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Thread started 02/06/20 8:39pm

noobman

Guy makes racist comment at PTA meeting

No doubt that the guy who made this racist comment was influenced by Trump.

https://www.youtube.com/w...XurJAajxe4

This is almost the same language Trump used against Ilhan Omar. But he's applauded by his base.

Why do these racists keep making this same childish remark, "if you have complaints, leave" ... it is so stupid... isn't Trump's whole deal MAGA (make america great again)... implying it isn't already great? If he doesn't think it's great why doesn't he just leave? He's allowed to say things aren't great... white people are allowed say it, but non-whites can't?

[Edited 2/7/20 1:14am]

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Reply #1 posted 02/07/20 5:19am

Pokeno4Money

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noobman said:

No doubt that the guy who made this racist comment was influenced by Trump.

https://www.youtube.com/w...XurJAajxe4

This is almost the same language Trump used against Ilhan Omar. But he's applauded by his base.

Why do these racists keep making this same childish remark, "if you have complaints, leave" ... it is so stupid... isn't Trump's whole deal MAGA (make america great again)... implying it isn't already great? If he doesn't think it's great why doesn't he just leave? He's allowed to say things aren't great... white people are allowed say it, but non-whites can't?


Thank you for posting this, it's a good feeling to see how the room full of people - many of them Caucasion - reacted so strongly against the racist guy. It's proof that racism is no longer acceptable like it was decades ago, and proof that we've come a long way and made a lot of progress.

However bringing Trump into it is downright silly. This sort of racism has existed for hundreds, if not thousands of years, in every country. To say it just began after Trump was elected is comical.

As for "MAGA", it's a well-known fact that the meaning relates to making America great again in terms of the economy, jobs, safety from violence and crime, and especially in comparison to other countries (ie increasing exports, decreasing dependency on other countries, etc).

I know some try to twist MAGA into a sinister code for racism, but that's of course a crock of shit.

And guess what? Trump certainly isn't the first to use the term. It was used extensively by Reagan (1980), Bill Clinton (1992) and Hillary Clinton (2008).




"Be good to yourselves, and each other."
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Reply #2 posted 02/07/20 5:44am

noobman

Pokeno4Money said:

noobman said:

No doubt that the guy who made this racist comment was influenced by Trump.

https://www.youtube.com/w...XurJAajxe4

This is almost the same language Trump used against Ilhan Omar. But he's applauded by his base.

Why do these racists keep making this same childish remark, "if you have complaints, leave" ... it is so stupid... isn't Trump's whole deal MAGA (make america great again)... implying it isn't already great? If he doesn't think it's great why doesn't he just leave? He's allowed to say things aren't great... white people are allowed say it, but non-whites can't?


Thank you for posting this, it's a good feeling to see how the room full of people - many of them Caucasion - reacted so strongly against the racist guy. It's proof that racism is no longer acceptable like it was decades ago, and proof that we've come a long way and made a lot of progress.

I agree progress has been made over the long-term, but over the short-term it's more complex. You are oversimplifying it. There are two deeply divided worldviews in the US. One side reacts strongly against what this guy said like you saw in this video. The other side is far more comfortable supporting this guy than prior to Trump.


However bringing Trump into it is downright silly. This sort of racism has existed for hundreds, if not thousands of years, in every country. To say it just began after Trump was elected is comical.

You are twisting my words. Do you think parents at PTA meetings discussing bullying would have felt comfortable saying "why don't you go back to mexico" during the Obama or GW Bush eras. Of course the racists would be there at the meeting but they'd keep their mouths shut at least in public.

You really don't think this guy was emboldened by Trump's racial language? If the president says it, and he's worshipped by a large part of the country why can't I say it?

It backfired for this guy on this occasion, but I have no doubt he was emboldened by Trump.


As for "MAGA", it's a well-known fact that the meaning relates to making America great again in terms of the economy, jobs, safety from violence and crime, and especially in comparison to other countries (ie increasing exports, decreasing dependency on other countries, etc).

I know some try to twist MAGA into a sinister code for racism, but that's of course a crock of shit.

And guess what? Trump certainly isn't the first to use the term. It was used extensively by Reagan (1980), Bill Clinton (1992) and Hillary Clinton (2008).

220px-Let%27s_Make_America_Great_Again_button.jpeg


This has nothing to do with what I posted. My point is the Trump supporters obviously have complaints about the country. If they think America is already great, than what the heck does MAGA even mean? By their own logic, if they don't like how America is they should leave. That was my only reason for bringing up MAGA. I'm not saying MAGA is racist code... but when a non-white complains about something he's told to leave the country... when a white person complains he's trying to make america great again.

