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Thread started 08/10/20 9:33am

maplenpg

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Back to school

In the UK we have had lots of MPs taking the opportunity to tell us how safe our schools are. Apparently there is robust science to prove there is no risk, though it isn't available until near Christmastime. Apparently parents have a 'moral duty' to send their kids back so that they themselves can get back to work and bolster the economy.

There are some strange rules regarding UK schools returning. Bubbles of up 240 kids, no masks etc... which is fine for Scotland, who are running on minimal cases and have an excellent track and trace system, but what about England? Yesterday we had over 1000 cases, over 800 today, our track and trace is awful, and frankly I don't trust a word our politicians say. Oh, and we'll get fined up to £60 per child, per day if we don't send them.

I hope this thread can be used to discuss both news items on children going back to school, but also to get our personal opinions as many of us are parents, either of kids or teachers. Also to compare rules and regulations around the world.

[Edited 8/10/20 9:36am]

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Reply #1 posted 08/10/20 9:36am

maplenpg

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https://www.nytimes.com/2...eCP0lLmaBg


When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

Confident it had beaten the coronavirus and desperate to reboot a devastated economy, the Israeli government invited the entire student body back in late May.

Within days, infections were reported at a Jerusalem high school, which quickly mushroomed into the largest outbreak in a single school in Israel, possibly the world.

The virus rippled out to the students’ homes and then to other schools and neighborhoods, ultimately infecting hundreds of students, teachers and relatives.

To accumulate power, a government with authoritarian tendencies must first destroy power. https://www.theguardian.c...y-exchange
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Reply #2 posted 08/10/20 9:39am

maplenpg

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-53718066

Coronavirus: Little evidence of Covid transmission in schools, says Williamson


Mr Williamson said the government was being guided by the best science as it accelerated plans to reopen schools to all pupils in England next month.

Government advisers have warned the nation may have reached the limit of what can be reopened in society safely.

But Mr Williamson suggested an upcoming study would support the government's position on reopening schools.

His comments come after Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the reopening of schools - after months without in-person education - was the "national priority" of the government.

To accumulate power, a government with authoritarian tendencies must first destroy power. https://www.theguardian.c...y-exchange
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Reply #3 posted 08/10/20 10:05am

maplenpg

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https://www.usnews.com/ne...s-pandemic

How Countries Reopened Schools Amid a Pandemic

Israel, Japan, Sweden and Uruguay can offer invaluable insights to U.S. education officials on how to reopen schools.


There is no perfect way to reopen schools during a pandemic. Even when a country has COVID-19 under control, there's no guarantee that schools can reopen safely.

But the policies and practices of countries that have had some initial success with schools point in the same direction. It helps to slowly stage the reopening. Strict mask wearing and social distancing is critical, both in schools and surrounding communities. And both officials and families need reliable and up-to-date data so that they can continually assess outbreaks – and change course quickly if necessary.

To accumulate power, a government with authoritarian tendencies must first destroy power. https://www.theguardian.c...y-exchange
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Reply #4 posted 08/10/20 10:58am

DiminutiveRock
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This is also relevant to this thread which is more specifically about 'back to school" in the age of Covid:

At Least 97,000 Children in the U.S. Tested Positive in Last 2 Weeks of July

Trump’s unilateral economic relief actions come under fire. Ohio’s governor urges use of rapid tests, but with caution after his false positive.

At least 97,000 children in the United States tested positive for the coronavirus the last two weeks of July alone, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association. The report says that at least 338,000 children have tested positive since the pandemic began, meaning more than a quarter have tested positive in just those two weeks.

The report comes as parents and education leaders grapple with the challenges of resuming schooling as the virus continues to surge in parts of the country.

More than seven out of 10 infections were from states in the South and West, according to the report, which relied on data from 49 states along with Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and Guam. The count could be higher because the report did not include complete data from Texas and information from parts of New York State outside of New York City.

Missouri, Oklahoma, Alaska, Nevada, Idaho and Montana were among the states with the highest percent increase of child infections during that period, according to the report.

