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Reply #30 posted 04/04/21 3:27pm

coldcoffeeandc
ocacola

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AMERICA1ST said:



coldcoffeeandcocacola said:


Also, free speech does seem to be stifled. Here too. (UK, not the org) This is a problem! I don't know enough about usa culture to comment on the rest of your post, you are often I suppose quite extreme in your views but I think both of these points you made are very, very accurate. [Edited 3/31/21 15:16pm]

Do you know why you would call my views extreme?



I'm very central politically, and find myself erring both a bit left and then a bit right depending on topic. I would define in America the left as democrat and the right republican.

You're I think quite right leaning, conversely I think the org is quite left.

So to me, you can seem extreme simply as you are strongly one way. But then so are others who go the other! But you are very right on the decline of free speech, and the rise of cancel culture for instance.

I like this forum as I get to read from both sides and often change my mind among the way.
[Edited 4/4/21 15:37pm]
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Reply #31 posted 04/04/21 10:05pm

Margot

jjhunsecker said:

Margot said:

I think you mentioned attending parochial school as I did. I attended one year of parochial high school as well. The classes were arduous but I am now greatful for the experience.

After that year I attended high school in an affluent zip code in the Bay Area and was one year ahead in every subject, particularly Latin. (Did a little skating that year). It showed me that very few public schools are likely teaching @ a high level unless one is enrolled in AP or Honor's classes.

[Edited 4/3/21 17:51pm]

After leaving Catholic grammar school I attended a very good public high school, considered at the time a “magnet school “. It was in an almost entirely White neighborhood, and my mother, knowing the iniquities in society and the especially the school system, very wisely assessed that a school like this would have better teachers and better facilities. I received an excellent education there, both academically and socially, as I learned how to interact with different types of people. I made friendships that last to this day. Being one of the few minorities in this environment also had an ugly side: I heard the words “nigger” and “spic” pretty much every day. And there were several instances of what could be described as racially motivated confrontations and even violence, especially in the areas surrounding the school. At that time, race riots were not uncommon in the boroughs and suburbs of New York. One had to be on-guard at all times

It's difficult to know what to do.

Sad to hear about your experiences.

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Reply #32 posted 04/05/21 7:22am

2freaky4church
1

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Noam Chomsky said that racism may destroy the world. He never said that before.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #33 posted 04/05/21 3:27pm

jjhunsecker

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Margot said:



jjhunsecker said:


Margot said:



I think you mentioned attending parochial school as I did. I attended one year of parochial high school as well. The classes were arduous but I am now greatful for the experience.


After that year I attended high school in an affluent zip code in the Bay Area and was one year ahead in every subject, particularly Latin. (Did a little skating that year). It showed me that very few public schools are likely teaching @ a high level unless one is enrolled in AP or Honor's classes.



[Edited 4/3/21 17:51pm]



After leaving Catholic grammar school I attended a very good public high school, considered at the time a “magnet school “. It was in an almost entirely White neighborhood, and my mother, knowing the iniquities in society and the especially the school system, very wisely assessed that a school like this would have better teachers and better facilities. I received an excellent education there, both academically and socially, as I learned how to interact with different types of people. I made friendships that last to this day. Being one of the few minorities in this environment also had an ugly side: I heard the words “nigger” and “spic” pretty much every day. And there were several instances of what could be described as racially motivated confrontations and even violence, especially in the areas surrounding the school. At that time, race riots were not uncommon in the boroughs and suburbs of New York. One had to be on-guard at all times


It's difficult to know what to do.



Sad to hear about your experiences.




That’s the world I grew up in and shaped me...

If you have HBO, you can get a taste of the environment in an excellent documentary they had on the channel about the murder of Yusuf Hawkins in Brooklyn
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #34 posted 04/05/21 3:58pm

coldcoffeeandc
ocacola

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jjhunsecker said:

Margot said:



jjhunsecker said:


Margot said:


America is in decline. I feel much of it stems from sub-standard educational standards.


There are very Americans who speak and write well; very few read anything of substance.


There is a lack true effort expended to gain insight into the political sphere; most rely on TV, Twitter


or facebook for their 'info.' There is little cross-checking of this 'info' to ascertain the nuances.


