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Thread started 12/25/18 7:12pm

willie

billboard year end issue no rnb album listed

have u notice that in the hip/hop rnb album chart there is no rnb album its all hip/hop so i'm guessing is that rnb music is dead,or billboard has not a single album qualify's as a rnb album

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Reply #1 posted 12/25/18 10:17pm

MotownSubdivis
ion

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I believe things were better when it was called the "black" chart.

A lot of people say it was racist to go by that name but it honestly gauged our musical tastes better. It wasn't out of the ordinary to see songs and LPs of other genres besides R&B, soul and funk appearing on the black charts. The vast majority of them didn't chart high but the fact that they made a mark there was evidence enough of their appeal to a black audience.

By using the chart to specifically measure the popularity of hip hop and R&B, naturally only those genres will be present. And since hip hop has become the most dominant international genre in history and R&B has only waned in popularity (and/or arguably been underutilized) compared to last decade and decades prior, this is the result.

If anything, it's racist that they renamed the black chart "Hip Hop/R&B". It implies that's the only kind of music black people listen to when both the past and present have proven that to be ignorantly false.
[Edited 12/26/18 16:12pm]
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Reply #2 posted 12/26/18 1:19am

MotownSubdivis
ion

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Also, if you could, could you please post pictures or provide a link to this?
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Reply #3 posted 12/26/18 7:58am

StrangeButTrue

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Billboard is about as relevant as a rotary telephone in 2018.

.

PR57718V6.JPG

.

"Hello Billboard? I would like to report a duopoly circle jerk I noticed in your year-end issue."

[Edited 12/26/18 7:58am]

if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #4 posted 12/26/18 9:08am

2freaky4church
1

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We need an R&B comeback.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #5 posted 12/27/18 1:29pm

kitbradley

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Doesn't Billboard have a seperate album listing for R&B albums outside of the R&B/Hip-Hop listings? I believe it's for the veteran R&B acts. I remember reading a couple of weeks ago that Mariah's "Caution" held the number one spot on that listing and then was replaced by her "Merry Christmas" album. Would that listing have a year end chart also?

"It's not nice to fuck with K.B.! All you haters will see!" - Kitbradley
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Reply #6 posted 12/27/18 3:05pm

Goddess4Real

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2freaky4church1 said:

We need an R&B comeback.

yeahthat

Keep Calm & Listen To Prince
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Reply #7 posted 12/27/18 3:18pm

lastdecember

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Problem is RB died a long time ago, at least the RB i can remember. You know when RB bands existed. Its funny everytime i bring this up someone says what about Mint Condition? Seriously, Mint Condition is three decades old now and they are trouded out everytime someone says dont RB bands exist or play anymore. My problem with RB goes back to the 90's as it does WITH ALOT of music, some people call it a great decade I see it as the end of a lot great things. RB and even Dance Music, you had Freestylin Acts coming out of the 80's like LISA LISA and the Cover Girls all riding on hits and then corporate people saying "Hey lets slap a rapper on you and remix that shit" and as soon as it sold Like it did with Mariah Carey and others your RB genre was gone. Brian Mcknight couldnt make a move singing without labels saying how about hoooking up with so and so and lets get this to radio, and people bought it by the shit loads so honestly you reap what you sow.


"We went where our music was appreciated, and that was everywhere but the USA, we knew we had fans, but there is only so much of the world you can play at once" Magne F
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Reply #8 posted 12/28/18 11:37am

MickyDolenz

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kitbradley said:

Doesn't Billboard have a seperate album listing for R&B albums outside of the R&B/Hip-Hop listings?

