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Thread started 07/11/10 11:20am

Identity

Forbes.com: Prince is Right--The Internet Is Over

[img:$uid]http://imgur.com/77sem.jpg[/img:$uid]

July 2010

When Prince says "the Internet is completely over," he has a point.

The artist formerly known as a weird symbol said this in a British newspaper interview earlier this week.

The newspaper, The Mirror, is going to distribute several million copies of his latest record inside their paper this week, so he granted them a rare interview. Presumably they are paying him a great deal of money for his music.

There will be no Internet downloads, though his CD will probably be distributed via other newspapers in Europe – and, who knows, even in those record store things.

Denizens of the Web seemed to arise in millions to comment on Prince's stupidity. How could the Internet be dead? If you think that, they seem to say, then just send me an email about it – Oh, that's right, you can't, because you think the Internet is dead.

But the critics didn't look hard at what he said, which had solely to do with his own professional relationship to the medium.

"The Internet is completely over," said Prince. "I don't see why I should give my new music to iTunes or anyone else. They won't pay me an advance for it and then [the public] gets angry when they can't get [the music]."

New music. For free. With a sense of entitlement. Sorry, you music-pirating websites, but I see his point. Why should people feel like that is an inalienable right? (He also said a few things about harmful addiction to digital devices, but let's stick to his disdain for the free distribution model.)

We should cheer Prince. He said outright what others are just acting on. Wired Magazine, which not long ago had a cover story on how great it is that everything is free, just came out with an iPad app that costs $4.99.

Time Magazine this week gave up some of its free print content in favor of a pay-based system. It may not work, but Time seems to be gambling that it will make more than nothing.

Moreover, Prince (who has sold over 100 million records in a 30-year career) may know what a lot of people are still learning: In any market, it is important to either deliver abundant commodities cheaply and efficiently, or cater to high-value scarcity. He has done a good job of focusing on the latter.

In that sense, he has the Internet completely figured out. In the digital world, where music is free and we're inundated with easily-duplicated information, what is scarce? Human contact.

Things that vanish in time. Things that are handcrafted, or have to be sought out. Things that identify your personal connection to a passion.

That's why, though music is free, U2 can sell concert tickets for $300 or more (a Paris show currently has seats for $930). Concerts are human contact with the band, with other fans, and they disappear after a few hours.

Replaying recordings is not the same. That's why Trent Reznor, the lead singer of the band Nine Inch Nails, sells deluxe editions of the band's CDs for hundreds of dollars.

Prince made a lot of money a few years ago by playing expensive, up-close dinner concerts at the Rio in Las Vegas for months on end, and people paid between $120 and $312.10 (for dinner, priced for personal affiliation with Prince's 3121 album.)

This week he's at a huge venue in France, where some 22,000 tickets will sell for $106 apiece, and another 3,000 premium tickets go for $157 each.

That's more than tickets for either The Black Eyed Peas or Pearl Jam cost earlier in the week. From Prince's point of view, there's something to be said for making yourself scarce.

http://blogs.forbes.com/v...topstories

[Edited 7/12/10 9:51am]

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Reply #1 posted 07/11/10 12:14pm

purpledoveuk

As I've said before...perhaps we should remind Prince if his quote when he wants to top up his piggybank by touring again...let's see him sell tickets without the Internet.

What he actually meant was, he found another way to line his pocket. Shame is, back in 1995 he embraced the Internet and said he aimed to give sway free music without the need for record labels...never did though did he?!

It's bullshit that it's a stand against piracy...all he's really saying is "I've already been paid so it's no skin off my nose"... It has to be, as long as he is still releasing hardcopies they'll be distributed. Ironically digital downloads with keys will be the most anti- piracy.

The irony - search Internet forums and you'll get the opinion Prince is now a shadow of his talent...therefore the Internet says Prince is over smile
[Edited 7/11/10 12:21pm]
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Reply #2 posted 07/11/10 12:16pm

purpledoveuk

Oh and nobody got anything for free...The Mirror put it's price up on Saturday... No doubt to cover Princes fees.
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Reply #3 posted 07/11/10 12:21pm

TheVoid

purpledoveuk said:

As I've said before...perhaps we should remind Prince if his quote when he wants to top up his piggybank by touring again...let's see him sell tickets without the Internet. What he actually meant was, he found another way tonkine his pocket. Shame is, back in 1995 he embraced the Internet and said he aimed to give sway free music without the need for record labels...never did though did he?! The irony - search Internet forums and you'll get the opinion Prince is now a shadow of his talent...therefore the Internet says Prince is over smile

I take issue with this comment.

