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Thread started 05/24/21 12:08pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Woke, Women, White

This is troubling, but humorous, I've been seeing and hearing of more Black, Latino, Brown, Mixed people having online encounters with predominately white women, who will call them bootlickers, uncle toms or other very 'racialized' slurs when they disagree with them about stuff I assume they are learning from their anti-racial classes or books. Stuff you know they would not say to their faces, not go into predominately Black/Latino neighborhoods and say that sh-t...
.


A good general rule: "criticize ideas, not people."

.

184973557_3943337799052718_3038760411334008641_n.jpg?_nc_cat=101&ccb=1-3&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_ohc=_xy5GEpyUOMAX8Y4VkT&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=f012edfe573addce315deec2c952a5e1&oe=60D36E5D

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
https://www.youtube.com/w...nm2Qq6QTFs
#IDEFINEME
https://www.youtube.com/w...XfF2cimj7I
Never No Time To Play...
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Reply #1 posted 05/24/21 12:38pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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https://youtu.be/fnF1pHDCtyc

Alyssa Milano panders to ... - YouTube

mqdefault_6s.webp?du=3000&sqp=CNTLr4UG&rs=AOn4CLA-rl_5FPlQaceykmzL_9ut6lQZtQ

https://youtu.be/h5p21hbBNJA


BXBeastBoy

AAUvwngAiu0bWvXcj0mZLXXoGbhfF0DxBj3ge88e1ckhRA=s48-c-k-c0x00ffffff-no-rj

181135228_3917489318304233_921635375855818224_n.jpg?_nc_cat=108&ccb=1-3&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=EzOMyD0uLAQAX--CVwz&_nc_oc=AQku0nhSCYPqM1UPbb3Mfdsmz1sfsw0RuU_voOY7FvDw28zZT_LVL0V7UALx1Vp86cQ&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=5983d2fa555e1953f624db6296fb7f2c&oe=60D23A74

182155054_3917489438304221_4773477041618479593_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&ccb=1-3&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=posvXPqiuXwAX8HVcPi&_nc_oc=AQkya9m_eC-jsYA3vKvAX306rXv5GLFEx7ZViFq3RzLdEmxvqJEyvUUwFGGyM_7wKeo&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=467078b0e6d0e2b83308fb26af121df9&oe=60D131DB

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
https://www.youtube.com/w...nm2Qq6QTFs
#IDEFINEME
https://www.youtube.com/w...XfF2cimj7I
Never No Time To Play...
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Reply #2 posted 05/25/21 7:33am

2freaky4church
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Most woke morons are white. Black Americans cannot stand patronizing white liberals. Leave us the fuck alone they say. While they vote for gentrification.

Woke does have to be retired. It is weaponized by the right to stop leftist viewpoints.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #3 posted 05/25/21 9:18pm

onlyforaminute

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I wish it were all as simple as a slogan. It's not a bilateral problem but too many try to make it that way.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
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Reply #4 posted 05/26/21 11:47am

TonyVanDam

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OldFriends4Sale said:

This is troubling, but humorous, I've been seeing and hearing of more Black, Latino, Brown, Mixed people having online encounters with predominately white women, who will call them bootlickers, uncle toms or other very 'racialized' slurs when they disagree with them about stuff I assume they are learning from their anti-racial classes or books. Stuff you know they would not say to their faces, not go into predominately Black/Latino neighborhoods and say that sh-t...



184973557_3943337799052718_3038760411334008641_n.jpg?_nc_cat=101&ccb=1-3&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_ohc=_xy5GEpyUOMAX8Y4VkT&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=f012edfe573addce315deec2c952a5e1&oe=60D36E5D

.

"Woke" white female, white femimists, white female SJWs, white female believers of white supremacy, white female neo-conservatives & white female neo-liberals have THE SAME kind of psychological problem..........

.

Too much "white girl magic[k]"! lurking


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Reply #5 posted 05/26/21 12:09pm

2freaky4church
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Critical Race Theory is silly but it should not be banned.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #6 posted 05/27/21 6:15am

Strive

Let's not beat around the bush, Kastenbaum is a jewish name.

They're the first to say "as a white person..." then fall back onto "actually I'm jewish and a fellow minority" when pressed.

