independent and unofficial
Prince fan community
Forum jump
Forums > Politics & Religion > George Floyd - Part 2 Discussion
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Page 2 of 16 <123456789>Last »
  New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Reply #30 posted 06/08/20 5:15am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

2elijah said:

The George Floyd protests is moving many in other countries to protests and expose the racial injustices within their countries as well, and helping to expose/raise awareness of similar injustices around the world. (Click link to continue reading) https://www.bbc.com/news/...a-52900929 Indigenous deaths in custody: Why Australians are seizing on US protests 05 June 2020 Australia “Anger over the death of George Floyd has spread to Australia, with Black Lives Matter protests being held across the country. But Australian demonstrators are not just expressing solidarity. Many are using the moment to vent fury about indigenous deaths in custody in Australia. So what is the situation? How many indigenous Australians have died in custody? Almost three decades on from a major inquiry into this issue, there is no easily accessible record. In 1987, the Committee to Defend Black Rights found that one indigenous person was dying in custody every 11 days. It spurred a royal commission, completed in 1991, which investigated the incarceration of Aboriginal people and the circumstances of 99 deaths.” (Edited for compliance) Are Aboriginal Australians disproportionately jailed? Massively. Indigenous people comprise almost 30% of Australian inmates but less than 3% of the national population, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This is about four times higher than the proportion of African-Americans jailed in the US. NSW police scheme 'targeted' Aboriginal children There have been other stark reminders. A committee heard last year that every child in detention in the Northern Territory was indigenous.“ [Edited 6/8/20 5:02am]



eek wow, interesting (and horrifying) facts. The GF protests have brought to light so many other other injustices being perpetrated to people of color, globally.

A friend of mine posted a meme on FB in response to the looting taking place at the onset of the protests. This does not condone the looting, but puts "looting" in historical perspective:
101837093_10219772171632526_1031339944053833728_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&_nc_sid=8024bb&_nc_ohc=GvFCJCxRsQYAX8_oIsQ&_nc_ht=scontent-lax3-1.xx&oh=515e74fd17f9a211d6d3ad4542d70acb&oe=5F055379

A conservative guy said "this is not relevant." I said it was 100% relevant - because on this continent this is the root of where the white privilege began of taking land and killing the indigenous people who lived on it. And then taking people from another continent and enslaving them here.








[Edited 6/8/20 5:17am]

“In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”
-George Orwell, 1984
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #31 posted 06/08/20 5:20am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

deebee said:

maplenpg said:

It's a shame the government took the hard line with it, saying it's unacceptable vandalism yada yada. It would have been a great chance for the government to show empathy, that they were a party for the people, all people, but I expected no different from the Tories - it'll probably be back up in a few weeks

EDIT to add: The mayor of Bristol however is much more well-reasoned: https://twitter.com/SkyNe...7873440771

[Edited 6/8/20 0:55am]

They'll have to fish it out of the docks first! lol I don't think it'll go back up, though. This issue has been a thorn in Bristol's side for a while now, with attempts to rename the concert venue the Colston Hall and publicly acknowledge the role of the great and the good of the city in the slave trade dragging on for more than a decade, due to the intransigence of interest groups with the city council's ear. Attempts even to change the wording on the plaque, saying that Colston was "one of the most virtuous and wise sons of th[e] city" were blocked. (Good account of that here.) I suspect that they may leave Teddy in the docks, or put him in a museum.

They've said they'll keep the placards laid around the empty plinth and put them into a museum exhibit too.

103424939_3339347089432000_4919034288358031018_o.jpg?_nc_cat=1&_nc_sid=8024bb&_nc_oc=AQmKCzLqJTowgRe14AYHuhdOzS0Cyi10yWhQ6_jwoSdwnSMKtgXRE303pyxx-ILR7nycVz73xbYNHG9kJMK331z2&_nc_ht=scontent-lht6-1.xx&oh=f268a95c756786d5e56f298407368baf&oe=5F054BC7


^ I love this photo!



It's no different than the confederate statues in the US. There is no honor in perpetrating human slavery. I never understood why these kind of tributes were even erected.




[Edited 6/8/20 5:21am]

“In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”
-George Orwell, 1984
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #32 posted 06/08/20 5:43am

2elijah

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:



2elijah said:


The George Floyd protests is moving many in other countries to protests and expose the racial injustices within their countries as well, and helping to expose/raise awareness of similar injustices around the world. (Click link to continue reading) https://www.bbc.com/news/...a-52900929 Indigenous deaths in custody: Why Australians are seizing on US protests 05 June 2020 Australia “Anger over the death of George Floyd has spread to Australia, with Black Lives Matter protests being held across the country. But Australian demonstrators are not just expressing solidarity. Many are using the moment to vent fury about indigenous deaths in custody in Australia. So what is the situation? How many indigenous Australians have died in custody? Almost three decades on from a major inquiry into this issue, there is no easily accessible record. In 1987, the Committee to Defend Black Rights found that one indigenous person was dying in custody every 11 days. It spurred a royal commission, completed in 1991, which investigated the incarceration of Aboriginal people and the circumstances of 99 deaths.” (Edited for compliance) Are Aboriginal Australians disproportionately jailed? Massively. Indigenous people comprise almost 30% of Australian inmates but less than 3% of the national population, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This is about four times higher than the proportion of African-Americans jailed in the US. NSW police scheme 'targeted' Aboriginal children There have been other stark reminders. A committee heard last year that every child in detention in the Northern Territory was indigenous.“ [Edited 6/8/20 5:02am]



eek wow, interesting (and horrifying) facts. The GF protests have brought to light so many other other injustices being perpetrated to people of color, globally.

