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Thread started 11/05/21 11:07am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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When Arsenio Hall & Queer Nation clashed

wow, why don't I remember any of this??

Why Arsenio Hall Shut Down Gay Protestors - CH News

MYslzhySd-6abRArI7hy09elMTtg7A0ZRqHO94dt-Nn_OuTFJomTaNzWFHYfTFfSlmZG7TBbtAo=s48-c-k-c0x00ffffff-no-rj

https://youtu.be/fHUaZRq60wk

Why Arsenio Hall Shut Dow... - YouTube

Back in 1991, Arsenio Hall found himself in a similar face off with the LGBTQ as Dave Chappelle today. Hall would get an impromptu visit from leaders of the 'Queer Nation' during a taping of his hit show, 'The Arsenio Hall Show'. In this special CH News break, we find out why Hall took such a strong stance.

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
https://www.youtube.com/w...nm2Qq6QTFs
#IDEFINEME
“Strong people define themselves; weak people allow others to define them.” ― Ken Poirot
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Reply #1 posted 11/05/21 2:03pm

TrivialPursuit

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Arensio did what is the equivilant of a white person saying, "But I have Black friends!" He needed to listen instead of trying to talk over someone like a white woman.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
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Reply #2 posted 11/05/21 3:11pm

jjhunsecker

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TrivialPursuit said:

Arensio did what is the equivilant of a white person saying, "But I have Black friends!" He needed to listen instead of trying to talk over someone like a white woman.



And given the rumors that have circulated around Arsenio for decades, one has to wonder...
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #3 posted 11/06/21 2:13am

SantanaMaitrey
a

Queer Nation? Are people identyfing themselves with their sexuality so much that they think it's a nation? This is just another thing that sets people apart. And this might be as good a time to say this as any, but what kind of nonsense is it to write black with a capital B? A skin colour isn't a nation either.
If you take any of this seriously, you're a bigger fool than I am.
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Reply #4 posted 11/06/21 4:33am

IanRG

SantanaMaitreya said:

And this might be as good a time to say this as any, but what kind of nonsense is it to write black with a capital B? A skin colour isn't a nation either.

.

Not only nations are capitalised. Proper nouns and proper adjectives derived from proper nouns are also capitalised. For example the "Asian" in "Asian cuisine", "Anglican" in "Anglican priest" and "Southern" in "Southern hospitality" are adjectives to the nouns "cuisine", "priest" and "hospitality" respectively. You would never write "asian" here just because it is not the noun.

.

The interesting question is why is it common to write Black people when referring to Indigenous Australians or African Americans (so long as they are darker than the African American known as Charlize Theron), just as we would write Asian people and Asian Americans but we commonly write white people or white Americans?

I may not agree with what you say, but I will never seek to cancel you with an anti-free speech signature
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Reply #5 posted 11/06/21 6:25am

PJMcGee

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Queer Nation is an LGBTQ activist organization founded in March 1990 in New York City, by HIV/AIDS activists from ACT UP.[1] The four founders were outraged at the escalation of anti-gay violence on the streets and prejudice in the arts and media. The group is known for its confrontational tactics, its slogans, and the practice of outing.

Wiki
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Reply #6 posted 11/06/21 10:14am

SantanaMaitrey
a

IanRG said:



SantanaMaitreya said:


And this might be as good a time to say this as any, but what kind of nonsense is it to write black with a capital B? A skin colour isn't a nation either.

.


Not only nations are capitalised. Proper nouns and proper adjectives derived from proper nouns are also capitalised. For example the "Asian" in "Asian cuisine", "Anglican" in "Anglican priest" and "Southern" in "Southern hospitality" are adjectives to the nouns "cuisine", "priest" and "hospitality" respectively. You would never write "asian" here just because it is not the noun.


.


The interesting question is why is it common to write Black people when referring to Indigenous Australians or African Americans (so long as they are darker than the African American known as Charlize Theron), just as we would write Asian people and Asian Americans but we commonly write white people or white Americans?