Once you start noticing that, it's hard to ignore.

______

Here's another funny one.

"When you deny people the option to not pick a side, you may not like the side they'll pick."
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Reply #7 posted 05/27/21 6:36am

coldcoffeeandc
ocacola

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Im white and a woman

The neighbourhood I grew up in taught me being black is the same as being white, but the media tells me it's entirely different. Sometimes I feel like there is an agenda at play to divide people over something as unimportant as skin tone. But how would I know, I never lived a day as a black woman. In the 90s i never once considered skin tone and nor did anyone I know but now it seems to be the main topic of discussion. Feels like to me the world's gone backwards as its such a topic now, but maybe if I was black I'd see it differently I don't know. I feel like all this talk on colour and race fans the flames of difference when the differences between us aren't skin tone they are culture and really and truly we aren't all that different, we are all very much the same. I don't think it's a simplistic statement to make either. We all eat, sleep, want the best for our families, want to get on, need food and shelter and believe in God, or don't. I know historically black people have been oppressed but here in England I don't see that happening now. I wish the discussion would go away, not because I don't care but so people just webt back to being people, not groups being divided over social media. Our police are hot on racism and that's a good thing. I know in America its different.
[Edited 5/27/21 6:49am]

Also, I cannot believe anti racism classes exist I don't understand how you could need to be taught this stuff? It's skin. I just don't get it. Again I go back to the 90s in the UK when I say it didn't even cross anyone's mind that I knew what colour someone was... How are we here?
[Edited 5/27/21 6:53am]
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Reply #8 posted 05/27/21 8:10am

jjhunsecker

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coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

Im white and a woman

The neighbourhood I grew up in taught me being black is the same as being white, but the media tells me it's entirely different. Sometimes I feel like there is an agenda at play to divide people over something as unimportant as skin tone. But how would I know, I never lived a day as a black woman. In the 90s i never once considered skin tone and nor did anyone I know but now it seems to be the main topic of discussion. Feels like to me the world's gone backwards as its such a topic now, but maybe if I was black I'd see it differently I don't know. I feel like all this talk on colour and race fans the flames of difference when the differences between us aren't skin tone they are culture and really and truly we aren't all that different, we are all very much the same. I don't think it's a simplistic statement to make either. We all eat, sleep, want the best for our families, want to get on, need food and shelter and believe in God, or don't. I know historically black people have been oppressed but here in England I don't see that happening now. I wish the discussion would go away, not because I don't care but so people just webt back to being people, not groups being divided over social media. Our police are hot on racism and that's a good thing. I know in America its different.
[Edited 5/27/21 6:49am]

Also, I cannot believe anti racism classes exist I don't understand how you could need to be taught this stuff? It's skin. I just don't get it. Again I go back to the 90s in the UK when I say it didn't even cross anyone's mind that I knew what colour someone was... How are we here?
[Edited 5/27/21 6:53am]


Do you think a Black person , or an Asian person, in the UK, one of your generation, would agree that race or color never crossed THEIR minds , in the 90s or today? Perhaps this has always been an issue, and either you were unaware of it, or it was something not mentioned in most of the mainstream press or news sources?

Since you’re in the UK, did you get a chance to watch “Small Axe”, the series of 5 films by Black English director Steve McQueen ? They are set amongst the Black communities in England, mainly during the 70s and 80s. Perhaps they can provide you with a different perspective, from how Black Britons experienced life in the UK
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #9 posted 05/27/21 8:17am

2freaky4church
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Blacks are not aliens jj? Why otherize people?

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #10 posted 05/27/21 8:23am

jjhunsecker

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I will mention that Kim Klacik has been one of the White Right Wingers favorite shoeshine gals
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #11 posted 05/27/21 8:24am

2freaky4church
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She's black

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #12 posted 05/27/21 8:45am

jjhunsecker

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2freaky4church1 said:

Blacks are not aliens jj? Why otherize people?