A friend of mine posted a meme on FB in response to the looting taking place at the onset of the protests. This does not condone the looting, but puts "looting" in historical perspective:
101837093_10219772171632526_1031339944053833728_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&_nc_sid=8024bb&_nc_ohc=GvFCJCxRsQYAX8_oIsQ&_nc_ht=scontent-lax3-1.xx&oh=515e74fd17f9a211d6d3ad4542d70acb&oe=5F055379



A conservative guy said "this is not relevant." I said it was 100% relevant - because on this continent this is the root of where the white privilege began of taking land and killing the indigenous people who lived on it. And then taking people from another continent and enslaving them here.








[Edited 6/8/20 5:17am]



Yes I think the problem has always been to sugarcoat how America became America, by leaving out of the history books, how this land was looted, by many early European immigrants, who did not have the best interests of the original inhabitants who were here first, for many years, and abused their cultures, killed many of them, and the original Natives’ land stolen from them, by foreigners. When it became America, slavery still existed, and many Native Americans displaced.

So that in and of itself, shows that when America became America, it did not have the best interests of ‘all humans’ who were alive and living in this country, at that time. Many don’t seem to get that the racism in America today, stems from that ugly past.
[Edited 6/8/20 5:50am]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #33 posted 06/08/20 5:52am

poppys

Funny how certain people think they get to decide what's "relevant" to the entire country.

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #34 posted 06/08/20 6:13am

IanRG

2elijah said:

The George Floyd protests is moving many in other countries to protest and expose the racial/social injustices within their countries as well, and helping to expose/raise awareness of similar injustices around the world. (Click link to continue reading) https://www.bbc.com/news/...a-52900929 Indigenous deaths in custody: Why Australians are seizing on US protests 05 June 2020 Australia “Anger over the death of George Floyd has spread to Australia, with Black Lives Matter protests being held across the country. But Australian demonstrators are not just expressing solidarity. Many are using the moment to vent fury about indigenous deaths in custody in Australia. So what is the situation? How many indigenous Australians have died in custody? Almost three decades on from a major inquiry into this issue, there is no easily accessible record. In 1987, the Committee to Defend Black Rights found that one indigenous person was dying in custody every 11 days. It spurred a royal commission, completed in 1991, which investigated the incarceration of Aboriginal people and the circumstances of 99 deaths.” (Edited for compliance) Are Aboriginal Australians disproportionately jailed? Massively. Indigenous people comprise almost 30% of Australian inmates but less than 3% of the national population, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This is about four times higher than the proportion of African-Americans jailed in the US. [Edited 6/8/20 5:13am]

.

The lack of action from the Indigenous deaths in custody Royal Commission in 1991 means that there are more today than then.

.

This is why I pointed out in Part 1 of this thread that the Australian BLM marches have all included Indigenous deaths as part of what we marched against. Here is an article on the arrest of a boy in the suburb I work in last Monday.

[Edited 6/8/20 6:16am]

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #35 posted 06/08/20 6:40am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

2elijah said:

DiminutiveRocker said:



eek wow, interesting (and horrifying) facts. The GF protests have brought to light so many other other injustices being perpetrated to people of color, globally.

A friend of mine posted a meme on FB in response to the looting taking place at the onset of the protests. This does not condone the looting, but puts "looting" in historical perspective:

A conservative guy said "this is not relevant." I said it was 100% relevant - because on this continent this is the root of where the white privilege began of taking land and killing the indigenous people who lived on it. And then taking people from another continent and enslaving them here.








[Edited 6/8/20 5:17am]

Yes I think the problem has always been to sugarcoat how America became America, by leaving out of the history books, how this land was looted, by many early European immigrants, who did not have the best interests of the original inhabitants who were here first, for many years, and abused their cultures, killed many of them, and the original Natives’ land stolen from them, by foreigners. When it became America, slavery still existed, and many Native Americans displaced. So that in and of itself, shows that when America became America, it did not have the best interests of ‘all humans’ who were alive and living in this country, at that time. Many don’t seem to get that the racism in America today, stems from that ugly past. [Edited 6/8/20 5:50am]



I said in another post that racism is ingrained in our society, and JJ took it a step further and said our society was built on it. True. We cannot change the past, but we can forge a future and dilute that which poisons our culture and social unity. It is not easy, and it can not happen overnight, but I believe the next generation can make it happen. I believed that electing a man of color for president was a step forward, but trump and his "base" managed to pull the pendulum back the other way. I hope and pray if what I have seen in these protests as a result of what happened to George Floyd (and others) that the direction is correcting itself with as much if not more pull.