Not really. Technically there is, but it's the same as the main R&B/Hip Hop chart, except the rap albums are left off and vice versa for the rap albums chart. For example, this week on the R&B only album chart Mariah Carey's Merry Christmas album is #1, but is #6 on the R&B/Hip Hop chart. The #1 is identical on the R&B/Hip Hop albums and rap only album charts, which is Dying To Live by Kodak Black. There is a separate Adult R&B airplay chart because it is a different radio format, and that is where the veterans like Charlie Wilson get hits. Adult R&B does play a few of the acts that are on the main R&B/Hip Hop chart such as Ella Mai.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #9 posted 12/29/18 9:45am

2freaky4church
1

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You all could be nicer to TTD

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #10 posted 12/29/18 6:17pm

MickyDolenz

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2freaky4church1 said:

You all could be nicer to TTD

Since I haven't heard a new song by him on the radio since Delicate in the early 1990s, I don't know how he's relevant to be on a Billboard R&B list of 2018.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #11 posted 01/02/19 11:13am

namepeace

MickyDolenz said:

kitbradley said:

Doesn't Billboard have a seperate album listing for R&B albums outside of the R&B/Hip-Hop listings?

Not really. Technically there is, but it's the same as the main R&B/Hip Hop chart, except the rap albums are left off and vice versa for the rap albums chart. For example, this week on the R&B only album chart Mariah Carey's Merry Christmas album is #1, but is #6 on the R&B/Hip Hop chart. The #1 is identical on the R&B/Hip Hop albums and rap only album charts, which is Dying To Live by Kodak Black. There is a separate Adult R&B airplay chart because it is a different radio format, and that is where the veterans like Charlie Wilson get hits. Adult R&B does play a few of the acts that are on the main R&B/Hip Hop chart such as Ella Mai.


Did R&B create its own monster when it began to co-opt rap music more than a generation ago? I genuinely ask that because it seems that the R&B industry turned to hip-hop to modernize its sound and maintain relevance, until the time came when people could no longer tell the difference, and then, hip-hop eclipsed R&B altogether from a commercial standpoint.

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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Reply #12 posted 01/02/19 1:25pm

MickyDolenz

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namepeace said:

Did R&B create its own monster when it began to co-opt rap music more than a generation ago? I genuinely ask that because it seems that the R&B industry turned to hip-hop to modernize its sound and maintain relevance, until the time came when people could no longer tell the difference, and then, hip-hop eclipsed R&B altogether from a commercial standpoint.

I think it was more a new generation of singers/groups taking over R&B with a younger audience that wanted a new sound/image of their own, more so than veteran acts accepting hip hop. Older acts made disco records in the 1970s, but that didn't last long, probably because disco was geared more towards an adult audience who went to dance at clubs that teens & younger children generally couldn't get into. There's a difference in disco movies like Saturday Night Fever/Thank God It's Friday and b-boy movies like Breakin'/Beat Street/Wild Style. Hip hop is an entire culture (rapping, DJs, grafitti, the dozens, fashion, popping/locking/breakdancing, & slang). Disco not so much.

Very early hip hop sometimes had a band playing on the records (Sugarhill Records house band, Orange Krush, Larry Smith, Thomas Dolby, etc). Most of it was based on R&B, funk, & disco songs. Groups like Force MDs, Sequence, & New Edition combined R&B singing and rapping. Force MDs & NE also did b-boy choreography rather than the old fashioned Temptations style moves. Some R&B acts rapped on a song (Stevie Wonder, Teena Marie, Johnny Guitar Watson, Millie Jackson, Cameo, Lakeside). Pop groups also had rapping or hip hop sounds (Rapture, Wham Rap, Rock Me Amedeus). Stevie also produced the rap song The Crown by Gary Byrd. Some early 80s rap & R&B had Kraftwerk elements in them to make electrofunk, which was used for breakdancing. This is around the time horn groups were going out of style and downsized or broke up. So both rap & R&B had similar sounds. There isn't that much of a difference in rap songs like Scorpio by Grandmaster Flash, Planet Rock by Soul Sonic Force, and R&B like Freak A Zoid by Midnight Star.

