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Reply #30 posted 12/27/21 3:56pm

MotownSubdivis
ion

telecode101 said:

There was a lot of really great R&B in the early 80s. I got into the Ray Parker Jr / Raydio back catalog not long ago. It is really great music.



Rumor has it from what I read, Ray Parker was one of the first people to be brought on to get Prince to make his first records at Warnrs but he left the project. He made really great records and music back then. The last I head of him, he was doing session work on blues records and a Boz Scaggs record.



Raydiowoman.jpg


[Edited 12/27/21 5:52am]

[Edited 12/27/21 5:53am]

The early 80s is my favorite era of R&B and to me, the best there was second only to the 70s. 1982 and '83 in particular are the highlight years though delving more into '81, it's a hotly contested comparison.

Ray wasn't the best singer but he was perfect as the smooth ladies man type of singer and very talented. I never really gave him a listen beyond his singles though, same goes for Raydio.
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Reply #31 posted 12/27/21 4:01pm

MotownSubdivis
ion

MickyDolenz said:



MotownSubdivision said:


Disco as we knew it, in it's original, most associated form wasn't doing big business on the pop charts anymore.

I think it is interesting that John Travolta was the face of the 3 main crazes during that time period:


disco (Saturday Night Fever), 50's nostalgia (Grease), & country crossover (Urban Cowboy).

I know that bothered a lot of folks back in the day; having a white person be the face of a genre created by black people. Same thing with the Bee Gees but they were the real deal.
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Reply #32 posted 12/30/21 10:08am

paisleypark4

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The next #1 hits single was by the Boss, Miss Ross with Upside Down"
I always loved the story of Upside Down as well:


The song was written by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers (of the band Chic).

In a 2011 interview, Nile Rodgers said "Diana Ross was the first big star we ever worked with and we took it very seriously." Rodgers and Edwards interviewed her for several days. "This was the first time in her life somebody cared about who she was; what she was — everyone previously had treated her the way we had treated Sister Sledge — they got her in and said 'Sing this'. We (took a more personal approach)."[3]

As would be widely reported later, their studio liaison with Ross was not a success. She disliked the results of their sessions and gave them specific remixing instructions; they made slight changes and suggested that if she still did not like them, she could get them remixed herself. Ross did so, reworking the whole album with Motown producer Russ Terrana to downplay the funk element and make her voice more prominent.

Rodgers and Edwards were initially furious, and considered having their production credit removed. They eventually decided to leave the track unedited, as the sound they used for Chic remained heavily influential on the album. The LP became a platinum-selling No. 1 that spent a year on the American chart. Ross left Motown soon afterwards for RCA



See the source image

Straight Jacket Funk Affair
Album plays and love for vinyl records.
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Reply #33 posted 12/30/21 10:51am

MotownSubdivis
ion

Forget what I said earlier...

^^^THAT was the last disco #1 pop hit. I forgot all about it SMH
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Reply #34 posted 12/30/21 1:30pm

purplethunder3
121

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Man, my age is showing... I know all of these songs. razz lol

"Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything." --Plato
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Reply #35 posted 12/30/21 1:31pm

purplethunder3
121

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paisleypark4 said:

The next #1 hits single was by the Boss, Miss Ross with Upside Down"
I always loved the story of Upside Down as well:


The song was written by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers (of the band Chic).

In a 2011 interview, Nile Rodgers said "Diana Ross was the first big star we ever worked with and we took it very seriously." Rodgers and Edwards interviewed her for several days. "This was the first time in her life somebody cared about who she was; what she was — everyone previously had treated her the way we had treated Sister Sledge — they got her in and said 'Sing this'. We (took a more personal approach)."[3]

As would be widely reported later, their studio liaison with Ross was not a success. She disliked the results of their sessions and gave them specific remixing instructions; they made slight changes and suggested that if she still did not like them, she could get them remixed herself. Ross did so, reworking the whole album with Motown producer Russ Terrana to downplay the funk element and make her voice more prominent.

