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Thread started 12/28/10 5:07am

rialb

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Can someone define "Punk Funk?"

I read in another thread someone said that Rick James created his own genre of music (Punk Funk). Obviously I have heard the term before but is it really it's own genre? I'm fairly familiar with most of Rick James music (particularly 1978-1985) and it does not sound radically different from other funk music of that time. Are there specific characteristics that define Punk Funk or was it just a bit of hype that Rick came up with to sell himself? His funk may be slightly more rock oriented than some of his peers but it seems like Rick was kind of following in the path that Parliament-Funkadelic had laid down.

Just from the name you would expect a mixture of punk and funk and I don't really hear much punk in Rick James' music. The name always confused me and if someone can explain it a bit it would be apprreciated.

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Reply #1 posted 12/28/10 5:11am

unique

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance-punk

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Reply #2 posted 12/28/10 5:25am

rialb

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unique said:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance-punk

Thanks for responding but I don't think that the music Rick James made fits in with that genre. Dance-Punk seems like white punk/new wave/post punk groups incorporating "black" music into their music.

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Reply #3 posted 12/28/10 5:34am

novabrkr

The acts that have been labeled "dance-punk" certainly have very little in common with the music of Rick James.

I believe it was just a misappropriation as a term. Perhaps the contemporary audiences felt that Rick had a "punk attitude" and it just caught on? I don't think Rick really identified with the punk crowd himself and he wasn't a favourite among them either. Prince's "Dirty Mind" and "Controversy" are certainly closer to punk and new wave than what Rick was doing.

That type of a thing was pretty common at that time due to journalists having very little idea of what they were talking about - for example "industrial" started to get connected with all kinds styles that were very different to what it had originally meant. If you read some of those old magazines they're full of stupid horseshit like that. People coming up with bogus genres, linking completely different artists under them etc.

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Reply #4 posted 12/28/10 5:42am

rialb

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novabrkr said:

The acts that have been labeled "dance-punk" certainly have very little in common with the music of Rick James.

I believe it was just a misappropriation as a term. Perhaps the contemporary audiences felt that Rick had a "punk attitude" and it just caught on? I don't think Rick really identified with the punk crowd himself and he wasn't a favourite among them either. Prince's "Dirty Mind" and "Controversy" are certainly closer to punk and new wave than what Rick was doing.

That type of a thing was pretty common at that time due to journalists having very little idea of what they were talking about - for example "industrial" started to get connected with all kinds styles that were very different to what it had originally meant. If you read some of those old magazines they're full of stupid horseshit like that. People coming up with bogus genres, linking completely different artists under them etc.

I have to plead ignorance but I was under the assumption that it was Rick James that started calling his misic Punk Funk. If it was the media then I can completely see your point.

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Reply #5 posted 12/28/10 6:24am

paisleypark4

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rialb said:

novabrkr said:

The acts that have been labeled "dance-punk" certainly have very little in common with the music of Rick James.

I believe it was just a misappropriation as a term. Perhaps the contemporary audiences felt that Rick had a "punk attitude" and it just caught on? I don't think Rick really identified with the punk crowd himself and he wasn't a favourite among them either. Prince's "Dirty Mind" and "Controversy" are certainly closer to punk and new wave than what Rick was doing.

That type of a thing was pretty common at that time due to journalists having very little idea of what they were talking about - for example "industrial" started to get connected with all kinds styles that were very different to what it had originally meant. If you read some of those old magazines they're full of stupid horseshit like that. People coming up with bogus genres, linking completely different artists under them etc.

I have to plead ignorance but I was under the assumption that it was Rick James that started calling his misic Punk Funk. If it was the media then I can completely see your point.

It was in my opinion!

"We want the funk!

Nothing but the Punk Funk!"

- Standing On The Top

Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #6 posted 12/28/10 6:26am

novabrkr

rialb said:

novabrkr said:

The acts that have been labeled "dance-punk" certainly have very little in common with the music of Rick James.

I believe it was just a misappropriation as a term. Perhaps the contemporary audiences felt that Rick had a "punk attitude" and it just caught on? I don't think Rick really identified with the punk crowd himself and he wasn't a favourite among them either. Prince's "Dirty Mind" and "Controversy" are certainly closer to punk and new wave than what Rick was doing.

