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Thread started 12/23/20 3:48am

PURPLEIZED3121

Is anyone still shocked at the level of esteem P is still held in?

Outside of the cesspit that this place can be [we all know it so just don't!] are you surprised that P is still spoken about since his passing in such high esteem. From my perspective here in the UK I hear & see references weekly across radio, TV , social media etc. I shouldn't be shocked but I actually am both shocked, delighted & have a true feeling of pride. Our guy is still so loved, so respected & his influence on younger musicians is perhaps his greatest legacy.

The org is an uber critical community in many parts BUT in the wider world - where it really counts - P is still worshipped.

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Reply #1 posted 12/23/20 6:48am

SantanaMaitrey
a

We're uber critical because we're uber fans. We listen every little bit of music that we can get our hands on and with Prince being so productive, there's bound to be disappointments. Most people who like Prince just enjoy the albums without worrying too much about him being a JW or how he treated Morris or Sheila or whoever. The music lives on, just like with James Brown and Marvin Gaye and so many others who weren't always nice men.
O tempora! O mores!
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Reply #2 posted 12/23/20 8:51am

masaba

No. The respect on his name is well deserved. I'm glad to see it. I promise you they'll be a resurgence of fandom in the future when future folk rediscover 1999 and find it's a perfect reflection of their world.
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Reply #3 posted 12/23/20 9:07am

Genesia

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rolleyes

We don’t mourn artists because we knew them. We mourn them because they helped us know ourselves.
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Reply #4 posted 12/23/20 10:50am

PURPLEIZED3121

SantanaMaitreya said:

We're uber critical because we're uber fans. We listen every little bit of music that we can get our hands on and with Prince being so productive, there's bound to be disappointments. Most people who like Prince just enjoy the albums without worrying too much about him being a JW or how he treated Morris or Sheila or whoever. The music lives on, just like with James Brown and Marvin Gaye and so many others who weren't always nice men.

uber fans opinions are rarely relevant & often highly pretentious. That said some of the fan alaysis on social media is exceptional.

I prefer the opinions of his peers acoss the industry who truly understand what it is to have a long, sustained career, appreciate the physical pain of gigging, the art of song writing / playing etc. I think most stars look at fan comments with a raised eyebrow!

Back to the point - I love the fact that P isn't forgotten - his cultural imapact was & remains huge.

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Reply #5 posted 12/24/20 8:42am

MotownSubdivis
ion

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No.

Since P was such an elusive figure when alive, he was rarely ever a subject of conversation. Since his death, it's been pretty much the opposite; plus when people pass away, the public tends to romanticize them out of tribute and perhaps guilt/regret for looking down upon/overlooking them while alive.

The fact that Prince has been getting more verbal and published recognition is testament to his impact and how aside from his handful of popular/controversial periods, how he's been largely off the topical grid.
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Reply #6 posted 12/24/20 9:32am

Margot

SantanaMaitreya said:

We're uber critical because we're uber fans. We listen every little bit of music that we can get our hands on and with Prince being so productive, there's bound to be disappointments. Most people who like Prince just enjoy the albums without worrying too much about him being a JW or how he treated Morris or Sheila or whoever. The music lives on, just like with James Brown and Marvin Gaye and so many others who weren't always nice men.

I would align with this assessment.

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Reply #7 posted 12/24/20 9:39am

TheBigBang

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PURPLEIZED3121 said:

SantanaMaitreya said:

We're uber critical because we're uber fans. We listen every little bit of music that we can get our hands on and with Prince being so productive, there's bound to be disappointments. Most people who like Prince just enjoy the albums without worrying too much about him being a JW or how he treated Morris or Sheila or whoever. The music lives on, just like with James Brown and Marvin Gaye and so many others who weren't always nice men.

uber fans opinions are rarely relevant & often highly pretentious. That said some of the fan alaysis on social media is exceptional.

I prefer the opinions of his peers acoss the industry who truly understand what it is to have a long, sustained career, appreciate the physical pain of gigging, the art of song writing / playing etc. I think most stars look at fan comments with a raised eyebrow!

Back to the point - I love the fact that P isn't forgotten - his cultural imapact was & remains huge.