What the fuck are you talking about?
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #13 posted 05/27/21 8:47am

jjhunsecker

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2freaky4church1 said:

She's black



Her skin might be
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #14 posted 05/27/21 9:20am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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rolleyes

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
https://www.youtube.com/w...nm2Qq6QTFs
#IDEFINEME
https://www.youtube.com/w...XfF2cimj7I
Never No Time To Play...
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Reply #15 posted 05/27/21 9:59am

coldcoffeeandc
ocacola

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jjhunsecker said:

coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

Im white and a woman

The neighbourhood I grew up in taught me being black is the same as being white, but the media tells me it's entirely different. Sometimes I feel like there is an agenda at play to divide people over something as unimportant as skin tone. But how would I know, I never lived a day as a black woman. In the 90s i never once considered skin tone and nor did anyone I know but now it seems to be the main topic of discussion. Feels like to me the world's gone backwards as its such a topic now, but maybe if I was black I'd see it differently I don't know. I feel like all this talk on colour and race fans the flames of difference when the differences between us aren't skin tone they are culture and really and truly we aren't all that different, we are all very much the same. I don't think it's a simplistic statement to make either. We all eat, sleep, want the best for our families, want to get on, need food and shelter and believe in God, or don't. I know historically black people have been oppressed but here in England I don't see that happening now. I wish the discussion would go away, not because I don't care but so people just webt back to being people, not groups being divided over social media. Our police are hot on racism and that's a good thing. I know in America its different.
[Edited 5/27/21 6:49am]

Also, I cannot believe anti racism classes exist I don't understand how you could need to be taught this stuff? It's skin. I just don't get it. Again I go back to the 90s in the UK when I say it didn't even cross anyone's mind that I knew what colour someone was... How are we here?
[Edited 5/27/21 6:53am]


Do you think a Black person , or an Asian person, in the UK, one of your generation, would agree that race or color never crossed THEIR minds , in the 90s or today? Perhaps this has always been an issue, and either you were unaware of it, or it was something not mentioned in most of the mainstream press or news sources?

Since you’re in the UK, did you get a chance to watch “Small Axe”, the series of 5 films by Black English director Steve McQueen ? They are set amongst the Black communities in England, mainly during the 70s and 80s. Perhaps they can provide you with a different perspective, from how Black Britons experienced life in the UK



When we were all getting jobs and all those things we all got equal jobs and earnt similarly and there didn't seem to be anyone particularly doing better than the other, so I'd hope race didn't cross anyone's mind as it just didn't matter. I hope noone considers their race day to day unless they're researching their family history as we all are the same people just in different skin suits. I know it wasn't so easy in the 80s and 70s but 90s/00s things seemed so equal and good as they should be. I thought we'd made progress and all the awful things experienced by other racial groups to myself were in the past, in the bin. I often wonder if we stopped recognising and mentioning race and colour, would things get better than they are now as the lens would be off it and people would just not notice it other than a quick visual cue when you see someone. How can we be the top of the species on earth of we need classes on not being racist? Does this focus not point out to kids hey look how different we are and create division as opposed to what I grew up with which was your friend has brown skin and you have peach skin and that's just how we are made. I never thought about it again and neither did the kids in my class. I recall a classmate of mine Lucy asking the teacher why Roy was a different colour to her and then when the teacher said that noone really gave it any more thought. Is this too simplistic?
[Edited 5/27/21 10:10am]
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Reply #16 posted 05/27/21 10:15am

jjhunsecker

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coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

jjhunsecker said:



Do you think a Black person , or an Asian person, in the UK, one of your generation, would agree that race or color never crossed THEIR minds , in the 90s or today? Perhaps this has always been an issue, and either you were unaware of it, or it was something not mentioned in most of the mainstream press or news sources?

Since you’re in the UK, did you get a chance to watch “Small Axe”, the series of 5 films by Black English director Steve McQueen ? They are set amongst the Black communities in England, mainly during the 70s and 80s. Perhaps they can provide you with a different perspective, from how Black Britons experienced life in the UK



When we were all getting jobs and all those things we all got equal jobs and earnt similarly and there didn't seem to be anyone particularly doing better than the other, so I'd hope race didn't cross anyone's mind as it just didn't matter. I hope noone considers their race day to day unless they're researching their family history as we all are the same people just in different skin suits. I know it wasn't so easy in the 80s and 70s but 90s/00s things seemed so equal and good as they should be. I thought we'd made progress and all the awful things experienced by other racial groups to myself were in the past, in the bin. I often wonder if we stopped recognising and mentioning race and colour, would things get better than they are now as the lens would be off it and people would just not notice it other than a quick visual cue when you see someone. How can we be the top of the species on earth of we need classes on not being racist?
[Edited 5/27/21 10:05am]


But again, that’s your perspective as a self described “White Woman “.
And I have absolutely no doubts about the sincerity of your beliefs. And I’m sure you meant no harm to any other person.

