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Thread started 02/11/22 5:03pm

rap

Prince’s “Love Symbol” Era Was the 1992 Definition of a Cultural Reset

https://www.popsugar.co.uk/entertainment/prince-love-symbol-album-30-years-later-48710971?fbclid=IwAR2xlpHW3Ew70lvuW1qC_u-wLtBxXeBFngE1wb-UmRrPyL_lKHgBAKv1eJg

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Reply #1 posted 02/12/22 2:02am

bluegangsta

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Always cry 4 love, never cry 4 pain.
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Reply #2 posted 02/13/22 5:31am

udo

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Please drop the stupid fakebook stuff in links.

It serves no purpose in finding the info for the users here.

Pills and thrills and daffodils will kill... If you don't believe me or don't get it, I don't have time to try to convince you, sorry.
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Reply #3 posted 02/13/22 3:36pm

EnglishGent2

udo said:

Please drop the stupid fakebook stuff in links.

It serves no purpose in finding the info for the users here.

You've got no chance, they refuse to even make them clickable. Instead of them taking two seconds to make it user friendly, they instead force anyone wanting to view the content to take the time to copy the text and paste it into their browser address bar.

It's why I don't read or take part in discussion. They are just being selfish at this point.

[Edited 2/13/22 15:37pm]

The orger formerly known as https://prince.org/profil...nglishGent
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Reply #4 posted 02/13/22 9:47pm

bozojones

Isn't a "cultural reset" when something is considered to have changed the landscape of pop culture in a major way? I'm not sure anything besides Purple Rain comes even close to falling in that category, let alone something he released in 1992.

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Reply #5 posted 02/14/22 1:47am

Vannormal

"I got wet dreams coming out of my ears

I get hard if the wind blows your cologne near me"

Never paid attention to that lyric...

S U P P O R T --- U K R A I N E --- N O W --- 4 --- MORE PEACE !!!
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves. And wiser people so full of doubts" (Bertrand Russsell 1872-1972)
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Reply #6 posted 02/15/22 1:45am

JorisE73

bozojones said:

Isn't a "cultural reset" when something is considered to have changed the landscape of pop culture in a major way? I'm not sure anything besides Purple Rain comes even close to falling in that category, let alone something he released in 1992.


I think during this time Prince was lagging behind the Gangster Rap phenomenon that was at his highest point then.

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Reply #7 posted 02/15/22 9:57am

SolaceAHA

I think the reset was that the 90s were in and as within decades in with the new and out with the old, some hang on, some don't. Obviously grunge was on the scene and there to take out that later 80s hair bands and all it could, I also think the 90s were about smashing the rb bands away, I mean you had mint condition but you had this new breed, Shai and Next and 112 it seemed like there was this factory rolling out sad grunge bands and RB groups, that all had the more open explicit songs about sex, singing how they couldn't get any, and you always had the one dude with his shirt open or off and the one dude hitting high notes. I know peeps love and worship the 90s I see it it differently as the focus became "what can you sell week one" and to me what killed strong albums was every artist putting 18 tracks on a disc, because the consumer felt an eighty minute cd with seventy minutes of filler was better for their money. So I agree there was a big reset, as for Prince this was really getting close to his end commercially, though he would still sell and have a few number one albums it was usually a one to two week seller with very little if any kind of airplay, TMBGITW would be his last top 10 hit, and 1995 would see his last top 20 Hot 100 hit with "I Hate U", not to mention he would do the name change thing which definitely cause a reset of all sorts for him and how people viewed him for awhile.

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Reply #8 posted 02/15/22 4:25pm

Milty2

Not sure if this album was the definition of a cultural reset in that year or any year. I love the album but I think there were other albums by other artists that "culturally reset" the era. Nirvana's Nevermind and NWA springs to mind. If anything, the name change (and the "retirement") was a bold move for the times and even I thought it was crazy but I think the legacy of that move eventually proved him right.

It was also kind of the end of the vinyl era too.

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Reply #9 posted 02/17/22 1:20am

Vannormal

Milty2 said:

Not sure if this album was the definition of a cultural reset in that year or any year. I love the album but I think there were other albums by other artists that "culturally reset" the era. Nirvana's Nevermind and NWA springs to mind. If anything, the name change (and the "retirement") was a bold move for the times and even I thought it was crazy but I think the legacy of that move eventually proved him right.

It was also kind of the end of the vinyl era too.

Exactly.

But Nirvana's Nevermind was released in 1991,

same for NWA's Efil4zaggin, but I agree both albums had a bigger impact in 1992 than Prince's.

S U P P O R T --- U K R A I N E --- N O W --- 4 --- MORE PEACE !!!
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves. And wiser people so full of doubts" (Bertrand Russsell 1872-1972)
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Reply #10 posted 02/17/22 4:57am

Milty2

Vannormal said:

Milty2 said:

Not sure if this album was the definition of a cultural reset in that year or any year. I love the album but I think there were other albums by other artists that "culturally reset" the era. Nirvana's Nevermind and NWA springs to mind. If anything, the name change (and the "retirement") was a bold move for the times and even I thought it was crazy but I think the legacy of that move eventually proved him right.

It was also kind of the end of the vinyl era too.

Exactly.

But Nirvana's Nevermind was released in 1991,

same for NWA's Efil4zaggin, but I agree both albums had a bigger impact in 1992 than Prince's.

Agree but I was talking about the era (which this article talks about) not the year. Maybe it was a reset for Prince himself too. A confusing reset that stretched on for about a decade.

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Reply #11 posted 02/17/22 6:49am

udo

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EnglishGent2 said:

They are just being selfish at this point.

.

You misspelled 'lazy'. lol

Pills and thrills and daffodils will kill... If you don't believe me or don't get it, I don't have time to try to convince you, sorry.
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Reply #12 posted 02/20/22 8:41pm

DarkKnight1

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prince is/was his most underrated album. An eclectic masterpiece. Start to finish.
(Insert something clever here)
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Reply #13 posted 02/21/22 1:14am

Vannormal

I'll have to take a listen again.

I haven't heard prince since it's release i believe.

But from what I remember, it was all too clean imho.

His tone and music was spot on perfectly played by his assembled skilled musicians.

And that turned me off big time.

Same for D&P, that awefull wall of sound production - all imho of course.

His band lacked to bring the wonder or deliver personal warmth that Prince's music used to have in collaboration with his old bandmates.

Compare this album for that matter with any of his pré 1989 albums.

All was so distanced and robotically perfect.

The songwriting somehow was still there, but the performance and recording did not hit me.

Yesterday I was thinking, if it's the Paisley Park thing that made Prince to what he has become.

When he was still depending on Sunset Sound or any other studio, it feels to me that he had more passion and was unwated limited in many ways, restricted even.

Maybe that was a good thing - don't know.

There is quite a difference i believe as i come to think of it.

Since PP he could do whatever he wanted, right?

Don't know if that was good at all tbh.

-

To me, that piano album once more had some passion and warmth I missed so much in his post 80s work.

And now i'm going to spin prince again. Let's see if I'm wrong.

S U P P O R T --- U K R A I N E --- N O W --- 4 --- MORE PEACE !!!
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves. And wiser people so full of doubts" (Bertrand Russsell 1872-1972)
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Reply #14 posted 02/22/22 3:28pm

homesquid

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Love the album but it was not much more than more of the same of D & P albeit superior. Prince really did die in the sense he was no longer a trendsetter but a follower. Just like 99% of any artist's career. I'm glad he did it though. He had little choice. Rap really is shit and future generations will hold their noses but I think Prince incorporated rap way better than he gets credit for.

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