#FACTS

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Reply #8 posted 12/24/20 9:54am

Margot

TheBigBang said:

PURPLEIZED3121 said:

uber fans opinions are rarely relevant & often highly pretentious. That said some of the fan alaysis on social media is exceptional.

I prefer the opinions of his peers acoss the industry who truly understand what it is to have a long, sustained career, appreciate the physical pain of gigging, the art of song writing / playing etc. I think most stars look at fan comments with a raised eyebrow!

Back to the point - I love the fact that P isn't forgotten - his cultural imapact was & remains huge.


#FACTS

Though the Org can be critical, the critique reminds me of what a deeply-involved parent has of a treasured child.

I can't imagine another site with a deeper knowledge of Prince and his work than the Org.

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Reply #9 posted 12/24/20 11:46am

EnDoRpHn

Why wouldn't he be?

People here were trash talking him the day before he died. Go look up the posts after the airplane incident in Moline, you'll have a hap-hap-happy Christmas indeed.

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Reply #10 posted 12/25/20 8:53pm

RODSERLING

Look at the grammy, Superbowl, etc. Official events that are STILL paying tribute to Prince YEARS AFTER his passing, and broadcast it on tv.
.
This is really uncommon.
.
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Reply #11 posted 12/25/20 9:01pm

MoodyBlumes

Margot said:

TheBigBang said:


#FACTS

Though the Org can be critical, the critique reminds me of what a deeply-involved parent has of a treasured child.

I can't imagine another site with a deeper knowledge of Prince and his work than the Org.

Except we weren't Prince's parents. How would the average 'child'(?) feel about their 'deeply invoved' parent posting about them on a site like this? My guess is that deeply (and publicly) critical parents don't have great relationships with their children.

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Reply #12 posted 12/25/20 9:13pm

khill95

A lot of the things he pioneered are now commonplace in the industry such as having complete control over ones career/output as well as changing looks and styles with each project, gender fluidity, and an embrace of the new. Real recognizes real and he’s the realest
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Reply #13 posted 12/25/20 9:26pm

MoodyBlumes

khill95 said:

A lot of the things he pioneered are now commonplace in the industry such as having complete control over ones career/output as well as changing looks and styles with each project, gender fluidity, and an embrace of the new. Real recognizes real and he’s the realest

Yes, online streaming also comes to mind. Webby is considered the Oscars of the Internet:

.

Prince to Receive Webby L...bby Awards

.

"New York, NY (May 31, 2006) – In recognition of his visionary use of the Internet to distribute music and connect with audiences, music legend Prince will be honored at The 10th Annual Webby Awards on June 12th in New York City, the International Academy of the Digital Arts and Sciences announced today.

The first major artist to release an entire album – 1997’s Crystal Ball – exclusively on the Web, Prince’s leadership online has transformed the entertainment industry and reshaped the relationship between artist and fan. Long before MySpace and iTunes, Prince used the Web in new ways to distribute music, premiere videos, and build his relationship with his fans. His groundbreaking web site, NPG Music Club (www.npgmusicclub.com) boasts more than seven full-length CDs of music that are unavailable anywhere else.

“Besides being a musical genius, Prince is a visionary who recognized early on that the web would completely change how we experience music,” said Tiffany Shlain, founder of The Webby Awards. “For more than a decade, he has tapped the power of the Web to forge a deeper connection with his fans and push the boundaries of technology and art.” "

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Reply #14 posted 12/25/20 11:21pm

Vannormal

avatar

Margot said:

SantanaMaitreya said:

We're uber critical because we're uber fans. We listen every little bit of music that we can get our hands on and with Prince being so productive, there's bound to be disappointments. Most people who like Prince just enjoy the albums without worrying too much about him being a JW or how he treated Morris or Sheila or whoever. The music lives on, just like with James Brown and Marvin Gaye and so many others who weren't always nice men.

I would align with this assessment.

-

True, that.

And, don't forget that he too became a musicians musician when he was still amongst us.

Now even more so. That helped a lot - the undeniable respect awarded.

This kind of recognition is the best advertising ever to be honest for any artist.

And he has lived well on that. And yes it somehow still does.

But unfortunately it was never resulted in convincing sales, no matter what people might think.

Which also is known to many.