“In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”
-George Orwell, 1984
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #36 posted 06/08/20 7:27am

2elijah

avatar

IanRG said:



2elijah said:


The George Floyd protests is moving many in other countries to protest and expose the racial/social injustices within their countries as well, and helping to expose/raise awareness of similar injustices around the world. (Click link to continue reading) https://www.bbc.com/news/...a-52900929 Indigenous deaths in custody: Why Australians are seizing on US protests 05 June 2020 Australia “Anger over the death of George Floyd has spread to Australia, with Black Lives Matter protests being held across the country. But Australian demonstrators are not just expressing solidarity. Many are using the moment to vent fury about indigenous deaths in custody in Australia. So what is the situation? How many indigenous Australians have died in custody? Almost three decades on from a major inquiry into this issue, there is no easily accessible record. In 1987, the Committee to Defend Black Rights found that one indigenous person was dying in custody every 11 days. It spurred a royal commission, completed in 1991, which investigated the incarceration of Aboriginal people and the circumstances of 99 deaths.” (Edited for compliance) Are Aboriginal Australians disproportionately jailed? Massively. Indigenous people comprise almost 30% of Australian inmates but less than 3% of the national population, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This is about four times higher than the proportion of African-Americans jailed in the US. [Edited 6/8/20 5:13am]

.


The lack of action from the Indigenous deaths in custody Royal Commission in 1991 means that there are more today than then.


.


This is why I pointed out in Part 1 of this thread that the Australian BLM marches have all included Indigenous deaths as part of what we marched against. Here is an article on the arrest of a boy in the suburb I work in last Monday.

[Edited 6/8/20 6:16am]



Oh I didn’t see that in the 1st thread. I’ll go look at it. Thanks. I’m glad the protests in the U.S. are encouraging people I’m other countries, to expose abuses/injustices in other countries.
[Edited 6/8/20 7:28am]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #37 posted 06/08/20 7:27am

maplenpg

avatar

deebee said:

maplenpg said:

It's a shame the government took the hard line with it, saying it's unacceptable vandalism yada yada. It would have been a great chance for the government to show empathy, that they were a party for the people, all people, but I expected no different from the Tories - it'll probably be back up in a few weeks

EDIT to add: The mayor of Bristol however is much more well-reasoned: https://twitter.com/SkyNe...7873440771

[Edited 6/8/20 0:55am]

They'll have to fish it out of the docks first! lol I don't think it'll go back up, though. This issue has been a thorn in Bristol's side for a while now, with attempts to rename the concert venue the Colston Hall and publicly acknowledge the role of the great and the good of the city in the slave trade dragging on for more than a decade, due to the intransigence of interest groups with the city council's ear. Attempts even to change the wording on the plaque, saying that Colston was "one of the most virtuous and wise sons of th[e] city" were blocked. (Good account of that here.) I suspect that they may leave Teddy in the docks, or put him in a museum.

They've said they'll keep the placards laid around the empty plinth and put them into a museum exhibit too.

103424939_3339347089432000_4919034288358031018_o.jpg?_nc_cat=1&_nc_sid=8024bb&_nc_oc=AQmKCzLqJTowgRe14AYHuhdOzS0Cyi10yWhQ6_jwoSdwnSMKtgXRE303pyxx-ILR7nycVz73xbYNHG9kJMK331z2&_nc_ht=scontent-lht6-1.xx&oh=f268a95c756786d5e56f298407368baf&oe=5F054BC7

Yes, since I posted it's been confirmed it'll be fished back up and put in a museum. Be cool if they kept the placards with it to tell the full story. I'm going to go out on a limb and say they won't charge anyone for vandalism like they are saying they will.

EDIT to add: It's good to see you back. Feel free to post in the UK thread too biggrin

[Edited 6/8/20 7:29am]

The Org is my playground and y'all are my playmates.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #38 posted 06/08/20 7:32am

2elijah

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:



2elijah said:


DiminutiveRocker said:




eek wow, interesting (and horrifying) facts. The GF protests have brought to light so many other other injustices being perpetrated to people of color, globally.

A friend of mine posted a meme on FB in response to the looting taking place at the onset of the protests. This does not condone the looting, but puts "looting" in historical perspective:



A conservative guy said "this is not relevant." I said it was 100% relevant - because on this continent this is the root of where the white privilege began of taking land and killing the indigenous people who lived on it. And then taking people from another continent and enslaving them here.