I'll give an example. Rand Paul and Ilhan Omar had some similar views on some issues (related to Israel). They were almost saying the same things. But nobody tells Rand Paul, "if you don't like it here leave". But they are perfectly comfortable saying it to Ilhan Omar. Trump didn't tell Rand Paul to leave the country even though he's said some of the same things Ilhan Omar has.Heck even Rand Paul said Ilhan Omar should leave even though he agrees with her on a lot of things. The racial connotation is obvious to me.

[Edited 2/7/20 5:59am]

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Reply #3 posted 02/07/20 6:37am

poppys

noobman said:

No doubt that the guy who made this racist comment was influenced by Trump.

https://www.youtube.com/w...XurJAajxe4



This is almost the same language Trump used against Ilhan Omar. But he's applauded by his base.

Why do these racists keep making this same childish remark, "if you have complaints, leave" ... it is so stupid... isn't Trump's whole deal MAGA (make america great again)... implying it isn't already great? If he doesn't think it's great why doesn't he just leave? He's allowed to say things aren't great... white people are allowed say it, but non-whites can't?


Good points! So true about Paul and Omar too.

"an attack against me, I've reported it. I won't respond further while I wait for your post to be removed." - Troll

"I don't mind trolls but if you can't fight back, there's just no reason to hang around an unfair situation." - Rodeo Schro 17 yr orger
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Reply #4 posted 02/07/20 6:43am

Pokeno4Money

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noobman said:

Pokeno4Money said:

You are twisting my words. Do you think parents at PTA meetings discussing bullying would have felt comfortable saying "why don't you go back to mexico" during the Obama or GW Bush eras. Of course the racists would be there at the meeting but they'd keep their mouths shut at least in public.

You really don't think this guy was emboldened by Trump's racial language? If the president says it, and he's worshipped by a large part of the country why can't I say it?

It backfired for this guy on this occasion, but I have no doubt he was emboldened by Trump.


As for "MAGA", it's a well-known fact that the meaning relates to making America great again in terms of the economy, jobs, safety from violence and crime, and especially in comparison to other countries (ie increasing exports, decreasing dependency on other countries, etc).

I know some try to twist MAGA into a sinister code for racism, but that's of course a crock of shit.

And guess what? Trump certainly isn't the first to use the term. It was used extensively by Reagan (1980), Bill Clinton (1992) and Hillary Clinton (2008).

220px-Let%27s_Make_America_Great_Again_button.jpeg


This has nothing to do with what I posted. My point is the Trump supporters obviously have complaints about the country. If they think America is already great, than what the heck does MAGA even mean? By their own logic, if they don't like how America is they should leave. That was my only reason for bringing up MAGA. I'm not saying MAGA is racist code... but when a non-white complains about something he's told to leave the country... when a white person complains he's trying to make america great again.

I'll give an example. Rand Paul and Ilhan Omar had some similar views on some issues (related to Israel). They were almost saying the same things. But nobody tells Rand Paul, "if you don't like it here leave". But they are perfectly comfortable saying it to Ilhan Omar. Trump didn't tell Rand Paul to leave the country even though he's said some of the same things Ilhan Omar has.Heck even Rand Paul said Ilhan Omar should leave even though he agrees with her on a lot of things. The racial connotation is obvious to me.

[Edited 2/7/20 5:59am]


Are you asking me to provide examples where the "go back to where you came from" insult was used prior to Trump's election? Because there are plenty out there, as it's been used AT LEAST since 1798.

According to a August 31, 2003, Houston Chronicle article, a car salesman of East Indian descent who was Muslim was had been hired at a Texas car dealership in May 2001, began to be subjected to taunts by his co-workers including "go back where you came from" post 9/11.[8] He filed a complaint with the EEOC in 2003 after he was fired from the dealership in 2002. According to CNN, in rendering their decision to side with the EEOC case on behalf of the salesman and against the car dealership accused of creating a "hostile work environment based on ... national origin and religion", the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit "cited the example" several times of the repeated use of the phrase "just go back where [he] came from".[5][6][8] By 2003, allegedly as part of the post-9/11 backlash, over 943 discrimination complaints were filed to the EEOC leading to over 115 lawsuits.

Since at least 2006, according to a list of EEOC litigation cases from 2005 to 2016, published by EEOC, the Delano Regional Medical Center (DRMC) in southern California subjected "Filipino-American hospital workers" to harassing comments, including "humiliating threats of arrest if they did not speak English and were told to go back to the Philippines". The case against DMRC, settled on September 17, 2012, awarded the workers who were mostly nursing staff with $975,000 and injunctive relief.