Maybe it's a language thing. The Dutch word for Southern is zuidelijk en we don't use a capital Z, but then again, Midden Oosten is used with capitals. We also don't use capitals for religious groups. And the second part of your post, yes, that's exactly what I'm wondering about.
If you take any of this seriously, you're a bigger fool than I am.
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Reply #7 posted 11/06/21 12:36pm

onlyforaminute

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IanRG said:



SantanaMaitreya said:


And this might be as good a time to say this as any, but what kind of nonsense is it to write black with a capital B? A skin colour isn't a nation either.

.


Not only nations are capitalised. Proper nouns and proper adjectives derived from proper nouns are also capitalised. For example the "Asian" in "Asian cuisine", "Anglican" in "Anglican priest" and "Southern" in "Southern hospitality" are adjectives to the nouns "cuisine", "priest" and "hospitality" respectively. You would never write "asian" here just because it is not the noun.


.


The interesting question is why is it common to write Black people when referring to Indigenous Australians or African Americans (so long as they are darker than the African American known as Charlize Theron), just as we would write Asian people and Asian Americans but we commonly write white people or white Americans?


It's ADOS now to be even more distinctive as the world and times change. One can be Asian and be Pacific Islander to be more specific as black is general and worldwide vs AA which is very specific.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
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Reply #8 posted 11/06/21 1:56pm

IanRG

onlyforaminute said:

IanRG said:

.

Not only nations are capitalised. Proper nouns and proper adjectives derived from proper nouns are also capitalised. For example the "Asian" in "Asian cuisine", "Anglican" in "Anglican priest" and "Southern" in "Southern hospitality" are adjectives to the nouns "cuisine", "priest" and "hospitality" respectively. You would never write "asian" here just because it is not the noun.

.

The interesting question is why is it common to write Black people when referring to Indigenous Australians or African Americans (so long as they are darker than the African American known as Charlize Theron), just as we would write Asian people and Asian Americans but we commonly write white people or white Americans?

It's ADOS now to be even more distinctive as the world and times change. One can be Asian and be Pacific Islander to be more specific as black is general and worldwide vs AA which is very specific.

.

I had to look up ADOS, so it is not (yet) that common internationally.

.

I assume you don't mean the "Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule" which was by far the most common search result. Nor was it - "Attention Deficit ... Oh Shiny".

.

Surely ADOS also has twice the Charlize Theron problem because: 1 It excludes parts of the American Black Community and 2 there are many Americans who are descendents of slaves who are not Black Americans e.g. Asians from the Gold Rush and up to the present day, Indigenous Northern and Southern Americans etc.

.

Black people in Australia is (mostly) very specific - It is used to refer to Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders. It is not commonly used to refer to people directly from an African nation or via another country. It is not used for Polynesian, Melanesian or Micronesian Islanders (although the slave trade of Melanesians was called "blackbirding"). These Pacific Islanders would also not refer to themselves as Asians (although Indonesians and Philipinos do).

I may not agree with what you say, but I will never seek to cancel you with an anti-free speech signature
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Reply #9 posted 11/06/21 2:34pm

onlyforaminute

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IanRG said:



onlyforaminute said:


IanRG said:


.


Not only nations are capitalised. Proper nouns and proper adjectives derived from proper nouns are also capitalised. For example the "Asian" in "Asian cuisine", "Anglican" in "Anglican priest" and "Southern" in "Southern hospitality" are adjectives to the nouns "cuisine", "priest" and "hospitality" respectively. You would never write "asian" here just because it is not the noun.


.


The interesting question is why is it common to write Black people when referring to Indigenous Australians or African Americans (so long as they are darker than the African American known as Charlize Theron), just as we would write Asian people and Asian Americans but we commonly write white people or white Americans?



It's ADOS now to be even more distinctive as the world and times change. One can be Asian and be Pacific Islander to be more specific as black is general and worldwide vs AA which is very specific.

.


I had to look up ADOS, so it is not (yet) that common internationally.


.


I assume you don't mean the "Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule" which was by far the most common search result. Nor was it - "Attention Deficit ... Oh Shiny".


.


Surely ADOS also has twice the Charlize Theron problem because: 1 It excludes parts of the American Black Community and 2 there are many Americans who are descendents of slaves who are not Black Americans e.g. Asians from the Gold Rush and up to the present day, Indigenous Northern and Southern Americans etc.


.