[Edited 6/8/20 5:17am]



Yes I think the problem has always been to sugarcoat how America became America, by leaving out of the history books, how this land was looted, by many early European immigrants, who did not have the best interests of the original inhabitants who were here first, for many years, and abused their cultures, killed many of them, and the original Natives’ land stolen from them, by foreigners. When it became America, slavery still existed, and many Native Americans displaced. So that in and of itself, shows that when America became America, it did not have the best interests of ‘all humans’ who were alive and living in this country, at that time. Many don’t seem to get that the racism in America today, stems from that ugly past. [Edited 6/8/20 5:50am]



I said in another post that racism is ingrained in our society, and JJ took it a step further and said our society was built on it. True. We cannot change the past, but we can forge a future and dilute that which poisons our culture and social unity. It is not easy, and it can not happen overnight, but I believe the next generation can make it happen. I believed that electing a man of color for president was a step forward, but trump and his "base" managed to pull the pendulum back the other way. I hope and pray if what I have seen in these protests as a result of what happened to George Floyd (and others) that the direction is correcting itself with as much if not more pull.


Love your post. I’m hoping major changes and improvements will be made, although I know it will be gradual. Since George Floyd’s death, there are other cases coming to light about unarmed Black men being stopped by police and shot/killed. So many whose tragedies never reached the media.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #39 posted 06/08/20 7:47am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

2elijah said:

DiminutiveRocker said:



I said in another post that racism is ingrained in our society, and JJ took it a step further and said our society was built on it. True. We cannot change the past, but we can forge a future and dilute that which poisons our culture and social unity. It is not easy, and it can not happen overnight, but I believe the next generation can make it happen. I believed that electing a man of color for president was a step forward, but trump and his "base" managed to pull the pendulum back the other way. I hope and pray if what I have seen in these protests as a result of what happened to George Floyd (and others) that the direction is correcting itself with as much if not more pull.

Love your post. I’m hoping major changes and improvements will be made, although I know it will be gradual. Since George Floyd’s death, there are other cases coming to light about unarmed Black men being stopped by police and shot/killed. So many whose tragedies never reached the media.



Change is on the horizon - some hope in the below:



An encounter in Buffalo last Thursday — in which two police officers shoved a 75-year-old man to the ground and left lying him there while blood poured out of his ear — was troubling partly because of the original police account.

The account claimed that the man “was injured when he tripped and fell.” If a video hadn’t existed, the truth might never have come out.

That’s a widespread problem:

Philip Stinson, a criminologist at Bowling Green State University, who has analyzed thousands of police reports, told CNN that lies like these were fairly common.

Activists in the current protest movement have begun to focus on how they can turn the rallies of the past 10 days into lasting change, to reduce both racism and police brutality. And reducing the frequency of false reports by the police is likely to be a key issue.

Already, reform-minded prosecutors and police chiefs have taken some steps in the last few years. The top prosecutor in St. Louis, Kim Gardner, has stopped accepting new cases or search warrant requests from officers with a history of misconduct or lies. In Philadelphia and Seattle, prosecutors are creating similar “do not call” lists, The Marshall Project has reported.

Chris Magnus, the police chief in Tucson, Ariz., told the Marshall Project: “If I had my way, officers who lie wouldn’t just be put on a list, they’d be fired, and also not allowed to work in any other jurisdiction as a police officer ever again.” Often, though, police-union contracts prevent firing even officers with a record of brutality and dishonesty — which then casts a shadow over the many police officers who tell the truth.

(The Times published an investigation this weekend, explaining how police unions have amassed political power and blocked change.)

False police reports are not a new problem. What’s new are the videos that have caused people to realize how common they are. “When I was a reporter, it was the police officer’s word against the victim’s or suspect’s,” Jamie Stockwell, a deputy national editor at The Times, told me. “Cellphone video has changed the debate over policing.”

“In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”
-George Orwell, 1984
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #40 posted 06/08/20 8:01am

2elijah

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:



2elijah said:


DiminutiveRocker said:




I said in another post that racism is ingrained in our society, and JJ took it a step further and said our society was built on it. True. We cannot change the past, but we can feel orge a future and dilute that which poisons our culture and social unity. It is not easy, and it can not happen overnight, but I believe the next generation can make it happen. I believed that electing a man of color for president was a step forward, but trump and his "base" managed to pull the pendulum back the other way. I hope and pray if what I have seen in these protests as a result of what happened to George Floyd (and others) that the direction is correcting itself with as much if not more pull.



Love your post. I’m hoping major changes and improvements will be made, although I know it will be gradual. Since George Floyd’s death, there are other cases coming to light about unarmed Black men being stopped by police and shot/killed. So many whose tragedies never reached the media.



Change is on the horizon - some hope in the below:







An encounter in Buffalo last Thursday — in which two police officers shoved a 75-year-old man to the ground and left lying him there while blood poured out of his ear — was troubling partly because of the original police account.





The account claimed that the man “was injured when he tripped and fell.” If a video hadn’t existed, the truth might never have come out.





That’s a widespread problem:








Philip Stinson, a criminologist at Bowling Green State University, who has analyzed thousands of police reports, told CNN that lies like these were fairly common.





Activists in the current protest movement have begun to focus on how they can turn the rallies of the past 10 days into lasting change, to reduce both racism and police brutality. And reducing the frequency of false reports by the police is likely to be a key issue.