Prince absolutely gave his music away free with a $100 lifetime subscription to his website. Then he gave away even more free music for an extra $77 before shutting down NPMGC.com and deciding it was time to give away even MORE free music through lotus flower for just $77.

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Reply #4 posted 07/11/10 12:22pm

Timmy84

purpledoveuk said:

Oh and nobody got anything for free...The Mirror put it's price up on Saturday... No doubt to cover Princes fees.

How much does the Mirror sell over there? I'm sure it didn't rise because of Prince's album...

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Reply #5 posted 07/11/10 7:24pm

Alexandernvrmi
nd

avatar

Timmy84 said:

purpledoveuk said:

Oh and nobody got anything for free...The Mirror put it's price up on Saturday... No doubt to cover Princes fees.

How much does the Mirror sell over there? I'm sure it didn't rise because of Prince's album...

and why would you be sure of that

of course they sold more copies because of the Prince disc... why else would the put it in there? Because they like him and think hes cute?

LMAO

Dance... Let me see you dance
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Reply #6 posted 07/11/10 7:56pm

SoulSplash

avatar

"the internet is dead" (Prince, 2008)

"the internet is completely over" (Prince, 2010)

no more playing "make believe"?

for reals?

shucks

∞ ʀ⁅VERB⁆я ∞
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Reply #7 posted 07/11/10 8:10pm

jtfolden

avatar

Timmy84 said:

purpledoveuk said:

Oh and nobody got anything for free...The Mirror put it's price up on Saturday... No doubt to cover Princes fees.

How much does the Mirror sell over there? I'm sure it didn't rise because of Prince's album...

To be fair, it probably did pull in some extra buyers... but how many is the question? I'd be extremely surprised if more than a few thousand, if that.

I wasn't aware the price of that specific issue went up, though...

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Reply #8 posted 07/11/10 8:15pm

robinhood

avatar

since when was it mandatory for any music artist to use the internet to make money?

the internet was the medium through which music could be completely emancipated.

just like Prince said "Music should be free", in many cases it already is:

this obvious fact was clear from the beginning, the internet is a free zone

but no, not satisfied with the millions they already make, record companies thought they'd hijack the net to leech more money off the general public...

businesses and individuals galore threw themselves onto the net, desperately grasping for some more 3D cash

maybe the net doesnt like it when people use it to serve their own interests ?

maybe the net is about SHARING, not TAKING ?

maybe wealthy music artists have absolutely no right to complain when the net doesnt work in their favor ?

make your money offline and leave cyberspace free.

typos

[Edited 7/11/10 20:18pm]

this too shall pass
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Reply #9 posted 07/11/10 10:54pm

aarontj

Identity said:

[img:$uid]http://imgur.com/77sem.jpg[/img:$uid]

July 2010

When Prince says "the Internet is completely over," he has a point.

The artist formerly known as a weird symbol said this in a British newspaper interview earlier this week.

The newspaper, The Mirror, is going to distribute several million copies of his latest record inside their paper this week, so he granted them a rare interview. Presumably they are paying him a great deal of money for his music.

There will be no Internet downloads, though his CD will probably be distributed via other newspapers in Europe – and, who knows, even in those record store things.

Denizens of the Web seemed to arise in millions to comment on Prince's stupidity. How could the Internet be dead? If you think that, they seem to say, then just send me an email about it – Oh, that's right, you can't, because you think the Internet is dead.

But the critics didn't look hard at what he said, which had solely to do with his own professional relationship to the medium.

"The Internet is completely over," said Prince. "I don't see why I should give my new music to iTunes or anyone else. They won't pay me an advance for it and then [the public] gets angry when they can't get [the music]."

New music. For free. With a sense of entitlement. Sorry, you music-pirating websites, but I see his point. Why should people feel like that is an inalienable right? (He also said a few things about harmful addiction to digital devices, but let's stick to his disdain for the free distribution model.)

