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Reply #150 posted 12/23/16 4:41am

novabrkr

SoulAlive said:

^^on this album,the standout jam is "Ride On" headbang


hmph! "Side Effects"

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Reply #151 posted 12/23/16 10:58am

HardcoreJollie
s

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HardcoreJollies said:

mrwiggles said:

I have never seen inside the pictorial book but have always been intrigued by it. The Needs book is in need of a serious edit job as it contains lots of incorrect info. Don't know of it is editing or just shoddy research but it's chock full of inconsistencies. That being said, when Needs does come correct he nails it with some hilarious insights on The Funks. Now Clinton's memoirs is brilliantly written, although he omits a lot. Hardcore Jollies, were you at any of the legendary LA Funk Fests? If so, could you give a brief run down from the wide world of wiggles? I heard Trick James stole the show from the Mob at the 79 funktion.

mrwiggles, there is what I hope is a very entertaining and enlightening chapter on my most memorable concert and in-person funk experiences in "Everything Is on the One: The First Guide of Funk." Following is a passage addressing your inquiry.

If You Ain’t Gonna Get It On, Take Your Dead Ass Home

There’s no more fitting place to begin a deep discussion about taking funk to the stage than the most famous band for coining that phrase, making that indisputable declaration with the superlative Let’s Take It to the Stage album and title track in 1975. Funkadelic, companion group

Parliament, ringmaster and leader George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worrell and the rest of the Funk Mob are at the head of the class not only as a live act but also as far as being among my most frequently attended concerts — and absolutely most unforgettable. How powerful were they? Consider that part of the reason Parliament-Funkadelic splintered into several offshoots was the need to fill their own opening act slots since most contemporaries, even powerhouses like Earth, Wind and Fire, were understandably intimidated to share a stage with the universe’s supreme sonic funk force.

While I was too young and not yet indoctrinated to see the P-Funk circus during its more cult-like late 1960s through early 1970s era, I did have a chance to see their legendary P-Funk Earth Tour at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in June of 1977 (yes, there was a time when funk sold out stadiums and arenas across the country). The operative word is “chance.” As a devout funkateer since being exposed to Parliament’s seminal Mothership Connection album in 1975, I not only immersed myself in the music and culture but also proselytized to everyone in my circle, exposing them to the hypnotizing grooves whenever possible and converting many new followers in the process. And that turned out to be part of my undoing leading up to the historic landing of the Mothership at the Coliseum.

Having hipped my immediate circle of fellow Caucasian teens to the funk, one of my friends was assigned to purchase our four tickets from the Ticketmaster window in the local Santa Monica Sears. We were then supposed to get our tickets from him and reimburse the money. However, one of my other so-called friends who was not among the original four beat me to pick up the ticket, casting me into the zone of zero funkativity. I was enraged at him (and also my other friend for letting him pay for what should have been my ticket). I confronted and chased him at school in an attempt to beat his ass, including scaling chain-link fences and climbing onto school building rooftops. This went on for at least an hour before I relented, warning him through a fence that from that day forward he had better watch his back.

Considering I heard the show was incredible and never had another chance to see the original Mothership, I still don’t forgive that weasel. There is a happy ending to this story, however. No, I never pounded that clown senselessly. But the next year I was present at what has to be one of the greatest concert experiences of all time; no question it was among the top five of the many hundreds taken in during my lifetime.

I had noticed George Clinton’s protégé act the Brides of Funkenstein was listed to perform its very first headlining show at the Starwood, a standing-room-only, 300-capacity club in West Hollywood, Calif., that was quite popular at that time. By then I was so deep into music and especially funk that I had cultivated a sort of “Spidey sense” about the artists of which I was a fan. And knowing that the Brides would have to have a band with them I had a hunch that perhaps others of the Funk Mob would be present. I shared my suspicion with a couple of other friends, convincing them to take the gamble and join me (it helped that tickets were only in the $10 range, although not insignificant at the time for high school kids).

