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Thread started 08/19/20 12:32pm

OldFriends4Sal
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South African issues of unrest

I've been reading some heavy stuff about violent attacks towards farmers here. Do we have any S Africans on the Org? 'Soft Targets'

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

South African farmers protest attacks

Hundreds of farmers on tractors, excavators, harvesters, trucks or horses took to the streets of the small South African town of Mookgophong on Tuesday, protesting what they said was a spike in attacks on farms.
...
Protester Adriaan Pont said that because farmers live in isolated areas, "we are soft targets".

Murders are generally high in South Africa. In the 12 months up to April, the police recorded 21,325 murders, averaging 58.4 per day and showing a 1.4-percent increase over the previous year, according to official police statistics.

Of that number, 49 were farmers.

...
The group said the assaults and murders are not only targeting whites, but also black people and Indians.

.

http://img-s-msn-com.akam...=f&l=f

http://img-s-msn-com.akam...=f&l=f

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https://prince.org/msg/7/464433 9.24.2020
if you ever try the lotus position
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Reply #1 posted 08/19/20 2:33pm

SantanaMaitrey
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Crime has been on the rise in SA since the end of apartheid, that's for sure.
I once met a white South African in a bar in Zanzibar and he talked about the former communist countries and said, "at least there was no crime."
To which I replied: "the government was the criminal."
And that's the whole thing. The apartheid regime was criminal, but the ANC is also full of corruption, but because of the fight against apartheid and the iconic Nelson Mandela, the ANC still has the image of freedom fighters. So why would they care about the Boers? They're not going to vote for the ANC anyway. The power of apartheid has been broken, now it's time for the power of the ANC to be broken. The Boers are no longer the oppressors and the ANC are no longer the freedom fighters. Look at what happened in Zimbabwe. The country was totally ruined by freedom fighter Robert Mugabe.
O tempora! O mores!
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Reply #2 posted 08/31/20 6:14pm

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https://www.msn.com/en-us...d=msedgntp

'Too loud': S Africa court bans call to prayer at Durban mosque

Mia Swart 2 days ago

Al Jazeera logo'Too loud': S Africa court bans call to prayer at Durban mosque

Johannesburg, South Africa - A court has ruled the call to prayer at a mosque was too loud and ordered it toned down after a complaint from a nearby resident.

a group of people walking in front of a building: A Muslim association said the ruling 'ignores the right of a religious group to manifest its religious beliefs as protected under the rights in the constitution' [File: Rajesh Jantilal/AFP]© [File: Rajesh Jantilal/AFP] A Muslim association said the ruling 'ignores the right of a religious group to manifest its religious beliefs as protected under the rights in the constitution' [File: Rajesh Jantilal/AFP]

Judge Sidwell Mngadi from the Kwazulu-Natal High Court in Durban issued a court order against the mosque to ensure its call to prayer is not audible inside a neighbour's house across the street.

The case was brought by Chandra Ellaurie who lives opposite the Madrasah Talemuddeen Islamic Institute in Isipingo Beach. Ellaurie argued the prayer call "deprived him of the enjoyment of his property rights".

On Wednesday, the Isipingo Institute said it will appeal the ruling.

"The proximity of the applicant's property to that of the Madrasah and the overwhelming evidence of the making of the call to prayer ... create probabilities that favour the applicant's version that the call to prayer interferes with his private space," Mngadi said in his judgement.

Ellaurie, a Hindu, complained the call to prayer gives the neighbourhood "a distinct Muslim atmosphere". He also requested the institute be shut down, but Mngadi refused to make such an order.

The judge ordered the call to prayer may not be heard within Ellaurie's house.

Mohammed Patel, chairman of the Isipingo Muslim Association, said the mosque did not intend to further use external sound amplification.

Human Rights Commission

Ellaurie had been complaining about the call to prayer since 2003 and reported it to the South African Human Rights Commission in July 2004.

At the time, the commission recommended the Isipingo Beach Muslim Association "desist from using the external sound amplifier system during the first call to prayer of each day" - which is at about 3:30am local time. It also said each call to prayer should not last longer than three minutes.

Mohamed Ameermia, commissioner at the South African Human Rights Commission, described the judgment as "shocking". Speaking to Al Jazeera, he said the ruling violated a number of constitutional rights, including the right to equality and the right to freedom of religion.

"South Africa is a diverse nation in which people have to show tolerance and a sense of social cohesion," said Ameermia.

The chairperson of the Muslim Judicial Council in South Africa, Moulana Abdul Kalik, told Al Jazeera the complainant had a weak case because the call to prayer was being regulated and was not "on loudspeakers".

Kalik said the judgement "ignores the right of a religious group to manifest its religious beliefs as protected under the rights in the constitution".

According to Pierre de Vos, professor of constitutional law at the University of Cape Town, the court made "a serious mistake" in granting Ellaurie's complaint.

De Vos said under South African law, property owners do not have an absolute right to "undisturbed enjoyment of property" as assumed by the judge.

"Property owners are required to tolerate a degree of nuisance from their neighbours," said de Vos.

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
https://prince.org/msg/7/464433 9.24.2020
if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?
#IDEFINEME
For the mystery of iniquity doth already work...
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Reply #3 posted 09/08/20 10:19am

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https://www.msn.com/en-us...d=msedgntp

...

In late August, Nathaniel Julius, a young South African boy, was killed by police from the Eldorado Park police station in Soweto. According to neighbors, Nathaniel — who had been living with Down syndrome — was shot in the head and chest because he did not respond to officers' questions. He was unarmed.

"Nobody should ever feel this pain when I identified his body. No child is supposed to die like that. Not one child in this world needs to die like this," said Bridget Harris, his mother.

The community is now demanding answers from authorities who are supposed to serve and protect the people. They want those responsible for the shooting to be held accountable.

Police version different from witness account

Police have claimed that the boy was killed during a confrontation between police officers and gang members. Gang violence is a huge problem in Eldorado Park, a suburb south of Johannesburg. However, the official explanation has contradicted the description of witnesses.

The South African Police Service has faced unprecedented local and international media attention over several incidents in which people have died or have been assaulted by the police. The country has a history of law enforcement violence due to racial and socioeconomic disparities that have continuously plagued the Rainbow Nation.

a person standing on top of a grass covered field: In 2012, South African police shot and killed 37 striking miners in what became known as the Marikana Massacre© Reuters In 2012, South African police shot and killed 37 striking miners in what became known as the Marikana Massacre

South Africa police most corrupt: report

A 2019 report by Corruption Watch suggested South Africa's police are the most corrupt public servants — with abuse of power and bribery being ripe. "The trend is systemic and has been institutionalized from the very top," said Wikus Steyl, a lawyer in Johannesburg. Steyl, who represents victims of police brutality, said he wants to see more responsible officers in charge.

According to annual statistics from the Independent Police Investigative Department, South African police officers killed 538 people in the 2017-2018 reporting year, and 440 people in the 2018- 2019 reporting year.

But the loss of trust in police is not only a problem in South Africa. During the COVID-19 pandemic, many human rights organiz...ice abuse.

...

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
https://prince.org/msg/7/464433 9.24.2020
if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?
#IDEFINEME
For the mystery of iniquity doth already work...
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