But I strongly suspect that Black and Asian people in the UK, of your generation, of older, and most likely younger, hold quite a different perspective on these issues. And one that, unless you were extremely close to Black or Asian people, are perspectives that they might not have been comfortable sharing with you, or bringing up.

I recommended “Small Axe” because they are a series of films created by Black people, probably around your age, focusing on their experiences as non-Whites in the UK. Experiences that probably most of “mainstream “ England knew little or nothing about
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #17 posted 05/27/21 11:53am

coldcoffeeandc
ocacola

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jjhunsecker said:

coldcoffeeandcocacola said:




When we were all getting jobs and all those things we all got equal jobs and earnt similarly and there didn't seem to be anyone particularly doing better than the other, so I'd hope race didn't cross anyone's mind as it just didn't matter. I hope noone considers their race day to day unless they're researching their family history as we all are the same people just in different skin suits. I know it wasn't so easy in the 80s and 70s but 90s/00s things seemed so equal and good as they should be. I thought we'd made progress and all the awful things experienced by other racial groups to myself were in the past, in the bin. I often wonder if we stopped recognising and mentioning race and colour, would things get better than they are now as the lens would be off it and people would just not notice it other than a quick visual cue when you see someone. How can we be the top of the species on earth of we need classes on not being racist?
[Edited 5/27/21 10:05am]


But again, that’s your perspective as a self described “White Woman “.
And I have absolutely no doubts about the sincerity of your beliefs. And I’m sure you meant no harm to any other person.
A
But I strongly suspect that Black and Asian people in the UK, of your generation, of older, and most likely younger, hold quite a different perspective on these issues. And one that, unless you were extremely close to Black or Asian people, are perspectives that they might not have been comfortable sharing with you, or bringing up.

I recommended “Small Axe” because they are a series of films created by Black people, probably around your age, focusing on their experiences as non-Whites in the UK. Experiences that probably most of “mainstream “ England knew little or nothing about


Okay ill certainly look at that I love recommendations, kpowers is the best at that! Is what is on that show still relevant today or is it what non white people went through in the past? Race stuff makes me so upset it's so pointless all this division and I'm not even the one on the receiving end.
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Reply #18 posted 05/27/21 12:28pm

jjhunsecker

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coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

jjhunsecker said:



But again, that’s your perspective as a self described “White Woman “.
And I have absolutely no doubts about the sincerity of your beliefs. And I’m sure you meant no harm to any other person.
A
But I strongly suspect that Black and Asian people in the UK, of your generation, of older, and most likely younger, hold quite a different perspective on these issues. And one that, unless you were extremely close to Black or Asian people, are perspectives that they might not have been comfortable sharing with you, or bringing up.

I recommended “Small Axe” because they are a series of films created by Black people, probably around your age, focusing on their experiences as non-Whites in the UK. Experiences that probably most of “mainstream “ England knew little or nothing about


Okay ill certainly look at that I love recommendations, kpowers is the best at that! Is what is on that show still relevant today or is it what non white people went through in the past? Race stuff makes me so upset it's so pointless all this division and I'm not even the one on the receiving end.


As a great American author William Faulkner once said: “The past is never dead. It’s never even really past “.

This is not “ancient “ history, but things still relevant to today, and based on what you’re saying here, are things that occurred during your lifetime.

I agree that division is pointless, but people explaining their experiences and perspectives is not was causes division. In fact, it can only bring enlightenment... for those who want it.
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #19 posted 05/27/21 12:37pm

jjhunsecker

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coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

jjhunsecker said:



Do you think a Black person , or an Asian person, in the UK, one of your generation, would agree that race or color never crossed THEIR minds , in the 90s or today? Perhaps this has always been an issue, and either you were unaware of it, or it was something not mentioned in most of the mainstream press or news sources?