After arriving at the venue the evening of Nov. 16, 1978, we found ourselves shoulder-to-shoulder in a packed house with a perceptible buzz in the air. A P-Funk camp representative eventually appeared on stage and told the crowd they were going to be bringing the funk to us in three parts, first opening comedian James Wesley Harding (who often toured with P-Funk), then the Brides and then Parliament-Funkadelic! The place went berserk, with no one shouting louder or throwing their P-Funk sign into the air with more authority than me. While my funky sixth sense had proven right about what was in store, I later found out Clinton had revealed his hand on local radio that day, ensuring the venue was spilling over and with hundreds of people turned away outside.

The show, which would kick off what came to be known as the Anti-Tour in which with little advance fanfare the Funk Mob would pop up at club-sized venues around the country, afforded Clinton and his cohorts a much-needed reprieve following the utter insanity and massive crowds of the Earth Tour. The Brides (Dawn Silva and Lynn Mabry) were a feast for entranced eyes and dancing feet, backed by a band of mostly newcomers to the P-Funk fold. They included DeWayne “Blackbyrd” McKnight (guitar), Jeff “Cherokee” Bunn (bass) and Dennis Chambers (drums). I remember being particularly impressed with Blackbyrd, who despite the relatively short set was given the space to contribute a blistering solo spotlight. All of them would go on to ingratiate themselves as important, longtime members of the P-Funk family.

Finally around midnight, the curtain rose again and, as memory serves, the band led by diaper-clad frontman Garry Shider launched into a throbbing “Cholly (Funk Get Ready to Roll”), with Clinton later strolling on stage amid a deafening and orgasmic collision of electrified sound and roaring hollers. The place rocked for three hours until the wee hours of the morning.

The heat generated on stage was matched by the venue’s steadily rising temperature (the fire marshal would have had a field day). The sweaty throng vibrated in unison until the last groovalistic gasp, following which everyone stumbled out onto Santa Monica Blvd. with wobbly legs, soaked clothing, buzzing ears and dazed smiles plastered on their blissful faces. Libations and substances notwithstanding, all were riding the altered state of having received the ultimate funktastic high. I would subsequently see at least a dozen more P-Funk shows, but none quite like that one.

You can read more about this book here: http://www.einpresswire.c...-bookshelf

And you can sample or buy it here: https://www.amazon.com/gp...4865a2eed3

51RUtZT2U6L.jpg


Peace and funky holidaze!

FYI, the book is on sale for $5 off through December 30 only. So get the funk while it's hot and fresh! Peace and happy holidaze!

If you've got funk, you've got style.
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Reply #152 posted 12/23/16 11:14am

Graycap23

avatar

HardcoreJollies said:

HardcoreJollies said:

mrwiggles, there is what I hope is a very entertaining and enlightening chapter on my most memorable concert and in-person funk experiences in "Everything Is on the One: The First Guide of Funk." Following is a passage addressing your inquiry.

If You Ain’t Gonna Get It On, Take Your Dead Ass Home

There’s no more fitting place to begin a deep discussion about taking funk to the stage than the most famous band for coining that phrase, making that indisputable declaration with the superlative Let’s Take It to the Stage album and title track in 1975. Funkadelic, companion group

Parliament, ringmaster and leader George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worrell and the rest of the Funk Mob are at the head of the class not only as a live act but also as far as being among my most frequently attended concerts — and absolutely most unforgettable. How powerful were they? Consider that part of the reason Parliament-Funkadelic splintered into several offshoots was the need to fill their own opening act slots since most contemporaries, even powerhouses like Earth, Wind and Fire, were understandably intimidated to share a stage with the universe’s supreme sonic funk force.

While I was too young and not yet indoctrinated to see the P-Funk circus during its more cult-like late 1960s through early 1970s era, I did have a chance to see their legendary P-Funk Earth Tour at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in June of 1977 (yes, there was a time when funk sold out stadiums and arenas across the country). The operative word is “chance.” As a devout funkateer since being exposed to Parliament’s seminal Mothership Connection album in 1975, I not only immersed myself in the music and culture but also proselytized to everyone in my circle, exposing them to the hypnotizing grooves whenever possible and converting many new followers in the process. And that turned out to be part of my undoing leading up to the historic landing of the Mothership at the Coliseum.