New York City, New Jersey and other states in the Northeast, where the virus peaked in March and April, had the lowest percent increase of child infections, according to the report.

In total, 338,982 children have been infected, according to the report.

Not every locality where data was collected categorized children in the same age range. Most places cited in the report considered children to be people no older than 17 or 19. In Alabama, though, the age limit was 24; in Florida and Utah the age limit was 14.

The report noted that children rarely get severely sick from Covid-19, but another report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, highlighted how the threat from a new Covid-19-related condition, called Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children or MIS-C, has disproportionately affected people of color.

https://www.nytimes.com/2...k-6dbc15a3

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
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Reply #5 posted 08/10/20 11:12am

maplenpg

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DiminutiveRocker said:

This is also relevant to this thread which is more specifically about 'back to school" in the age of Covid:

At Least 97,000 Children in the U.S. Tested Positive in Last 2 Weeks of July

Trump’s unilateral economic relief actions come under fire. Ohio’s governor urges use of rapid tests, but with caution after his false positive.

At least 97,000 children in the United States tested positive for the coronavirus the last two weeks of July alone, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association. The report says that at least 338,000 children have tested positive since the pandemic began, meaning more than a quarter have tested positive in just those two weeks.

The report comes as parents and education leaders grapple with the challenges of resuming schooling as the virus continues to surge in parts of the country.

More than seven out of 10 infections were from states in the South and West, according to the report, which relied on data from 49 states along with Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and Guam. The count could be higher because the report did not include complete data from Texas and information from parts of New York State outside of New York City.

Missouri, Oklahoma, Alaska, Nevada, Idaho and Montana were among the states with the highest percent increase of child infections during that period, according to the report.

New York City, New Jersey and other states in the Northeast, where the virus peaked in March and April, had the lowest percent increase of child infections, according to the report.

In total, 338,982 children have been infected, according to the report.

Not every locality where data was collected categorized children in the same age range. Most places cited in the report considered children to be people no older than 17 or 19. In Alabama, though, the age limit was 24; in Florida and Utah the age limit was 14.

The report noted that children rarely get severely sick from Covid-19, but another report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, highlighted how the threat from a new Covid-19-related condition, called Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children or MIS-C, has disproportionately affected people of color.

https://www.nytimes.com/2...k-6dbc15a3

This is shocking, the figures I would also like to know about is how many adults became infected from these children? It's widely reported that kids don't get as sick with Covid but can spread it. SAGE (the UK scientific body advising government) said teenagers spread it much the same as adults. Only a few weeks ago we shut some schools as Matt Hancock, who now says it is safe, said exactly the opposite (video in this tweet). Heck, our latest town to get it, Preston has the slogan, "Don't kill Granny" as so many young people (under 30) have been getting it sad

To accumulate power, a government with authoritarian tendencies must first destroy power. https://www.theguardian.c...y-exchange
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Reply #6 posted 08/10/20 11:43am

DiminutiveRock
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maplenpg said:

DiminutiveRocker said:

This is also relevant to this thread which is more specifically about 'back to school" in the age of Covid:

At Least 97,000 Children in the U.S. Tested Positive in Last 2 Weeks of July

Trump’s unilateral economic relief actions come under fire. Ohio’s governor urges use of rapid tests, but with caution after his false positive.

At least 97,000 children in the United States tested positive for the coronavirus the last two weeks of July alone, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association. The report says that at least 338,000 children have tested positive since the pandemic began, meaning more than a quarter have tested positive in just those two weeks.

The report comes as parents and education leaders grapple with the challenges of resuming schooling as the virus continues to surge in parts of the country.

More than seven out of 10 infections were from states in the South and West, according to the report, which relied on data from 49 states along with Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and Guam. The count could be higher because the report did not include complete data from Texas and information from parts of New York State outside of New York City.

Missouri, Oklahoma, Alaska, Nevada, Idaho and Montana were among the states with the highest percent increase of child infections during that period, according to the report.