We should cheer Prince. He said outright what others are just acting on. Wired Magazine, which not long ago had a cover story on how great it is that everything is free, just came out with an iPad app that costs $4.99.

Time Magazine this week gave up some of its free print content in favor of a pay-based system. It may not work, but Time seems to be gambling that it will make more than nothing.

Moreover, Prince (who has sold over 100 million records in a 30-year career) may know what a lot of people are still learning: In any market, it is important to either deliver abundant commodities cheaply and efficiently, or cater to high-value scarcity. He has done a good job of focusing on the latter.

In that sense, he has the Internet completely figured out. In the digital world, where music is free and we're inundated with easily-duplicated information, what is scarce? Human contact.

Things that vanish in time. Things that are handcrafted, or have to be sought out. Things that identify your personal connection to a passion.

That's why, though music is free, U2 can sell concert tickets for $300 or more (a Paris show currently has seats for $930). Concerts are human contact with the band, with other fans, and they disappear after a few hours.

Replaying recordings is not the same. That's why Trent Reznor, the lead singer of the band Nine Inch Nails, sells deluxe editions of the band's CDs for hundreds of dollars.

Prince made a lot of money a few years ago by playing expensive, up-close dinner concerts at the Rio in Las Vegas for months on end, and people paid between $120 and $312.10 (for dinner, priced for personal affiliation with Prince's "3121" album.)

This week he's at a huge venue in France, where some 22,000 tickets will sell for $106 apiece, and another 3,000 premium tickets go for $157 each.

That's more than tickets for either The Black Eyed Peas or Pearl Jam cost earlier in the week. From Prince's point of view, there's something to be said for making yourself scarce.

http://blogs.forbes.com/v...topstories

[Edited 7/11/10 11:34am]

I knew that the first article was taken out of context. Everybody knows the internet as a tool is not over. THUMBS UP FOR FORBES!!!! wink

"I have so much love for Prince. But why don't they look at me that way"- MJ
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Reply #10 posted 07/11/10 11:16pm

purpledoveuk

jtfolden said:



Timmy84 said:




purpledoveuk said:


Oh and nobody got anything for free...The Mirror put it's price up on Saturday... No doubt to cover Princes fees.

How much does the Mirror sell over there? I'm sure it didn't rise because of Prince's album...




To be fair, it probably did pull in some extra buyers... but how many is the question? I'd be extremely surprised if more than a few thousand, if that.



I wasn't aware the price of that specific issue went up, though...




It's usually 45p but was 65p for that one day. It's not much but if Prince is getting that 25p per copy sold then it's a HUGE increase on what h claims he gets through record sales normally.

On the plus side at last he'll have more money to help out of his fiends that he sings about in Old Skool Company...wonder if he wil smile
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Reply #11 posted 07/12/10 6:25am

OperatingTheta
n

avatar

Identity said:

[img:$uid]http://imgur.com/77sem.jpg[/img:$uid]

July 2010

When Prince says "the Internet is completely over," he has a point.

The artist formerly known as a weird symbol said this in a British newspaper interview earlier this week.

The newspaper, The Mirror, is going to distribute several million copies of his latest record inside their paper this week, so he granted them a rare interview. Presumably they are paying him a great deal of money for his music.

There will be no Internet downloads, though his CD will probably be distributed via other newspapers in Europe – and, who knows, even in those record store things.

Denizens of the Web seemed to arise in millions to comment on Prince's stupidity. How could the Internet be dead? If you think that, they seem to say, then just send me an email about it – Oh, that's right, you can't, because you think the Internet is dead.

But the critics didn't look hard at what he said, which had solely to do with his own professional relationship to the medium.

"The Internet is completely over," said Prince. "I don't see why I should give my new music to iTunes or anyone else. They won't pay me an advance for it and then [the public] gets angry when they can't get [the music]."

New music. For free. With a sense of entitlement. Sorry, you music-pirating websites, but I see his point. Why should people feel like that is an inalienable right? (He also said a few things about harmful addiction to digital devices, but let's stick to his disdain for the free distribution model.)

We should cheer Prince. He said outright what others are just acting on. Wired Magazine, which not long ago had a cover story on how great it is that everything is free, just came out with an iPad app that costs $4.99.