The Gap Band & Gladys Knight & The Pips had music videos with breakdancing. Jeffrey Daniel from Shalamar did popping & locking and they put out a song about it, Pop Along Kid. The moonwalk was a b-boy move. Then when New Jack Swing blew up, and that is when R&B and hip hop really combined. Singers started dressing in a street style like the rappers (Jodeci, Bell Biv DeVoe, TLC, SWV, Aaliyah, Jade, etc.) Notice early rappers such as Grandmaster Flash & The Furious 5 dressed more like a rock group like KISS. But Run DMC and their Addias track outfits was the beginning of the end of that. They dressed like the audience instead of in a flashy showbiz style like funk groups with outer space jumpsuits or matching suits/tuxes like vocal groups. Hip hop got to the point where it didn't have to crossover like R&B did. It was automaticly pop music and it didn't really have to change its sound to get pop airplay like a Lionel Richie or Kool & The Gang. In the late 1980s, a few did had more of a pop friendly or rock sound which helped to get Top 40 airplay (Tone Loc, Fat Boys, Jazzy Jeff & Fresh Prince, Young MC, Vanilla Ice, MC Hammer). Run DMC & Beastie Boys was helped by having rock guitar solos and rock music was still huge then.

Another thing is that unlike jazz, blues, & rock n roll, popular rappers mostly remained black. There wasn't really a Glenn Miller, Elvis Presley, Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, or Bee Gees to make it more acceptable to radio or white audiences to get the bigger sales & popularity. Rap songs couldn't really be covered by a Pat Boone to make a safe version that was ok for parents. In recent years there's been more popular white rappers, but in the beginning there was only a few like Beastie Boys, Vanilla Ice & maybe 3rd Base & House Of Pain. Others like Young Black Teenagers, Jesse Jaymes, & Lucas didn't really hit.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #13 posted 01/02/19 1:37pm

SoulAlive

namepeace said:


Did R&B create its own monster when it began to co-opt rap music more than a generation ago? I genuinely ask that because it seems that the R&B industry turned to hip-hop to modernize its sound and maintain relevance, until the time came when people could no longer tell the difference, and then, hip-hop eclipsed R&B altogether from a commercial standpoint.

Yes,I believe that this is what happened.I never liked the idea of R&B merging with hip-hop.

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Reply #14 posted 01/02/19 1:45pm

namepeace

MickyDolenz said:

namepeace said:

Did R&B create its own monster when it began to co-opt rap music more than a generation ago? I genuinely ask that because it seems that the R&B industry turned to hip-hop to modernize its sound and maintain relevance, until the time came when people could no longer tell the difference, and then, hip-hop eclipsed R&B altogether from a commercial standpoint.

I think it was more a new generation of singers/groups taking over R&B with a younger audience that wanted a new sound/image of their own, more so than veteran acts accepting hip hop. Older acts made disco records in the 1970s, but that didn't last long, probably because disco was geared more towards an adult audience who went to dance at clubs that teens & younger children generally couldn't get into. There's a difference in disco movies like Saturday Night Fever/Thank God It's Friday and b-boy movies like Breakin'/Beat Street/Wild Style. Hip hop is an entire culture (rapping, DJs, grafitti, the dozens, fashion, popping/locking/breakdancing, & slang). Disco not so much.

Very early hip hop sometimes had a band playing on the records (Sugarhill Records house band, Orange Krush, Larry Smith, Thomas Dolby, etc). Most of it was based on R&B, funk, & disco songs. Groups like Force MDs, Sequence, & New Edition combined R&B singing and rapping. Force MDs & NE also did b-boy choreography rather than the old fashioned Temptations style moves. Some R&B acts rapped on a song (Stevie Wonder, Teena Marie, Johnny Guitar Watson, Millie Jackson, Cameo, Lakeside). Pop groups also had rapping or hip hop sounds (Rapture, Wham Rap, Rock Me Amedeus). Stevie also produced the rap song The Crown by Gary Byrd. Some early 80s rap & R&B had Kraftwerk elements in them to make electrofunk, which was used for breakdancing. This is around the time horn groups were going out of style and downsized or broke up. So both rap & R&B had similar sounds. There isn't that much of a difference in rap songs like Scorpio by Grandmaster Flash, Planet Rock by Soul Sonic Force, and R&B like Freak A Zoid by Midnight Star.

