independent and unofficial
Prince fan community
Forum jump
Forums > Music: Non-Prince > Radiohead-blackest white band ever?
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Page 2 of 2 <12
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Reply #30 posted 10/09/20 5:23pm

paligap

avatar

CynicKill said:

RJOrion said:

CynicKill said: he didnt arrange or compose the music...the band's sound is what made them sound "black"...that was the TK Records house band/session artists that were in place before KC&TSB even formed. that band played on records by Betty Wright, George & Gwen McCrae, Peter Brown, Foxy, etc... all those session musicians playing on hits by those artists, ended up becoming The Sunshine Band...and except for 1 or 2 horn players, they were all black...in performances, KC (harry casey) would stand behind a keyboard and act like he was playing it... as far as "writing songs", 'shake your booty' and 'get down tonight' are elementary school level lyricism, made catchy, and fattened up by some serious Miami funk.. Harry Casey was a fraud as an artist, but he was apparently very intelligent, well connected and opportunistic.

Thanks for the info.

I should've known KC did WAY too much bopping behind that keyboard to be actually playing it.

Session careers, which thrived in the 70's, seems all but dead now.

.....

....

Look, I'm not a big fan, but Harry Casey and Richard Finch (the two white guys in the band) composed all of those songs, as well as hits for other artists, including George McCrae (they wrote "Rock Your Baby", and "I Get Lifted") Gwen McCrae (They wrote "Rocking Chair") and even the Crusaders (they wrote 'Chain Reaction").

...

and BTW, I agree with those that said AWB is the blackest white band ever.....along with maybe Tower of Power...

....

...

[Edited 10/9/20 17:27pm]

" I've got six things on my mind --you're no longer one of them." - Paddy McAloon, Prefab Sprout
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #31 posted 10/10/20 5:44am

JoeTyler

lol lol Millenial journalists are so idiotic.

Delta Blues: Led Zeppelin
Electric Blues:AC/DC
Soul/Funky: The Rolling Stones,plus the jazz/swing of Watts.
Reagge: The Police/Sting
Disco: Bee Gees, Jamiroquai
[Edited 10/10/20 5:49am]
tinkerbell
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #32 posted 10/10/20 7:19am

2freaky4church
1

avatar

Don't 4get Van Halen

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #33 posted 10/10/20 11:27am

CynicKill

I saw an online quote once that said The Police are just three jazz musicians pretending to be in a rock band.

Or something to that affect.

[Edited 10/10/20 11:28am]

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #34 posted 10/11/20 2:14am

kygermo

CynicKill said:

I saw an online quote once that said The Police are just three jazz musicians pretending to be in a rock band.

Or something to that affect.

[Edited 10/10/20 11:28am]

.

hmmm Overall, I'd say thats a pretty fair assessment, as long as it's not meant to be an insult that is.

Gary shoulda steered clear of that Blind Dog Bourbon

When I can (or when the mood strikes), I write stuff on a blog I've created. Mostly music-related. Site link here: rockhardinafunkyplace.wordpress.com
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #35 posted 10/11/20 9:31am

CynicKill

kygermo said:

CynicKill said:

I saw an online quote once that said The Police are just three jazz musicians pretending to be in a rock band.

Or something to that affect.

[Edited 10/10/20 11:28am]

.

hmmm Overall, I'd say thats a pretty fair assessment, as long as it's not meant to be an insult that is.

It was a compliment, though Stewart Copeland, being the contrarian that he is, probably wouldn't see it that way.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #36 posted 10/12/20 1:12pm

Groovy1

CynicKill said:

kygermo said:

.

hmmm Overall, I'd say thats a pretty fair assessment, as long as it's not meant to be an insult that is.

It was a compliment, though Stewart Copeland, being the contrarian that he is, probably wouldn't see it that way.



Where are you on the argument that Outlandos d'Amour is Punk, at least partially?

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #37 posted 10/13/20 9:21am

CynicKill

Groovy1 said:

CynicKill said:

It was a compliment, though Stewart Copeland, being the contrarian that he is, probably wouldn't see it that way.



Where are you on the argument that Outlandos d'Amour is Punk, at least partially?

They definitely put out punk records.

I think the comment was more directed at their chops then the content of some of their records.