I'm not hopeful.





Education should be there to show people not WHAT to think, but HOW to think.., Unfortunately, that’s really only done at college or grad level of education. This should be emphasized in grade school, and certainly by high school. But it’s not... And I certainly think there’s a lot of iniquities in the school system. As Conservative icon Condelezza Rice once said “Tell me your zip code, and I tell you if you have access to a decent education “


I think you mentioned attending parochial school as I did. I attended one year of parochial high school as well. The classes were arduous but I am now greatful for the experience.


After that year I attended high school in an affluent zip code in the Bay Area and was one year ahead in every subject, particularly Latin. (Did a little skating that year). It showed me that very few public schools are likely teaching @ a high level unless one is enrolled in AP or Honor's classes.


[Edited 4/3/21 17:51pm]



After leaving Catholic grammar school I attended a very good public high school, considered at the time a “magnet school “. It was in an almost entirely White neighborhood, and my mother, knowing the iniquities in society and the especially the school system, very wisely assessed that a school like this would have better teachers and better facilities. I received an excellent education there, both academically and socially, as I learned how to interact with different types of people. I made friendships that last to this day. Being one of the few minorities in this environment also had an ugly side: I heard the words “nigger” and “spic” pretty much every day. And there were several instances of what could be described as racially motivated confrontations and even violence, especially in the areas surrounding the school. At that time, race riots were not uncommon in the boroughs and suburbs of New York. One had to be on-guard at all times



Ive never heard the word spic before and never heard the N word unless it was two guys greeting one another. I'm so sorry you experienced this. But how wise your mum was and schooling in new York sounds so fast paced
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Reply #35 posted 04/06/21 6:53pm

jjhunsecker

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coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

jjhunsecker said:



After leaving Catholic grammar school I attended a very good public high school, considered at the time a “magnet school “. It was in an almost entirely White neighborhood, and my mother, knowing the iniquities in society and the especially the school system, very wisely assessed that a school like this would have better teachers and better facilities. I received an excellent education there, both academically and socially, as I learned how to interact with different types of people. I made friendships that last to this day. Being one of the few minorities in this environment also had an ugly side: I heard the words “nigger” and “spic” pretty much every day. And there were several instances of what could be described as racially motivated confrontations and even violence, especially in the areas surrounding the school. At that time, race riots were not uncommon in the boroughs and suburbs of New York. One had to be on-guard at all times



Ive never heard the word spic before and never heard the N word unless it was two guys greeting one another. I'm so sorry you experienced this. But how wise your mum was and schooling in new York sounds so fast paced


It was great in a lot of ways, and very close to insane in a lot of ways
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #36 posted 04/07/21 7:56pm

uPtoWnNY

jjhunsecker said:

Margot said:

I think you mentioned attending parochial school as I did. I attended one year of parochial high school as well. The classes were arduous but I am now greatful for the experience.

After that year I attended high school in an affluent zip code in the Bay Area and was one year ahead in every subject, particularly Latin. (Did a little skating that year). It showed me that very few public schools are likely teaching @ a high level unless one is enrolled in AP or Honor's classes.

[Edited 4/3/21 17:51pm]

After leaving Catholic grammar school I attended a very good public high school, considered at the time a “magnet school “. It was in an almost entirely White neighborhood, and my mother, knowing the iniquities in society and the especially the school system, very wisely assessed that a school like this would have better teachers and better facilities. I received an excellent education there, both academically and socially, as I learned how to interact with different types of people. I made friendships that last to this day. Being one of the few minorities in this environment also had an ugly side: I heard the words “nigger” and “spic” pretty much every day. And there were several instances of what could be described as racially motivated confrontations and even violence, especially in the areas surrounding the school. At that time, race riots were not uncommon in the boroughs and suburbs of New York. One had to be on-guard at all times

I had similar experiences when my family moved from the South Bronx to Long Island, but with less violence (probably because the neighborhood was @ 60/40). Not only did I deal with ignorant shit from racist whites, but also from some brothas who called me "punk", "fa****" or "white" because I got good grades and was only average at sports. I wasn't exactly part of the "cool" crowd who smoked weed and talked "hip". College was a breath of fresh air....it was pleasure being around brothas and sistas who were all about education/empowerment instead of nonsense. But it was a good life lesson....just because someone has the same color as me, doesn't mean they have my back.