That type of a thing was pretty common at that time due to journalists having very little idea of what they were talking about - for example "industrial" started to get connected with all kinds styles that were very different to what it had originally meant. If you read some of those old magazines they're full of stupid horseshit like that. People coming up with bogus genres, linking completely different artists under them etc.

I have to plead ignorance but I was under the assumption that it was Rick James that started calling his misic Punk Funk. If it was the media then I can completely see your point.

I have to plead ignorance myself. I don't know how it came about. I just have trouble believing Rick came up with it himself originally. On the other hand, I have no trouble believing Rick liked to be called the "king" of something - "the king of punk-funk". lol

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Reply #7 posted 12/28/10 6:55am

shorttrini

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rialb said:

I read in another thread someone said that Rick James created his own genre of music (Punk Funk). Obviously I have heard the term before but is it really it's own genre? I'm fairly familiar with most of Rick James music (particularly 1978-1985) and it does not sound radically different from other funk music of that time. Are there specific characteristics that define Punk Funk or was it just a bit of hype that Rick came up with to sell himself? His funk may be slightly more rock oriented than some of his peers but it seems like Rick was kind of following in the path that Parliament-Funkadelic had laid down.

Just from the name you would expect a mixture of punk and funk and I don't really hear much punk in Rick James' music. The name always confused me and if someone can explain it a bit it would be apprreciated.

I think it can be considered a genre, with Rick as it's creator. Why? Because, although it has elements of rock, funk, soul, etc; none of the genre's mentioned, by themselves, comes close to sounding like it. By the way, I am the one that made the comment originally, and I stand by it.

"Love is like peeing in your pants, everyone sees it but only you feel its warmth"
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Reply #8 posted 12/28/10 7:16am

vainandy

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It's music that has the Rick James/Stone City Band sound.....Rick James, early Teena Marie, The Mary Jane Girls, and The Stone City Band. It does have it's own sound and each of the songs were recognizeable from the very first time they aired on the radio, that Rick James had something to do with them.

As for the reason Rick used the term punk funk, I don't know. I've always wondered if he came up with the term because of he and his band's appearance, moreso than the music having a punk sound. I mean, punk rock artists were the wildest and most outrageous looking artists out there and Rick and his band was definately the wildest and most outrageous looking funk artists at the time.

Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #9 posted 12/28/10 7:19am

banks

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vainandy said:

It's music that has the Rick James/Stone City Band sound.....Rick James, early Teena Marie, The Mary Jane Girls, and The Stone City Band. It does have it's own sound and each of the songs were recognizeable from the very first time they aired on the radio, that Rick James had something to do with them.

As for the reason Rick used the term punk funk, I don't know. I've always wondered if he came up with the term because of he and his band's appearance, moreso than the music having a punk sound. I mean, punk rock artists were the wildest and most outrageous looking artists out there and Rick and his band was definately the wildest and most outrageous looking funk artists at the time.

nod

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Reply #10 posted 12/28/10 7:47am

Timmy84

It was always my assumption that the reason it was called that because Rick dressed like a rock star and did funk music. shrug To be honest he seemed more adapt to classic rock than punk though.

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Reply #11 posted 12/28/10 8:01am

rialb

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shorttrini said:

rialb said:

I read in another thread someone said that Rick James created his own genre of music (Punk Funk). Obviously I have heard the term before but is it really it's own genre? I'm fairly familiar with most of Rick James music (particularly 1978-1985) and it does not sound radically different from other funk music of that time. Are there specific characteristics that define Punk Funk or was it just a bit of hype that Rick came up with to sell himself? His funk may be slightly more rock oriented than some of his peers but it seems like Rick was kind of following in the path that Parliament-Funkadelic had laid down.

Just from the name you would expect a mixture of punk and funk and I don't really hear much punk in Rick James' music. The name always confused me and if someone can explain it a bit it would be apprreciated.

I think it can be considered a genre, with Rick as it's creator. Why? Because, although it has elements of rock, funk, soul, etc; none of the genre's mentioned, by themselves, comes close to sounding like it. By the way, I am the one that made the comment originally, and I stand by it.

I guess what I am having trouble with is the notion that Rick James created a genre. I like a lot of his music but it seems fairly similar to what Parliament-Funkadelic was already doing (funk with a bit of rock). Is there anything musically that sets Rick apart from Parliament-Funkadelic?