The Gap Band & Gladys Knight & The Pips had music videos with breakdancing. Jeffrey Daniel from Shalamar did popping & locking and they put out a song about it, Pop Along Kid. The moonwalk was a b-boy move. Then when New Jack Swing blew up, and that is when R&B and hip hop really combined. Singers started dressing in a street style like the rappers (Jodeci, Bell Biv DeVoe, TLC, SWV, Aaliyah, Jade, etc.) Notice early rappers such as Grandmaster Flash & The Furious 5 dressed more like a rock group like KISS. But Run DMC and their Addias track outfits was the beginning of the end of that. They dressed like the audience instead of in a flashy showbiz style like funk groups with outer space jumpsuits or matching suits/tuxes like vocal groups. Hip hop got to the point where it didn't have to crossover like R&B did. It was automaticly pop music and it didn't really have to change its sound to get pop airplay like a Lionel Richie or Kool & The Gang. In the late 1980s, a few did had more of a pop friendly or rock sound which helped to get Top 40 airplay (Tone Loc, Fat Boys, Jazzy Jeff & Fresh Prince, Young MC, Vanilla Ice, MC Hammer). Run DMC & Beastie Boys was helped by having rock guitar solos and rock music was still huge then.

Another thing is that unlike jazz, blues, & rock n roll, popular rappers mostly remained black. There wasn't really a Glenn Miller, Elvis Presley, Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, or Bee Gees to make it more acceptable to radio or white audiences to get the bigger sales & popularity. Rap songs couldn't really be covered by a Pat Boone to make a safe version that was ok for parents. In recent years there's been more popular white rappers, but in the beginning there was only a few like Beastie Boys, Vanilla Ice & maybe 3rd Base & House Of Pain. Others like Young Black Teenagers, Jesse Jaymes, & Lucas didn't really hit.


All good stuff in terms of the demographics and fluidity between genres that contributed to the evolution of the R&B sound.

I've lived through those eras of different sounds dominating "r&b" charts and radio (disco, funk (including "electrofunk"), Minneapolis Sound, New Jack, and ultimately rap music). I don't think that a thirty-something today (a 30-year old has little if any memory of New Jack's heyday) has ever known an era when rap didn't dominate R&B.

So, do you think there was any point where that evolution became industry-driven, rather than by the factors you mentioned?

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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Reply #15 posted 01/02/19 3:19pm

MickyDolenz

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namepeace said:

All good stuff in terms of the demographics and fluidity between genres that contributed to the evolution of the R&B sound.

I've lived through those eras of different sounds dominating "r&b" charts and radio (disco, funk (including "electrofunk"), Minneapolis Sound, New Jack, and ultimately rap music). I don't think that a thirty-something today (a 30-year old has little if any memory of New Jack's heyday) has ever known an era when rap didn't dominate R&B.

So, do you think there was any point where that evolution became industry-driven, rather than by the factors you mentioned?

