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Thread started 06/18/20 10:18am

2elijah

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What Is Juneteenth and When Is It?

For informational purposes. Feel free to add more info.

What Is Juneteenth and When Is It?

https://www.google.com/am...ontext=amp

By Seth Cline Senior Producer, News • June 17, 2020, at 3:27 p.m.

“The annual holiday celebrating the end of slavery has gained visibility amid protests of police violence and the Black Lives Matter movement.

As the nation confronts issues of racial injustice, Friday's annual Juneteenth commemoration of the end of slavery has taken on added significance.

This year's holiday will come amid civil unrest sparked by the high-profile deaths of George Floyd and other African Americans at the hands of the police, which could bring increased visibility, and increased tensions, to the celebrations.

Here's a brief primer on the holiday.

What is Juneteenth?

In short, Juneteenth – a combination of the words "June" and "19th" – is the primary holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States. Its date is tied to a speech informing the formerly enslaved black people of Texas that the Civil War was over and they were, therefore, free.

What is the origin of the Juneteenth holiday?

The holiday traces back to a speech given by a Union general in Galveston, Texas, in 1865. In his "General Order No. 3," Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger declared that, with Texas under Union control, "all slaves are free" in the state, owing to the Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Abraham Lincoln more than two years earlier.

The order did not end slavery overnight in Texas, just as Lincoln's earlier proclamation had not ended its practice in other Confederate states. But the formerly enslaved people of Texas, particularly in the area around Galveston, began to celebrate Juneteenth as the day of slavery's abolition a few years later.


How is Juneteenth celebrated?

The holiday, alternatively known as Freedom Day, Jubilee Day, and Cel-Liberation Day, is often marked by parades and public ceremonies, though celebrations vary widely from place to place.


But the Juneteenth holiday doesn't just celebrate one day in history, says Minkah Makalani, an assistant professor of African and African diaspora studies at the University of Texas at Austin.

"(The holiday) has always meant something more than just celebrating that 'we're free and equal to you.' It's always been bound up with, 'We're free and now we want freedom to mean something beyond what you think it means,'" Makalani says "It's a celebration of blackness and black life displayed in all its complexity and dynamism and diversity."

Where is Juneteenth celebrated?

In the decades since the first celebration, Juneteenth has been adopted across the U.S., with a particular focus on the South and southeastern U.S.
The celebrations are particularly jubilant in Texas, Makalani says.

"In Texas, it definitely has a tremendous source of pride and meaning and significance for people in this state who continue to suffer various forms of white supremacy and racial injustice," Makalani says.
"It's not too different in intent and passion from what you see in Carnival celebrations – not the scale and grandeur of those but the sense of celebration."
[Edited 6/18/20 18:41pm]
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Reply #1 posted 06/18/20 12:06pm

OldFriends4Sal
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Cuomo declares Juneteenth a holiday for N.Y. state employees

Danielle Garrand

9 hrs ago

Every state's most beautiful town

Jobless claims total 1.5M, worse than expected

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order on Wednesday recognizing Juneteenth — a day that commemorates the end of slavery in America — as a holiday for state employees. The holiday is celebrated each year on June 19.

Juneteenth, also called Emancipation Day and Freedom Day, will be a paid day of leave for state employees, with those required to work receiving one additional day off instead. Cuomo will also advance legislation to make Juneteenth a state holiday next year and will consider making it a celebration next year.

"Friday is Juneteenth — a day to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States — and it's a day that is especially relevant in this moment in history," Cuomo said in a news release. "Although slavery ended over 150 years ago, there has still been rampant, systemic discrimination and injustice in this state and this nation, and we have been working to enact real reforms to address these inequalities."

Cuomo said New Yorkers can use the holiday to "reflect on all the changes we still need to make to create a more fair, just and equal society."

"I think this is a period where we could see, we could see monumental change. I want to be a force for change and I want to help synergize this moment," he said in a briefing Wednesday. "If Juneteenth is part of that and recognition of what happened and an understanding of what happened and an acknowledgment of that — great."

The holiday honors June 19, 1865, when news made it to African Americans in Texas that President Abraham Lincoln had issued the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves living in Confederate states two years earlier.

Former slaves celebrated when Union soldiers finally arrived in Galveston to bring the news that slavery was abolished.

New York is not the first state to move to recognize Juneteenth as an official state holiday. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam on Tuesday did just that. Texas first made the day a state holiday in 1980.