And how those chops infiltrated their songs.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #38 posted 10/13/20 7:40pm

fen

avatar

The influence of black music is everywhere if you're looking for it. It seems odd that she singles out Kid A without any mention of what was undoubtedly the single biggest influence on Radiohead’s change of direction with that album, namely the UK electronica scene of the 90s and the stuff coming out of Warp records (Aphex Twin, Autechre, Squarepusher). Of course, those artists have a very clear Jazz/Dance/Hip-Hop influence, Windowlicker is as funky as hell. Most of the qualities that she describes were probably already present in much of their work (that radical, introspective, ambient quality). If she’d sat through LP5, she’d know that. wink She probably should have mentioned Tricky and the whole Trip-Hop thing too. These things always have a nice circularity and cross-pollination to them. James Brown meets Karlheinz Stockhausen with Miles’ “On The Corner” etc. The broken, experimental IDM beats of some of the best modern Hip Hop is another example – Zebra Katz etc.


https://www.youtube.com/w...XZA4KB2pds

[Edited 10/13/20 19:49pm]

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #39 posted 10/14/20 2:09am

jaawwnn

avatar

Well said Fen.

"I think people ought to know that we're anti-fascist, we're anti-violence, we're anti-racist and we're pro-creative. We're against ignorance."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #40 posted 10/15/20 4:07am

MattyJam

avatar

Radiohead is the epitome of white music, lol.

Nice try though.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #41 posted 10/15/20 4:43am

3rdeyedude

avatar

MattyJam said:

Radiohead is the epitome of white music, lol.

Nice try though.

It's sad that people make such statements about 'white' or 'black' music these days. Musicians are influenced by music in general and what they are exposed to or grew up listening to. Prince was exposed to both all types of music growing up so it is easy to hear his influences and it's why he has such mass appeal. I don't doubt that Radiohead is heavily influenced by all types of music, regardless of the color of the people that made it. But hey, if you still want to label and categorize music - go right ahead. That's not what Prince was really about though, in case you did not know.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #42 posted 10/19/20 8:41am

namepeace

Abdul said:

MotorBootyAffair said:

Average White Band

Bingo!


First band that came to mind but I think she was smart enough to write "of our time" instead of "ever." The title of the thread wasn't really accurate.

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #43 posted 10/19/20 12:14pm

CynicKill

I have to read the article, but I do notice that black artists on the more alternative side of the spectrum (think Frank Ocean) are big fan boys of the band so that's very interesting.

A big difference from when black people had a fondness for Coldplay, totally by-stepping U2, whom is a big influence on them.

I guess U2, though churchy and christiany, were too rock and or folksy.

But Coldplay being THE safest throws off the "blackness" curve a little.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #44 posted 10/21/20 7:48am

RJOrion

CynicKill said:

I have to read the article, but I do notice that black artists on the more alternative side of the spectrum (think Frank Ocean) are big fan boys of the band so that's very interesting.

A big difference from when black people had a fondness for Coldplay, totally by-stepping U2, whom is a big influence on them.

I guess U2, though churchy and christiany, were too rock and or folksy.

But Coldplay being THE safest throws off the "blackness" curve a little.

besides JayZ, what Black People "have a fondness for Coldplay"?...i personally think their music is trash bin material...none of my friends or family or acquaintances are fans either...who you talkin bout?

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #45 posted 10/22/20 6:43am

CynicKill

RJOrion said:

CynicKill said:

I have to read the article, but I do notice that black artists on the more alternative side of the spectrum (think Frank Ocean) are big fan boys of the band so that's very interesting.

A big difference from when black people had a fondness for Coldplay, totally by-stepping U2, whom is a big influence on them.

I guess U2, though churchy and christiany, were too rock and or folksy.

But Coldplay being THE safest throws off the "blackness" curve a little.

besides JayZ, what Black People "have a fondness for Coldplay"?...i personally think their music is trash bin material...none of my friends or family or acquaintances are fans either...who you talkin bout?

You might be onto something.

I might have mistaken the declarations of a few celebs as the whole of black people.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #46 posted 10/22/20 6:01pm

slyjackson

RJOrion said:

CynicKill said:

I have to read the article, but I do notice that black artists on the more alternative side of the spectrum (think Frank Ocean) are big fan boys of the band so that's very interesting.

A big difference from when black people had a fondness for Coldplay, totally by-stepping U2, whom is a big influence on them.

I guess U2, though churchy and christiany, were too rock and or folksy.

But Coldplay being THE safest throws off the "blackness" curve a little.

besides JayZ, what Black People "have a fondness for Coldplay"?...i personally think their music is trash bin material...none of my friends or family or acquaintances are fans either...who you talkin bout?