Probably the 1990s. Most of the hip hop in the 1980s was on indie labels and a lot of 80s rappers didn't even have albums. A lot of it was only released on 12" singles (especially the very early stuff because the songs were long). They generally didn't edit it for 45s. That might have helped the popularity of 12" maxi singles. It was the 1990s when TV shows on the major networks were built around rappers (Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air, In The House, Living Single), had Saturday morning cartoons (Kid n Play, MC Hammer), or had a hip hop vibe (New York Undercover, In Living Color, Martin). Notice that Bell Biv DeVoe's album sold way more than Ralph Tresvant's & Johnny Gill's who both had a more traditional R&B image than BBD. TLC sold more than En Vogue. Rappers became accepted as movie actors in a way that pop & rock singers like Madonna, Prince, & Mick Jagger couldn't. Hip hop fashion was sold in mainstream department stores (Cross Colours, FUBU). Soul Train was really the Rap Train in its later years and its hosts after Don C reflected that like Shemar Moore. Rock bands in the 1990s had rap elements in their music (Red Hot Chili Peppers, Limp Bizkit, even Tommy Lee from Mötley Crüe solo album) and many of Weird Al's later parodies are rap songs. His biggest hit is White & Nerdy. Today hip hop is is many genres like dance music, jazz, country, classical, Broadway showtunes, blues, zydeco, children's music, gospel, heavy metal, etc. It's really the mainstream audience that kept hip hop alive all this time. They didn't abandon it after a little white like earlier listeners did with big band jazz, doo wop, psychedelic rock, 1970s James Taylor/Cat Stevens style singer-songwriter, disco, new wave, Latin Freestyle, glam metal, New Jack Swing, & early 1990s house music. There has been different sounds for hip hop over the years though. I think that people today have more options for entertainment than people around pre-1980s. They can spend all day playing video games, texting, internet, rather than sitting around trying to play a guitar or something.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #16 posted 01/02/19 9:29pm

onlyforaminute

StrangeButTrue said:

Billboard is about as relevant as a rotary telephone in 2018.


.


PR57718V6.JPG


.


"Hello Billboard? I would like to report a duopoly circle jerk I noticed in your year-end issue."

[Edited 12/26/18 7:58am]




:lurk: that's not a rotary phone. But it still works.
Year of Return 2019
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Reply #17 posted 01/04/19 12:37pm

Cinny

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It needs a comeback and a PUSH from the industry. I quite enjoyed the talent on the 2018 Soul Train Awards. When you try to look it up, it only lists the nineties throwback performers (Jon B, Erykah, Donnell Jones, BBD, Faith).

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Reply #18 posted 01/04/19 1:43pm

StrangeButTrue

avatar

onlyforaminute said:

StrangeButTrue said:

Billboard is about as relevant as a rotary telephone in 2018.

.

PR57718V6.JPG

.

"Hello Billboard? I would like to report a duopoly circle jerk I noticed in your year-end issue."

[Edited 12/26/18 7:58am]

lurking that's not a rotary phone. But it still works.

.

LOL!

.

.

"Hello Billboard, I would like to hear sales figures for physical sales of retail albums for the year 2018? Streaming? No, I'm not calling about going fishing, I'm calling about records. Wait -What are records? Well, its likely I'm gonna have one after I beat yo' ass."

if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #19 posted 01/04/19 4:39pm

kitbradley

avatar

SoulAlive said:

namepeace said:


Did R&B create its own monster when it began to co-opt rap music more than a generation ago? I genuinely ask that because it seems that the R&B industry turned to hip-hop to modernize its sound and maintain relevance, until the time came when people could no longer tell the difference, and then, hip-hop eclipsed R&B altogether from a commercial standpoint.

Yes,I believe that this is what happened.I never liked the idea of R&B merging with hip-hop.

Well, I guess we can blame Chaka or more specifically, Arif Mardin for that since "I Feel For You" was the first R&B/Hip-Hop merger to have across-the-board success both in the states and internationally. lol Then I believe after that came Rene & Angela's "Save Your Love" with Kurtis Blow which was also a number one song but didn't have the same impact as "IFFY". Prior to that, I remember when most R&B stations refused to play anything even remotely resembling a rap record. Only a few of the extremely progressive ones dared. But, most of them started to slowly add hip-hop songs to their playlists around 1985. I remember hearing the Sugar Hill Gang's "Rapper's Delight" on the radio a lot but not much after that until the mid-80's.