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Reply #37 posted 04/08/21 12:50am

coldcoffeeandc
ocacola

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uPtoWnNY said:



jjhunsecker said:


Margot said:



I think you mentioned attending parochial school as I did. I attended one year of parochial high school as well. The classes were arduous but I am now greatful for the experience.


After that year I attended high school in an affluent zip code in the Bay Area and was one year ahead in every subject, particularly Latin. (Did a little skating that year). It showed me that very few public schools are likely teaching @ a high level unless one is enrolled in AP or Honor's classes.



[Edited 4/3/21 17:51pm]



After leaving Catholic grammar school I attended a very good public high school, considered at the time a “magnet school “. It was in an almost entirely White neighborhood, and my mother, knowing the iniquities in society and the especially the school system, very wisely assessed that a school like this would have better teachers and better facilities. I received an excellent education there, both academically and socially, as I learned how to interact with different types of people. I made friendships that last to this day. Being one of the few minorities in this environment also had an ugly side: I heard the words “nigger” and “spic” pretty much every day. And there were several instances of what could be described as racially motivated confrontations and even violence, especially in the areas surrounding the school. At that time, race riots were not uncommon in the boroughs and suburbs of New York. One had to be on-guard at all times


I had similar experiences when my family moved from the South Bronx to Long Island, but with less violence (probably because the neighborhood was @ 60/40). Not only did I deal with ignorant shit from racist whites, but also from some brothas who called me "punk", "fa****" or "white" because I got good grades and was only average at sports. I wasn't exactly part of the "cool" crowd who smoked weed and talked "hip". College was a breath of fresh air....it was pleasure being around brothas and sistas who were all about education/empowerment instead of nonsense. But it was a good life lesson....just because someone has the same color as me, doesn't mean they have my back.




This is such an interesting comment. I've often wondered (I'm white) why some people I know who are black think other black people will support them just for colour. My colleague messed up and assumed another black colleague would have her back who she isn't friendly with and didn't witness. She said it's sisterhood. I said nothing as it wasn't my place but when the other colleague shrugged and said she hasn't seen a thing, the lady next to me (who had this incident) seemed like an offence had been made! I felt bad for her as she was so sure she'd be off the hook (she had messed up but I wasn't going to say I saw, but equally I wasn't going to lie for her) but I was left wondering why she thought this was a thing?? So interested to know whether this was exclusive to her or a belief you grow up as a minority (black is minority where I am from although I see at least one, usually many people of colour in every shop or street at least so it's not a small minority at all). The lady who triggered said incident is smart, well educated, beautiful, social, wealthy.. She's the epitome of success and so she wasn't a chancer who had grown up used to people bailing her out. Thats why I think her assuming this was jarring to me. Is it a cultural thing I wouldn't grasp or is it something else?
[Edited 4/8/21 0:58am]
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Reply #38 posted 04/08/21 3:00am

uPtoWnNY

coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

uPtoWnNY said:

I had similar experiences when my family moved from the South Bronx to Long Island, but with less violence (probably because the neighborhood was @ 60/40). Not only did I deal with ignorant shit from racist whites, but also from some brothas who called me "punk", "fa****" or "white" because I got good grades and was only average at sports. I wasn't exactly part of the "cool" crowd who smoked weed and talked "hip". College was a breath of fresh air....it was pleasure being around brothas and sistas who were all about education/empowerment instead of nonsense. But it was a good life lesson....just because someone has the same color as me, doesn't mean they have my back.