Already, reform-minded prosecutors and police chiefs have taken some steps in the last few years. The top prosecutor in St. Louis, Kim Gardner, has stopped accepting new cases or search warrant requests from officers with a history of misconduct or lies. In Philadelphia and Seattle, prosecutors are creating similar “do not call” lists, The Marshall Project has reported.





Chris Magnus, the police chief in Tucson, Ariz., told the Marshall Project: “If I had my way, officers who lie wouldn’t just be put on a list, they’d be fired, and also not allowed to work in any other jurisdiction as a police officer ever again.” Often, though, police-union contracts prevent firing even officers with a record of brutality and dishonesty — which then casts a shadow over the many police officers who tell the truth.





(The Times published an investigation this weekend, explaining how police unions have amassed political power and blocked change.)





False police reports are not a new problem. What’s new are the videos that have caused people to realize how common they are. “When I was a reporter, it was the police officer’s word against the victim’s or suspect’s,” Jamie Stockwell, a deputy national editor at The Times, told me. “Cellphone video has changed the debate over policing.”




Yes, I expect to see more police reform in police depts. across the country. It’s long overdue. Time to weed out the racist and also rogue cops, who abuse their job title and bring their personal prejudice or lack of respect to the job. The people have shown that they have the real power to effect change, and these current protests are proving it.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #41 posted 06/08/20 8:23am

poppys

Strange that George Floyd (and other victims) died saying I can't breathe - while at the same time the Covid-19 pandemic kills people by them being unable to breathe. It strikes me, looking at the peaceful protester photos with all the masks. People are being conscientious, but the masks are an amplified visual part of what is happening in tandem.

[Edited 6/8/20 13:43pm]

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #42 posted 06/08/20 8:59am

2elijah

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:



2elijah said:


DiminutiveRocker said:




I said in another post that racism is ingrained in our society, and JJ took it a step further and said our society was built on it. True. We cannot change the past, but we can feel orge a future and dilute that which poisons our culture and social unity. It is not easy, and it can not happen overnight, but I believe the next generation can make it happen. I believed that electing a man of color for president was a step forward, but trump and his "base" managed to pull the pendulum back the other way. I hope and pray if what I have seen in these protests as a result of what happened to George Floyd (and others) that the direction is correcting itself with as much if not more pull.



Love your post. I’m hoping major changes and improvements will be made, although I know it will be gradual. Since George Floyd’s death, there are other cases coming to light about unarmed Black men being stopped by police and shot/killed. So many whose tragedies never reached the media.



Change is on the horizon - some hope in the below:







An encounter in Buffalo last Thursday — in which two police officers shoved a 75-year-old man to the ground and left lying him there while blood poured out of his ear — was troubling partly because of the original police account.





The account claimed that the man “was injured when he tripped and fell.” If a video hadn’t existed, the truth might never have come out.





That’s a widespread problem:








Philip Stinson, a criminologist at Bowling Green State University, who has analyzed thousands of police reports, told CNN that lies like these were fairly common.





Activists in the current protest movement have begun to focus on how they can turn the rallies of the past 10 days into lasting change, to reduce both racism and police brutality. And reducing the frequency of false reports by the police is likely to be a key issue.





Already, reform-minded prosecutors and police chiefs have taken some steps in the last few years. The top prosecutor in St. Louis, Kim Gardner, has stopped accepting new cases or search warrant requests from officers with a history of misconduct or lies. In Philadelphia and Seattle, prosecutors are creating similar “do not call” lists, The Marshall Project has reported.





Chris Magnus, the police chief in Tucson, Ariz., told the Marshall Project: “If I had my way, officers who lie wouldn’t just be put on a list, they’d be fired, and also not allowed to work in any other jurisdiction as a police officer ever again.” Often, though, police-union contracts prevent firing even officers with a record of brutality and dishonesty — which then casts a shadow over the many police officers who tell the truth.





(The Times published an investigation this weekend, explaining how police unions have amassed political power and blocked change.)





False police reports are not a new problem. What’s new are the videos that have caused people to realize how common they are. “When I was a reporter, it was the police officer’s word against the victim’s or suspect’s,” Jamie Stockwell, a deputy national editor at The Times, told me. “Cellphone video has changed the debate over policing.”




Yes, I expect to see more police reform in police depts. across the country. It’s long overdue. Time to weed out the racist and also rogue cops, who abuse their job titles and bring their personal prejudice or lack of respect to the job. The people have shown that they have the real power to effect change, and these current protests are proving it.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #43 posted 06/08/20 11:59am

cborgman

avatar

2elijah said:

DiminutiveRocker said:



Change is on the horizon - some hope in the below:



An encounter in Buffalo last Thursday — in which two police officers shoved a 75-year-old man to the ground and left lying him there while blood poured out of his ear — was troubling partly because of the original police account.

The account claimed that the man “was injured when he tripped and fell.” If a video hadn’t existed, the truth might never have come out.

That’s a widespread problem:

Philip Stinson, a criminologist at Bowling Green State University, who has analyzed thousands of police reports, told CNN that lies like these were fairly common.