The states are formally recognizing the holiday amid a nationwide reckoning over racial injustice. Protests against police violence and demands for police reform have continued for weeks, following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody.

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Reply #2 posted 06/18/20 4:54pm

DiminutiveRock
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Tomorrow is Juneteenth, the oldest known U.S. celebration of the end of slavery. Juneteenth, a blending of the words June and nineteenth, commemorates the news of emancipation finally coming to 250,000 enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865 - two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation.



It has long been a sacred day of celebration and a testament that Black Americans continue to rise, even when promises are unfulfilled. Every celebration of freedom should be a celebration for us all. Now more than ever, we should reflect on our history and demand action that finally fulfills those promises in our country.

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Reply #3 posted 06/19/20 4:09am

poppys

I saw this the other day when I was looking for something else -


Thread started 07/08/04 2:44pm

bwnladybug

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How long have you been a Prince fan? Thread started by deondiva.

This thread has been started by deondiva at NPGMUSICCLUB. How long have you been a Prince fan?

A very long time from seeing him over North at the Juneteenth Festival back in the days.
"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
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Reply #4 posted 06/19/20 4:40am

poppys

noa.com 6/18/20

Black-led charter schools in New Orleans declare Juneteenth a holiday, starting this year

Starting Friday, more than a dozen New Orleans charter school organizations led by African Americans will now recognize Juneteenth as an official holiday, according to a statement put out Thursday by school leaders.

The group said officials' collaborative goal in recognizing the day is for it to serve as a reminder of "the importance of black history, events, and culture."

Officials added they hoped to serve as a catalyst, encouraging the official holiday for all schools in New Orleans in the future.

“We recognize the racial inequities and disparities that are still plaguing our city, state, and nation," school leaders said. "As school entities that are black led and serve majority students of color, we acknowledge that recognizing and celebrating Juneteenth as a holiday is long overdue."

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
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Reply #5 posted 06/19/20 4:44am

poppys

fhg
juneteenth2-png-1592498804.png?crop=1.00xw:0.499xh;0,0&resize=900:*

NEW ORLEANS —

New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell recognized Juneteenth in New Orleans in a proclamation on Thursday. Cantrell tweeted the proclamation.

[Edited 6/19/20 4:50am]

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Reply #6 posted 06/19/20 4:52am

3rdeyedude

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If anything good comes from this, at least more people will know what Juneteenth is.

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Reply #7 posted 06/19/20 5:10am

poppys

This was from last years celebration in Congo Square, French Quarter. One year they had it up at the Lakefront, part of the ceremony was in the water, all the women wore white turbans, it was so cool.

5d132941d0647.image.jpg?resize=1200%2C698


5d132945d5c0c.image.jpg?resize=1200%2C800

[Edited 6/19/20 6:39am]

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Reply #8 posted 06/19/20 5:22am

3rdeyedude

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How cool if Trump just fucking made it a national holiday with one stroke of his pen? Can't he do that? Instead we have a month dedicated to Black History which most people often don't even know when that is.

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Reply #9 posted 06/19/20 7:30am

2elijah

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poppys said:

noa.com 6/18/20

Black-led charter schools in New Orleans declare Juneteenth a holiday, starting this year


Starting Friday, more than a dozen New Orleans charter school organizations led by African Americans will now recognize Juneteenth as an official holiday, according to a statement put out Thursday by school leaders.


The group said officials' collaborative goal in recognizing the day is for it to serve as a reminder of "the importance of black history, events, and culture."


Officials added they hoped to serve as a catalyst, encouraging the official holiday for all schools in New Orleans in the future.


“We recognize the racial inequities and disparities that are still plaguing our city, state, and nation," school leaders said. "As school entities that are black led and serve majority students of color, we acknowledge that recognizing and celebrating Juneteenth as a holiday is long overdue."



Wonderful. Many other states are considering honoring it as well.
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Reply #10 posted 06/19/20 7:50am

2elijah

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https://www.cnn.com/2020/...index.html


The Juneteenth flag is full of symbols. Here's what they mean

By Harmeet Kaur, CNN
Design by Will Mullery, CNN
Updated 5:00 AM ET, Fri June 19, 2020

(CNN)”You might see another red, white and blue flag flying today over state capitols and city buildings.