Since you’re in the UK, did you get a chance to watch “Small Axe”, the series of 5 films by Black English director Steve McQueen ? They are set amongst the Black communities in England, mainly during the 70s and 80s. Perhaps they can provide you with a different perspective, from how Black Britons experienced life in the UK



When we were all getting jobs and all those things we all got equal jobs and earnt similarly and there didn't seem to be anyone particularly doing better than the other, so I'd hope race didn't cross anyone's mind as it just didn't matter. I hope noone considers their race day to day unless they're researching their family history as we all are the same people just in different skin suits. I know it wasn't so easy in the 80s and 70s but 90s/00s things seemed so equal and good as they should be. I thought we'd made progress and all the awful things experienced by other racial groups to myself were in the past, in the bin. I often wonder if we stopped recognising and mentioning race and colour, would things get better than they are now as the lens would be off it and people would just not notice it other than a quick visual cue when you see someone. How can we be the top of the species on earth of we need classes on not being racist? Does this focus not point out to kids hey look how different we are and create division as opposed to what I grew up with which was your friend has brown skin and you have peach skin and that's just how we are made. I never thought about it again and neither did the kids in my class. I recall a classmate of mine Lucy asking the teacher why Roy was a different colour to her and then when the teacher said that noone really gave it any more thought. Is this too simplistic?
[Edited 5/27/21 10:10am]


Like, I wonder if Black or Asian people in the UK would say that the 90s/00s were such an ideal time, racially, as you perceived it to be.

Perhaps what you consider “division “ today is a direct result of things being ignored or swept under the rug back in those days, and is bubbling to the surface now
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #20 posted 05/27/21 1:35pm

2freaky4church
1

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Race is now in the dna...lol

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #21 posted 05/27/21 2:46pm

PJMcGee

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Great job, jj, politely explaining things. Reminds me of whenever I would talk to my father about racial issues. He was white, born in the 1940s, and he couldn't understand why people would make an issue of it. It was like trying to explain to a fish what water was.

Note that he married an Asian woman (and later, a Puerto Rican woman). I've had brushes with racism (got called chink a lot as a child), but I've never had a negative encounter with a police officer (my dad was a cop), so I really have nothing to complain about. But being partially nonwhite helps me to be empathetic, I think.
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Reply #22 posted 05/27/21 2:48pm

coldcoffeeandc
ocacola

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jjhunsecker said:

coldcoffeeandcocacola said:




When we were all getting jobs and all those things we all got equal jobs and earnt similarly and there didn't seem to be anyone particularly doing better than the other, so I'd hope race didn't cross anyone's mind as it just didn't matter. I hope noone considers their race day to day unless they're researching their family history as we all are the same people just in different skin suits. I know it wasn't so easy in the 80s and 70s but 90s/00s things seemed so equal and good as they should be. I thought we'd made progress and all the awful things experienced by other racial groups to myself were in the past, in the bin. I often wonder if we stopped recognising and mentioning race and colour, would things get better than they are now as the lens would be off it and people would just not notice it other than a quick visual cue when you see someone. How can we be the top of the species on earth of we need classes on not being racist? Does this focus not point out to kids hey look how different we are and create division as opposed to what I grew up with which was your friend has brown skin and you have peach skin and that's just how we are made. I never thought about it again and neither did the kids in my class. I recall a classmate of mine Lucy asking the teacher why Roy was a different colour to her and then when the teacher said that noone really gave it any more thought. Is this too simplistic?
[Edited 5/27/21 10:10am]


Like, I wonder if Black or Asian people in the UK would say that the 90s/00s were such an ideal time, racially, as you perceived it to be.

Perhaps what you consider “division “ today is a direct result of things being ignored or swept under the rug back in those days, and is bubbling to the surface now



This really made me think, I like when posts make me change my mind. Small axe is another world to me. Thank you for the recommendation. I really appreciated it, I guess we all live in the world we experience and this small axe is a new one. My best friend is Jamaican and I showed her this thread and she said the only racism she has experienced is when people expect her to be loud, want to touch her hair or when men fetishize her colour. It's not something we ever really discussed until today. I never knew that. I know poepoz always want to touch her hair but I never knzw she felt it was racist. Off topic I know, but that's what I learnt today. She said I don't see it as I don't think that way I hope that's true because now I just feel a bit stupid! She also told me to get off a thread about colour because I'm idealistic and might upset someone. So I'm off! So many apologies if I did. I hope you see that wasn't my intention.
[Edited 5/27/21 15:08pm]
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Reply #23 posted 05/27/21 4:09pm

jjhunsecker

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PJMcGee said:

Great job, jj, politely explaining things. Reminds me of whenever I would talk to my father about racial issues. He was white, born in the 1940s, and he couldn't understand why people would make an issue of it. It was like trying to explain to a fish what water was.