Black people in Australia is (mostly) very specific - It is used to refer to Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders. It is not commonly used to refer to people directly from an African nation or via another country. It is not used for Polynesian, Melanesian or Micronesian Islanders (although the slave trade of Melanesians was called "blackbirding"). These Pacific Islanders would also not refer to themselves as Asians (although Indonesians and Philipinos do).



There are many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa where the people don't call themselves black yet that's how others define them. That's a whole other issue.
The "S" stand for Slavery as in the legal institution of. While there are many pockets of severe mistreatment or profitable misuse of groups of people there generally wasn't a sustained governmental legalized system attached. And to be perfectly blunt, none outside of American blacks will be increasing in number to be a self-identified cultural people. So we can spend an enormous amount of time being tightly technical but it serves no purpose.

As far as who claims Asian, not my place just going by what I observe.

A former congressional staffer in the 1970s, Jeanie Jew, first approached Representative Frank Horton with the idea of designating a month to recognize Asian Pacific Americans, following the bicentennial celebrations.[19] In June 1977 Representatives Horton, and Norman Y. Mineta, introduced a United States House of Representatives resolution to proclaim the first ten days of May as Asian-Pacific Heritage Week.[20][21] A similar bill was introduced in the Senate a month later by Daniel Inouye and Spark Matsunaga.[20][22]

The proposed resolutions sought that May be designated for two reasons. For on May 7, 1843, the first Japanese immigrant arrived in the United States.[23][24][25] More than two decades later, on May 10, 1869, the golden spike was driven into the First Transcontinental Railroad, which was completed using Chinese labor.[23][24][26]

President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution for the celebration on October 5, 1978.

Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month (as of 2009, officially changed from Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month)[1] is a period for the duration of the month of May for recognizing the contributions and influence of Asian Americans and Pacific Islander Americans to the history, culture, and achievements of the United States.[2]

.....
[Edited 11/6/21 15:40pm]
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


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Reply #10 posted 11/06/21 3:47pm

IanRG

onlyforaminute said:

IanRG said:

.

I had to look up ADOS, so it is not (yet) that common internationally.

.

I assume you don't mean the "Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule" which was by far the most common search result. Nor was it - "Attention Deficit ... Oh Shiny".

.

Surely ADOS also has twice the Charlize Theron problem because: 1 It excludes parts of the American Black Community and 2 there are many Americans who are descendents of slaves who are not Black Americans e.g. Asians from the Gold Rush and up to the present day, Indigenous Northern and Southern Americans etc.

.

Black people in Australia is (mostly) very specific - It is used to refer to Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders. It is not commonly used to refer to people directly from an African nation or via another country. It is not used for Polynesian, Melanesian or Micronesian Islanders (although the slave trade of Melanesians was called "blackbirding"). These Pacific Islanders would also not refer to themselves as Asians (although Indonesians and Philipinos do).

There are many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa where the people don't call themselves black yet that's how others define them. That's a whole other issue. The "S" stand for Slavery as in the legal institution of. While there are many pockets of severe mistreatment or profitable misuse of groups of people there generally wasn't a sustained governmental legalized system attached. And to be perfectly blunt, none outside of American blacks will be increasing in number to be a self-identified cultural people. So we can spend an enormous amount of time being tightly technical but it serves no purpose. As far as who claims Asian, not my place just going by what I observe. A former congressional staffer in the 1970s, Jeanie Jew, first approached Representative Frank Horton with the idea of designating a month to recognize Asian Pacific Americans, following the bicentennial celebrations.[19] In June 1977 Representatives Horton, and Norman Y. Mineta, introduced a United States House of Representatives resolution to proclaim the first ten days of May as Asian-Pacific Heritage Week.[20][21] A similar bill was introduced in the Senate a month later by Daniel Inouye and Spark Matsunaga.[20][22] The proposed resolutions sought that May be designated for two reasons. For on May 7, 1843, the first Japanese immigrant arrived in the United States.[23][24][25] More than two decades later, on May 10, 1869, the golden spike was driven into the First Transcontinental Railroad, which was completed using Chinese labor.[23][24][26] President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution for the celebration on October 5, 1978.[2 [Edited 11/6/21 15:27pm]

.

You are confusing mistreatment or economic exploitation with slavery - I am not. Government sanctioned or legalised slavery is very common in history. Whether people were legal or illegal slaves is not a valid distinction to any slave or descent of a slave held.