That banner with a bursting star in the middle is the Juneteenth Flag, a symbolic representation of the end of slavery in the United States.
The flag is the brainchild of activist Ben Haith, founder of the National Juneteenth Celebration Foundation (NJCF). Haith created the flag in 1997 with the help of collaborators, and Boston-based illustrator Lisa Jeanne Graf brought their vision to life.

The flag was revised in 2000 into the version we know today, according to the National Juneteenth Observation Foundation. Seven years later, the date "June 19, 1865" was added, commemorating the day that Union Army Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger rode into Galveston, Texas, and told enslaved African Americans of their emancipation.


(Edited for compliance)

The star

The white star in the center of the flag has a dual meaning, Haith said.
For one, it represents Texas, the Lone Star State. It was in Galveston in 1865 where Union soldiers informed the country's last remaining enslaved people that, under the Emancipation Proclamation issued two years earlier, they were free.
But the star also goes beyond Texas, representing the freedom of African Americans in all 50 states.

The burst

The bursting outline around the star is inspired by a nova, a term that astronomers use to mean a new star.

The arc

The curve that extends across the width of the flag represents a new horizon: the opportunities and promise that lay ahead for black Americans.


The red, white blue colors

The red, white and blue represents the American flag, a reminder that slaves and their descendants were and are Americans.

June 19, 1865, represents the day that enslaved black people in Galveston, Texas, became Americans under the law.

And while African Americans today are still fighting for equality and justice, Haith said those colors symbolize the continuous commitment of people in the United States to do better -- and to live up to the American ideal of liberty and justice for all.
[Edited 6/19/20 8:00am]
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Reply #11 posted 06/19/20 8:04am

DiminutiveRock
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2elijah said:

https://www.cnn.com/2020/...index.html The Juneteenth flag is full of symbols. Here's what they mean By Harmeet Kaur, CNN Design by Will Mullery, CNN Updated 5:00 AM ET, Fri June 19, 2020 (CNN)”You might see another red, white and blue flag flying today over state capitols and city buildings. That banner with a bursting star in the middle is the Juneteenth Flag, a symbolic representation of the end of slavery in the United States. The flag is the brainchild of activist Ben Haith, founder of the National Juneteenth Celebration Foundation (NJCF). Haith created the flag in 1997 with the help of collaborators, and Boston-based illustrator Lisa Jeanne Graf brought their vision to life. The flag was revised in 2000 into the version we know today, according to the National Juneteenth Observation Foundation. Seven years later, the date "June 19, 1865" was added, commemorating the day that Union Army Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger rode into Galveston, Texas, and told enslaved African Americans of their emancipation. (Edited for compliance) The star The white star in the center of the flag has a dual meaning, Haith said. For one, it represents Texas, the Lone Star State. It was in Galveston in 1865 where Union soldiers informed the country's last remaining enslaved people that, under the Emancipation Proclamation issued two years earlier, they were free. But the star also goes beyond Texas, representing the freedom of African Americans in all 50 states. The burst The bursting outline around the star is inspired by a nova, a term that astronomers use to mean a new star. The arc The curve that extends across the width of the flag represents a new horizon: the opportunities and promise that lay ahead for black Americans. The red, white blue colors The red, white and blue represents the American flag, a reminder that slaves and their descendants were and are Americans. June 19, 1865, represents the day that enslaved black people in Galveston, Texas, became Americans under the law. And while African Americans today are still fighting for equality and justice, Haith said those colors symbolize the continuous commitment of people in the United States to do better -- and to live up to the American ideal of liberty and justice for all. [Edited 6/19/20 8:00am]



"His wretched incompetence and imbecility have weakened the country, delighted our adversaries and terrified our friends. Never in the annals of American history has a bigger failure and joke risen as high as the @realDonaldTrump" - S. Schmidt
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Reply #12 posted 06/19/20 8:51am

2elijah

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DiminutiveRocker said:



2elijah said:


https://www.cnn.com/2020/...index.html The Juneteenth flag is full of symbols. Here's what they mean By Harmeet Kaur, CNN Design by Will Mullery, CNN Updated 5:00 AM ET, Fri June 19, 2020 (CNN)”You might see another red, white and blue flag flying today over state capitols and city buildings. That banner with a bursting star in the middle is the Juneteenth Flag, a symbolic representation of the end of slavery in the United States. The flag is the brainchild of activist Ben Haith, founder of the National Juneteenth Celebration Foundation (NJCF). Haith created the flag in 1997 with the help of collaborators, and Boston-based illustrator Lisa Jeanne Graf brought their vision to life. The flag was revised in 2000 into the version we know today, according to the National Juneteenth Observation Foundation. Seven years later, the date "June 19, 1865" was added, commemorating the day that Union Army Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger rode into Galveston, Texas, and told enslaved African Americans of their emancipation. (Edited for compliance) The star The white star in the center of the flag has a dual meaning, Haith said. For one, it represents Texas, the Lone Star State. It was in Galveston in 1865 where Union soldiers informed the country's last remaining enslaved people that, under the Emancipation Proclamation issued two years earlier, they were free. But the star also goes beyond Texas, representing the freedom of African Americans in all 50 states. The burst The bursting outline around the star is inspired by a nova, a term that astronomers use to mean a new star. The arc The curve that extends across the width of the flag represents a new horizon: the opportunities and promise that lay ahead for black Americans. The red, white blue colors The red, white and blue represents the American flag, a reminder that slaves and their descendants were and are Americans. June 19, 1865, represents the day that enslaved black people in Galveston, Texas, became Americans under the law. And while African Americans today are still fighting for equality and justice, Haith said those colors symbolize the continuous commitment of people in the United States to do better -- and to live up to the American ideal of liberty and justice for all. [Edited 6/19/20 8:00am]




Thanks for posting the image. My phone can’t post images on this site.
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Reply #13 posted 06/19/20 9:36am

OldFriends4Sal
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https://static.vibe.com/f...50x366.jpg

In Celebration Of Juneteenth: Read 'we them people,' A New Poem By Kevin Powell

June 19, 2020 - 9:00 am by Kevin Powell FACEBOOK TWITTER

An exclusive excerpt from his new book 'When We Free The World.'

MV5BMmI0NTQzZTMtNjY4OC00NDViLTk5YmItMzk3NzI2OGRhYjYwXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNjUxMjc1OTM@._V1_.jpg

104400950_3027783043941536_22141844150150136_n.jpg?_nc_cat=108&_nc_sid=07e735&_nc_ohc=loIrdUy32LQAX_MBWWJ&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=b16759f29787f2868bf799c6eabb055a&oe=5F13904C

dream on

dreamer

the way Alvin Ailey

and Maya Angelou

and George Floyd

and Breonna Taylor

dreamed of

southern-baked

pilgrims

dancing and

slow marching

their sorrows

down the yellow

brick roads

of

second-line members

humming from

the heels of their dirt-kissed feet:

i wanna be ready/to put on my long white robe....

we are survivors

we are survivors

we are survivors

of people

who were free

and became slaves

of people

who were slaves

and became free

we know why the caged bird sings

we know what a redemption song brings

we them people

we the people

we are those people

who shall never forget

our ancestors all up in us as we sleep

our grandmother all up in us as we weep

because we are

native american

black irish welsh french german polish italian

jewish puerto rican mexican greek russian

dominican chinese japanese vietnamese

filipino korean arab middle eastern

we are biracial and we are multicultural

we are bicentennial and we are new millennial

we are essential and we are frontline
we are everyday people and we are people everyday

we are #metoo we are #metoo we are #metoo

we are muslim christian hebrew too

we are bible torah koran atheist agnostic truer than true

we are rabbis and imams and preachers and yoruba priests

tap-dancing with buddhists and hindus and rastafarians

as the Nicholas Brothers

jump and jive and split the earth in half

while Chloe and Maud Arnold

them syncopated ladies

twist and shout and stomp and trump

hate

again—

again—

again—

yeah

still we rise still we surprise

like we got Judith Jamison's crying solo in our eyes

every hello ain't alone every good-bye ain't gone

we are every tongue every nose every skin every color every face mask

we are mattered lives paint it black

we are mattered lives paint it black

we are mattered lives paint it black

we are every tattoo every piercing every drop of blood

every global flood

we are straight queer trans non-gender conforming

we are she/he/they

we are disabled abled poor rich

big people little people in between people

we are protesters pepper-sprayed with knees on our necks

we are protesters pepper-sprayed with knees on our necks

we are protesters pepper-sprayed with knees on our necks

we them people

we the people

we are those people

who will survive

these times

because we done

survived

those times

where pandemics were

trail of tears and lynchings and holocausts

where pandemics were

no hope and no vote and no freedom spoke

we them people

we the people

we are those people

while our planet gently weeps

we bob and bop

like hip-hop

across the tender bones

of those tear-stained photographs

to hand to

this generation

the next generation

those revelations

yeah

that blues suite

yeah

that peaceful dance

inside a raging tornado

we call

love

-

This poem is an exclusive excerpt from Kevin Powell's new book When We Free The World, published by Apple Books. Kevin Powell is a poet, journalist, civil and human rights activist, and the author of 14 books. His next will be a biography of Tupac Shakur.