And that is perfectly OK.

I believe he is better known as a niche artist, mainly driven by his numerous talents and skills, as well as his boldness.

Usually commemorated by the masses for those handful of hits they can name,

not to mention his exceptional appearance and unconventional public behavior.

-

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves.
And wiser people so full of doubts"
(Bertrand Russsell 1872-1972)
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Reply #15 posted 12/26/20 2:32am

MoodyBlumes

Vannormal said:

Margot said:

I would align with this assessment.

-

True, that.

And, don't forget that he too became a musicians musician when he was still amongst us.

Now even more so. That helped a lot - the undeniable respect awarded.

This kind of recognition is the best advertising ever to be honest for any artist.

And he has lived well on that. And yes it somehow still does.

But unfortunately it was never resulted in convincing sales, no matter what people might think.

Which also is known to many.

And that is perfectly OK.

I believe he is better known as a niche artist, mainly driven by his numerous talents and skills, as well as his boldness.

Usually commemorated by the masses for those handful of hits they can name,

not to mention his exceptional appearance and unconventional public behavior.

-

The greatest selling jazz album of all time is Miles Davis' Kind of Blue, today having sold about 4 million copies -- not sure most consider Miles and the whole jazz genre niche, never mind classical. Howard Bloom ran the most successful PR firm in the music industry, speaking here on Prince's 2nd album: What Made Prince Prince? - YouTube

.

So not sure your point... indeed, Prince wasn't The Spice Girls, and was never trying to be putting out albums like Dirty Mind. However, he did sell over 100 million albums.

[Edited 12/26/20 2:35am]

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Reply #16 posted 12/26/20 2:46am

BartVanHemelen

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khill95 said:

A lot of the things he pioneered are now commonplace in the industry such as having complete control over ones career/output

.

LOL. You think he pioneered that? Stones did this decades before him. Plenty of artists had complete control. And FYI: Prince didn't have complete control.

.

gender fluidity,

.

Again: LOL.

© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
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Reply #17 posted 12/26/20 3:54am

Vannormal

avatar

MoodyBlumes said:

Vannormal said:

-

True, that.

And, don't forget that he too became a musicians musician when he was still amongst us.

Now even more so. That helped a lot - the undeniable respect awarded.

This kind of recognition is the best advertising ever to be honest for any artist.

And he has lived well on that. And yes it somehow still does.

But unfortunately it was never resulted in convincing sales, no matter what people might think.

Which also is known to many.

And that is perfectly OK.

I believe he is better known as a niche artist, mainly driven by his numerous talents and skills, as well as his boldness.

Usually commemorated by the masses for those handful of hits they can name,

not to mention his exceptional appearance and unconventional public behavior.

-

The greatest selling jazz album of all time is Miles Davis' Kind of Blue, today having sold about 4 million copies -- not sure most consider Miles and the whole jazz genre niche, never mind classical. Howard Bloom ran the most successful PR firm in the music industry, speaking here on Prince's 2nd album: What Made Prince Prince? - YouTube

.

So not sure your point... indeed, Prince wasn't The Spice Girls, and was never trying to be putting out albums like Dirty Mind. However, he did sell over 100 million albums.

[Edited 12/26/20 2:35am]

-

Hm... wink

I'm not a jazz specialist, but a dear friend of mine is a huge one,

and he said once that miles Davis is one of those artists who's name is far more known than his music.

It's not my opinion, but there's something to say about that for many other artists out there.

And my point is somehow the same for Prince. Why ?

Most people only know the songs 'Purple Rain', 'Kiss', and '1999' tbh (and imho of course).

-

I know Howard Bloom was and is a huge Prince fan.

But, thank you for that Link/clip. Never seen it. And yes, he's right.

(And I did not know he worked seven years for Prince either).

-

Wikipedia says Prince sold over 150 million albums.

That's 50% more than you say.

Other sites have even different numbers.


Apparently numbers fluctuate on a wave of interest, bias and self-interest, and so more often not with the correct numbers.

Anyways...

Case is Rogers Nelson sold well... actaully mostly in the beginning of his carreer!

-

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves.
And wiser people so full of doubts"
(Bertrand Russsell 1872-1972)
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Reply #18 posted 12/26/20 3:58am

NouveauDance

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Not even remotely.