This is such an interesting comment. I've often wondered (I'm white) why some people I know who are black think other black people will support them just for colour. My colleague messed up and assumed another black colleague would have her back who she isn't friendly with and didn't witness. She said it's sisterhood. I said nothing as it wasn't my place but when the other colleague shrugged and said she hasn't seen a thing, the lady next to me (who had this incident) seemed like an offence had been made! I felt bad for her as she was so sure she'd be off the hook (she had messed up but I wasn't going to say I saw, but equally I wasn't going to lie for her) but I was left wondering why she thought this was a thing?? So interested to know whether this was exclusive to her or a belief you grow up as a minority (black is minority where I am from although I see at least one, usually many people of colour in every shop or street at least so it's not a small minority at all). The lady who triggered said incident is smart, well educated, beautiful, social, wealthy.. She's the epitome of success and so she wasn't a chancer who had grown up used to people bailing her out. Thats why I think her assuming this was jarring to me. Is it a cultural thing I wouldn't grasp or is it something else? [Edited 4/8/21 0:58am]

Growing up in the South Bronx during the 60s & 70s, I learned at an early age, black and brown folks can be just as devious as white folks. And as adults, we're all trying to get the same piece of the pie, especially in cold-blooded city like New York. I handle my own business and trust NO ONE outside my inner circle of family and close friends.

[Edited 4/8/21 3:04am]

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Reply #39 posted 04/08/21 3:38am

coldcoffeeandc
ocacola

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uPtoWnNY said:



coldcoffeeandcocacola said:


uPtoWnNY said:



I had similar experiences when my family moved from the South Bronx to Long Island, but with less violence (probably because the neighborhood was @ 60/40). Not only did I deal with ignorant shit from racist whites, but also from some brothas who called me "punk", "fa****" or "white" because I got good grades and was only average at sports. I wasn't exactly part of the "cool" crowd who smoked weed and talked "hip". College was a breath of fresh air....it was pleasure being around brothas and sistas who were all about education/empowerment instead of nonsense. But it was a good life lesson....just because someone has the same color as me, doesn't mean they have my back.



This is such an interesting comment. I've often wondered (I'm white) why some people I know who are black think other black people will support them just for colour. My colleague messed up and assumed another black colleague would have her back who she isn't friendly with and didn't witness. She said it's sisterhood. I said nothing as it wasn't my place but when the other colleague shrugged and said she hasn't seen a thing, the lady next to me (who had this incident) seemed like an offence had been made! I felt bad for her as she was so sure she'd be off the hook (she had messed up but I wasn't going to say I saw, but equally I wasn't going to lie for her) but I was left wondering why she thought this was a thing?? So interested to know whether this was exclusive to her or a belief you grow up as a minority (black is minority where I am from although I see at least one, usually many people of colour in every shop or street at least so it's not a small minority at all). The lady who triggered said incident is smart, well educated, beautiful, social, wealthy.. She's the epitome of success and so she wasn't a chancer who had grown up used to people bailing her out. Thats why I think her assuming this was jarring to me. Is it a cultural thing I wouldn't grasp or is it something else? [Edited 4/8/21 0:58am]


Growing up in the South Bronx during the 60s & 70s, I learned at an early age, black and brown folks can be just as devious as white folks. And as adults, we're all trying to get the same piece of the pie, especially in cold-blooded city like New York. I handle my own business and trust NO ONE outside my inner circle of family and close friends.

[Edited 4/8/21 3:04am]




100% right.
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Reply #40 posted 04/08/21 4:09am

2elijah

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coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

uPtoWnNY said:



jjhunsecker said:


Margot said:



I think you mentioned attending parochial school as I did. I attended one year of parochial high school as well. The classes were arduous but I am now greatful for the experience.


After that year I attended high school in an affluent zip code in the Bay Area and was one year ahead in every subject, particularly Latin. (Did a little skating that year). It showed me that very few public schools are likely teaching @ a high level unless one is enrolled in AP or Honor's classes.



[Edited 4/3/21 17:51pm]



After leaving Catholic grammar school I attended a very good public high school, considered at the time a “magnet school “. It was in an almost entirely White neighborhood, and my mother, knowing the iniquities in society and the especially the school system, very wisely assessed that a school like this would have better teachers and better facilities. I received an excellent education there, both academically and socially, as I learned how to interact with different types of people. I made friendships that last to this day. Being one of the few minorities in this environment also had an ugly side: I heard the words “nigger” and “spic” pretty much every day. And there were several instances of what could be described as racially motivated confrontations and even violence, especially in the areas surrounding the school. At that time, race riots were not uncommon in the boroughs and suburbs of New York. One had to be on-guard at all times


I had similar experiences when my family moved from the South Bronx to Long Island, but with less violence (probably because the neighborhood was @ 60/40). Not only did I deal with ignorant shit from racist whites, but also from some brothas who called me "punk", "fa****" or "white" because I got good grades and was only average at sports. I wasn't exactly part of the "cool" crowd who smoked weed and talked "hip". College was a breath of fresh air....it was pleasure being around brothas and sistas who were all about education/empowerment instead of nonsense. But it was a good life lesson....just because someone has the same color as me, doesn't mean they have my back.




