed, “across the tracks of your mind”) the host, of course, was Cornelius, but to describe him as the black Dick Clark is somewhat misleading. (A bit like calling Pat Boone the white Little Richard, as David Bianculli noted in his “Dictionary of Teleliteracy.”)

For Cornelius, the difference was in the execution, as he told The Associated Press in 1995.

“If I saw ‘American Bandstand’ and I saw dancing and I knew black kids can dance better; and I saw white artists and I knew black artists make better music; and if I saw a white host and I knew a black host could project a hipper line of speech — and I DID know all these things,” then it was reasonable to try, he said.

On his show, Cornelius was the epitome of cool, with a baritone rumble that recalled seductive soul maestro Barry White, and an unflappable manner all the way through the hour to his trademark sign-off: “We wish you love, peace, and SOUL.”

He laced his show with pro-social messages directed at his black audience.

On a 1974 program, he interviewed James Brown about the tragedy of violence in black communities (”black-on-black crime looks very bad in the sight of The Man,” Brown said sorrowfully). Then he brought on a 19-year-old Al Sharpton, already a civil rights activist, who presented Brown with an award for his music.

But Cornelius never let preaching get in the way of “Soul Train’s” hipness — or of his own.

Standing by Mary Wilson of the Supremes on another edition, he sported a slim black suit that flared into bellbottoms, a grey shirt with white polka dots, and a huge afro.

“What do you do for kicks?” he asked Wilson, who mentioned bowling as one hobby, but said how much she wanted to dance with Cornelius on “Soul Train.”

“You can dance with me,” Cornelius replied. “But not on television.”

Great article! R.I.P. Don.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
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Reply #23 posted 02/03/12 9:35am

2elijah

avatar

luv4u said:

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this ........

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html

Thanks luv4u, that was a very, interesting read.

LOL
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Reply #24 posted 02/03/12 12:18pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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moderator


"To be free -to walk the good American earth as equal citizens, to live without fear, to enjoy the fruits of our toil to give our children every opportunity in life - that dream which we have held so long in our hearts is today the destiny that we hold in our hands." - Paul Robeson

In Princeton, New Jersey on April 9, 1898, Paul Robeson was born to a former slave, the Rev. William Robeson. His mother, a teacher, died shortly thereafter when he was only five years old. Three years later, the Robeson family moved to Westfield, New Jersey. In 1910, Robeson's father became pastor of St.Thomas A.M.E. Zion Church and the Robeson family moved to Somerville, New Jersey. Paul Robeson attended Somerville High School. There, Robeson excelled in sports, drama, singing, academics, and debating. He graduated from Somerville High School in 1915.

Robeson was awarded a four year academic scholarship to Rutgers University in 1915, the third black student in the history of the institution. Robeson became a twelve letter athlete excelling in baseball, basketball, football, and track. He was named to the All American Football team on two occasions. In addition to his athletic talents, Robeson was named a Phi Beta Kappa scholar, belonged to the Cap & Skull Honor Society, and graduated valedictorian of his class in 1919.

He went on to study law at Columbia in New York and received his degree in 1923. There he met and married Eslanda Cardozo Goode, who was the first black woman to head a pathology laboratory. Robeson worked as a law clerk in New York.

Now where I come from
We don't let society tell us how it's supposed 2 be
Our clothes, our hair, we don't care
It's all about being there...
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Reply #25 posted 02/03/12 12:20pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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moderator

Now where I come from
We don't let society tell us how it's supposed 2 be
Our clothes, our hair, we don't care
It's all about being there...
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Reply #26 posted 02/03/12 8:23pm

SHOCKADELICA1

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Why is it that anything and everything pertaining to "race" is put into P&R???? If that's the case, then change the name of the forum to "Race, Politics & Religion".

Ridiculous.... disbelief

"Bring friends, bring your children and bring foot spray 'cause it's gon' be funky." ~ Prince

A kiss on the lips, is betta than a knife in the back ~ Sheila E

Darkness isn't the absence of light, it's the absence of U ~ Prince
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Reply #27 posted 02/04/12 5:01am

smoothcriminal
12

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SHOCKADELICA1 said:

Why is it that anything and everything pertaining to "race" is put into P&R???? If that's the case, then change the name of the forum to "Race, Politics & Religion".

Ridiculous.... disbelief

I put it in here in advance because anything race related is put into P&R.

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Reply #28 posted 02/04/12 5:17am

noimageatall

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smoothcriminal12 said:

SHOCKADELICA1 said:

Why is it that anything and everything pertaining to "race" is put into P&R???? If that's the case, then change the name of the forum to "Race, Politics & Religion".

Ridiculous.... disbelief

I put it in here in advance because anything race related is put into P&R.

No...that's incorrect. Anything 'Black' related gets put in P&R. confused

edited because I did notice that imago's Shit WHITE GUYS says to ASIAN GIRLS was moved here. shrug

[Edited 2/4/12 5:23am]

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
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Reply #29 posted 02/04/12 5:23am

smoothcriminal
12

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noimageatall said:

smoothcriminal12 said:

I put it in here in advance because anything race related is put into P&R.

No...that's incorrect. Anything 'Black' related gets put in P&R. confused

Well....I'll just keep quiet on that one. lol

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
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