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Reply #19 posted 12/26/20 8:02am

Margot

While on the subject of Prince album sales...from what I have read, he did not seem to be interested in the promotional part of selling as he had often already moved on the 'next one.'

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Reply #20 posted 12/26/20 11:11am

v10letblues

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Nope, but i wish it was as out in the open then as it is now.

I see a lot of reaction videos with younger folks seeing clips of live Prince shows for the first time and being blown away.

I think it was partly on Prince's own control issues and his more adult image, but also on the fact that what people got to see and was promoted on maainstream outlets at the time was far more closely curated by a small group of industry insiders more focused on family-friendly pop acts. Whereas now that's basically all gone and we have places like YouTube where anyone can gush over whatever they like.

But good to see Prince still getting props all these years later. It's also good to see that time has been good to Prince and the choices he stuck to. Most 80's and 90's acts look super cheesy today.

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Reply #21 posted 12/26/20 11:59am

rebelenterpris
e

He was already looked upon as a Legend + genius before he transitioned to his next life... don't know why that would ever change. And yep, the reaction videos the current generation are posting now is exposing others to the music now more than ever. Its not going to happen on the regular radio...that era is just about over for everybody.

I'm sure this new decade will continue to bring even more awareness to his music + Funk/Rock music in general as well. "It Ain't Over"!
[Edited 12/26/20 20:06pm]
Exiles of the Nation
"Atlantic Ocean Black", the NEW 16th LP. Available everywhere now.
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Reply #22 posted 12/26/20 11:56pm

Vannormal

avatar

rebelenterprise said:

He was already looked upon as a Legend + genius before he transitioned to his next life... don't know why that would ever change. And yep, the reaction videos the current generation are posting now is exposing others to the music now more than ever. Its not going to happen on the regular radio...that era is just about over for everybody. I'm sure this new decade will continue to bring even more awareness to his music + Funk/Rock music in general as well. "It Ain't Over"! [Edited 12/26/20 20:06pm]

-

Unfortunately...

Look at it from a distance and in a greater time frame.

Prince will be forgotten at some point just like most bigger artist (not biggest) in contemporary music busyness.

There are plenty of writings about that.

Artists from the early recording eras for example that sold millions and millions are now basically completely forgotten.

The huge popular artists (at the time) also travelled the world and performed for hundreds of thousands of people everywhere.

Now their name and recordings still excitst somewhere, but only amongst niche collectors and interests.

Same happened with artists from the 40's to 70's (80's even) when vinyl became popular.

Check that, you'll be very surprised.

Just a few examples that come to mind...

...or name me 10 people under 25/30 who ever heard of these, or who can name actual albums or songs :

Ten Years After

Alan Parsons Project

Donna Summer

Diana Ross

The Kinks

Roy Orbisson

...and I could go on.

-

And you know, it's OK. History will move on, some things will be forgotten.

Prince was big, but not huge.

Also, don't forget that 'contemporary pop and rock music' we all know is very young (from the early 50's on).

Classical music for instance still goes on, although more as a elite interest.

Same might happen to pop and rock, but I very much doubt it.

Peace though. wink

-

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves.
And wiser people so full of doubts"
(Bertrand Russsell 1872-1972)
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Reply #23 posted 12/27/20 5:24am

v10letblues

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^

yes every generation has it's own zeitgeist. Popular culture is constantly moving and focuses mainly on the new.

If one is noteworthy enough, they may fall into obscurity. Everything else is eventually forgotten.

Memories last a lifetime, thats personality all i need, our kids will have their own.
And as for some noteworthy figures, technologies are allowing memories to outlast us. I'm pretty sure Donna Summer and The Kinks will be lucky enough to fit into their current state obscurity for at least another generation or two. Same with Prince.

[Edited 12/27/20 9:54am]

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Reply #24 posted 12/27/20 9:36am

Margot

My 27 y/o daughter's eyes glaze over when I mention Prince. (Likely too much enthusiasm on my part)

She does tell me, though, that some of her peer group is aware of Prince but I don't think many are familiar with more than PR, Kiss, WDC, 1999. He did not help with his anti-YT/Spotify stance;(Though I supported his decision)

A really good documentary could spark more interest.