.

Note the term you are using is "Asian-Pacific" not "Asian". This is because people do not consider Pacific Islanders to be Asian. From the apasf.org site: "Joint Resolution of the Congress of the United States designating the month of May for the celebration of Asian and Pacific Islanders culture and heritage". It is a combination of two different groups of people.

I may not agree with what you say, but I will never seek to cancel you with an anti-free speech signature
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Reply #11 posted 11/06/21 4:30pm

onlyforaminute

avatar

IanRG said:



onlyforaminute said:


IanRG said:


.


I had to look up ADOS, so it is not (yet) that common internationally.


.


I assume you don't mean the "Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule" which was by far the most common search result. Nor was it - "Attention Deficit ... Oh Shiny".


.


Surely ADOS also has twice the Charlize Theron problem because: 1 It excludes parts of the American Black Community and 2 there are many Americans who are descendents of slaves who are not Black Americans e.g. Asians from the Gold Rush and up to the present day, Indigenous Northern and Southern Americans etc.


.


Black people in Australia is (mostly) very specific - It is used to refer to Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders. It is not commonly used to refer to people directly from an African nation or via another country. It is not used for Polynesian, Melanesian or Micronesian Islanders (although the slave trade of Melanesians was called "blackbirding"). These Pacific Islanders would also not refer to themselves as Asians (although Indonesians and Philipinos do).



There are many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa where the people don't call themselves black yet that's how others define them. That's a whole other issue. The "S" stand for Slavery as in the legal institution of. While there are many pockets of severe mistreatment or profitable misuse of groups of people there generally wasn't a sustained governmental legalized system attached. And to be perfectly blunt, none outside of American blacks will be increasing in number to be a self-identified cultural people. So we can spend an enormous amount of time being tightly technical but it serves no purpose. As far as who claims Asian, not my place just going by what I observe. A former congressional staffer in the 1970s, Jeanie Jew, first approached Representative Frank Horton with the idea of designating a month to recognize Asian Pacific Americans, following the bicentennial celebrations.[19] In June 1977 Representatives Horton, and Norman Y. Mineta, introduced a United States House of Representatives resolution to proclaim the first ten days of May as Asian-Pacific Heritage Week.[20][21] A similar bill was introduced in the Senate a month later by Daniel Inouye and Spark Matsunaga.[20][22] The proposed resolutions sought that May be designated for two reasons. For on May 7, 1843, the first Japanese immigrant arrived in the United States.[23][24][25] More than two decades later, on May 10, 1869, the golden spike was driven into the First Transcontinental Railroad, which was completed using Chinese labor.[23][24][26] President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution for the celebration on October 5, 1978.[2 [Edited 11/6/21 15:27pm]

.


You are confusing mistreatment or economic exploitation with slavery - I am not. Government sanctioned or legalised slavery is very common in history. Whether people were legal or illegal slaves is not a valid distinction to any slave or descent of a slave held.


.


Note the term you are using is "Asian-Pacific" not "Asian". This is because people do not consider Pacific Islanders to be Asian. From the apasf.org site: "Joint Resolution of the Congress of the United States designating the month of May for the celebration of Asian and Pacific Islanders culture and heritage". It is a combination of two different groups of people.


I was very purposeful with my words (One can be Asian and be Pacific Islander), did I lie? I feel you're trying to re-word what I actually said.

In 1968, the term "Asian American" was coined by Yuji Ichioka and Emma Gee and other student activists as a strategic, unifying political identity for Asian ethnic groups to use as they resisted U.S. imperialism in Southeast Asia, and white Americans' use of "Oriental" as a derogatory term for Asians in the United States.

By the 1980s, the U.S. Census Bureau grouped persons of Asian ancestry and created the category "Asian Pacific Islander," which continued in the 1990s census. In 2000, "Asian" and "Pacific Islander" became two separate racial categories.