[Edited 1/4/19 16:43pm]

"It's not nice to fuck with K.B.! All you haters will see!" - Kitbradley
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Reply #20 posted 01/07/19 5:43pm

SoulAlive

^^I love Chaka but I actually didn’t like her version of “I Feel For You” (even though it was s massive hit).
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Reply #21 posted 01/08/19 8:47am

SeventeenDayze

Interesting thread but I find it hard to believe that disco didn't "have a culture". Studio 54? Gay culture? Glam?
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Reply #22 posted 01/08/19 9:02am

StrangeButTrue

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SeventeenDayze said:

Interesting thread but I find it hard to believe that disco didn't "have a culture". Studio 54? Gay culture? Glam?

.

Its so interesting that modern "EDM" and disco are considered two completely separate types of music. EDM is the hip hop of disco. Barry White had a frickin' orchestra.

if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #23 posted 01/08/19 9:22am

namepeace

kitbradley said:

SoulAlive said:

Yes,I believe that this is what happened.I never liked the idea of R&B merging with hip-hop.

Well, I guess we can blame Chaka or more specifically, Arif Mardin for that since "I Feel For You" was the first R&B/Hip-Hop merger to have across-the-board success both in the states and internationally. lol Then I believe after that came Rene & Angela's "Save Your Love" with Kurtis Blow which was also a number one song but didn't have the same impact as "IFFY". Prior to that, I remember when most R&B stations refused to play anything even remotely resembling a rap record. Only a few of the extremely progressive ones dared. But, most of them started to slowly add hip-hop songs to their playlists around 1985. I remember hearing the Sugar Hill Gang's "Rapper's Delight" on the radio a lot but not much after that until the mid-80's.

[Edited 1/4/19 16:43pm]


I don't disagree. R&B has had a history of co-opting sounds that, until that point, were gaining steam outside the mainstream -- disco, then funk, then hip-hop. But unlike disco and funk before it, hip-hop demonstrated staying power as an R&B staple for goiing on 3 decades now, eventually swallowing R&B whole.

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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Reply #24 posted 01/08/19 4:05pm

SoulAlive

StrangeButTrue said:



SeventeenDayze said:


Interesting thread but I find it hard to believe that disco didn't "have a culture". Studio 54? Gay culture? Glam?

.


Its so interesting that modern "EDM" and disco are considered two completely separate types of music. EDM is the hip hop of disco. Barry White had a frickin' orchestra.



I always argue that disco never really died.It just evolved and is now referred to as “dance music”.80s Freestyle was a form of disco and so is EDM.
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Reply #25 posted 01/08/19 6:33pm

SeventeenDayze

SoulAlive said:

StrangeButTrue said:



SeventeenDayze said:


Interesting thread but I find it hard to believe that disco didn't "have a culture". Studio 54? Gay culture? Glam?

.


Its so interesting that modern "EDM" and disco are considered two completely separate types of music. EDM is the hip hop of disco. Barry White had a frickin' orchestra.



I always argue that disco never really died.It just evolved and is now referred to as “dance music”.80s Freestyle was a form of disco and so is EDM.

I agree. Now with autotune everything sounds alike. I'm thinking it's going to be a long time before music has a groundbreaking genre come through. The execs love autotune and cheap production.
Trolls be gone!
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Reply #26 posted 01/08/19 7:43pm

Hudson

avatar

Edit: wrong thread
[Edited 1/8/19 20:46pm]
I don't want to get eaten alive
'cause you're so dangerous
No more hearts I can trust, you see
I don't want to get eaten alive
To be eaten alive
Eaten alive
I don't ever want to be
Eaten alive
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Reply #27 posted 01/08/19 9:00pm

MickyDolenz

avatar

namepeace said:

I don't disagree. R&B has had a history of co-opting sounds that, until that point, were gaining steam outside the mainstream -- disco, then funk, then hip-hop.

There was pscyhedelic soul in the late 1960s to early 1970s, after psychedelic rock became a thing. Booker T & The MGs and the Commodores had country & western elements in some songs. Other R&B/soul singers remade country songs & vice versa. There was a lot of R&B remakes of Beatles songs, and in jazz too.

namepeace said:

But unlike disco and funk before it, hip-hop demonstrated staying power as an R&B staple for goiing on 3 decades now, eventually swallowing R&B whole.