Having hipped my immediate circle of fellow Caucasian teens to the funk, one of my friends was assigned to purchase our four tickets from the Ticketmaster window in the local Santa Monica Sears. We were then supposed to get our tickets from him and reimburse the money. However, one of my other so-called friends who was not among the original four beat me to pick up the ticket, casting me into the zone of zero funkativity. I was enraged at him (and also my other friend for letting him pay for what should have been my ticket). I confronted and chased him at school in an attempt to beat his ass, including scaling chain-link fences and climbing onto school building rooftops. This went on for at least an hour before I relented, warning him through a fence that from that day forward he had better watch his back.

Considering I heard the show was incredible and never had another chance to see the original Mothership, I still don’t forgive that weasel. There is a happy ending to this story, however. No, I never pounded that clown senselessly. But the next year I was present at what has to be one of the greatest concert experiences of all time; no question it was among the top five of the many hundreds taken in during my lifetime.

I had noticed George Clinton’s protégé act the Brides of Funkenstein was listed to perform its very first headlining show at the Starwood, a standing-room-only, 300-capacity club in West Hollywood, Calif., that was quite popular at that time. By then I was so deep into music and especially funk that I had cultivated a sort of “Spidey sense” about the artists of which I was a fan. And knowing that the Brides would have to have a band with them I had a hunch that perhaps others of the Funk Mob would be present. I shared my suspicion with a couple of other friends, convincing them to take the gamble and join me (it helped that tickets were only in the $10 range, although not insignificant at the time for high school kids).

After arriving at the venue the evening of Nov. 16, 1978, we found ourselves shoulder-to-shoulder in a packed house with a perceptible buzz in the air. A P-Funk camp representative eventually appeared on stage and told the crowd they were going to be bringing the funk to us in three parts, first opening comedian James Wesley Harding (who often toured with P-Funk), then the Brides and then Parliament-Funkadelic! The place went berserk, with no one shouting louder or throwing their P-Funk sign into the air with more authority than me. While my funky sixth sense had proven right about what was in store, I later found out Clinton had revealed his hand on local radio that day, ensuring the venue was spilling over and with hundreds of people turned away outside.

The show, which would kick off what came to be known as the Anti-Tour in which with little advance fanfare the Funk Mob would pop up at club-sized venues around the country, afforded Clinton and his cohorts a much-needed reprieve following the utter insanity and massive crowds of the Earth Tour. The Brides (Dawn Silva and Lynn Mabry) were a feast for entranced eyes and dancing feet, backed by a band of mostly newcomers to the P-Funk fold. They included DeWayne “Blackbyrd” McKnight (guitar), Jeff “Cherokee” Bunn (bass) and Dennis Chambers (drums). I remember being particularly impressed with Blackbyrd, who despite the relatively short set was given the space to contribute a blistering solo spotlight. All of them would go on to ingratiate themselves as important, longtime members of the P-Funk family.

Finally around midnight, the curtain rose again and, as memory serves, the band led by diaper-clad frontman Garry Shider launched into a throbbing “Cholly (Funk Get Ready to Roll”), with Clinton later strolling on stage amid a deafening and orgasmic collision of electrified sound and roaring hollers. The place rocked for three hours until the wee hours of the morning.

The heat generated on stage was matched by the venue’s steadily rising temperature (the fire marshal would have had a field day). The sweaty throng vibrated in unison until the last groovalistic gasp, following which everyone stumbled out onto Santa Monica Blvd. with wobbly legs, soaked clothing, buzzing ears and dazed smiles plastered on their blissful faces. Libations and substances notwithstanding, all were riding the altered state of having received the ultimate funktastic high. I would subsequently see at least a dozen more P-Funk shows, but none quite like that one.

You can read more about this book here: http://www.einpresswire.c...-bookshelf

And you can sample or buy it here: https://www.amazon.com/gp...4865a2eed3

51RUtZT2U6L.jpg


Peace and funky holidaze!