This is such an interesting comment. I've often wondered (I'm white) why some people I know who are black think other black people will support them just for colour. My colleague messed up and assumed another black colleague would have her back who she isn't friendly with and didn't witness. She said it's sisterhood. I said nothing as it wasn't my place but when the other colleague shrugged and said she hasn't seen a thing, the lady next to me (who had this incident) seemed like an offence had been made! I felt bad for her as she was so sure she'd be off the hook (she had messed up but I wasn't going to say I saw, but equally I wasn't going to lie for her) but I was left wondering why she thought this was a thing?? So interested to know whether this was exclusive to her or a belief you grow up as a minority (black is minority where I am from although I see at least one, usually many people of colour in every shop or street at least so it's not a small minority at all). The lady who triggered said incident is smart, well educated, beautiful, social, wealthy.. She's the epitome of success and so she wasn't a chancer who had grown up used to people bailing her out. Thats why I think her assuming this was jarring to me. Is it a cultural thing I wouldn't grasp or is it something else?
[Edited 4/8/21 0:58am]




Actually no, it’s not a ‘cultural’ thing specific to the Black community. There are people from your racial group, and other non-Black groups, who I’ve experienced doing the same with one another. Really depends on the situation. For example, there are many within their own racial group who will support each others’ businesses just to show ‘economic support’ in their community, to help those persons’ businesses grow. Nothing wrong with that but then there are many who may expect support in moral/personal ways, some not-so-nice ways, from someone from the same racial group, just like you mentioned about your friend, but don’t look at that situation, as ‘a specific to one racial group’, because then that leads to stereotyping, and the Black community is not monolithic.

Also I can relate to some of JJ’s and UptownNY’s experiences growing up in a middle-class community. In the early days my community was 70% White/30% Black. Few years later, when the ‘White-Flight’ started, my community’s demographics changed to a mixture of middle to Black upper class Black community. A community where everyone looked out for each other. In the midst of it all, we still had to endure the racism many of us faced in public school, and outside our community, even while out and about with our parents. But that didn’t stop me from doing well in school. My classes were racially diverse, and I also had the early experience of living in a diverse community as a young child, as the same, when I got older.

During my early school years, I didn’t listen to two White teachers who tried to tell me, because of my racial identity, that I shouldn’t seek certain aspirations in life. I just ignored their racial biases, and thought they were crazy, lol
because my father always taught me I could achieve whatever I wanted in life.

Sadly, I had to learn how to deal with racial prejudice at a young age, and at the same time, developed the courage to handle it, by not allowing it to define who I am as a human being nor dictate ‘limitations’ to me, because as time passed, I realized that someone else’s racial bias was not my problem, it is the insecurities and ignorance of individuals, who try to impose their racial hatred on others.
[Edited 4/8/21 4:13am]
PRESIDENT BIDEN, VICE-PRESIDENT HARRIS clapping
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Reply #41 posted 04/08/21 4:24am

2elijah

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To the OP’s question:

In 2024 I hope this country continues to become more racially-diverse, and Americans learn to respect and accept that this is a country of immigrants.

Would like to see more Americans take environmental issues more seriously for future generations,

and that we are rid of the pandemic, and the country is safe to get back to some normalcy, socially.
PRESIDENT BIDEN, VICE-PRESIDENT HARRIS clapping
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Reply #42 posted 04/08/21 5:44am

jjhunsecker

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uPtoWnNY said:



coldcoffeeandcocacola said:


uPtoWnNY said:



I had similar experiences when my family moved from the South Bronx to Long Island, but with less violence (probably because the neighborhood was @ 60/40). Not only did I deal with ignorant shit from racist whites, but also from some brothas who called me "punk", "fa****" or "white" because I got good grades and was only average at sports. I wasn't exactly part of the "cool" crowd who smoked weed and talked "hip". College was a breath of fresh air....it was pleasure being around brothas and sistas who were all about education/empowerment instead of nonsense. But it was a good life lesson....just because someone has the same color as me, doesn't mean they have my back.