Again to be blunt. There are always overlapping paradigms. The distinction comes in the size of the population and whether it can increases or decreases. Charlize Theron (love her) and those like her can increase in population just by simply immigrating here and having children. Those who are descendents of the gold rush slavery have never distinguished themselves nor is there any distinct population to identify and grow from so who cares if 100 people can trace themselves back to xyz, we're talking millions as a distinct identified heritage.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
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Reply #12 posted 11/06/21 4:32pm

onlyforaminute

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Indigenous Australians are not considered Pacific Islanders if that's why you keep inserting them. But Indigenous New Zealanders are.
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Reply #13 posted 11/06/21 4:52pm

IanRG

onlyforaminute said:

Indigenous Australians are not considered Pacific Islanders if that's why you keep inserting them. But Indigenous New Zealanders are.

.

I 100% agree because I never said Indigenous Australians are Pacific Islanders!

.

I said "Black people in Australia is (mostly) very specific - It is used to refer to Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders." and went on to say that this does not include Pacific Islanders

I may not agree with what you say, but I will never seek to cancel you with an anti-free speech signature
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Reply #14 posted 11/06/21 5:01pm

onlyforaminute

avatar

IanRG said:



onlyforaminute said:


Indigenous Australians are not considered Pacific Islanders if that's why you keep inserting them. But Indigenous New Zealanders are.

.


I 100% agree because I never said Indigenous Australians are Pacific Islanders!


.


I said "Black people in Australia is (mostly) very specific - It is used to refer to Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders." and went on to say that this does not include Pacific Islanders


That's their fight if they so choose to have one.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
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Reply #15 posted 11/06/21 5:13pm

IanRG

onlyforaminute said:

IanRG said:

.

You are confusing mistreatment or economic exploitation with slavery - I am not. Government sanctioned or legalised slavery is very common in history. Whether people were legal or illegal slaves is not a valid distinction to any slave or descent of a slave held.

.

Note the term you are using is "Asian-Pacific" not "Asian". This is because people do not consider Pacific Islanders to be Asian. From the apasf.org site: "Joint Resolution of the Congress of the United States designating the month of May for the celebration of Asian and Pacific Islanders culture and heritage". It is a combination of two different groups of people.

I was very purposeful with my words (One can be Asian and be Pacific Islander), did I lie? I feel you're trying to re-word what I actually said. In 1968, the term "Asian American" was coined by Yuji Ichioka and Emma Gee and other student activists as a strategic, unifying political identity for Asian ethnic groups to use as they resisted U.S. imperialism in Southeast Asia, and white Americans' use of "Oriental" as a derogatory term for Asians in the United States. By the 1980s, the U.S. Census Bureau grouped persons of Asian ancestry and created the category "Asian Pacific Islander," which continued in the 1990s census. In 2000, "Asian" and "Pacific Islander" became two separate racial categories. Again to be blunt. There are always overlapping paradigms. The distinction comes in the size of the population and whether it can increases or decreases. Charlize Theron (love her) and those like her can increase in population just by simply immigrating here and having children. Those who are descendents of the gold rush slavery have never distinguished themselves nor is there any distinct population to identify and grow from so who cares if 100 people can trace themselves back to xyz, we're talking millions as a distinct identified heritage.

.

Being purposeful does not mean this is right. Errors in groupings in the US Census does not make anything right - it remains just an error. There is a whole world outside of US government department errors.

.

One cannot be Asian because they are Pacific Islanders - The only way that you can be both Asian and a Pacific Islander is by being a mixed race.

.

There are not just 100 people that are descendents of immigants from China and the slaves sent by the Chinese to mine gold in California and Australia. In 1870 there were 63,000 Chinese in the USA, 77% of these in California. The USA was so concerned about the number of Chinese, they passed the only US law to exclude one group of people emigrating to the USA in 1882 - This was the Chinese Exclusion Act. it was not repealed until 1943. This means that most of the long term decendents of Chinese in the USA are from the gold rush period - Just as in Australia, this is a mix of emigrants and people sent as labourers by the Chinese government and trading businesses to mine gold for them. This was easier in Australia because we allowed the miners to own the gold (if they had a mining licence). This allowed for the development of a unique Asian cuisine - Australianised Chinese food developed over time from 1850s on by Chinese people here who had freely emigrated or escaped from their servitude.

[Edited 11/6/21 17:25pm]

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Reply #16 posted 11/06/21 5:20pm

IanRG

onlyforaminute said:

IanRG said:

.

I 100% agree because I never said Indigenous Australians are Pacific Islanders!