FYI, the book is on sale for $5 off through December 30 only. So get the funk while it's hot and fresh! Peace and happy holidaze!

I need a hard copy.

FOOLS multiply when WISE Men & Women are silent.
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Reply #153 posted 12/23/16 11:44am

HuMpThAnG

avatar

novabrkr said:

SoulAlive said:

^^on this album,the standout jam is "Ride On" headbang


hmph! "Side Effects"

the whole side 1 of that album cool

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Reply #154 posted 12/23/16 11:46am

HardcoreJollie
s

avatar

Graycap23 said:

HardcoreJollies said:

FYI, the book is on sale for $5 off through December 30 only. So get the funk while it's hot and fresh! Peace and happy holidaze!

I need a hard copy.

In the process of getting that accomplished. Should be available in hard copy next month, and with a more P-funk oriented cover. However it will be a few bucks more, looking like $19.99 (362 pages). Print costs more to produce.

If you've got funk, you've got style.
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Reply #155 posted 12/23/16 12:07pm

Graycap23

avatar

HardcoreJollies said:

Graycap23 said:

I need a hard copy.

In the process of getting that accomplished. Should be available in hard copy next month, and with a more P-funk oriented cover. However it will be a few bucks more, looking like $19.99 (362 pages). Print costs more to produce.

I dig.

FOOLS multiply when WISE Men & Women are silent.
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Reply #156 posted 12/23/16 12:43pm

SoulAlive

HardcoreJollies said:

Graycap23 said:

I need a hard copy.

In the process of getting that accomplished. Should be available in hard copy next month, and with a more P-funk oriented cover. However it will be a few bucks more, looking like $19.99 (362 pages). Print costs more to produce.

nice! I want a hard copy,too.

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Reply #157 posted 12/23/16 11:12pm

SoulAlive

novabrkr said:



SoulAlive said:


^^on this album,the standout jam is "Ride On" headbang




hmph! "Side Effects"



that's another good one
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Reply #158 posted 12/24/16 7:41am

mrwiggles

SoulAlive said:

in 1975,Parliament released the album Chocolate City


Image result for chocolate city parliament





Nice record with them not really knowing how to crystallize a concept thru the entire album until later that year. Casper's crowning achievement on bass though. I recently tried to nail George down about the horns on this and Down Stroke during one of his numerous periscope broadcasts.
He said the sax man on the title cut was somehow related to Chaka and he brought the rest of the brass section outta LA. George says he can't remember any names.
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Reply #159 posted 12/24/16 8:16am

HuMpThAnG

avatar

mrwiggles said:

SoulAlive said:

in 1975,Parliament released the album Chocolate City

Image result for chocolate city parliament

Nice record with them not really knowing how to crystallize a concept thru the entire album until later that year. Casper's crowning achievement on bass though. I recently tried to nail George down about the horns on this and Down Stroke during one of his numerous periscope broadcasts. He said the sax man on the title cut was somehow related to Chaka and he brought the rest of the brass section outta LA. George says he can't remember any names.

that shouldn't be a surprise lol

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Reply #160 posted 12/24/16 10:30am

mrwiggles

HuMpThAnG said:



mrwiggles said:


SoulAlive said:

in 1975,Parliament released the album Chocolate City


Image result for chocolate city parliament





Nice record with them not really knowing how to crystallize a concept thru the entire album until later that year. Casper's crowning achievement on bass though. I recently tried to nail George down about the horns on this and Down Stroke during one of his numerous periscope broadcasts. He said the sax man on the title cut was somehow related to Chaka and he brought the rest of the brass section outta LA. George says he can't remember any names.

that shouldn't be a surprise lol



Yeah he is a trip. He has this elephant memory about certain things. Seems to remember more about the early years than the P-Funk era. Was really sharp up until here recently now he can't seem to be bothered with it. According to the Fred Wesley book it's almost like he looked at horns as a mere footnote anyways.
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Reply #161 posted 12/24/16 12:39pm

SoulAlive

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Reply #162 posted 12/28/16 6:37pm

214

I've just discovered Electric Spankin song, i love it but what the hell are they talkin about?