New York City, New Jersey and other states in the Northeast, where the virus peaked in March and April, had the lowest percent increase of child infections, according to the report.

In total, 338,982 children have been infected, according to the report.

Not every locality where data was collected categorized children in the same age range. Most places cited in the report considered children to be people no older than 17 or 19. In Alabama, though, the age limit was 24; in Florida and Utah the age limit was 14.

The report noted that children rarely get severely sick from Covid-19, but another report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, highlighted how the threat from a new Covid-19-related condition, called Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children or MIS-C, has disproportionately affected people of color.

https://www.nytimes.com/2...k-6dbc15a3

This is shocking, the figures I would also like to know about is how many adults became infected from these children? It's widely reported that kids don't get as sick with Covid but can spread it. SAGE (the UK scientific body advising government) said teenagers spread it much the same as adults. Only a few weeks ago we shut some schools as Matt Hancock, who now says it is safe, said exactly the opposite (video in this tweet). Heck, our latest town to get it, Preston has the slogan, "Don't kill Granny" as so many young people (under 30) have been getting it sad


There is also the belief that ONLY people with underlying pre-existing conditions can get gravley ill. While this group is in the higher risk category, the virus may have effects that can leave a somewhat healthier person severely affected. If children can carry the virus and transmit it, it begs the question - why take the risk?

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
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Reply #7 posted 08/10/20 12:15pm

maplenpg

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DiminutiveRocker said:

maplenpg said:

This is shocking, the figures I would also like to know about is how many adults became infected from these children? It's widely reported that kids don't get as sick with Covid but can spread it. SAGE (the UK scientific body advising government) said teenagers spread it much the same as adults. Only a few weeks ago we shut some schools as Matt Hancock, who now says it is safe, said exactly the opposite (video in this tweet). Heck, our latest town to get it, Preston has the slogan, "Don't kill Granny" as so many young people (under 30) have been getting it sad


There is also the belief that ONLY people with underlying pre-existing conditions can get gravley ill. While this group is in the higher risk category, the virus may have effects that can leave a somewhat healthier person severely affected. If children can carry the virus and transmit it, it begs the question - why take the risk?

This. And especially when children might be carrying a higher viral load. https://www.the-scientist...tudy-67785

To accumulate power, a government with authoritarian tendencies must first destroy power. https://www.theguardian.c...y-exchange
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Reply #8 posted 08/10/20 12:39pm

2freaky4church
1

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Now they can be called death chambers. Shame.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #9 posted 08/10/20 1:50pm

DiminutiveRock
er

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maplenpg said:

DiminutiveRocker said:


There is also the belief that ONLY people with underlying pre-existing conditions can get gravley ill. While this group is in the higher risk category, the virus may have effects that can leave a somewhat healthier person severely affected. If children can carry the virus and transmit it, it begs the question - why take the risk?

This. And especially when children might be carrying a higher viral load. https://www.the-scientist...tudy-67785



disbelief It makes NO SENSE! sigh

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
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Reply #10 posted 08/11/20 5:25am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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New York City Could Lead on Reopening Schools, But It Isn't
Joe Nocera 2 hrs ago

.

.

(Bloomberg Opinion) -- If anybody can open schools," New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said, "we can open schools."

It was Friday morning, and at first glance, it sure looked as if Cuomo was throwing the school doors open — declaring that teachers and students could go back to their classrooms five days a week. As a parent of a son in a New York public school, I was thrilled. As I've written before, I think it is crucial that students get back into their classrooms.

After being pummeled by Covid-19 like no other state in March and April, New York had fought back like no other state. Its positivity rate — the percentage of people who test positive on a given day — which had peaked at 50% in the spring, was down to 1%. That low infection rate was the key for Cuomo.