104826196_3027782627274911_6124961963073832152_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&_nc_sid=07e735&_nc_ohc=ziXUvLlOoq4AX_iRvEN&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=7a43696dcc78f82ced72a4e0f3df7917&oe=5F114156

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #14 posted 06/19/20 10:52am

DiminutiveRock
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"His wretched incompetence and imbecility have weakened the country, delighted our adversaries and terrified our friends. Never in the annals of American history has a bigger failure and joke risen as high as the @realDonaldTrump" - S. Schmidt
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Reply #15 posted 06/19/20 10:54am

DiminutiveRock
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2elijah said:

Thanks for posting the image. My phone can’t post images on this site.


Anytime hug

"His wretched incompetence and imbecility have weakened the country, delighted our adversaries and terrified our friends. Never in the annals of American history has a bigger failure and joke risen as high as the @realDonaldTrump" - S. Schmidt
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Reply #16 posted 06/19/20 11:30am

OldFriends4Sal
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8 ways to celebrate Juneteenth, whether by yourself or with loved onesTonya Russell

5 hrs ago




It's 2020, and it's about time we acknowledge that July 4th isn't the only important independence holiday. On June 19th, 1865, almost 100 years after the nation gained its independence from Great Britain, enslaved people in Texas were finally free—this event is called Juneteenth. This was two and a half years after Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, which would free enslaved people in the Union States—but without a saturation of Union soldiers, the law was unenforceable in Texas and other confederate states. Eventually, Major General Gordon Granger of the Union army arrived in Galveston, Texas, to inform enslaved people that they were free.

However, most states did not acknowledge Juneteenth until after 2000 with Texas being the first in 1980. Today, 47 out of 50 states consider it a holiday and as of 2020, New York (and soon Virginia) will observe Juneteenth as a paid holiday. But freed enslaved people have been observing Juneteenth since 1866 (the first anniversary of General Granger's visit to Texas) and establishing traditions that have been carried on by descendants of enslaved people.

If you want to honor this day with your loved ones, here are eight ways to celebrate Juneteenth, including old traditions and socially-distanced activities.

1 Host a virtual family reunion.

One of the best ways you can honor this day is by connecting with family to celebrate love and freedom. But if social distancing is preventing a traditional family gathering, host a Zoom function instead. For instance, the NAACP is hosting a virtual family reunion. The event is open to anyone, and you can sign up on the NAACP's site.

2 Eat traditional red foods.

Strawberry soda, hibiscus tea, and red velvet cake are traditionally served at Juneteenth celebrations. The color red commemorates the blood that was shed during slavery. Historically, when families celebrated Juneteenth, they would bring and eat foods they considered of high quality and not always available at that time, including meats like lamb, pork, and beef.

3 Learn about Black history.

This doesn't have to be trauma-based films like 12 Years a Slave or Birth of a Nation. Instead, your family can watch educational and uplifting movies that show the hurdles that Black Americans have faced, and how they've had to overcome them. A few good films include 13th, The Banker, Something the Lord Made, and the Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. For smaller children, you can teach them about race through reading books.

4 Visit a museum from home.

The Smithsonians' National Museum of African American Culture and History has a virtual exhibit dedicated to Juneteenth. Maryland's Academy Art Museum is also hosting an event on June 19th and 20th, as is Philadelphia's African American Museum, which will host a virtual festival on the 20th.

5 Support Black-owned businesses.

Entrepreneur Cynthia Daniels from Memphis, Tennessee, has organized a shopping event, which highlights Black creators that you can attend. After making a purchase, share your receipt on the website My Black Receipt to join the #MyBlackReceipt movement. The site is hoping to help Black businesses earn 15 million dollars by July 4th. As they stated on the website, think of this as a petition to support more Black-owned businesses—but your signature is a receipt!

6 Attend a parade.

Many towns are still holding parades on June 19th, including New York. The International Association of Blacks in Dance will be marching on City Hall, advocating for the Andrew Kearse Act. This bill would hold police officers responsible for not providing medical care for people in custody. Check your local city's website to see if they're holding any Juneteenth events, and make sure to wear protective gear while attending these parades.