Rodgers and Edwards were initially furious, and considered having their production credit removed. They eventually decided to leave the track unedited, as the sound they used for Chic remained heavily influential on the album. The LP became a platinum-selling No. 1 that spent a year on the American chart. Ross left Motown soon afterwards for RCA



R-452749-1400936427-2638.jpeg.jpg

Just picked up this album on vinyl last month... In fact, I just now threw it on the turntable. Sounds so good... music fro

[Edited 12/30/21 13:54pm]

"Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything." --Plato
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Reply #36 posted 01/02/22 7:32pm

paisleypark4

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I still have not heard the album all the way

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Reply #37 posted 01/05/22 12:40am

TonyVanDam

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In 1980, I was only age 6! Even with disco "dead", there was still pretty of r&b/soul, funk, AND earlier hip-hop/rap tracks on black FM radio stations. cool

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Reply #38 posted 01/05/22 6:50am

paisleypark4

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TonyVanDam said:

In 1980, I was only age 6! Even with disco "dead", there was still pretty of r&b/soul, funk, AND earlier hip-hop/rap tracks on black FM radio stations. cool

Oh they tried it but you know we dont pay no attention

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Reply #39 posted 01/05/22 9:07am

vainandy

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MotownSubdivision said:

paisleypark4 said:

Yup, that's why I chose this year to study. This was the first few months in after the Disco Sucks campaign and as we see, black radio didnt give 2 s***s if they thought it sucked. What also happened is that rock wanted their own chart too.

And they got it the following year; surprised it took so long. Disco didn't just die over night, some songs of the genre were still on the charts. I think "Funkytown" was the final hurrah before the post-disco era kicked in. Strange though that it 'only' peaked at #2 on the Soul chart but was a #1 smash on the Hot 100. [Edited 12/16/21 10:33am]

I definitely consider "Funkytown" as the last disco hit before the era ended. I never heard it until after I had converted over to R&B radio in early 1980 so I consider on one hand I consider it officially as "funk" but because it has that 1979 copyright on the record, on the other hand, I consider it as the last "disco" song to slip through the cracks before the backlash totally took over. lol

Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #40 posted 01/05/22 9:16am

vainandy

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MotownSubdivision said:

Forget what I said earlier... ^^^THAT was the last disco #1 pop hit. I forgot all about it SMH

Naah.... That one is too far into 1980 to slip through the cracks for me to consider it as officially "disco" plus it has that 1980 copyright on it. I remember, by the time that one was on the radio, the disco backlash was in full force and it was horrible. Even though it resembles disco because it was produced by Nile Rodgers, if even the word "disco" was whispered in the same sentence as "Upside Down", the white stations would have never played it. Black stations had no problems with disco but most white people in that era absolutely HATED disco and everything it stood for.

Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #41 posted 01/05/22 9:33am

vainandy

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TonyVanDam said:

In 1980, I was only age 6! Even with disco "dead", there was still pretty of r&b/soul, funk, AND earlier hip-hop/rap tracks on black FM radio stations. cool

Speaking of hip hop/rap, remember, the majority of the stuff that made it onto the radio in those days was at a disco tempo. Most of it was even faster than funk. Fast forward to the early 1990s, I was working in a convenience store up the street from the coliseum. There was a concert one night with 95 South, Dis N Dat, and the 69 Boyz. As for as rap goes, I loved all that stuff because it wasn't boring and you could actually jam to it. I remember there was a large group of black teenagers that came into the store that night and I asked them... "Are y'all going to the concert tonight?".... and they said.... "HELL naw! That wack disco shit!".... I was like.... "What the???".... That really tripped me out. First of all, I was thinking to myself... "What the hell do y'all's little young asses know about disco because you were just being born when it existed?... but then it tripped me out because when I had heard hatred of disco, it had always come from white people, I had never heard a single black person shit on it. And these little brats actually preferred the stripped down, slow boring mess known as "shit hop", over the fast paced good rap of the era. Well, that opened my eyes real quick to the realization that black people are capable of being just as boring as white people and it also shattered the old stereotype that "all black folks have rhythm". lol

Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #42 posted 01/05/22 5:12pm

TonyVanDam

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vainandy said:

TonyVanDam said:

In 1980, I was only age 6! Even with disco "dead", there was still pretty of r&b/soul, funk, AND earlier hip-hop/rap tracks on black FM radio stations. cool