"We have the best infection rate in the country," he boasted, only slightly exaggerating. (Vermont, Maine and Connecticut have lower positivity rates.) He noted that "remote learning can be quite unequal," which is probably the most important reason it should be an absolute last resort. But it also makes it difficult for parents to go back to work. It deprives children of the chance to socialize with friends. And even for the well-off, remote learning leaves a lot to be desired, as everyone discovered last spring.
.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/new-york-city-could-lead-on-reopening-schools-but-it-isnt/ar-BB17P9KZ?ocid=ientp





#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?

#IDEFINEME
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Reply #11 posted 08/11/20 1:23pm

maplenpg

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OldFriends4Sale said:



New York City Could Lead on Reopening Schools, But It Isn't
Joe Nocera 2 hrs ago

.

.

(Bloomberg Opinion) -- If anybody can open schools," New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said, "we can open schools."

It was Friday morning, and at first glance, it sure looked as if Cuomo was throwing the school doors open — declaring that teachers and students could go back to their classrooms five days a week. As a parent of a son in a New York public school, I was thrilled. As I've written before, I think it is crucial that students get back into their classrooms.

After being pummeled by Covid-19 like no other state in March and April, New York had fought back like no other state. Its positivity rate — the percentage of people who test positive on a given day — which had peaked at 50% in the spring, was down to 1%. That low infection rate was the key for Cuomo.

"We have the best infection rate in the country," he boasted, only slightly exaggerating. (Vermont, Maine and Connecticut have lower positivity rates.) He noted that "remote learning can be quite unequal," which is probably the most important reason it should be an absolute last resort. But it also makes it difficult for parents to go back to work. It deprives children of the chance to socialize with friends. And even for the well-off, remote learning leaves a lot to be desired, as everyone discovered last spring.
.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/new-york-city-could-lead-on-reopening-schools-but-it-isnt/ar-BB17P9KZ?ocid=ientp





This bit stuck out for me:


“The teachers have to agree to go back,” Cuomo said. “I am telling you there is going to need to be significant discussion because teachers are raising many issues.”

He added, “You’re not going to order a teacher into a classroom and say, ‘Do your job even though you don’t want to be here and you feel like your health might be threatened.’ They’re not going to be able to teach in that environment.”

It sums it up. I'm not sure of the regulations in the US, but in the UK no PPE for staff or students, no social distancing between students, bubbles of 240 kids, but then different bubbles mixing on the school bus etc... As a former secondary school teacher (age 11-18) I can sure as hell say I would be worried sick about going back to work in September. But teachers will go back, because most teachers put the kids first, what will be telling is what happens to the profession when inevitable breakouts of the virus happen. I fear for the profession, which here in the UK was already stretched to its limits.

To accumulate power, a government with authoritarian tendencies must first destroy power. https://www.theguardian.c...y-exchange
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Reply #12 posted 08/17/20 5:52pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Georgia students push for mask mandate in reopened school

Some schools across the county have now resumed in-person classes without a mask requirement and it's making many students concerned for their health. Mark Strassmann reports for CBS News' series "The New Normal: Back to School."

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?

#IDEFINEME
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Reply #13 posted 08/18/20 5:25am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

WLTX-TV Columbia Allen University students arrive on campus

Duration: 01:13 12 hrs ago

In places where you might have had a four-person suite dorm you probably have two now, and students are being really good about cleaning their spaces.

More From WLTX-TV Columbia

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?

#IDEFINEME
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Reply #14 posted 08/18/20 8:29am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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moderator



California superintendent has a plan to bring students back to the classroom -- but not their teachers
By Stephanie Becker, CNN 1 hr ago

.

California superintendent has a plan to bring students back to the classroom -- but not their teachers

Most schools in California will not be reopening for in-person education this month -- but one superintendent in the Los Angeles area has come up with a plan to welcome some students back to class. And it doesn't involve their teachers.

http://img-s-msn-com.akam...=f&l=f


On August 19, when Glendale Unified School District kicks off the academic year, 20 of the district's elementary schools will open some empty classrooms for remote learning.

But instead of the traditional 24 students per classroom, there will be no more than 12. School officials are calling the group a "technology pod," which will be supervised by a single substitute teacher or district staffer.