Note that he married an Asian woman (and later, a Puerto Rican woman). I've had brushes with racism (got called chink a lot as a child), but I've never had a negative encounter with a police officer (my dad was a cop), so I really have nothing to complain about. But being partially nonwhite helps me to be empathetic, I think.


You’re welcome. I think empathy is the best thing people can try to bring to these types of discussions. People usually don’t feel or even say something (as long as they are being sincere) out of a vacuum... those feelings and beliefs come from something or someplace, and it’s good to at least try to understand
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #24 posted 05/27/21 4:17pm

jjhunsecker

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coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

jjhunsecker said:



Like, I wonder if Black or Asian people in the UK would say that the 90s/00s were such an ideal time, racially, as you perceived it to be.

Perhaps what you consider “division “ today is a direct result of things being ignored or swept under the rug back in those days, and is bubbling to the surface now



This really made me think, I like when posts make me change my mind. Small axe is another world to me. Thank you for the recommendation. I really appreciated it, I guess we all live in the world we experience and this small axe is a new one. My best friend is Jamaican and I showed her this thread and she said the only racism she has experienced is when people expect her to be loud, want to touch her hair or when men fetishize her colour. It's not something we ever really discussed until today. I never knew that. I know poepoz always want to touch her hair but I never knzw she felt it was racist. Off topic I know, but that's what I learnt today. She said I don't see it as I don't think that way I hope that's true because now I just feel a bit stupid! She also told me to get off a thread about colour because I'm idealistic and might upset someone. So I'm off! So many apologies if I did. I hope you see that wasn't my intention.
[Edited 5/27/21 15:08pm]


No, I certainly didn’t see anything that you said wrong or that you should apologize for. Sometimes we project our own personal feelings on to the world and on to others, but it’s important to realize that they might have had experiences that have lead them to different viewpoints and reactions
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #25 posted 05/27/21 6:53pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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2freaky4church1 said:

Critical Race Theory is silly but it should not be banned.

https://youtu.be/WRK9NEZGnTw

Now I have a dream that we will implement love, not hate. Or supporting another Jim Crow's agenda. CRT is not an honest dialogue. It is a tactic that was used by Hitler and the Ku Klux Klan on slavery many years ago to dumb down my ancestors so WE could not think for ourselves. CRT is racist. It is abusive. It discriminates against one's color. Let me educate you. An honest dialogue does not oppress. An honest dialogue does not implement hatred or injustice. It's to communicate without deceiving people. Today, we don't need your agreement. We want action and a backbone for what we ask for today: To ban CRT. We don't want your political advertisement to divide our children or belittle them. Think twice before you indoctrinate such racist theories. You can not tell me what is or is not racist. LOOK AT ME!

I had to come down here today to tell you to your face that we are coming together and we are strong. This will not be the last greet and meet.

Black Mother Obliterates School Board Over Critical Race Theory: 'Look at Me!'

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
That's what U want, TRANSCENDENCE. When that happens, O Boy -Prince 2015
https://www.youtube.com/w...nm2Qq6QTFs
#IDEFINEME
https://www.youtube.com/w...XfF2cimj7I
Never No Time To Play...
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Reply #26 posted 05/28/21 7:15am

2freaky4church
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There is no race. Quit this.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #27 posted 05/28/21 8:04am

jjhunsecker

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2freaky4church1 said:

There is no race. Quit this.



You’re delusional
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Reply #28 posted 05/28/21 12:25pm

2freaky4church
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Truth deludes.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #29 posted 05/28/21 12:41pm

jjhunsecker

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2freaky4church1 said:

There is no race. Quit this.



Tell it to the victims of the Tulsa massacre, or the 4 girls in Birmingham
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