[Edited 12/27/20 9:56am]

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Reply #25 posted 12/27/20 9:48am

rebelenterpris
e

As long as YouTube Reaction videos continue, people of this current generation and others will continue to react to his songs. Thankfully, there's so many of them that they'll barely ever run out of different ones to react to. When some folks see people that remind them of themselves diggin' something, it opens/frees their minds up to listening to it and possibly diggin' it as well. Makes it easier to get it or "relate" to it for the general public. YouTube is the real radio + "Music Television" now. It leads to people either downloading it or streaming it on Spotify, Apple or wherever.

I like Sirius XM, but they gotta step their game up. The Prince Channel should've never been limited edition. And they definitely should've played more of the deluxe version "unreleased" tracks. But, I'll give them credit for playing songs not from the so-called "classic" era alongside those. Didn't happen all of the time, but it did. Prince's channel should be brought back permanently...I listen to The Beatles station alot, and there's no shortage of things since they also play stuff from after they disbanded. It could be the same for Prince...with more & more "unreleased" tracks being released every year.
[Edited 12/27/20 12:09pm]
Exiles of the Nation
"Atlantic Ocean Black", the NEW 16th LP. Available everywhere now.
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Reply #26 posted 12/28/20 12:03am

FanAllMyLife

PURPLEIZED3121 said:

Outside of the cesspit that this place can be [we all know it so just don't!] are you surprised that P is still spoken about since his passing in such high esteem. From my perspective here in the UK I hear & see references weekly across radio, TV , social media etc. I shouldn't be shocked but I actually am both shocked, delighted & have a true feeling of pride. Our guy is still so loved, so respected & his influence on younger musicians is perhaps his greatest legacy.

The org is an uber critical community in many parts BUT in the wider world - where it really counts - P is still worshipped.

"There are many Kings, King Henry, King Kong...

But there is only one PRINCE!"

-Alisha Keys

Anyone who ever saw him perform a live concert knows that there is no one else in the world who can move you with so many emotions and joy and love.

He was and still is the greatest live performer ever.

He performed a lot. A lot of people saw him.

Thats why he is held in such high esteem

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Reply #27 posted 12/28/20 2:32am

Vannormal

avatar

FanAllMyLife said:

PURPLEIZED3121 said:

Outside of the cesspit that this place can be [we all know it so just don't!] are you surprised that P is still spoken about since his passing in such high esteem. From my perspective here in the UK I hear & see references weekly across radio, TV , social media etc. I shouldn't be shocked but I actually am both shocked, delighted & have a true feeling of pride. Our guy is still so loved, so respected & his influence on younger musicians is perhaps his greatest legacy.

The org is an uber critical community in many parts BUT in the wider world - where it really counts - P is still worshipped.

"There are many Kings, King Henry, King Kong...

But there is only one PRINCE!"

-Alisha Keys

Anyone who ever saw him perform a live concert knows that there is no one else in the world who can move you with so many emotions and joy and love.

He was and still is the greatest live performer ever.

He performed a lot. A lot of people saw him.

Thats why he is held in such high esteem

-

Like (most older) fans among us, and the musicians and artists who look up to Prince from some sort of recognition and appreciation.

And it will possibly end with that when we are gone.

-

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves.
And wiser people so full of doubts"
(Bertrand Russsell 1872-1972)
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Reply #28 posted 12/28/20 2:44am

SexyMuthaF

I'm not shocked he was a one of a kind talent with a work ethic unmatched and unlike others he kept his nose clean no criminal charges lawsuits nothing
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Reply #29 posted 12/28/20 3:12am

Vannormal

avatar

SexyMuthaF said:

I'm not shocked he was a one of a kind talent with a work ethic unmatched and unlike others he kept his nose clean no criminal charges lawsuits nothing

-

THAT is SO true !

(except for that one bad trip wink that gave us the wondrous The Black Album.)

But he was just a normal guy too.

Who got lost in religion, choices, trust and doubts, by all means very human.

And that's what I like/love about him the most.

-

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves.
And wiser people so full of doubts"
(Bertrand Russsell 1872-1972)
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