7 Raise money through dance.

Find a danceathon, like this one hosted by Philadelphia area Dance Fit studio. On June 27th, Grown Women Dance Collective will also host a free virtual dance concert on Facebook.

8 Attend a poetry reading.

If you can't find a virtual event held near you, attend the one featuring Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa. His work Neon Vernacular: New and Selected Poems details his upbringing in the South, Black resilience in the face of white supremacy, as well as the Vietnam War. It's being hosted by Stockton University. Find more info here.

The momentum of the current Black Lives Matter movement and protests are making headway for equality. We hope that the reforms that are coming out of these protests, including celebrating the nation's second Independence Day, will be here to stay. After all, this isn't just Black history, but every American's history.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...i=BB13jNHg

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #17 posted 06/19/20 11:34am

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https://okcfox.com/news/l...ion-in-okc

Black artists team up with BLM for Juneteenth celebration in OKC

by Jasmine Anderson

Thursday, June 18th 2020

Rapper and community activist Jabee and Black Lives Matter are throwing a block party as a way to celebrate the end of slavery.

On June 19th, 1865, Union troops in Galveston, Texas finally told slaves of their freedom more than 2 years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation.

Today, African Americans across the country, celebrate what is also known as their true independence day. Artist Jabee made an album entitled "Juneteenth" in 2016 and says this is an opportunity for all Oklahomans to celebrate every year, not just because of recent unrest in America.

"I just want to press on those people who aren't black or are just learning about it, don't just come and not come next year. Don't do it because it's cool, cause of the Instagram moment, or its the trendy thing to do or because its in the news right now. Do it because you genuinely care, concerned, and want to honor and celebrate the lives of black people who were freed on Juneteenth," said Jabee.

Jabee, Shortt Dogg, Nitro, Spence Brownee will hit the stage tomorrow. Organizers say to wear a mask, practice social distancing, and bring a lawn chair. The event starts at 6 pm at 3705 Springlake Drive in the parking lot, right in front of Nappy Roots Bookstore.Food trucks and activities for the kids will be onsite. If you can't attend --B.L.M. OKC will be live streaming the event from their Facebook page.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #18 posted 06/19/20 1:31pm

2elijah

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DiminutiveRocker said:


Love this... thanks for posting.
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Reply #19 posted 06/19/20 7:30pm

OldFriends4Sal
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https://www.kezi.com/content/news/City-of-Portland-to-make-Juneteenth-a-paid-holiday-571315501.html

City of Portland to make Juneteenth a paid holiday

City of Portland employees are encouraged to spend the holiday getting educated on the white supremacy that was foundational to American culture.

Posted: Jun 17, 2020 7:33 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- Mayor Ted Wheeler says Portland will formally recognize Juneteenth, a day that commemorates the end of slavery in U.S., as a paid holiday.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reports the Portland City Council plans to adopt an ordinance Wednesday to establish June 19 as a day of recognition of black American history and give employees a paid day off to engage in remembrance and action.

He says they are suggesting that City of Portland employees spend the holiday getting educated on the white supremacy that was foundational to American culture. ''The objectives of the day are to grieve, listen, learn, engage and heal.''





juneteenth2.jpg

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

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I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
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Is poverty bringing U down?
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Reply #20 posted 06/19/20 7:34pm

OldFriends4Sal
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Celebrating Juneteenth in San Diego

NBC 7 talks to the son of the man who founded San Diego’s Juneteenth Holiday celebration as well as a local author on what the holiday means to them.

By Mari Payton, Dorian Hargrove and Tom Jones • Published 3 hours ago • Updated 3 hours ago

https://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/investigations/celebrating-juneteenth-in-san-diego/2350545/

20200618-Juneteenth-SOCIAL.png?resize=850%2C478

Sidney Cooper Sr. was known as the “Mayor of Imperial Avenue.” He was also known as chief organizer of San Diego’s Juneteenth Celebration.

Until his passing in 2002, Cooper Sr. held the event behind his barber shop near the 2900 block of Imperial Avenue. It was there that members of the community celebrated what is known as Juneteenth, the day in 1865 when Union soldiers arrived at Galveston, Texas to announce an official end to slavery.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #21 posted 06/19/20 11:43pm

onlyforaminute

I'll wait and talk about it next year.
If you carry the egg basket do not dance.

Do good, then throw it into the sea.