Time Magazine this week gave up some of its free print content in favor of a pay-based system. It may not work, but Time seems to be gambling that it will make more than nothing.

Moreover, Prince (who has sold over 100 million records in a 30-year career) may know what a lot of people are still learning: In any market, it is important to either deliver abundant commodities cheaply and efficiently, or cater to high-value scarcity. He has done a good job of focusing on the latter.

In that sense, he has the Internet completely figured out. In the digital world, where music is free and we're inundated with easily-duplicated information, what is scarce? Human contact.

Things that vanish in time. Things that are handcrafted, or have to be sought out. Things that identify your personal connection to a passion.

That's why, though music is free, U2 can sell concert tickets for $300 or more (a Paris show currently has seats for $930). Concerts are human contact with the band, with other fans, and they disappear after a few hours.

Replaying recordings is not the same. That's why Trent Reznor, the lead singer of the band Nine Inch Nails, sells deluxe editions of the band's CDs for hundreds of dollars.

Prince made a lot of money a few years ago by playing expensive, up-close dinner concerts at the Rio in Las Vegas for months on end, and people paid between $120 and $312.10 (for dinner, priced for personal affiliation with Prince's "3121" album.)

This week he's at a huge venue in France, where some 22,000 tickets will sell for $106 apiece, and another 3,000 premium tickets go for $157 each.

That's more than tickets for either The Black Eyed Peas or Pearl Jam cost earlier in the week. From Prince's point of view, there's something to be said for making yourself scarce.

http://blogs.forbes.com/v...topstories

[Edited 7/11/10 11:34am]

Agreed. Prince was specifically talking about HIS professional relationship, not the medium as a whole.

Prince's comment has been misapplied and sensationalised. This doesn't apply to buying concert tickets, finding out Prince news or Prince promo, but the way Prince releases music.

Forbes knows its shit more than any tabloid.

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Reply #12 posted 07/12/10 6:55am

funksterr

Prince is correct. THe internet is over. Over him. biggrin He'd have a hard time selling any new sht on the interwebs.

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Reply #13 posted 07/12/10 7:04am

purpledoveuk

Although you have to say that on an input/output ratio it's served him VERY well...I think he just means that people don't trust him with he I Internet.

Certainly from my experience NPGMC year 1 wasn't perfect and then went downhill...never signed up for Lotus as I wasn't falling for it again...glad I didn't.
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Reply #14 posted 07/12/10 8:56am

Ankhesenamun

I agree.

Other than learning, it is dead.
The music industry could not control it and Independent artists received a chance to actually be able to put their music out without a binding contract.
They say if a system works for itself then who in actuality is the controller?
The music industry lost the ability to make an unsurrmountable amount of money from it.
It now feels like a super billboard...infomercial highway galore telling you what's wrong with yourself.

There are however, other avenues on the net that does actually educate you with truths...a cyber library, which is still beneficial.

The music industry got greedy...Independent artists got smart... And there it is.

Take care 
[Edited 7/12/10 8:58am]
[Edited 7/12/10 9:00am]
Silence is really golden and Gold is the rose in the heart for the Rose Of Sharon is where We never departed, YHVH/INRI...me.
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Reply #15 posted 07/12/10 9:46am

peterv

Forbes got it... when others didn't. That's why they make the BIG bucks.

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Reply #16 posted 07/12/10 9:50am

TheVoid

Ankhesenamun said:

I agree. Other than learning, it is dead. The music industry could not control it and Independent artists received a chance to actually be able to put their music out without a binding contract. They say if a system works for itself then who in actuality is the controller? The music industry lost the ability to make an unsurrmountable amount of money from it. It now feels like a super billboard...infomercial highway galore telling you what's wrong with yourself. There are however, other avenues on the net that does actually educate you with truths...a cyber library, which is still beneficial. The music industry got greedy...Independent artists got smart... And there it is. Take care  [Edited 7/12/10 8:58am] [Edited 7/12/10 9:00am]

You posted this: http://prince.org/msg/105...sg_7462762

I just can't take much stock in the above in light of that.