.

I said "Black people in Australia is (mostly) very specific - It is used to refer to Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders." and went on to say that this does not include Pacific Islanders

That's their fight if they so choose to have one.

.

This part of the discussion was just about capitalising the B in Black people when it is an identifiable group. It is not about any fight.

[Edited 11/6/21 17:21pm]

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Reply #17 posted 11/06/21 6:05pm

onlyforaminute

avatar

IanRG said:



onlyforaminute said:


IanRG said:


.


I 100% agree because I never said Indigenous Australians are Pacific Islanders!


.


I said "Black people in Australia is (mostly) very specific - It is used to refer to Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders." and went on to say that this does not include Pacific Islanders



That's their fight if they so choose to have one.

.


This part of the discussion was just about capitalising the B in Black people when it is an identifiable group. It is not about any fight.

[Edited 11/6/21 17:21pm]


It was about someone else making that decision for other people. Where others have made moves to define themselves.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


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Reply #18 posted 11/06/21 8:31pm

onlyforaminute

avatar

IanRG said:



onlyforaminute said:


IanRG said:


.


You are confusing mistreatment or economic exploitation with slavery - I am not. Government sanctioned or legalised slavery is very common in history. Whether people were legal or illegal slaves is not a valid distinction to any slave or descent of a slave held.


.


Note the term you are using is "Asian-Pacific" not "Asian". This is because people do not consider Pacific Islanders to be Asian. From the apasf.org site: "Joint Resolution of the Congress of the United States designating the month of May for the celebration of Asian and Pacific Islanders culture and heritage". It is a combination of two different groups of people.



I was very purposeful with my words (One can be Asian and be Pacific Islander), did I lie? I feel you're trying to re-word what I actually said. In 1968, the term "Asian American" was coined by Yuji Ichioka and Emma Gee and other student activists as a strategic, unifying political identity for Asian ethnic groups to use as they resisted U.S. imperialism in Southeast Asia, and white Americans' use of "Oriental" as a derogatory term for Asians in the United States. By the 1980s, the U.S. Census Bureau grouped persons of Asian ancestry and created the category "Asian Pacific Islander," which continued in the 1990s census. In 2000, "Asian" and "Pacific Islander" became two separate racial categories. Again to be blunt. There are always overlapping paradigms. The distinction comes in the size of the population and whether it can increases or decreases. Charlize Theron (love her) and those like her can increase in population just by simply immigrating here and having children. Those who are descendents of the gold rush slavery have never distinguished themselves nor is there any distinct population to identify and grow from so who cares if 100 people can trace themselves back to xyz, we're talking millions as a distinct identified heritage.

.


Being purposeful does not mean this is right. Errors in groupings in the US Census does not make anything right - it remains just an error. There is a whole world outside of US government department errors.


.


One cannot be Asian because they are Pacific Islanders - The only way that you can be both Asian and a Pacific Islander is by being a mixed race.


.


There are not just 100 people that are descendents of immigants from China and the slaves sent by the Chinese to mine gold in California and Australia. In 1870 there were 63,000 Chinese in the USA, 77% of these in California. The USA was so concerned about the number of Chinese, they passed the only US law to exclude one group of people emigrating to the USA in 1882 - This was the Chinese Exclusion Act. it was not repealed until 1943. This means that most of the long term decendents of Chinese in the USA are from the gold rush period - Just as in Australia, this is a mix of emigrants and people sent as labourers by the Chinese government and trading businesses to mine gold for them. This was easier in Australia because we allowed the miners to own the gold (if they had a mining licence). This allowed for the development of a unique Asian cuisine - Australianised Chinese food developed over time from 1850s on by Chinese people here who had freely emigrated or escaped from their servitude.

[Edited 11/6/21 17:25pm]


If I said Pacific Islanders are Asian but that is not what I said based on personal experience,

ASEAN BEAT
Are Filipinos Asian?
The Philippines is part of Southeast Asia geographically. But many Filipinos feel a closer attachment to the West.

Mong Palatino
By Mong Palatino
December 24, 2010
Are Filipinos Asian?
Credit: Flickr/ photobom
Are Filipinos Asians or Pacific Islanders? Is the Philippines part of Southeast Asia, Oceania or the Pacific Islands?