The staffers won't be teaching the students -- they will instead be present to offer computer technical assistance, monitor students' mask use, enforce social distancing and keep students focused on their work.

Superintendent Vivian Ekchian said she came up with the idea after noticing that many young children of essential workers didn't have proper childcare when schools were forced to pivot to remote learning in March due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

"We learned very early and during the pandemic that our parents who are essential workers, parents who could not work from home or parents who had multiple kids, had a dire need for childcare," Ekchian told CNN.

"And the reality was when we changed to remote learning, there wasn't a place for them to drop off their kids. So this at the elementary level is really an opportunity for childcare, for our parents who can't stay home with their kids and need a safe place where their students can continue to learn while they're away working or looking for a job."

This week, about 1,000 of the 13,000 grade schoolers in the district will head to classrooms, she said.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp



#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?

#IDEFINEME
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Reply #15 posted 08/18/20 10:16am

DiminutiveRock
er

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maplenpg said:

OldFriends4Sale said:



New York City Could Lead on Reopening Schools, But It Isn't
Joe Nocera 2 hrs ago

.

.

(Bloomberg Opinion) -- If anybody can open schools," New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said, "we can open schools."

It was Friday morning, and at first glance, it sure looked as if Cuomo was throwing the school doors open — declaring that teachers and students could go back to their classrooms five days a week. As a parent of a son in a New York public school, I was thrilled. As I've written before, I think it is crucial that students get back into their classrooms.

After being pummeled by Covid-19 like no other state in March and April, New York had fought back like no other state. Its positivity rate — the percentage of people who test positive on a given day — which had peaked at 50% in the spring, was down to 1%. That low infection rate was the key for Cuomo.

"We have the best infection rate in the country," he boasted, only slightly exaggerating. (Vermont, Maine and Connecticut have lower positivity rates.) He noted that "remote learning can be quite unequal," which is probably the most important reason it should be an absolute last resort. But it also makes it difficult for parents to go back to work. It deprives children of the chance to socialize with friends. And even for the well-off, remote learning leaves a lot to be desired, as everyone discovered last spring.
.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/new-york-city-could-lead-on-reopening-schools-but-it-isnt/ar-BB17P9KZ?ocid=ientp





This bit stuck out for me:


“The teachers have to agree to go back,” Cuomo said. “I am telling you there is going to need to be significant discussion because teachers are raising many issues.”

He added, “You’re not going to order a teacher into a classroom and say, ‘Do your job even though you don’t want to be here and you feel like your health might be threatened.’ They’re not going to be able to teach in that environment.”

It sums it up. I'm not sure of the regulations in the US, but in the UK no PPE for staff or students, no social distancing between students, bubbles of 240 kids, but then different bubbles mixing on the school bus etc... As a former secondary school teacher (age 11-18) I can sure as hell say I would be worried sick about going back to work in September. But teachers will go back, because most teachers put the kids first, what will be telling is what happens to the profession when inevitable breakouts of the virus happen. I fear for the profession, which here in the UK was already stretched to its limits.

It varies. In Cali, LA County has cosen online classrooms only, Orange County encourages/recommends kids go back to school and masks or social distancing is not necessary neutral


My nephew started kindergarten and got an iPad from his school wiht other supplies to learn from home. But not all schools districts have this money or maybe his parents contributed (they live in a nice neighborhood) but what about the poorer neighborhoods? Those children in poorer districts are at a disadvantage in supplies and in danger if they go to school.



"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
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Reply #16 posted 08/18/20 11:09am

v10letblues

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MY friend is teaching a kinder class with 29 kids online. She is overwhemed as all the lessons have to be reworked. But on a technical level, things are going pretty smooth. All the kids can log in an stay connected via Google Classroom pretty smoothly.

.

This is week 2 so i'm curious to see how things go throughout the year.

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Reply #17 posted 08/18/20 11:12am

DiminutiveRock
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v10letblues said:

MY friend is teaching a kinder class with 29 kids online. She is overwhemed as all the lessons have to be reworked. But on a technical level, things are going pretty smooth. All the kids can log in an stay connected via Google Classroom pretty smoothly.