Speaking of hip hop/rap, remember, the majority of the stuff that made it onto the radio in those days was at a disco tempo. Most of it was even faster than funk. Fast forward to the early 1990s, I was working in a convenience store up the street from the coliseum. There was a concert one night with 95 South, Dis N Dat, and the 69 Boyz. As for as rap goes, I loved all that stuff because it wasn't boring and you could actually jam to it. I remember there was a large group of black teenagers that came into the store that night and I asked them... "Are y'all going to the concert tonight?".... and they said.... "HELL naw! That wack disco shit!".... I was like.... "What the???".... That really tripped me out. First of all, I was thinking to myself... "What the hell do y'all's little young asses know about disco because you were just being born when it existed?... but then it tripped me out because when I had heard hatred of disco, it had always come from white people, I had never heard a single black person shit on it. And these little brats actually preferred the stripped down, slow boring mess known as "shit hop", over the fast paced good rap of the era. Well, that opened my eyes real quick to the realization that black people are capable of being just as boring as white people and it also shattered the old stereotype that "all black folks have rhythm". lol

.

Those kind of brats are always hating on music that make people dance with their feet AND shake their booties. Funk them! I'm too busy having fun listening to some classic 2 Live Crew records. cool

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Reply #43 posted 01/06/22 8:43am

paisleypark4

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George Benson Give Me the Night single.jpg

George Benson "Give Me The Night"is the next #1 Billboard Soul single

"Give Me the Night" is a song recorded by American jazz and R&B musician George Benson, which he released from his 1980 studio album of the same title. It was written and composed by Heatwave's keyboard player Rod Temperton and produced by Quincy Jones. Patti Austin provides the backing and scat vocals that are heard throughout, and one of Benson's fellow jazz guitarists, Lee Ritenour, also performs on the selection.

The song was a commercial success, and was Benson's first single to hit number one on the US Billboard Soul Singles chart. It also peaked at number four on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, making it his most successful pop entry. It also peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot Disco Singles chart and at number seven in the UK Singles Chart.

Straight Jacket Funk Affair
Album plays and love for vinyl records.
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Reply #44 posted 01/06/22 8:51am

paisleypark4

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vainandy said:

TonyVanDam said:

In 1980, I was only age 6! Even with disco "dead", there was still pretty of r&b/soul, funk, AND earlier hip-hop/rap tracks on black FM radio stations. cool

Speaking of hip hop/rap, remember, the majority of the stuff that made it onto the radio in those days was at a disco tempo. Most of it was even faster than funk. Fast forward to the early 1990s, I was working in a convenience store up the street from the coliseum. There was a concert one night with 95 South, Dis N Dat, and the 69 Boyz. As for as rap goes, I loved all that stuff because it wasn't boring and you could actually jam to it. I remember there was a large group of black teenagers that came into the store that night and I asked them... "Are y'all going to the concert tonight?".... and they said.... "HELL naw! That wack disco shit!".... I was like.... "What the???".... That really tripped me out. First of all, I was thinking to myself... "What the hell do y'all's little young asses know about disco because you were just being born when it existed?... but then it tripped me out because when I had heard hatred of disco, it had always come from white people, I had never heard a single black person shit on it. And these little brats actually preferred the stripped down, slow boring mess known as "shit hop", over the fast paced good rap of the era. Well, that opened my eyes real quick to the realization that black people are capable of being just as boring as white people and it also shattered the old stereotype that "all black folks have rhythm". lol

I never thought about that. I think it was because the mood of the music had changed. Once Eazy E started dissing Dr. Dre for being part of electro-hip hop group World Class Wrecking Crew, he totally distanced himself from making any more music like that. Smh. Gagsta Rap started taking over and you had to not dance, not have fun. In turn it crept into r&b as well when those artists started bringing in rappers to produce their songs with them. That was the vibe by 1994.