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Reply #163 posted 12/29/16 1:08am

SoulAlive

what's everyone's favorite George Clinton solo album?

Image result for george clinton computer games

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Reply #164 posted 12/29/16 6:08am

HuMpThAnG

avatar

SoulAlive said:

what's everyone's favorite George Clinton solo album?

Image result for george clinton computer games

this one for me biggrin

Image result for you shouldn't nuf bit fish

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Reply #165 posted 12/29/16 7:21am

HardcoreJollie
s

avatar

HuMpThAnG said:



SoulAlive said:


what's everyone's favorite George Clinton solo album?



Image result for george clinton computer games



this one for me biggrin



Image result for you shouldn't nuf bit fish



My pick too, that first side (yes had it on vinyl first) hit so hard. Quickie and Last Dance are two of my favorites. But if you consider tapoafom a Clinton album then that would be my pick.
If you've got funk, you've got style.
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Reply #166 posted 12/29/16 9:42am

SoEas42

Fun thread! My older cousin had all of the Parliament and some Funkadelic albums. I used to stare at the album artwork for hours especially the Motor Booty Affair album. My favorites:

Parliament -

Mothership Connection
The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein
Funkentelechy vs Placebo Syndrome
Motor Booty Affair
Parliament Live: P Funk Earth Tour

Funkadelic -

Funkadelic
Maggot Brain
Cosmic Slop
Standing on the Verge of Getting it On
Let's Take it to the Stage

Bootsy -

Stretchin Out in Bootsy's Rubber Band
Aah...the Name is Bootsy
Bootsy? Player of the Year
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Reply #167 posted 12/29/16 11:32am

HuMpThAnG

avatar

SoEas42 said:

Fun thread! My older cousin had all of the Parliament and some Funkadelic albums. I used to stare at the album artwork for hours especially the Motor Booty Affair album. My favorites: Parliament - Mothership Connection The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein Funkentelechy vs Placebo Syndrome Motor Booty Affair Parliament Live: P Funk Earth Tour Funkadelic - Funkadelic Maggot Brain Cosmic Slop Standing on the Verge of Getting it On Let's Take it to the Stage Bootsy - Stretchin Out in Bootsy's Rubber Band Aah...the Name is Bootsy Bootsy? Player of the Year

that was the fun part biggrin

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Reply #168 posted 12/29/16 4:45pm

SoulAlive

I really like the song "Bulletproof".It appears on one of George's solo albums,can't remember which one.
[Edited 12/29/16 16:45pm]
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Reply #169 posted 12/29/16 4:55pm

HuMpThAnG

avatar

SoulAlive said:

I really like the song "Bulletproof".It appears on one of George's solo albums,can't remember which one. [Edited 12/29/16 16:45pm]

biggrin

Some Of My Best Jokes Are Friends

[Edited 12/29/16 16:58pm]

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Reply #170 posted 12/29/16 6:31pm

SoulAlive

That's the one.I still need to get that album
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Reply #171 posted 01/01/17 5:54pm

mrwiggles

HardcoreJollies said:

HuMpThAnG said:



SoulAlive said:


what's everyone's favorite George Clinton solo album?



Image result for george clinton computer games



this one for me biggrin



Image result for you shouldn't nuf bit fish



My pick too, that first side (yes had it on vinyl first) hit so hard. Quickie and Last Dance are two of my favorites. But if you consider tapoafom a Clinton album then that would be my pick.


If I had to rank the capital solo LPs here is what it would be:
Computer Games
Bit Fish
Jokes
Skeletons

That being said my personal fave is Some Of My Best Jokes. It was just somn about how that record hit me at the time. Summer 85 we wore the grooves out on it. Bodyguard and Bullet Proof were both extremely fun tracks to listen to, dance to. First time I heard Bullet Proof it had come on the radio. I thought it was the baddest chyt I'd heard in years.
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Reply #172 posted 01/03/17 5:38am

HardcoreJollie
s

avatar

mrwiggles said:

HardcoreJollies said:



My pick too, that first side (yes had it on vinyl first) hit so hard. Quickie and Last Dance are two of my favorites. But if you consider tapoafom a Clinton album then that would be my pick.


