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Thread started 11/08/21 11:19am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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I'm the daughter of a funeral director.


Do you or someone you know work involving Funeral Homes and such?

The existance of death is hand in hand with life, but it's a concept that will alway be extremely troubling.

I'm the daughter of a fun... (msn.com)

Here's what being surrounded by death taught me about life.

insider@insider.com ( Jade Garnett) 22 hrs ago
Death is incredibly difficult to grasp, understand, and accept - but I've always been surrounded by it.

My father is the county coroner, a mortician, and a funeral director. His job wasn't like the other dads' jobs, but my family tried to bring light and humor to it.

At the dinner table each night, I'd ask my dad who died that day and feel relieved when it was no one I knew. And when other kids at school asked about my dad's "weird" job, I'd joke that at least he'd never go out of business.

What else can you do when something so dark is a prevalent part of your existence?

Death has no schedule, so my dad was always on call - it didn't matter if it was 3 a.m. or his daughter's 14th birthday.

As selfish as it seems, it never got easier to watch him leave in the middle of movies or skip my basketball games. I felt like his job usually got more attention than me.

As time passed and I matured, I started to gain more of an understanding and admiration for my father and his career.

My dad wasn't just headed to the office at all hours to file taxes. He was on call for moments when people's lives change forever. He was always the first one to help people in our community, no questions asked.

Although I didn't understand his frequent absence as a child, I now realize that he did everything to help others through the hardest time imaginable.

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#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
https://www.youtube.com/w...nm2Qq6QTFs
#IDEFINEME
“Strong people define themselves; weak people allow others to define them.” ― Ken Poirot
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Reply #1 posted 11/11/21 4:54pm

coldcoffeeandc
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What a man. Takes a special person and he was one. Sacrifice and care.
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Reply #2 posted 11/12/21 1:45pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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I wonder if she had any friends who got stung to death by bees?
i dIdn't reAd aNy of that gaRbaG
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Reply #3 posted 11/17/21 6:26am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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This is very interesting and I think something most of us have hear/experienced from someone who was dying

I had a (paternal) grand-aunt who passed away a few years ago at 105 who experienced the first two

Hospice Nurse Reveals Unexplained Phenomena That Happen Before Death Including 'The Rally'

Kate Fowler -

A hospice nurse has shared the unexplained phenomena that occur before we die, with one being dubbed "the rally."

Hospice nurse Julie McFadden, has been a nurse in a hospice for five years after working for over a decade as an ICU nurse, and now regularly shares little-known information about the last leg of life online, in a bid to raise awareness and ease fear surrounding the taboo of death. This time, she amassed millions of views after revealing the mystifying things that happen to us that simply can't be explained.

Hospice Nurse Reveals Une... (msn.com)

The first was a phenomenon, named "the rally" by hospice workers, which sees dying patients suddenly become their better, old selves just before dying. "This is when someone is really sick and almost towards actively dying, meaning dying within a few days, and then suddenly they look like they are 'better,'" she explained.


"This can manifest in a lot of ways, but a lot of times they suddenly eat, they'll suddenly talk, maybe even walk, they act like their old self, they have a little more personality, kind of laughing, talking, joking, but they usually they die within a few days after this," she added.

McFadden further explained that in her experience it happens to around a third of patients at her hospice, making it necessary for them to prepare family and loved ones for the bizarre change, "so it doesn't devastate them when they suddenly pass after doing so well for a few days."

According to Psychology Today, little research has been done into the "the rally," but it's sometimes known as "the last hurrah" or "the final goodbye." German researcher Michael Nahm named it "terminal lucidity" and has been attempting to discover more about it in recent years.

Nahm reported that around 84 percent of people who experience "the rally" die within a week, with 42 percent dying that very day.

The second phenomenon doesn't have a name like "the rally" does but is still extremely common according to McFadden. Often, dying patients will see their lost loved ones, including pets, who have passed away, in the lead-up to their own death.

"It usually happens a month or so before the patient dies, they start seeing dead relatives, dead friends, old pets that have passed on, spirits, angels, that are visiting them and only they can see them. Sometimes it's through a dream, sometimes they physically see them, and they'll actually ask us 'do you see what i'm seeing,'" said McFadden.

"They're usually not afraid, it's usually very comforting to them and they usually say they're sending a message like 'we're coming to get you soon' or 'don't worry, we'll help you.' Most people love this, they're very comforted by it, it's not scary to them."

McFadden's shared information on her TikTok account aims to provide comfort for the inevitable.

"Educating people on what it really looks like to die, what the phases you are most likely going to see, the 'abnormal' things that are normal in death and dying, and just broaching that topic, makes people feel better," she told cremation company Solace's blog.

McFadden said that because of reluctance to discuss death, and processes like "the rally," families were often ill-prepared for losing their loved one in real time.

"To watch the body take care of this person and allow them to naturally, peacefully pass, just seeing that time and time again, it was just 'wow.' It feels magical, that we even biologically and chemically have a body that can do that for us, to me is just like, 'wow.'"

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
https://www.youtube.com/w...nm2Qq6QTFs
#IDEFINEME
“Strong people define themselves; weak people allow others to define them.” ― Ken Poirot
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Reply #4 posted 11/17/21 3:21pm

lust

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Is that the B side to a popular hit by Dusty Springfield?
If the milk turns out to be sour, I aint the kinda pussy to drink it!
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Reply #5 posted 11/17/21 4:21pm

RichardS

lust said:

Is that the B side to a popular hit by Dusty Springfield?

Excellent work smile

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