Yeah, Quincy Jones released Back On The Block & Q's Jook Joint which featured MCs. Charlie Wilson made his comeback by 1st singing hooks on rap songs and pretty much all of his solo albums has at least 1 rap collab on them. There was hip hop sounds on Johnnie Taylor's later records and B.B. King did a song with Heavy D. Other veterans also sang on rap songs (The Temptations, Daryl Hall, Morris Day, The Dramatics, Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, etc.) or they had rappers on their songs. Hip hop producers like Pharrell, will.i.am, DJ Jazzy Jeff, & Timbaland produced songs for singers. Timbaland produced a Duran Duran album & will.i.am did one for Sergio Mendes. Staring in the 1990s a lot of songs had a rap break instead of a guitar or sax solo like in the 1980s. I've seen a video where Flea said he was a fan of J Dilla. DJ Screw remixed R&B songs with his chopped & screwed style. Brand New Heavies put out Heavy Rhyme Experience. Snoop has a cooking show with Martha Stewart. There was even a meme saying one of them has been in prison. lol The Roots are the house band on The Tonight Show and Epic Rap Battles Of History get many millions of views on Youtube. Until the recent Queen movie, Straight Outta Compton was the highest grossing music biopic.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #28 posted 01/09/19 8:09am

SeventeenDayze

MickyDolenz said:


namepeace said:


I don't disagree. R&B has had a history of co-opting sounds that, until that point, were gaining steam outside the mainstream -- disco, then funk, then hip-hop.



There was pscyhedelic soul in the late 1960s to early 1970s, after psychedelic rock became a thing. Booker T & The MGs and the Commodores had country & western elements in some songs. Other R&B/soul singers remade country songs & vice versa. There was a lot of R&B remakes of Beatles songs, and in jazz too.




namepeace said:


But unlike disco and funk before it, hip-hop demonstrated staying power as an R&B staple for goiing on 3 decades now, eventually swallowing R&B whole.



Yeah, Quincy Jones released Back On The Block & Q's Jook Joint which featured MCs. Charlie Wilson made his comeback by 1st singing hooks on rap songs and pretty much all of his solo albums has at least 1 rap collab on them. There was hip hop sounds on Johnnie Taylor's later records and B.B. King did a song with Heavy D. Other veterans also sang on rap songs (The Temptations, Daryl Hall, Morris Day, The Dramatics, Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, etc.) or they had rappers on their songs. Hip hop producers like Pharrell, will.i.am, DJ Jazzy Jeff, & Timbaland produced songs for singers. Timbaland produced a Duran Duran album & will.i.am did one for Sergio Mendes. Staring in the 1990s a lot of songs had a rap break instead of a guitar or sax solo like in the 1980s. I've seen a video where Flea said he was a fan of J Dilla. DJ Screw remixed R&B songs with his chopped & screwed style. Brand New Heavies put out Heavy Rhyme Experience. Snoop has a cooking show with Martha Stewart. There was even a meme saying one of them has been in prison. lol The Roots are the house band on The Tonight Show and Epic Rap Battles Of History get many millions of views on Youtube. Until the recent Queen movie, Straight Outta Compton was the highest grossing music biopic.


Interesting tidbit about Duran Duran considering how much their music was heavily sampled by black artists.
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Reply #29 posted 01/09/19 9:12am

MickyDolenz

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SeventeenDayze said:

Interesting tidbit about Duran Duran considering how much their music was heavily sampled by black artists.

Duran Duran is one of the first acts to have a sampler in their music with the remix for The Reflex. They also remade White Lines and Grandmaster Flash & The Furious 5 is on the song and the music video. They did 911 Is A Joke too which is on the same album. Phil Collins has said that he got the "Ha! Ha! Ha!" on Genesis song Mama from The Message. Phil has been sampled quite a bit too.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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