On February 12, 2008, a case against U-Haul of Nevada was resolved in Los Angeles, in favor of the employees. EEOC had alleged that some Hispanic and Asian/Filipino employees had been "subjected to derogatory comments and slurs based on their race and/or national origin such as "go back to Mexico."

A Texas-based oil company, Blue Ridge Resources, had to pay damages and provide injunctive relief to a five-member crew originally from Mexico, who had been were subjected to national origin harassment by their rig-crew supervisor, including being told to "go back to Mexico". The supervisor also used "unwelcomed ethnic slurs", called them "stupid Mexicans", and said that all Mexicans who came to the U.S. should be hung.

An employee who is Muslim and was originally from Gambia, filed an EEOC complaint against a Wal-Mart store and won the ensuing lawsuit in Philadelphia on June 12, 2015. The "national origin and religious harassment" he was subjected to included "being told to "go back to Africa," "all Muslims do is blow up buildings and people," and mocking his accent".

Do you seriously not realize this "blame Trump on everything" agenda going on right now is EXACTLY the same as when Obama was in office and conservatives were blaming everything on him?

As for Trump saying "leave the country" to the four radical liberal freshmen congresswomen, it's already been discussed but I understand you probably didn't get a chance to read it. In a nutshell, I don't condone it but I understand it's typically used when the person or the person's parents came from a different country. And it's typically used in response to the person expressing strong anti-American views.

The racist in this PTA meeting was an absolute idiot to say such a thing in that situation, as the Mexican guy was simply talking about past racist experiences and the impact they had. In a country of 328 million people you're going to have some idiotic racists, and these days we are more likely to hear about it with everyone owning cell phones that can record video. But for you to refuse to hold the racist accountable, and instead pass the blame onto Trump, is about as silly as those who have blamed violence on musicians that have recorded music with violent lyrics.

"Be good to yourselves, and each other."
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Reply #5 posted 02/07/20 8:37am

noobman

Pokeno4Money said:

noobman said:


Are you asking me to provide examples where the "go back to where you came from" insult was used prior to Trump's election? Because there are plenty out there, as it's been used AT LEAST since 1798.

According to a August 31, 2003, Houston Chronicle article, a car salesman of East Indian descent who was Muslim was had been hired at a Texas car dealership in May 2001, began to be subjected to taunts by his co-workers including "go back where you came from" post 9/11.[8] He filed a complaint with the EEOC in 2003 after he was fired from the dealership in 2002. According to CNN, in rendering their decision to side with the EEOC case on behalf of the salesman and against the car dealership accused of creating a "hostile work environment based on ... national origin and religion", the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit "cited the example" several times of the repeated use of the phrase "just go back where [he] came from".[5][6][8] By 2003, allegedly as part of the post-9/11 backlash, over 943 discrimination complaints were filed to the EEOC leading to over 115 lawsuits.

Since at least 2006, according to a list of EEOC litigation cases from 2005 to 2016, published by EEOC, the Delano Regional Medical Center (DRMC) in southern California subjected "Filipino-American hospital workers" to harassing comments, including "humiliating threats of arrest if they did not speak English and were told to go back to the Philippines". The case against DMRC, settled on September 17, 2012, awarded the workers who were mostly nursing staff with $975,000 and injunctive relief.


On February 12, 2008, a case against U-Haul of Nevada was resolved in Los Angeles, in favor of the employees. EEOC had alleged that some Hispanic and Asian/Filipino employees had been "subjected to derogatory comments and slurs based on their race and/or national origin such as "go back to Mexico."

A Texas-based oil company, Blue Ridge Resources, had to pay damages and provide injunctive relief to a five-member crew originally from Mexico, who had been were subjected to national origin harassment by their rig-crew supervisor, including being told to "go back to Mexico". The supervisor also used "unwelcomed ethnic slurs", called them "stupid Mexicans", and said that all Mexicans who came to the U.S. should be hung.

An employee who is Muslim and was originally from Gambia, filed an EEOC complaint against a Wal-Mart store and won the ensuing lawsuit in Philadelphia on June 12, 2015. The "national origin and religious harassment" he was subjected to included "being told to "go back to Africa," "all Muslims do is blow up buildings and people," and mocking his accent".

I see a PTA meeting with significant interracial contingent... there to discuss bullying and racism... as very different from the examples you posted.



But for you to refuse to hold the racist accountable, and instead pass the blame onto Trump, is about as silly as those who have blamed violence on musicians that have recorded music with violent lyrics.


You're oversimplifying things. Where did I refuse to hold him accountable? I'm talking about cause and effect here. Just because I mentioned the president as part of the larger issue doesn't mean I'm not holding the guy accountable. When the president of the United States tells congressman to "go back to where you came from" on a tweet with millions of followers... with little to no consequence, I think that is very likely to embolden people to speak out like this guy did.

