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Thread started 05/13/19 2:40pm

jfenster

another book due 11/19

"I Wonder U. How Prince Went beyond Race and Back" By Adilifu Nama

publication date: November 15, 2019

About This Book:
In 1993, Prince infamously changed his name to a unique, unpronounceable symbol. Yet this was only one of a long string of self-reinventions orchestrated by Prince as he refused to be typecast by the music industry’s limiting definitions of masculinity and femininity, of straightness and queerness, of authenticity and artifice, or of black music and white music.

Revealing how he continually subverted cultural expectations, I Wonder U examines the entirety of Prince’s diverse career as a singer, multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, producer, record label mogul, movie star, and director. It shows how, by blending elements of R&B, rock, and new wave into an extremely videogenic package, Prince was able to overcome the color barrier that kept black artists off of MTV. Yet even at his greatest crossover success, he still worked hard to retain his credibility among black music fans. In this way, Adilifu Nama suggests, Prince was able to assert a distinctly black political sensibility while still being perceived as a unique musical genius whose appeal transcended racial boundaries.

Table of Contents
Introduction

Incognegro
On the Black Hand Side
Enfant Terrible
Cherry Bomb
Chaos and Crossroads
Don’t Call it a Comeback…
Dearly Beloved: An Epitaph

Acknowledgements
Notes
Index
source: https://www.rutgersuniversitypress.or

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Reply #1 posted 05/13/19 2:45pm

Genesia

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From the link: "Dr. Nama explores the life of Prince through the lens of racial politics."

Thanks but no thanks. I'll just listen to the music.

We don’t mourn artists because we knew them. We mourn them because they helped us know ourselves.
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Reply #2 posted 05/13/19 7:04pm

PennyPurple

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Who is Adilifu Nama, and did they even know Prince?

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Reply #3 posted 05/13/19 8:09pm

rdhull

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Incognegro

c'mon baby, where's ya guts?
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Reply #4 posted 05/14/19 6:58am

thedoorkeeper

rdhull said:

Incognegro


Yeah I like that too.
Could be the title of a Prince instrumental piece.
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Reply #5 posted 05/14/19 8:54am

TrivialPursuit

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This experience will cover courtship, sex, commitment, fetishes, loneliness, vindication, love, and hate.
http://bit.ly/1D3FG2U
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Reply #6 posted 05/14/19 9:57am

rdhull

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thedoorkeeper said:

rdhull said:

Incognegro

Yeah I like that too. Could be the title of a Prince instrumental piece.

Not saying I like that (sheesh, assume much?)..just mentioning that he is using that AA pop term as a chapter title. Ironically, I don't know. I can just see what the chapter is about now though: the typical "Prince wiped away all traces of race in his works in the early 80s to become more accessible and later went back to his roots when he found his popularity waned" etc etc bl blah blah

I can write these things/books in my sleep (and have)

When is someone going to come up with something original to write about?

c'mon baby, where's ya guts?
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Reply #7 posted 05/14/19 10:03am

Genesia

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rdhull said:

thedoorkeeper said:

rdhull said: Yeah I like that too. Could be the title of a Prince instrumental piece.

Not saying I like that (sheesh, assume much?)..just mentioning that he is using that AA pop term as a chapter title. Ironically, I don't know. I can just see what the chapter is about now though: the typical "Prince wiped away all traces of race in his works in the early 80s to become more accessible and later went back to his roots when he found his popularity waned" etc etc bl blah blah

I can write these things/books in my sleep (and have)

When is someone going to come up with something original to write about?


clapping

We don’t mourn artists because we knew them. We mourn them because they helped us know ourselves.
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Reply #8 posted 05/14/19 2:28pm

Wlcm2thdwn3

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Come on. 3 years after his death? seriously learned all i nneded to know about Prince while he was alive. smile

How long do u wanna be loved? Is forever enough, is forever enough?
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Reply #9 posted 05/14/19 9:43pm

ISaidLifeIsJus
tAGame

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I dont have time to read all the books I have now let alone another.

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Reply #10 posted 05/15/19 2:59am

BartVanHemelen

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PennyPurple said:

Who is Adilifu Nama, and did they even know Prince?

.

Teh Googlez, howz doez dey workz?

© Bart Van Hemelen
This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights.
It is not authorized by Prince or the NPG Music Club. You assume all risk for
your use. All rights reserved.
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Reply #11 posted 05/15/19 7:26am

PennyPurple

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BartVanHemelen said:

PennyPurple said:

Who is Adilifu Nama, and did they even know Prince?

.

Teh Googlez, howz doez dey workz?

Eww another snide comment from Bart.

Why does it bother you so, that people comment on a discussion forum and ask questions?