.

This is week 2 so i'm curious to see how things go throughout the year.


Oh, please do let us know! My nephew began kindergarten online last week too~

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
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Reply #18 posted 08/18/20 1:02pm

v10letblues

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DiminutiveRocker said:

v10letblues said:

MY friend is teaching a kinder class with 29 kids online. She is overwhemed as all the lessons have to be reworked. But on a technical level, things are going pretty smooth. All the kids can log in an stay connected via Google Classroom pretty smoothly.

.

This is week 2 so i'm curious to see how things go throughout the year.


Oh, please do let us know! My nephew began kindergarten online last week too~

And likewise, let me know the other side of that, She would love to know kids think.

A couple of her kids are fellow teacher's kids and she gets feedback that way also. But the classes was just thrown together at the last minute. literally. Teachers were given notice and schedules without any supplies or teaching aids to hand out to the kids until the fiday before the first day of school.

Teachers as well as parents are stressed.

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Reply #19 posted 08/18/20 3:17pm

EmmaMcG

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The situation here in Ireland is a bit up in the air at the moment. We went for about a month with very few new cases and it looked like we were on track. But recently, the number of new cases per day as risen significantly so there's some debate about what's going to happen regarding schools.

I've registered to home school my daughter for the coming year anyway though because even though everyone who lives in my house are in excellent health and rarely, if ever, come into contact with vulnerable people, I just don't see the sense in taking the risk of putting my child in a potentially dangerous situation.
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Reply #20 posted 08/18/20 5:20pm

DiminutiveRock
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EmmaMcG said:

The situation here in Ireland is a bit up in the air at the moment. We went for about a month with very few new cases and it looked like we were on track. But recently, the number of new cases per day as risen significantly so there's some debate about what's going to happen regarding schools. I've registered to home school my daughter for the coming year anyway though because even though everyone who lives in my house are in excellent health and rarely, if ever, come into contact with vulnerable people, I just don't see the sense in taking the risk of putting my child in a potentially dangerous situation.


You're a good parent, Emma. hug

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
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Reply #21 posted 08/19/20 12:40am

EmmaMcG

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DiminutiveRocker said:



EmmaMcG said:


The situation here in Ireland is a bit up in the air at the moment. We went for about a month with very few new cases and it looked like we were on track. But recently, the number of new cases per day as risen significantly so there's some debate about what's going to happen regarding schools. I've registered to home school my daughter for the coming year anyway though because even though everyone who lives in my house are in excellent health and rarely, if ever, come into contact with vulnerable people, I just don't see the sense in taking the risk of putting my child in a potentially dangerous situation.


You're a good parent, Emma. hug



Thank you. The thing that worries me is that she won't get to see her friends in school. She says she doesn't mind and she actually seems eager to get started but there's bound to be an adjustment period. I'm sure I'll work something out so she can still see her friends.
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Reply #22 posted 08/19/20 6:40am

DiminutiveRock
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EmmaMcG said:

DiminutiveRocker said:


You're a good parent, Emma. hug

Thank you. The thing that worries me is that she won't get to see her friends in school. She says she doesn't mind and she actually seems eager to get started but there's bound to be an adjustment period. I'm sure I'll work something out so she can still see her friends.


My nephews zoom and facetime with their friends. They even facetimed me, on their own! I asked how ythey knew to ring me and they said they saw my face on a list! lol

I am sure that once the numbers drop, outdoor playdates with masks and hand washing can resume.

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
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Reply #23 posted 08/19/20 3:13pm

EmmaMcG

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DiminutiveRocker said:



EmmaMcG said:


DiminutiveRocker said:



You're a good parent, Emma. hug



Thank you. The thing that worries me is that she won't get to see her friends in school. She says she doesn't mind and she actually seems eager to get started but there's bound to be an adjustment period. I'm sure I'll work something out so she can still see her friends.