If I had to rank the capital solo LPs here is what it would be:
Computer Games
Bit Fish
Jokes
Skeletons

That being said my personal fave is Some Of My Best Jokes. It was just somn about how that record hit me at the time. Summer 85 we wore the grooves out on it. Bodyguard and Bullet Proof were both extremely fun tracks to listen to, dance to. First time I heard Bullet Proof it had come on the radio. I thought it was the baddest chyt I'd heard in years.

Also like Thrashin on that one. Thomas Dolby influence on that album, whatever happened to that dude?
If you've got funk, you've got style.
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Reply #173 posted 01/07/17 9:59am

Graycap23

avatar

HardcoreJollies said:

mrwiggles said:
If I had to rank the capital solo LPs here is what it would be: Computer Games Bit Fish Jokes Skeletons That being said my personal fave is Some Of My Best Jokes. It was just somn about how that record hit me at the time. Summer 85 we wore the grooves out on it. Bodyguard and Bullet Proof were both extremely fun tracks to listen to, dance to. First time I heard Bullet Proof it had come on the radio. I thought it was the baddest chyt I'd heard in years.
Also like Thrashin on that one. Thomas Dolby influence on that album, whatever happened to that dude?

Thomas was the man for a hot minute.........and a half.

FOOLS multiply when WISE Men & Women are silent.
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Reply #174 posted 01/07/17 3:16pm

mrwiggles

HardcoreJollies said:

mrwiggles said:



If I had to rank the capital solo LPs here is what it would be:
Computer Games
Bit Fish
Jokes
Skeletons

That being said my personal fave is Some Of My Best Jokes. It was just somn about how that record hit me at the time. Summer 85 we wore the grooves out on it. Bodyguard and Bullet Proof were both extremely fun tracks to listen to, dance to. First time I heard Bullet Proof it had come on the radio. I thought it was the baddest chyt I'd heard in years.

Also like Thrashin on that one. Thomas Dolby influence on that album, whatever happened to that dude?


Man Skeet Curtis is laying down some in the pocket bass on that isn't he? George was grooving in the 80's. Record got good press but I think Capital was dropping the ball on George by then from a promotional standpoint. Didn't seem to know what to do with him. Interestingly Grace Jones was signing onto Capitol about that time and was saying the same kinds of things.
George claims in his book the head of the label's black music dept didn't even know who Miles Davis was, WTF.

You know about the other records he made with Dolby right? Thomas is still out there from time to time. I recall the first time I heard Blinded me with Science, I said this is some funk right here.
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Reply #175 posted 01/07/17 4:04pm

SoulAlive

mrwiggles said:

I recall the first time I heard Blinded me with Science, I said this is some funk right here.

I thought the same thing smile that song is extremely funky! One of my favorite jams of the 80s.

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Reply #176 posted 01/07/17 4:09pm

Graycap23

avatar

SoulAlive said:

mrwiggles said:

I recall the first time I heard Blinded me with Science, I said this is some funk right here.

I thought the same thing smile that song is extremely funky! One of my favorite jams of the 80s.

His 80's albums were also good.

FOOLS multiply when WISE Men & Women are silent.
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Reply #177 posted 01/07/17 5:35pm

Astasheiks

avatar

Funkentelechy... that is a Jam!

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Reply #178 posted 01/07/17 5:54pm

Graycap23

avatar

Astasheiks said:

Funkentelechy... that is a Jam!

Funk...Intelligence

Something that is missing from these new jacks.

FOOLS multiply when WISE Men & Women are silent.
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Reply #179 posted 01/07/17 6:22pm

HuMpThAnG

avatar

Graycap23 said:

Astasheiks said:

Funkentelechy... that is a Jam!

Funk...Intelligence

Something that is missing from these new jacks.

cool TAWK!!!!

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