This is such an interesting comment. I've often wondered (I'm white) why some people I know who are black think other black people will support them just for colour. My colleague messed up and assumed another black colleague would have her back who she isn't friendly with and didn't witness. She said it's sisterhood. I said nothing as it wasn't my place but when the other colleague shrugged and said she hasn't seen a thing, the lady next to me (who had this incident) seemed like an offence had been made! I felt bad for her as she was so sure she'd be off the hook (she had messed up but I wasn't going to say I saw, but equally I wasn't going to lie for her) but I was left wondering why she thought this was a thing?? So interested to know whether this was exclusive to her or a belief you grow up as a minority (black is minority where I am from although I see at least one, usually many people of colour in every shop or street at least so it's not a small minority at all). The lady who triggered said incident is smart, well educated, beautiful, social, wealthy.. She's the epitome of success and so she wasn't a chancer who had grown up used to people bailing her out. Thats why I think her assuming this was jarring to me. Is it a cultural thing I wouldn't grasp or is it something else? [Edited 4/8/21 0:58am]


Growing up in the South Bronx during the 60s & 70s, I learned at an early age, black and brown folks can be just as devious as white folks. And as adults, we're all trying to get the same piece of the pie, especially in cold-blooded city like New York. I handle my own business and trust NO ONE outside my inner circle of family and close friends.

[Edited 4/8/21 3:04am]



I hear ya.... as a New Yorker, it was instilled in me since childhood to never trust anyone that I don’t know personally.

I also think that I was spared the whole “acting White” nonsense by attending Parochial school. Even though most of the other kids there were minorities, I suspect that most of them had a different perspective because they came from homes where the parents struggled and worked very hard to pay for the schooling. A sort of social self selection in a way. And then in High School, it was only about 10% minority at most when I attended
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #43 posted 04/08/21 6:10am

jjhunsecker

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2elijah said:

coldcoffeeandcocacola said:




This is such an interesting comment. I've often wondered (I'm white) why some people I know who are black think other black people will support them just for colour. My colleague messed up and assumed another black colleague would have her back who she isn't friendly with and didn't witness. She said it's sisterhood. I said nothing as it wasn't my place but when the other colleague shrugged and said she hasn't seen a thing, the lady next to me (who had this incident) seemed like an offence had been made! I felt bad for her as she was so sure she'd be off the hook (she had messed up but I wasn't going to say I saw, but equally I wasn't going to lie for her) but I was left wondering why she thought this was a thing?? So interested to know whether this was exclusive to her or a belief you grow up as a minority (black is minority where I am from although I see at least one, usually many people of colour in every shop or street at least so it's not a small minority at all). The lady who triggered said incident is smart, well educated, beautiful, social, wealthy.. She's the epitome of success and so she wasn't a chancer who had grown up used to people bailing her out. Thats why I think her assuming this was jarring to me. Is it a cultural thing I wouldn't grasp or is it something else?
[Edited 4/8/21 0:58am]




Actually no, it’s not a ‘cultural’ thing specific to the Black community. There are people from your racial group, and other non-Black groups, who I’ve experienced doing the same with one another. Really depends on the situation. For example, there are many within their own racial group who will support each others’ businesses just to show ‘economic support’ in their community, to help those persons’ businesses grow. Nothing wrong with that but then there are many who may expect support in moral/personal ways, some not-so-nice ways, from someone from the same racial group, just like you mentioned about your friend, but don’t look at that situation, as ‘a specific to one racial group’, because then that leads to stereotyping, and the Black community is not monolithic.

Also I can relate to some of JJ’s and UptownNY’s experiences growing up in a middle-class community. In the early days my community was 70% White/30% Black. Few years later, when the ‘White-Flight’ started, my community’s demographics changed to a mixture of middle to Black upper class Black community. A community where everyone looked out for each other. In the midst of it all, we still had to endure the racism many of us faced in public school, and outside our community, even while out and about with our parents. But that didn’t stop me from doing well in school. My classes were racially diverse, and I also had the early experience of living in a diverse community as a young child, as the same, when I got older.