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Reply #17 posted 07/12/10 9:52am

purpledoveuk

Do you think there's anything to be said for the choice of paper that he rejected the Internet for...hardly wholesome publication and I'm sure everything he stands against - gossip, chauvinism, lies...
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Reply #18 posted 07/12/10 10:02am

laurarichardso
n

peterv said:

Forbes got it... when others didn't. That's why they make the BIG bucks.

Because it is Forbes and not some message board or blog with people commenting who are probably high school dropouts (we have a 40% level of drop outs in the U.S) who did not take time to read the entire interview. At no time did P say the internet was over for the entire free world. Read and think people.

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Reply #19 posted 07/12/10 10:30am

NDRU

avatar

SoulSplash said:

"the internet is dead" (Prince, 2008)

"the internet is completely over" (Prince, 2010)

no more playing "make believe"?

for reals?

shucks

"Prince is dead" -- prince, 1994

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Reply #20 posted 07/12/10 7:58pm

Timmy84

NDRU said:

SoulSplash said:

"the internet is dead" (Prince, 2008)

"the internet is completely over" (Prince, 2010)

no more playing "make believe"?

for reals?

shucks

"Prince is dead" -- prince, 1994

The music industry is dead - prince, 1993

"It's time for jazz to die" - Prince, 1982

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Reply #21 posted 07/12/10 8:08pm

robinhood

avatar

Timmy84 said:

NDRU said:

"Prince is dead" -- prince, 1994

The music industry is dead - prince, 1993

"It's time for jazz to die" - Prince, 1982

money is dead. it has no life of its own, no mind of its own, no soul.

it just gets dragged around and hoarded, distributed unevenly, and the love of it causes all kinds of cancers.

it turns hearts of flesh of blood into hearts of stone, cuz thats what it really is.

a stone cold object designed to make you totally forget what really matters.

money, is dead.

this too shall pass
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Reply #22 posted 07/12/10 8:50pm

alandail

Identity said:

This week he's at a huge venue in France, where some 22,000 tickets will sell for $106 apiece, and another 3,000 premium tickets go for $157 each.

[Edited 7/12/10 9:51am]

That's $2.8 million for one show.

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Reply #23 posted 07/13/10 5:34am

JayJai

avatar

After all these yrs of crptic talk, people still take Prince's words literally?? lol

I swear the words "HATER" is wayyy over-rated...smh
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Reply #24 posted 07/13/10 2:02pm

peterv

laurarichardson said:

peterv said:

Forbes got it... when others didn't. That's why they make the BIG bucks.

Because it is Forbes and not some message board or blog with people commenting who are probably high school dropouts (we have a 40% level of drop outs in the U.S) who did not take time to read the entire interview. At no time did P say the internet was over for the entire free world. Read and think people.

Right on, brotha!

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Reply #25 posted 07/13/10 2:03pm

NDRU

avatar

I wish texting was over instead!

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Reply #26 posted 07/13/10 2:06pm

Timmy84

JayJai said:

After all these yrs of crptic talk, people still take Prince's words literally?? lol

Well "Prince is a genius" so he's qualified I guess. Since he knows about music and all. biggrin

Yeah texting needs to die. I agree. nod

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Reply #27 posted 07/13/10 2:07pm

Timmy84

NDRU said:

I wish texting was over instead!

I never understood its popularity. I've noticed it in several songs now. Instead of "call me on the telephone" it's "text me when you can." WTF?! lol

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Reply #28 posted 07/13/10 2:28pm

NDRU

avatar

Timmy84 said:

NDRU said:

I wish texting was over instead!

I never understood its popularity. I've noticed it in several songs now. Instead of "call me on the telephone" it's "text me when you can." WTF?! lol

it takes 10 times as much effort as calling someone!

I don't mind receiving a text w/info, but if it's a question? shake I am not texting back an answer, sorry

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Reply #29 posted 07/13/10 2:29pm

Timmy84

NDRU said:

Timmy84 said:

I never understood its popularity. I've noticed it in several songs now. Instead of "call me on the telephone" it's "text me when you can." WTF?! lol

it takes 10 times as much effort as calling someone!

I don't mind receiving a text w/info, but if it's a question? shake I am not texting back an answer, sorry

Like "huh you expect me to know? Fuck outta here!" lol

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