Activists in the current protest movement have begun to focus on how they can turn the rallies of the past 10 days into lasting change, to reduce both racism and police brutality. And reducing the frequency of false reports by the police is likely to be a key issue.

Already, reform-minded prosecutors and police chiefs have taken some steps in the last few years. The top prosecutor in St. Louis, Kim Gardner, has stopped accepting new cases or search warrant requests from officers with a history of misconduct or lies. In Philadelphia and Seattle, prosecutors are creating similar “do not call” lists, The Marshall Project has reported.

Chris Magnus, the police chief in Tucson, Ariz., told the Marshall Project: “If I had my way, officers who lie wouldn’t just be put on a list, they’d be fired, and also not allowed to work in any other jurisdiction as a police officer ever again.” Often, though, police-union contracts prevent firing even officers with a record of brutality and dishonesty — which then casts a shadow over the many police officers who tell the truth.

(The Times published an investigation this weekend, explaining how police unions have amassed political power and blocked change.)

False police reports are not a new problem. What’s new are the videos that have caused people to realize how common they are. “When I was a reporter, it was the police officer’s word against the victim’s or suspect’s,” Jamie Stockwell, a deputy national editor at The Times, told me. “Cellphone video has changed the debate over policing.”

Yes, I expect to see more police reform in police depts. across the country. It’s long overdue. Time to weed out the racist and also rogue cops, who abuse their job titles and bring their personal prejudice or lack of respect to the job. The people have shown that they have the real power to effect change, and these current protests are proving it.

very much so

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #44 posted 06/08/20 12:24pm

cborgman

avatar

some fuckhat local terrorist drove into a crowd of protesters today and shot a man in seattle.


[Edited 6/8/20 12:28pm]

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #45 posted 06/08/20 1:08pm

2elijah

avatar

cborgman said:

some fuckhat local terrorist drove into a crowd of protesters today and shot a man in seattle.


[Edited 6/8/20 12:28pm]


I saw that. Then he got out the car and walked around the crowd with a weapon on his hand. Glad they caught the idiot.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #46 posted 06/08/20 2:41pm

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

2elijah said:

cborgman said:

some fuckhat local terrorist drove into a crowd of protesters today and shot a man in seattle.


[Edited 6/8/20 12:28pm]

I saw that. Then he got out the car and walked around the crowd with a weapon on his hand. Glad they caught the idiot.

Oh, FFS. sad Ugh.

“In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”
-George Orwell, 1984
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #47 posted 06/08/20 3:11pm

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

In more positive news... similar to DC






On Sunday afternoon, some 20,000 people — estimated to be the largest protest over the death of George Floyd in the Los Angeles area so far — poured into the streets lined by the Hollywood Walk of Fame for a widely promoted march organized by Black Lives Matter Los Angeles and BLD PWR, along with the rapper YG.

Though protesters’ message was urgent, the vibe was more like a street festival for a diverse spectrum of Angelenos. N.W.A. and Nipsey Hussle blared and people sang along.

While social distancing wasn’t possible, nearly everyone wore face coverings and demonstrators passed out water bottles and hand sanitizer.

The only police presence I saw was in the air — helicopters circled overhead.

“In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”
-George Orwell, 1984
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #48 posted 06/08/20 3:21pm

IanRG

2elijah said:

IanRG said:

.

The lack of action from the Indigenous deaths in custody Royal Commission in 1991 means that there are more today than then.

.

This is why I pointed out in Part 1 of this thread that the Australian BLM marches have all included Indigenous deaths as part of what we marched against. Here is an article on the arrest of a boy in the suburb I work in last Monday.

[Edited 6/8/20 6:16am]

Oh I didn’t see that in the 1st thread. I’ll go look at it. Thanks. I’m glad the protests in the U.S. are encouraging people I’m other countries, to expose abuses/injustices in other countries. [Edited 6/8/20 7:28am]

.

Here it is:

.

There were many protest marches in Australia today in support of BLM and George Floyd, including ours in my town. Link

.

In this we added recognition of the inequity against Indigenous Australians as reflected in the rate of imprisonment and deaths in custody.

.

These were conducted in Red (Progressives) and Blue (Conservative) States (Note this is the other way around from in the US), in capital cities and country towns. There was no looting and few arrests (mostly of counter-BLM protestors). No one was gassed and cleared for a photo op, there was no looting, etc. The Sydney (Blue State) march went ahead dispite being illegal when it started, but the court made it legal very soon after. The organisers of the Melbourne (Red State) march have been fined under Covid rules. Our conservative PM asked people to reconsider marching because of Covid (as did a number of the government medical advisors) - but he did this by showing support for BLM and encourgaging people to consider alternate ways to protest or show support.

.

Despite at least one person here trying to make this a US left vs US right issue - it is neither. It is much broader than just the USA and it is not a left vs right issue. There is no equivalence between a far right rally and protests by people across the world against racist authoritarian violence. There should be no other side.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #49 posted 06/08/20 4:36pm

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

Some thing kind of friv, but none the less is a result of the mass support for BLM with respect to the death of George Floyd, Breonna Tayor, Ahmaud Aubery, etc. The info is issued by a website The Infatuation which is focused on local eateries. I often go here for reviews and to get the 411 on restaurants, they offer several curated lists.