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Reply #22 posted 06/20/20 6:11am

poppys

The focus of the march here yesterday was reparations.See the source image
See the source image

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
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Reply #23 posted 06/20/20 6:15am

poppys


A band leads a march during a Juneteenth celebration in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, June 19, 2020. (AP/Frank Franklin II)

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
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Reply #24 posted 06/20/20 9:14am

2elijah

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poppys said:


A band leads a march during a Juneteenth celebration in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, June 19, 2020. (AP/Frank Franklin II)


All the celebrations all over the country yesterday, and the rest of this weekend. Glad it may be a federal holiday... one of these days.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
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Reply #25 posted 06/20/20 10:33am

DiminutiveRock
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2elijah said:

poppys said:


A band leads a march during a Juneteenth celebration in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, June 19, 2020. (AP/Frank Franklin II)

All the celebrations all over the country yesterday, and the rest of this weekend. Glad it may be a federal holiday... one of these days.


I heart that photo - it emmanates pure joy.

"His wretched incompetence and imbecility have weakened the country, delighted our adversaries and terrified our friends. Never in the annals of American history has a bigger failure and joke risen as high as the @realDonaldTrump" - S. Schmidt
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Reply #26 posted 06/20/20 11:11am

2elijah

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Here’s an article explaining why many were not aware of Juneteeth or theme Tulsa riots.

https://www.nbcnews.com/n...d-n1231442


From Juneteenth to the Tulsa massacre: What isn't taught in classrooms has a profound impact

Educators said the history of systemic racism in this country and the contributions of Black people have been erased.“


June 18, 2020, 5:04 PM EDT
By Daniella Silva

“A Connecticut fourth grade social studies textbook falsely claimed that slaves were treated just like “family.” A Texas geography textbook referred to enslaved Africans as “workers.” In Alabama, up until the 1970s, fourth graders learned in a textbook called "Know Alabama" that slave life on a plantation was "one of the happiest ways of life."

In contrast, historians and educators point out, many children in the U.S. education system are not taught about major Black historical events, such as the Tulsa Race Massacre or Juneteenth, the June 19 commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States.

(Edited for compliance)

“King said the experiences and oppression of Black people, Latino people, indigenous people, Asian people and other minority groups in the U.S. are largely ignored or sidelined to fit those narratives.“So, of course you’re not going to have crucial information such as what happened in Tulsa, you’re not going to have information such as the bombing of a Philadelphia black neighborhood,” he said.

In 1921 in Oklahoma, whites looted and destroyed Tulsa's Greenwood District, known for its affluent Black community. Historians believe that as many as 300 Black people were killed.

In May 1985, Philadelphia police dropped a bomb onto the compound of MOVE, a black liberation group, killing six members, five of their children and destroying 65 homes in the neighborhood.

Another often-omitted period of U.S. Black history is the Red Summer, a period of time through 1919 when white mobs incited a wave of anti-Black violence in dozens of cities.”




(Click link to continue reading)
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
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Reply #27 posted 06/20/20 3:52pm

DiminutiveRock
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2elijah said:

Here’s an article explaining why many were not aware of Juneteeth or theme Tulsa riots. https://www.nbcnews.com/n...d-n1231442 From Juneteenth to the Tulsa massacre: What isn't taught in classrooms has a profound impact Educators said the history of systemic racism in this country and the contributions of Black people have been erased.“ June 18, 2020, 5:04 PM EDT By Daniella Silva “A Connecticut fourth grade social studies textbook falsely claimed that slaves were treated just like “family.” A Texas geography textbook referred to enslaved Africans as “workers.” In Alabama, up until the 1970s, fourth graders learned in a textbook called "Know Alabama" that slave life on a plantation was "one of the happiest ways of life." In contrast, historians and educators point out, many children in the U.S. education system are not taught about major Black historical events, such as the Tulsa Race Massacre or Juneteenth, the June 19 commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States. (Edited for compliance) “King said the experiences and oppression of Black people, Latino people, indigenous people, Asian people and other minority groups in the U.S. are largely ignored or sidelined to fit those narratives.“So, of course you’re not going to have crucial information such as what happened in Tulsa, you’re not going to have information such as the bombing of a Philadelphia black neighborhood,” he said. In 1921 in Oklahoma, whites looted and destroyed Tulsa's Greenwood District, known for its affluent Black community. Historians believe that as many as 300 Black people were killed. In May 1985, Philadelphia police dropped a bomb onto the compound of MOVE, a black liberation group, killing six members, five of their children and destroying 65 homes in the neighborhood. Another often-omitted period of U.S. Black history is the Red Summer, a period of time through 1919 when white mobs incited a wave of anti-Black violence in dozens of cities. (Click link to continue reading)

Jesus - you'd think we'd been living in Stalin's Russia.