Officially, of course, Filipinos are categorized as Asians and the Philippines as part of Southeast Asia. But describing Filipinos as Pacific Islanders isn’t necessarily wrong either. In fact, for a long time, Filipinos were known as Pacific Islanders.

The Philippines used to be called the Philippine Islands of the Pacific, and when the Americans first arrived more than a century ago, they described the Philippine Islands as ‘orphans of the Pacific.’
[Edited 11/6/21 20:40pm]
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


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Reply #19 posted 11/06/21 11:07pm

IanRG

onlyforaminute said:

IanRG said:

.

Being purposeful does not mean this is right. Errors in groupings in the US Census does not make anything right - it remains just an error. There is a whole world outside of US government department errors.

.

One cannot be Asian because they are Pacific Islanders - The only way that you can be both Asian and a Pacific Islander is by being a mixed race.

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There are not just 100 people that are descendents of immigants from China and the slaves sent by the Chinese to mine gold in California and Australia. In 1870 there were 63,000 Chinese in the USA, 77% of these in California. The USA was so concerned about the number of Chinese, they passed the only US law to exclude one group of people emigrating to the USA in 1882 - This was the Chinese Exclusion Act. it was not repealed until 1943. This means that most of the long term decendents of Chinese in the USA are from the gold rush period - Just as in Australia, this is a mix of emigrants and people sent as labourers by the Chinese government and trading businesses to mine gold for them. This was easier in Australia because we allowed the miners to own the gold (if they had a mining licence). This allowed for the development of a unique Asian cuisine - Australianised Chinese food developed over time from 1850s on by Chinese people here who had freely emigrated or escaped from their servitude.

[Edited 11/6/21 17:25pm]

If I said Pacific Islanders are Asian but that is not what I said based on personal experience, ASEAN BEAT Are Filipinos Asian? The Philippines is part of Southeast Asia geographically. But many Filipinos feel a closer attachment to the West. Mong Palatino By Mong Palatino December 24, 2010 Are Filipinos Asian? Credit: Flickr/ photobom Are Filipinos Asians or Pacific Islanders? Is the Philippines part of Southeast Asia, Oceania or the Pacific Islands? Officially, of course, Filipinos are categorized as Asians and the Philippines as part of Southeast Asia. But describing Filipinos as Pacific Islanders isn’t necessarily wrong either. In fact, for a long time, Filipinos were known as Pacific Islanders. The Philippines used to be called the Philippine Islands of the Pacific, and when the Americans first arrived more than a century ago, they described the Philippine Islands as ‘orphans of the Pacific.’ [Edited 11/6/21 20:40pm]

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As I said before, Indonesians and Filipinos are Asian because they are not Pacific Islanders (ie Polynesians, Melanesians or Micronesians). Look at the map - The Indonesians, Taiwanese and Japanese are Asian - The Philipines does not go as east as Japan or Indonesia and just north of Indeonesia and just south of Taiwan. The people ethnically are mostly Malay from mainland South East Asia and Indonesia.

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You threw in the Māori when you said "Indigenous Australians are not considered Pacific Islanders if that's why you keep inserting them. But Indigenous New Zealanders are."- Māori are Pacific Islanders as such, they are not Asian

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You cannot be Pacific Islander and Asian - Micronesia, Polynesia and Melanesia are not in Asia, they are in Oceania.

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Historic names for the Phillipines:

1 Ma-i 13th Century - The Chinese identified the islands as being in the South China Sea

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2 Mindor

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3 Las islas de San Lazaro 1521

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4 Las islas de Poniente also 1521

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5 Ilhas de do oriente and lihhas de Liquios Celebes 1540

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6 Las islas Felipinas 1543

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7 Las islas Filipinas or just Filipinas

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8 Pearl of the Orient / Pearl of the Orient Seas / Perla de oriente / Perlas del mar de oriente 1751

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9 Republica Fillipina during the Philippine revolution

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10 Philippine Islands during US colonisation.

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11 Philippines from 1946

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I cannot find a time when it was called "of the Pacific"

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Reply #20 posted 11/06/21 11:16pm

IanRG

onlyforaminute said:

IanRG said:

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This part of the discussion was just about capitalising the B in Black people when it is an identifiable group. It is not about any fight.