LA restaurants have started stepping up and donating a portion of their takeout and delivery profits to national organizations like Black Lives Matter, Reclaim The Block, Campaign Zero, and more. We’ve compiled a list of those restaurants below. We’ll continue to update it, too, so please email us at losangeles@theinfatuation.com with any suggestions.

If you’re looking to order takeout and delivery this week, please also consider doing so from a Black-owned restaurant in LA. Here’s our updated list of over 200 Black-owned rest...s and bars open for takeout and delivery, organized by city and neighborhood.


Spread the good.

“In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”
-George Orwell, 1984
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #50 posted 06/08/20 6:07pm

v10letblues

avatar

I had been hearing people on the right like Tucker Carlson and Hannity say that democrats now want to "defund cops". Though it is a bullshit argument that rightwingers would love to have, let's snuff this out and not give it any oxygen.

.

We all know we need cops, it's racist and incompetent cops we are against.

So i was glad to see democrats get up front in this bullshit.

And yeah I know there are bound to be a few easter bunny believing group who believe this is a feasable thing, but still let's not even humor this.

.

And contrary to what it says in the article, it sure isnt liberals pushing this bullshit. Progeressives and libertarians? Not even them.

And I know a great part of the solution in is rethinking how policing is done and eforced and what some of these people is just that. But semantics matter a lot. The message they are pushing forward with this "defund cops" is just beyond moronic.

.

Hill Democrats squash liberal push to ‘defund the police’

“I think it can be used as a distraction, and that’s my concern,” said Rep. Karen Bass, chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus.

https://www.politico.com/...ats-307766

“Defund the police” has become the latest battle cry of liberals protesting George Floyd's death in demonstrations across the country. But it won’t be echoed by lawmakers in the halls of Congress.

Top Democrats are carefully — but forcefully — speaking out against growing calls from activists to defund police departments, an idea backed by prominent progressives to dismantle the system that has perpetuated the type of brutality as seen in Floyd’s death in Minneapolis.

.

“I think it can be used as a distraction, and that’s my concern,” Rep. Karen Bass, chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus, told reporters on Monday. “I think the intent behind it, is something that I support — the idea that communities need investments.”

.

To illustrate just how seriously Democratic leaders are taking the potential problem, several senior Democrats spoke out about it on a private caucus call Monday.

“This movement today, some people tried to hijack it,” House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) told Democrats on the call, according to multiple sources listening. “Don’t let yourselves be drawn into the debate about defunding police forces.”

.

[Edited 6/8/20 18:11pm]

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #51 posted 06/08/20 7:57pm

poppys

usatoday

Prosecutor: Virginia man who drove truck into crowd of peaceful protesters is a Ku Klux Klan leader

A man who drove his pick-up truck into a crowd of peaceful protesters in Richmond, Virginia over the weekend is an admitted leader of the Ku Klux Klan, according to prosecutors.

Henrico County Police identified the man as 36-year-old Harry H. Rogers of Virginia. Rogers has been charged with assault, battery, attempted malicious wounding and felony vandalism in the Sunday night incident.

Henrico Commonwealth Attorney Shannon Taylor said in a tweet that a "cursory glance" at Rogers' social media and his own admissions to authorities revealed that he was a leader of the white supremacist group.

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #52 posted 06/08/20 10:29pm

cborgman

avatar

poppys said:

usatoday

Prosecutor: Virginia man who drove truck into crowd of peaceful protesters is a Ku Klux Klan leader

A man who drove his pick-up truck into a crowd of peaceful protesters in Richmond, Virginia over the weekend is an admitted leader of the Ku Klux Klan, according to prosecutors.

Henrico County Police identified the man as 36-year-old Harry H. Rogers of Virginia. Rogers has been charged with assault, battery, attempted malicious wounding and felony vandalism in the Sunday night incident.

Henrico Commonwealth Attorney Shannon Taylor said in a tweet that a "cursory glance" at Rogers' social media and his own admissions to authorities revealed that he was a leader of the white supremacist group.

not surprised

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #53 posted 06/08/20 10:52pm

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

cborgman said:

poppys said:

usatoday

Prosecutor: Virginia man who drove truck into crowd of peaceful protesters is a Ku Klux Klan leader

A man who drove his pick-up truck into a crowd of peaceful protesters in Richmond, Virginia over the weekend is an admitted leader of the Ku Klux Klan, according to prosecutors.

Henrico County Police identified the man as 36-year-old Harry H. Rogers of Virginia. Rogers has been charged with assault, battery, attempted malicious wounding and felony vandalism in the Sunday night incident.