Straight Jacket Funk Affair
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Reply #45 posted 01/13/22 2:09pm

paisleypark4

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220px-FunkinforJamaica45.jpg

Funkin' for Jamaica (N.Y.)" is a 1980 single by jazz trumpeter Tom Browne. The single—a memoir of the Jamaica neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens where Browne was born and raised—is from his second solo album, Love Approach. Browne got the idea for the song while he was at his parents' home. The vocals for the single were performed by Toni Smith (Thomassina Carrollyne Smith), who also helped compose the song. The song hit number one on the US Billboard R&B chart for a month. "Funkin' for Jamaica" peaked at number nine on the dance chart[3] and made the Top 10 on the UK Singles Chart, but it never charted on the Billboard Hot 100. It later became one of the most interpolated melodies in R&B with the chorus' chord sequence used by artists such as Johnny Kemp. In 2009, George Benson released his album Songs and Stories, which contained "Nuthin But a Party" which contained sections of a melody bearing resemblance to "Funkin' for Jamaica", but the former was never released as a single.

R.db7c7209764ec5e58be7a182bd31b7d6?rik=ngJrL9qKRRalFA&riu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.breakwellrecords.com%2Fdata%2Fbreakwellrecords%2Fproduct%2F20151222_23e5b7.jpg&ehk=ePVoajYsydZZSUwTNNxRdh2Vy1HlbKfkEwySm%2F%2BDG%2B0%3D&risl=&pid=ImgRaw&r=0

Mariah Carey also covered this song on her album Glitter in 2000

[Edited 1/13/22 14:10pm]

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Reply #46 posted 01/14/22 1:40pm

SoulAlive

telecode101 said:

There was a lot of really great R&B in the early 80s. I got into the Ray Parker Jr / Raydio back catalog not long ago. It is really great music.

Rumor has it from what I read, Ray Parker was one of the first people to be brought on to get Prince to make his first records at Warnrs but he left the project. He made really great records and music back then. The last I head of him, he was doing session work on blues records and a Boz Scaggs record.

Raydiowoman.jpg

I love the Ray Parker Jr./Raydio albums.Jams like "For Those Who Like To Groove"."More Than One Way To Love A Woman","It's Time To Party Now","Until The Morning Comes","It's Your Night",etc....some great stuff! headbang

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Reply #47 posted 01/14/22 1:43pm

SoulAlive

interestingly,the B-side of MJ's "Rock With You" 45 was "Worki'n Day and Night",which also got a ton of radio airplay back then.It could have easily been a single in its own right.Come to think of it,almost every track on 'Off The Wall' could have been a single! That is truly a high-quality album filled with highlights.

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Reply #48 posted 01/14/22 1:52pm

SoulAlive

vainandy said:

I definitely consider "Funkytown" as the last disco hit before the era ended. I never heard it until after I had converted over to R&B radio in early 1980 so I consider on one hand I consider it officially as "funk" but because it has that 1979 copyright on the record, on the other hand, I consider it as the last "disco" song to slip through the cracks before the backlash totally took over. lol

it's interesting that,in the summer of 1980,a song like "Funkytown" reached Number One on the charts....at a time when disco was supposedly "dead" biggrin kinda proves my point that disco never really died.They just simply labeled it something else.

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Reply #49 posted 01/18/22 12:55pm

Se7en

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MickyDolenz said:

MotownSubdivision said:

Disco as we knew it, in it's original, most associated form wasn't doing big business on the pop charts anymore.

I think it is interesting that John Travolta was the face of the 3 main crazes during that time period:

disco (Saturday Night Fever), 50's nostalgia (Grease), & country crossover (Urban Cowboy).


Travolta reportedly turned down An Officer And A Gentleman and American Gigolo as well.

That's who was hot at the time! 10 years later he was acting with a talking baby.

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Reply #50 posted 01/18/22 1:38pm

paisleypark4

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September 12th 1980 Stevie Wonder's classic Master Blaster (Jammin') was released to the world. It spent 7 weeks at #1 in November to December that year.

Master Blaster Jammin.jpg

The song, built on a heavy reggae feel, is an ode to reggae legend Bob Marley; Wonder had been performing live with Marley (billing him as an opening act) on his US tour in the fall of that year. Lyrics mention "children of Jah", "Marley's Hot on the box" and the end of the civil war in Zimbabwe. The song has a similar feel to Marley's own song "Jamming," from his 1977 album Exodus.