My nephews zoom and facetime with their friends. They even facetimed me, on their own! I asked how ythey knew to ring me and they said they saw my face on a list! lol

I am sure that once the numbers drop, outdoor playdates with masks and hand washing can resume.



I can barely switch my computer on, never mind zoom razz
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Reply #24 posted 08/19/20 3:53pm

DiminutiveRock
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EmmaMcG said:

DiminutiveRocker said:


My nephews zoom and facetime with their friends. They even facetimed me, on their own! I asked how ythey knew to ring me and they said they saw my face on a list! lol

I am sure that once the numbers drop, outdoor playdates with masks and hand washing can resume.

I can barely switch my computer on, never mind zoom razz



lol Imagine my shock when a 6 & 3 year old factimed me!

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
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Reply #25 posted 08/20/20 9:22am

OldFriends4Sal
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Wisconsin teacher creates outdoor classroom for students. Here's how
Alec Johnson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel 2 hrs ago

.

MILWAUKEE – A Wisconsin teacher is creating an outdoor classroom that she hopes will ease parents' concerns about sending their children back to school in the fall.

Lindsey Earle, a fourth grade teacher at Prairie Hill Waldorf School in Pewaukee, said the idea came from the school's early childhood program, which has outdoor time in the mornings. Even before the coronavirus pandemic, Earle said, the school had looked to create more of an outdoor learning environment.

"This year has been a catalyst for that because the air flow, we know, is so much better outside, and I guess from what we know right now that it (COVID-19) spreads less effectively outdoors than it does indoors," Earle said. "We have a fairly large campus, so we can utilize that space to make the children 6 feet apart and learn outside."

Earle said the school's students will wear masks when social distancing can't be maintained, whether indoors or outdoors...

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/wisconsin-teacher-creates-outdoor-classroom-for-students-heres-how/ar-BB18baUg?ocid=ientp

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?

#IDEFINEME
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Reply #26 posted 08/20/20 9:55am

2freaky4church
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What about that scary ass doll?

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #27 posted 08/20/20 2:07pm

DiminutiveRock
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2freaky4church1 said:

What about that scary ass doll?

Betsy DeVos?

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
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Reply #28 posted 08/22/20 8:39am

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https://www.msn.com/en-us...r-BB18g5hX

I don't want to die by going back to school': Teachers pen wills before returning to classrooms

Stephanie Asymkos 1 hr ago

Yahoo! Finance logo'I don't want to die by going back to school': Teachers pen wills before returning to classrooms

Summer planning for some teachers this year included a new, somber task: Penning their last wishes in case they contract COVID-19 when they return to their classrooms in the fall.

In interviews with Yahoo Money, some teachers and union representatives shared their frustrations at being at the mercy of their school boards since the coronavirus pandemic’s arrival in March, awaiting clarity about how they would return to teaching in the fall — hopefully safely.

Amid growing cases and death tolls — and President Donald Trump’...open fully — they’re worried that returning to a classroom is more like an occupational hazard.

“All of us ended up talking to people who were spending their summers writing their wills,” said Alison, a teacher in Colorado and her school’s teachers’ union rep. She asked to go by an alias out of fear of retribution. “They were like: ‘We probably are going to go back in person and that feels unsafe, so I'm spending my summer writing a will.’”

a group of people standing on a sidewalk: A school employee checks the temperature of a student as she returns to school on the first day of in-person classes in Orange County at Baldwin Park Elementary School on August 21, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)© Provided by Yahoo! Finance A school employee checks the temperature of a student as she returns to school on the first day of in-person classes in Orange County at Baldwin Park Elementary School on August 21, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?

#IDEFINEME
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Reply #29 posted 08/23/20 12:42am

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This is an interesting article from an interview with the UK's chief medical advisor. I know the article is probably supposed to reassure, but for me it just reaffirms the tightrope we are walking with this virus.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-53875410

To accumulate power, a government with authoritarian tendencies must first destroy power. https://www.theguardian.c...y-exchange
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