During my early school years, I didn’t listen to two White teachers who tried to tell me, because of my racial identity, that I shouldn’t seek certain aspirations in life. I just ignored their racial biases, and thought they were crazy, lol
because my father always taught me I could achieve whatever I wanted in life.

Sadly, I had to learn how to deal with racial prejudice at a young age, and at the same time, developed the courage to handle it, by not allowing it to define who I am as a human being nor dictate ‘limitations’ to me, because as time passed, I realized that someone else’s racial bias was not my problem, it is the insecurities and ignorance of individuals, who try to impose their racial hatred on others.
[Edited 4/8/21 4:13am]


Very true. You can’t let the ignorance and stupidity of others affect you or bring you down to their level
#SOCIETYDEFINESU
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Reply #44 posted 04/08/21 8:24am

coldcoffeeandc
ocacola

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2elijah said:

coldcoffeeandcocacola said:




This is such an interesting comment. I've often wondered (I'm white) why some people I know who are black think other black people will support them just for colour. My colleague messed up and assumed another black colleague would have her back who she isn't friendly with and didn't witness. She said it's sisterhood. I said nothing as it wasn't my place but when the other colleague shrugged and said she hasn't seen a thing, the lady next to me (who had this incident) seemed like an offence had been made! I felt bad for her as she was so sure she'd be off the hook (she had messed up but I wasn't going to say I saw, but equally I wasn't going to lie for her) but I was left wondering why she thought this was a thing?? So interested to know whether this was exclusive to her or a belief you grow up as a minority (black is minority where I am from although I see at least one, usually many people of colour in every shop or street at least so it's not a small minority at all). The lady who triggered said incident is smart, well educated, beautiful, social, wealthy.. She's the epitome of success and so she wasn't a chancer who had grown up used to people bailing her out. Thats why I think her assuming this was jarring to me. Is it a cultural thing I wouldn't grasp or is it something else?
[Edited 4/8/21 0:58am]




Actually no, it’s not a ‘cultural’ thing specific to the Black community. There are people from your racial group, and other non-Black groups, who I’ve experienced doing the same with one another. Really depends on the situation. For example, there are many within their own racial group who will support each others’ businesses just to show ‘economic support’ in their community, to help those persons’ businesses grow. Nothing wrong with that but then there are many who may expect support in moral/personal ways, some not-so-nice ways, from someone from the same racial group, just like you mentioned about your friend, but don’t look at that situation, as ‘a specific to one racial group’, because then that leads to stereotyping, and the Black community is not monolithic.

Also I can relate to some of JJ’s and UptownNY’s experiences growing up in a middle-class community. In the early days my community was 70% White/30% Black. Few years later, when the ‘White-Flight’ started, my community’s demographics changed to a mixture of middle to Black upper class Black community. A community where everyone looked out for each other. In the midst of it all, we still had to endure the racism many of us faced in public school, and outside our community, even while out and about with our parents. But that didn’t stop me from doing well in school. My classes were racially diverse, and I also had the early experience of living in a diverse community as a young child, as the same, when I got older.

During my early school years, I didn’t listen to two White teachers who tried to tell me, because of my racial identity, that I shouldn’t seek certain aspirations in life. I just ignored their racial biases, and thought they were crazy, lol
because my father always taught me I could achieve whatever I wanted in life.