That doesn't mean anything, though.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #47 posted 10/22/20 7:10pm

alphastreet

RJOrion said:



CynicKill said:


I have to read the article, but I do notice that black artists on the more alternative side of the spectrum (think Frank Ocean) are big fan boys of the band so that's very interesting.


A big difference from when black people had a fondness for Coldplay, totally by-stepping U2, whom is a big influence on them.


I guess U2, though churchy and christiany, were too rock and or folksy.


But Coldplay being THE safest throws off the "blackness" curve a little.





besides JayZ, what Black People "have a fondness for Coldplay"?...i personally think their music is trash bin material...none of my friends or family or acquaintances are fans either...who you talkin bout?



Brandy likes Coldplay and referenced them in one song, and sampled clocks in another song on her afrodisiac album
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #48 posted 10/22/20 9:57pm

khill95

Radiohead is as white as trader joes mayonnaise, who are they talking about. The real answer is Paramore

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #49 posted 10/22/20 10:25pm

purplepolitici
an

avatar

^ "Don't go crying to yo mama" clapping dancing jig
For all time I am with you, you are with me.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #50 posted 10/22/20 10:36pm

khill95

purplepolitician said:

^ "Don't go crying to yo mama" clapping dancing jig

hailey williams is the truth. her solo album is da bomb

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #51 posted 10/23/20 11:18am

namepeace

khill95 said:

Radiohead is as white as trader joes mayonnaise, who are they talking about. The real answer is Paramore


I see your Paramore and raise you one Hiatus Kaiyote.

https://www.abc.net.au/triplej/news/musicnews/nai-palm-drake-kendrick-lamar-hiatus-kaiyote-beyonce-jay-z-paak/9949808

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #52 posted 10/23/20 1:54pm

onlyforaminute

I'd have to look closer.
There are abundant think pieces and academic theses on Radiohead’s fluent conversations with jazz: the band’s guitarist Jonny Greenwood has cited Miles Davis’s fusion classic Bitches Brew as an important blueprint for OK Computer, and Mingus has had a continuing impact on their work, for instance on Pyramid Song from 2001’s Amnesiac. Black jazz artists, meanwhile, repay Radiohead’s respects with their own. Pianist and producer Robert Glasper’s multiple, stirring Radiohead covers – of tracks such as Packt Like Sardines in a Crushed Tin Box and Reckoner – attest to the ways that their music travels in jazz musicians’ circles as topics of roving, improvisational exploration and abandon. Glasper’s crossfade reading of Everything in Its Right Place with Herbie Hancock’s Maiden Voyage connect Kid A’s escapist watery universe – awash in keyboard soundscapes that plunging you down and pull you to the surface of things – with Hancock’s rolling aquatic journey.

But there are signs of Radiohead’s appeal to Black artists all around pop. Take the typically sly and unpredictable version of Creep that Prince dropped on a delighted Coachella audience in 2008, scrambling the pronouns of that self-loathing anthem (“What are we doing here? We don’t belong here!”). In Gnarls Barkley’s version of Reckoner (also circa ’08, at the dawn of the Obama era) Cee-Lo Green’s robust falsetto earnestly takes over Yorke’s dark songbird incantations about human division; Frank Ocean gave us an agonising and exquisite Fake Plastic Trees for one minute at a 2012 Spotify press conference. Risk-taking Black musicians keep turning to the band’s repertoire for its massive, formalist vistas, and for its expression of knotty feelings about the uncertainties of the world and one’s place in it.
If you carry the egg basket do not dance.

Do good, then throw it into the sea.

#octavia tried to tell us
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #53 posted 10/23/20 8:17pm

CynicKill

Two of my favorite songs on my ipod playlist by Christian Scott:

https://www.youtube.com/w...-9-E0SOfMI

https://www.youtube.com/w...Ijh2oUoU_M

Christian Scott | Discografia | Discogs

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #54 posted 10/24/20 7:36am

onlyforaminute

CynicKill said:

Two of my favorite songs on my ipod playlist by Christian Scott:


https://www.youtube.com/w...-9-E0SOfMI


https://www.youtube.com/w...Ijh2oUoU_M


Christian Scott | Discografia | Discogs


I really like these.
If you carry the egg basket do not dance.

Do good, then throw it into the sea.

#octavia tried to tell us
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Page 2 of 2 <12
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > Music: Non-Prince > Radiohead-blackest white band ever?