You must have a miserable life Bart.

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Reply #12 posted 05/15/19 1:46pm

BlackCandle

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rdhull said:

Incognegro



...I'm guessing we can distill that chapter into one Prince line:
"You never woulda drank my coffee, If I hadn't served you cream.."
"Had to get off the boat so I could walk on water..."
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Reply #13 posted 05/16/19 1:51am

jaawwnn

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It's a worthy topic, hard to get right though. There's an equal number of people who say his music should be seen first and foremost as black, and you can make a VERY strong case for that, as there are who argue that it's no race, "black, white, peurto rican, everybody just a freakin" or "purple" music.

I don't mean people who say his blackness is too often erased by white critics (a valid criticism, and i'm a white (european) guy so I need to watch what I say) are incorrect, but that the truth is that his music walked a very strange line on race that needs to be properly explored. For example he did appeal to the white audience, and some of that was approaching cynicism on his part; i.e. get some white folks in the band, add a bit more guitar to soften the mix for pop radio - but at the same time he took his art very seriously, he wasn't tossing out throwaway pop songs just for a hit (at least not under his name), what he released he believed in.

I feel that simply celebrating his Blackness, his African-American-ness, while worthy and needed to tip the balance, has also been done before. People need to go further.

A decent book about his race would have to explore all that imho. Maybe I should write it hrmph

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Reply #14 posted 05/16/19 2:10pm

stillwaiting

jaawwnn said:



I don't mean people who say his blackness is too often erased by white critics (a valid criticism, and i'm a white (european) guy so I need to watch what I say) are incorrect, but that the truth is that his music walked a very strange line on race that needs to be properly explored. For example he did appeal to the white audience, and some of that was approaching cynicism on his part; i.e. get some white folks in the band, add a bit more guitar to soften the mix for pop radio - but at the same time he took his art very seriously, he wasn't tossing out throwaway pop songs just for a hit (at least not under his name), what he released he believed in.



A point to be argued. When Graffiti Bridge bombed, Diamonds And Pearls has some genius, but also has some cringe worthy moments....and at the end...Hit N Run Phase One, he was tossing out the flavor of the day, with Auto Tune, and the trends of the day...The "Prize Patrol" Horn sound effect on Art Official Cage which has been used more than Police sirens in rap songs. Still, glad that Phase Two was much better. A much better swan song for P.

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Reply #15 posted 05/16/19 2:19pm

stillwaiting

stillwaiting said:

jaawwnn said:



I don't mean people who say his blackness is too often erased by white critics (a valid criticism, and i'm a white (european) guy so I need to watch what I say) are incorrect, but that the truth is that his music walked a very strange line on race that needs to be properly explored. For example he did appeal to the white audience, and some of that was approaching cynicism on his part; i.e. get some white folks in the band, add a bit more guitar to soften the mix for pop radio - but at the same time he took his art very seriously, he wasn't tossing out throwaway pop songs just for a hit (at least not under his name), what he released he believed in.



A point to be argued. When Graffiti Bridge bombed, Diamonds And Pearls has some genius, but also has some cringe worthy moments....and at the end...Hit N Run Phase One, he was tossing out the flavor of the day, with Auto Tune, and the trends of the day...The "Prize Patrol" Horn sound effect on Art Official Cage which has been used more than Police sirens in rap songs. Still, glad that Phase Two was much better. A much better swan song for P.

He was pandering to a younger audience that was not listening to him in the first place. Sad, but he would have come out with something great had he lived. I always knew he had one more great album in him...3121 and Disc 1 of Lotus Flow3r were great comebacks

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Reply #16 posted 05/17/19 8:32am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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moderator

jaawwnn said:

It's a worthy topic, hard to get right though. There's an equal number of people who say his music should be seen first and foremost as black, and you can make a VERY strong case for that, as there are who argue that it's no race, "black, white, peurto rican, everybody just a freakin" or "purple" music.

I don't mean people who say his blackness is too often erased by white critics (a valid criticism, and i'm a white (european) guy so I need to watch what I say) are incorrect, but that the truth is that his music walked a very strange line on race that needs to be properly explored. For example he did appeal to the white audience, and some of that was approaching cynicism on his part; i.e. get some white folks in the band, add a bit more guitar to soften the mix for pop radio - but at the same time he took his art very seriously, he wasn't tossing out throwaway pop songs just for a hit (at least not under his name), what he released he believed in.

I feel that simply celebrating his Blackness, his African-American-ness, while worthy and needed to tip the balance, has also been done before. People need to go further.

A decent book about his race would have to explore all that imho. Maybe I should write it hrmph

I'm reading a book now called the Last Utopians, and Prince resonated throught this book

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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