Sadly, I had to learn how to deal with racial prejudice at a young age, and at the same time, developed the courage to handle it, by not allowing it to define who I am as a human being nor dictate ‘limitations’ to me, because as time passed, I realized that someone else’s racial bias was not my problem, it is the insecurities and ignorance of individuals, who try to impose their racial hatred on others.
[Edited 4/8/21 4:13am]


I've never seen it happen anywhere else other than my work situation but you are right, I didn't mean to pigeon hole at all, it was just her use of the word sisterhood that made me wonder as she made it clear it was cos she was black. I don't think I've ever seen it happen in my own group But most places I've worked have been run exclusively by middle aged white men so perhaps this is a thing that happens between them I wouldn't be privy to..
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Reply #45 posted 04/09/21 6:34am

2elijah

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coldcoffeeandcocacola said:

2elijah said:





Actually no, it’s not a ‘cultural’ thing specific to the Black community. There are people from your racial group, and other non-Black groups, who I’ve experienced doing the same with one another. Really depends on the situation. For example, there are many within their own racial group who will support each others’ businesses just to show ‘economic support’ in their community, to help those persons’ businesses grow. Nothing wrong with that but then there are many who may expect support in moral/personal ways, some not-so-nice ways, from someone from the same racial group, just like you mentioned about your friend, but don’t look at that situation, as ‘a specific to one racial group’, because then that leads to stereotyping, and the Black community is not monolithic.

Also I can relate to some of JJ’s and UptownNY’s experiences growing up in a middle-class community. In the early days my community was 70% White/30% Black. Few years later, when the ‘White-Flight’ started, my community’s demographics changed to a mixture of middle to Black upper class Black community. A community where everyone looked out for each other. In the midst of it all, we still had to endure the racism many of us faced in public school, and outside our community, even while out and about with our parents. But that didn’t stop me from doing well in school. My classes were racially diverse, and I also had the early experience of living in a diverse community as a young child, as the same, when I got older.

During my early school years, I didn’t listen to two White teachers who tried to tell me, because of my racial identity, that I shouldn’t seek certain aspirations in life. I just ignored their racial biases, and thought they were crazy, lol
because my father always taught me I could achieve whatever I wanted in life.

Sadly, I had to learn how to deal with racial prejudice at a young age, and at the same time, developed the courage to handle it, by not allowing it to define who I am as a human being nor dictate ‘limitations’ to me, because as time passed, I realized that someone else’s racial bias was not my problem, it is the insecurities and ignorance of individuals, who try to impose their racial hatred on others.
[Edited 4/8/21 4:13am]


I've never seen it happen anywhere else other than my work situation but you are right, I didn't mean to pigeon hole at all, it was just her use of the word sisterhood that made me wonder as she made it clear it was cos she was black.

I don't think I've ever seen it happen in my own group But most places I've worked have been run exclusively by middle aged white men so perhaps this is a thing that happens between them I wouldn't be privy to..

Sisterhood is not an isolated term for Black women. That’s a term many women from any racial group use, for a specific cause, like when women say, women should stick together for certain causes, like fighting for womens’ rights. There’s a sisterhood in that, and really nothing strange about 2 women from any racial group expecting support from one from the same racial group. It’s more or less maybe an expected familiarity/similarity or something culturally similar, she thought the woman being Black, would understand, but as Black women in this country, we come from various economic/educational/cultural/ethnic backgrounds. So nothing unusual that she didn’t agree with the other Boavk woman, whatever the situation was.
PRESIDENT BIDEN, VICE-PRESIDENT HARRIS clapping
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Reply #46 posted 04/15/21 7:10pm

PeachyGirl

Old America- Basically a White majority and Black minority. But the two groups shared two strong commonalities. The English language and Christianity faith.

New America
Black vs White vs Hispanic vs Asian
Straight vs Gay vs Transgender
Christianity vs Muslim
Left vs Right (Civil War hatred)
Mass ethnic killings
No Freedom of Press
Freedom of Speech weakening

Enjoy the decline
When Doves Cry
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Reply #47 posted 04/15/21 9:58pm

2elijah

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PeachyGirl said:

Old America- Basically a White majority and Black minority. But the two groups shared two strong commonalities. The English language and Christianity faith.

New America
Black vs White vs Hispanic vs Asian
Straight vs Gay vs Transgender
Christianity vs Muslim
Left vs Right (Civil War hatred)
Mass ethnic killings
No Freedom of Press
Freedom of Speech weakening

Enjoy the decline


What decline? It’s a country whose demographics, among other things are changing. It was never meant to stay the same.

You do know that ‘mass ethnic killing’ is not new in America right? Because it happened in what you label as ‘Old America.’ It was called ‘Genocide’.
[Edited 4/15/21 22:29pm]
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