Three versions include:

Album version

Dub

Radio Edit

See the source image

Straight Jacket Funk Affair
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Reply #51 posted 01/18/22 8:55pm

SoulAlive

Se7en said:



MickyDolenz said:




MotownSubdivision said:


Disco as we knew it, in it's original, most associated form wasn't doing big business on the pop charts anymore.

I think it is interesting that John Travolta was the face of the 3 main crazes during that time period:


disco (Saturday Night Fever), 50's nostalgia (Grease), & country crossover (Urban Cowboy).




Travolta reportedly turned down An Officer And A Gentleman and American Gigolo as well.

That's who was hot at the time! 10 years later he was acting with a talking baby.




I think ‘American Gigolo’ is a great movie and much better than ‘Urban Cowboy’ (which seemed forced and unconvincing to me).
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Reply #52 posted 01/18/22 8:57pm

SoulAlive

but I believe he turned down ‘American Gigolo’ because his mother advised him to.She thought it would be too sleazy for him.
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Reply #53 posted 01/18/22 8:58pm

SoulAlive

anyway…back on topic biggrin
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Reply #54 posted 01/18/22 8:59pm

SoulAlive

Huge fan of Stevie Wonder but I never really liked the song “Master Blaster”.
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Reply #55 posted 01/18/22 11:17pm

alphastreet

The Diana album is great, I have the version with niles production and the final production, but misplaced one of the discs and I could kick myself for it cause it’s not replaceable right no

George is also great, these were all 45s my parents had and I got into them, so love disco though I wasn’t born yet when it was trendy
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Reply #56 posted 01/19/22 6:45am

paisleypark4

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SoulAlive said:

Se7en said:


Travolta reportedly turned down An Officer And A Gentleman and American Gigolo as well.

That's who was hot at the time! 10 years later he was acting with a talking baby.

I think ‘American Gigolo’ is a great movie and much better than ‘Urban Cowboy’ (which seemed forced and unconvincing to me).

Recommended? I never seen it before.

Straight Jacket Funk Affair
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Reply #57 posted 01/19/22 6:50am

paisleypark4

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**Last #1 R&B Hit of 1980 is**





See the source image

"Celebration" is a 1980 song by American band Kool & the Gang. Released as the first single from their twelfth album, Celebrate!, it was the band's first and only single to reach No. 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100.

In 2021, the Library of Congress selected "Celebration" for preservation in the National Recording Registry for being "culturally historically or aesthetically significant".

Co-founder Ronald Bell, the group's saxophonist and musical arranger, explained the origins of the song;

"The initial idea came from the Quran. I was reading the passage, where God was creating Adam, and the angels were celebrating and singing praises. That inspired me to write the basic chords, the line, 'Everyone around the world, come on, celebration"

"Celebration" reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on February 7, 1981, and held that position for two weeks before Dolly Parton's "9 to 5" overtook it. It remains the band's only Billboard No. 1 hit.

By late 1980, the song had also reached No. 1 on both the Billboard Dance and R&B charts. The song was featured heavily on the radio throughout the year. It has since been frequently used in weddings and parties, and is a popular anthem for sporting events. In 1981, it was commonly played by radio stations in honor of the release of US hostages from captivity in Iran. It was also an international hit, reaching No. 7 in the United Kingdom on November 29, 1980, spending 13 weeks in the chart.

Straight Jacket Funk Affair
Album plays and love for vinyl records.
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Reply #58 posted 01/19/22 6:51am

paisleypark4

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Thank for all the comments and likes, info on this year in music. It has been education for me.

Straight Jacket Funk Affair
Album plays and love for vinyl records.
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Reply #59 posted 01/20/22 9:20pm

SoulAlive

paisleypark4 said:

SoulAlive said:

Se7en said: I think ‘American Gigolo’ is a great movie and much better than ‘Urban Cowboy’ (which seemed forced and unconvincing to me).

Recommended? I never seen it before.

I recommend it.Richard Gere took the role and it's a very good movie.

The theme song,"Call Me" by Blondie, also became a big hit single.

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