[Edited 11/6/21 17:21pm]

It was about someone else making that decision for other people. Where others have made moves to define themselves.

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No it was not. There has been no discussion on where someone was making the decision for other people where others have made moves to define themselves.

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Reply #21 posted 11/07/21 8:35am

onlyforaminute

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.....
[Edited 11/7/21 8:36am]
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
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Reply #22 posted 11/17/21 6:55am

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lol yall sure know how to derail a discussion

pt 1 if it goes past 3 post and looks like it will continue STOP and agree to created a seperate thread on that topic

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Reply #23 posted 11/17/21 6:57am

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In 1991, Talk Show Host Arsenio Hall Stood Up for Gay Rights

“This ain’t Johnny [Carson], I ain’t gonna run from it. I’m going to deal with it.”

In 1991, Talk Show Host Arsenio Hall Stood Up for Gay Rights

In 1991, late-night talk show host Arsenio Hall got into a heated exchange with gay rights activists from Queer Nation after they disrupted his show. The protesters were angry at Hall for not featuring gay guests on The Arsenio Hall Show. In the exchange, Hall took a firm pro-gay stance, which was a rarity on television 25 years ago.

“You think I haven’t had somebody on my show because they’re gay? What’s wrong with you, man?” Hall yelled at a protester. “The one thing that I would not do is discriminate against a guest because of their sexual preference. To be honest with you, there are a lot of gay guests on this show, but it ain’t none of your damn business that they’re gay.”

Two years ago, Hall gave an interview with the Logo cable network, explaining why the protests bothered him so much. “It’s because I knew who I was. I knew a lot of my friends didn’t come to my defense when everyone was in the closet,” Hall says. “I can give you 20 guests on my show in a month [who were gay], but they weren’t talking about it. Luther Vandross ain’t talking about it. He can’t at that time. Louie Anderson can’t then. Ellen can’t then. Rosie can’t then.”

In 1991, Talk Show Host A... (good.is)

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
https://www.youtube.com/w...nm2Qq6QTFs
#IDEFINEME
“Strong people define themselves; weak people allow others to define them.” ― Ken Poirot
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Reply #24 posted 11/17/21 11:09am

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Arsenio Hall Explains His... Activists

That legendary battle. That’s one interesting thing of coming back. I went through a lot of things, and now I get to do it in a different climate. When I analyze the Queer Nation battle now, I think about why it bothered me so much. It’s because I knew who I was. I knew a lot of my friends didn’t come to my defense when everyone was in the closet. I can give you 20 guests on my show in a month [who were gay], but they weren’t talking about it. Luther Vandross ain’t talking about it. He can’t at that time. Louie Anderson can’t then. Ellen can’t then. Rosie can’t then. They couldn’t even say, “Leave [Arsenio] alone!” Only that writer in New York, Harvey Fierstein [repeats Fierstein’s name in an incredible impersonation], was sitting on my couch and talking about issues. I had to let the world be what it is and catch up to the moment, but I knew what I was doing.”

Arsenio Hall Explains His... / Queerty

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That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
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“Strong people define themselves; weak people allow others to define them.” ― Ken Poirot
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Reply #25 posted 11/17/21 11:57am

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Richard Noble in 1991 before AB 101 veto. Noble is a longtime LGBT rights and HIV/AIDS activist. (Photo courtesy Richard Settles)

Los Angeles Queer Nationals stood in line for the taping of the “Arsenio Hall Show” with hidden T-shirts, some with pink triangles and pockets full of Queer Nation stickers. Inside, we waited for Andrew Dice Clay to hit the stage. The supposed comedian was nasty to women and gays and we wanted it to stop.

Arsenio heard we were there and asked the audience if anyone wanted to talk about it. So I stood up. He asked me why I was there and I said, “I’m gay” and we didn’t like the way Hollywood treated women and the LGBT community and we were going to start holding Hollywood accountable. Arsenio was surprised. I had just “come out” on national television. We wanted to show that gay men and lesbians were a lot more than the serial killers Hollywood depicted us to be in films.


#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
https://www.youtube.com/w...nm2Qq6QTFs
#IDEFINEME
“Strong people define themselves; weak people allow others to define them.” ― Ken Poirot
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