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Reply #12 posted 12/28/10 8:08am

paisleypark4

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rialb said:

shorttrini said:

I think it can be considered a genre, with Rick as it's creator. Why? Because, although it has elements of rock, funk, soul, etc; none of the genre's mentioned, by themselves, comes close to sounding like it. By the way, I am the one that made the comment originally, and I stand by it.

I guess what I am having trouble with is the notion that Rick James created a genre. I like a lot of his music but it seems fairly similar to what Parliament-Funkadelic was already doing (funk with a bit of rock). Is there anything musically that sets Rick apart from Parliament-Funkadelic?

Not exactly...take a listen at how similar his songs started becoming in the Fire It Up to the Glow phase....those same synths...the use of live drums with a drum machine in the same time with a tamborine usually somewhere in the mix....Rick LOVED having a tamborine being pounded on the snare on alot of songs...like Vainandy said..that was the "punk funk" sound.

Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #13 posted 12/28/10 8:10am

shorttrini

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rialb said:

shorttrini said:

I think it can be considered a genre, with Rick as it's creator. Why? Because, although it has elements of rock, funk, soul, etc; none of the genre's mentioned, by themselves, comes close to sounding like it. By the way, I am the one that made the comment originally, and I stand by it.

I guess what I am having trouble with is the notion that Rick James created a genre. I like a lot of his music but it seems fairly similar to what Parliament-Funkadelic was already doing (funk with a bit of rock). Is there anything musically that sets Rick apart from Parliament-Funkadelic?

I guess, it also has elements of "Pop", which Parliament's music, did not have.

"Love is like peeing in your pants, everyone sees it but only you feel its warmth"
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Reply #14 posted 12/28/10 8:12am

Timmy84

I think that "punk funk" notion came to real focus during the Street Songs period. Really he was a rock 'n' roller.

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Reply #15 posted 12/28/10 10:32am

SoulAlive

It could simply mean funk music but with a punk attitude...meaning a rebellious,outrageous outlook on things.

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Reply #16 posted 12/28/10 10:36am

Timmy84

SoulAlive said:

It could simply mean funk music but with a punk attitude...meaning a rebellious,outrageous outlook on things.

I think we have our answer. lol nod

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Reply #17 posted 12/28/10 10:37am

shorttrini

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Ding....Ding...Ding..."We have a winner".

"Love is like peeing in your pants, everyone sees it but only you feel its warmth"
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Reply #18 posted 12/28/10 11:16am

novabrkr

"Punk" rhymes with "funk" and sounds better than "Classic-Rock-Funk".

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Reply #19 posted 12/28/10 11:28am

PFunkjazz

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The actual answer is it was just a marketing ploy. Rick had launched a producer's deal for his back-up band, a female vocal group, and other close associates like Val Young. He needed to distunguish his brand from EW&F and PFunk who had already launched similar deals. Rick wanted something with a "P" so he could be lumped in with a PFunk discussion with out being labeled a Clinton clone. Punk was at its height at the time, but if you know anything about punk (ie Bad Brains, Fishbone ) you know there's nothing punk about Rick's funk.

test
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Reply #20 posted 12/28/10 12:24pm

PurpleDiamond2
009

Queen? boxed

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Reply #21 posted 12/28/10 12:28pm

Timmy84

PFunkjazz said:

The actual answer is it was just a marketing ploy. Rick had launched a producer's deal for his back-up band, a female vocal group, and other close associates like Val Young. He needed to distunguish his brand from EW&F and PFunk who had already launched similar deals. Rick wanted something with a "P" so he could be lumped in with a PFunk discussion with out being labeled a Clinton clone. Punk was at its height at the time, but if you know anything about punk (ie Bad Brains, Fishbone ) you know there's nothing punk about Rick's funk.

Good point.

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Reply #22 posted 12/28/10 12:46pm

purplemookiebu
t

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punk funk..i like that...dirty mind era p!!

yoda i don't wear a cross?!!? i wear a prince symbol prince guitar wacky nutty I When Prince's cum dries, diamonds are formed. lol eek drooling no one tops prince in concert!
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Reply #23 posted 12/28/10 1:02pm

Angelic1302

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Give it away - Red Hot Chili Peppers

Um... let me warm up my vocals
Me ME ME ME ME...U U U U U!
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