"His wretched incompetence and imbecility have weakened the country, delighted our adversaries and terrified our friends. Never in the annals of American history has a bigger failure and joke risen as high as the @realDonaldTrump" - S. Schmidt
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Reply #28 posted 06/20/20 4:02pm

jjhunsecker

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2elijah said:

Here’s an article explaining why many were not aware of Juneteeth or theme Tulsa riots. https://www.nbcnews.com/n...d-n1231442 From Juneteenth to the Tulsa massacre: What isn't taught in classrooms has a profound impact Educators said the history of systemic racism in this country and the contributions of Black people have been erased.“ June 18, 2020, 5:04 PM EDT By Daniella Silva “A Connecticut fourth grade social studies textbook falsely claimed that slaves were treated just like “family.” A Texas geography textbook referred to enslaved Africans as “workers.” In Alabama, up until the 1970s, fourth graders learned in a textbook called "Know Alabama" that slave life on a plantation was "one of the happiest ways of life." In contrast, historians and educators point out, many children in the U.S. education system are not taught about major Black historical events, such as the Tulsa Race Massacre or Juneteenth, the June 19 commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States. (Edited for compliance) “King said the experiences and oppression of Black people, Latino people, indigenous people, Asian people and other minority groups in the U.S. are largely ignored or sidelined to fit those narratives.“So, of course you’re not going to have crucial information such as what happened in Tulsa, you’re not going to have information such as the bombing of a Philadelphia black neighborhood,” he said. In 1921 in Oklahoma, whites looted and destroyed Tulsa's Greenwood District, known for its affluent Black community. Historians believe that as many as 300 Black people were killed. In May 1985, Philadelphia police dropped a bomb onto the compound of MOVE, a black liberation group, killing six members, five of their children and destroying 65 homes in the neighborhood. Another often-omitted period of U.S. Black history is the Red Summer, a period of time through 1919 when white mobs incited a wave of anti-Black violence in dozens of cities.” (Click link to continue reading)

Remember, history is written by the "victors"...those who have the power to create a narrative, whether by lies or omissions, will do so to make themselves look better. It's often HIS-story

[Edited 6/21/20 11:29am]

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Reply #29 posted 06/20/20 7:34pm

2elijah

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DiminutiveRocker said:



2elijah said:


Here’s an article explaining why many were not aware of Juneteeth or theme Tulsa riots. https://www.nbcnews.com/n...d-n1231442 From Juneteenth to the Tulsa massacre: What isn't taught in classrooms has a profound impact Educators said the history of systemic racism in this country and the contributions of Black people have been erased.“ June 18, 2020, 5:04 PM EDT By Daniella Silva “A Connecticut fourth grade social studies textbook falsely claimed that slaves were treated just like “family.” A Texas geography textbook referred to enslaved Africans as “workers.” In Alabama, up until the 1970s, fourth graders learned in a textbook called "Know Alabama" that slave life on a plantation was "one of the happiest ways of life." In contrast, historians and educators point out, many children in the U.S. education system are not taught about major Black historical events, such as the Tulsa Race Massacre or Juneteenth, the June 19 commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States. (Edited for compliance) “King said the experiences and oppression of Black people, Latino people, indigenous people, Asian people and other minority groups in the U.S. are largely ignored or sidelined to fit those narratives.“So, of course you’re not going to have crucial information such as what happened in Tulsa, you’re not going to have information such as the bombing of a Philadelphia black neighborhood,” he said. In 1921 in Oklahoma, whites looted and destroyed Tulsa's Greenwood District, known for its affluent Black community. Historians believe that as many as 300 Black people were killed. In May 1985, Philadelphia police dropped a bomb onto the compound of MOVE, a black liberation group, killing six members, five of their children and destroying 65 homes in the neighborhood. Another often-omitted period of U.S. Black history is the Red Summer, a period of time through 1919 when white mobs incited a wave of anti-Black violence in dozens of cities. (Click link to continue reading)


Jesus - you'd think we'd been living in Stalin's Russia.


A shameful history, that’s somehow not in many text books.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
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