Henrico Commonwealth Attorney Shannon Taylor said in a tweet that a "cursory glance" at Rogers' social media and his own admissions to authorities revealed that he was a leader of the white supremacist group.

not surprised


neutral

“In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”
-George Orwell, 1984
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #54 posted 06/09/20 5:35am

3rdeyedude

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:

3rdeyedude said:

Nice to see protests are fewer and calmer. And change is happening like the disbanding of the Minneapolis police department. Nice on Prince's Birthday. smile

Fewer? There are more and more. All peaceful.

Sorry, I meant fewer people. And getting less tv coverage because of it.

https://dcist.com/story/2...e-weekend/

eek

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #55 posted 06/09/20 7:01am

2elijah

avatar

poppys said:

usatoday

Prosecutor: Virginia man who drove truck into crowd of peaceful protesters is a Ku Klux Klan leader


A man who drove his pick-up truck into a crowd of peaceful protesters in Richmond, Virginia over the weekend is an admitted leader of the Ku Klux Klan, according to prosecutors.


Henrico County Police identified the man as 36-year-old Harry H. Rogers of Virginia. Rogers has been charged with assault, battery, attempted malicious wounding and felony vandalism in the Sunday night incident.


Henrico Commonwealth Attorney Shannon Taylor said in a tweet that a "cursory glance" at Rogers' social media and his own admissions to authorities revealed that he was a leader of the white supremacist group.

So in other words, he’s angry because decent people were protesting against racism/police brutality. What did that idiot think he could actually accomplish, by driving his vehicle into a crowd? That somehow he could magically stop them from protesting against an ugly, racist, false ideology that exists, and one in which he embraces? What an idiot. I hope he serves time for shooting that guy
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #56 posted 06/09/20 7:16am

2elijah

avatar

v10letblues said:

I had been hearing people on the right like Tucker Carlson and Hannity say that democrats now want to "defund cops". Though it is a bullshit argument that rightwingers would love to have, let's snuff this out and not give it any oxygen.


.


We all know we need cops, it's racist and incompetent cops we are against.


So i was glad to see democrats get up front in this bullshit.


And yeah I know there are bound to be a few easter bunny believing group who believe this is a feasable thing, but still let's not even humor this.


.


And contrary to what it says in the article, it sure isnt liberals pushing this bullshit. Progeressives and libertarians? Not even them.


And I know a great part of the solution in is rethinking how policing is done and eforced and what some of these people is just that. But semantics matter a lot. The message they are pushing forward with this "defund cops" is just beyond moronic.


.


Hill Democrats squash liberal push to ‘defund the police’


“I think it can be used as a distraction, and that’s my concern,” said Rep. Karen Bass, chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus.


https://www.politico.com/...ats-307766



“Defund the police” has become the latest battle cry of liberals protesting George Floyd's death in demonstrations across the country. But it won’t be echoed by lawmakers in the halls of Congress.


Top Democrats are carefully — but forcefully — speaking out against growing calls from activists to defund police departments, an idea backed by prominent progressives to dismantle the system that has perpetuated the type of brutality as seen in Floyd’s death in Minneapolis.



.


“I think it can be used as a distraction, and that’s my concern,” Rep. Karen Bass, chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus, told reporters on Monday. “I think the intent behind it, is something that I support — the idea that communities need investments.”


.


To illustrate just how seriously Democratic leaders are taking the potential problem, several senior Democrats spoke out about it on a private caucus call Monday.


“This movement today, some people tried to hijack it,” House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) told Democrats on the call, according to multiple sources listening. “Don’t let yourselves be drawn into the debate about defunding police forces.”



.

[Edited 6/8/20 18:11pm]



That’s why they have to clarify what they mean by defunding, because some would take that as getting rid of police departments altogether, when I believe it means to redirect some funding into other agencies/programs, that police shouldn’t be responsible for, and making changes/improvements to training/better background checks, etc. when hiring police candidates. I’m not surprised many on the right running with that phrase, and suggesting the Dems want to get rid of police depts. We all know we need the police, but also there has to be better ways for improvement in relations/communication between police and citizens. Get rid of the bad cops period.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #57 posted 06/09/20 7:17am

2elijah

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:

In more positive news... similar to DC










On Sunday afternoon, some 20,000 people — estimated to be the largest protest over the death of George Floyd in the Los Angeles area so far — poured into the streets lined by the Hollywood Walk of Fame for a widely promoted march organized by Black Lives Matter Los Angeles and BLD PWR, along with the rapper YG.






Though protesters’ message was urgent, the vibe was more like a street festival for a diverse spectrum of Angelenos. N.W.A. and Nipsey Hussle blared and people sang along.






While social distancing wasn’t possible, nearly everyone wore face coverings and demonstrators passed out water bottles and hand sanitizer.






The only police presence I saw was in the air — helicopters circled overhead.



Just to also add, the Philadelphia crowd of protesters were massive and amazing this past weekend.
[Edited 6/9/20 7:18am]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #58 posted 06/09/20 9:11am

poppys

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #59 posted 06/09/20 10:08am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

poppys said:

pray rose

“In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”
-George Orwell, 1984
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Page 2 of 16 <123456789>Last »
  New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > Politics & Religion > George Floyd - Part 2 Discussion