I hold the guy accountable for his own actions. Is it possible this guy would have said this even if Trump wasn't in office? Yes of course. I concede that. I still think it's very likely the guy was influenced by Trump.

Obviously politicians have an influence on their constitutents. In the twitter age, this is far more so. With Trump who is #10 on number of twitter followers... who posts tweets all the time, there is no question he has an influence on a large group of people. One group rallies in support, one group rallies against.


This guy for example admits he's emboldened by Trump:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83WsgVnIQ8k

He also says his organization has doubled activity since Trump came into office. Is he lying? I'm not saying it's Trump's fault, but there's nothing wrong with examining whether there's a relationship here.

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Reply #6 posted 02/07/20 3:06pm

Pokeno4Money

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noobman said:

Pokeno4Money said:

I see a PTA meeting with significant interracial contingent... there to discuss bullying and racism... as very different from the examples you posted.



But for you to refuse to hold the racist accountable, and instead pass the blame onto Trump, is about as silly as those who have blamed violence on musicians that have recorded music with violent lyrics.


You're oversimplifying things. Where did I refuse to hold him accountable? I'm talking about cause and effect here. Just because I mentioned the president as part of the larger issue doesn't mean I'm not holding the guy accountable. When the president of the United States tells congressman to "go back to where you came from" on a tweet with millions of followers... with little to no consequence, I think that is very likely to embolden people to speak out like this guy did.

I hold the guy accountable for his own actions. Is it possible this guy would have said this even if Trump wasn't in office? Yes of course. I concede that. I still think it's very likely the guy was influenced by Trump.

Obviously politicians have an influence on their constitutents. In the twitter age, this is far more so. With Trump who is #10 on number of twitter followers... who posts tweets all the time, there is no question he has an influence on a large group of people. One group rallies in support, one group rallies against.


This guy for example admits he's emboldened by Trump:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83WsgVnIQ8k

He also says his organization has doubled activity since Trump came into office. Is he lying? I'm not saying it's Trump's fault, but there's nothing wrong with examining whether there's a relationship here.


I agree the setting of the PTA meeting was bad, and different than the examples I provided. My goal was simply to show that sort of racism has been going on for a very long time.

I've said several times in other threads, I don't condone Trump saying it. Clearly it was inappropriate. I get what you're saying, and certainly there are simpleminded people whose behaviour is influenced by politicians and celebrities and athletes to name a few. But unless they come out and admit as much, it's impossible to surmise they were influenced by the president or anyone else. I'd guess 99 times out of a 100, they were not.

So in conclusion, yes there's likely a portion of society that's influenced by Trump. I just don't think there's as large a portion as you believe.

"Be good to yourselves, and each other."
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Reply #7 posted 02/07/20 8:19pm

noobman

Pokeno4Money said:

noobman said:

I see a PTA meeting with significant interracial contingent... there to discuss bullying and racism... as very different from the examples you posted.



But for you to refuse to hold the racist accountable, and instead pass the blame onto Trump, is about as silly as those who have blamed violence on musicians that have recorded music with violent lyrics.


You're oversimplifying things. Where did I refuse to hold him accountable? I'm talking about cause and effect here. Just because I mentioned the president as part of the larger issue doesn't mean I'm not holding the guy accountable. When the president of the United States tells congressman to "go back to where you came from" on a tweet with millions of followers... with little to no consequence, I think that is very likely to embolden people to speak out like this guy did.

I hold the guy accountable for his own actions. Is it possible this guy would have said this even if Trump wasn't in office? Yes of course. I concede that. I still think it's very likely the guy was influenced by Trump.

Obviously politicians have an influence on their constitutents. In the twitter age, this is far more so. With Trump who is #10 on number of twitter followers... who posts tweets all the time, there is no question he has an influence on a large group of people. One group rallies in support, one group rallies against.


This guy for example admits he's emboldened by Trump:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83WsgVnIQ8k

He also says his organization has doubled activity since Trump came into office. Is he lying? I'm not saying it's Trump's fault, but there's nothing wrong with examining whether there's a relationship here.


I agree the setting of the PTA meeting was bad, and different than the examples I provided. My goal was simply to show that sort of racism has been going on for a very long time.

I've said several times in other threads, I don't condone Trump saying it. Clearly it was inappropriate. I get what you're saying, and certainly there are simpleminded people whose behaviour is influenced by politicians and celebrities and athletes to name a few. But unless they come out and admit as much, it's impossible to surmise they were influenced by the president or anyone else. I'd guess 99 times out of a 100, they were not.

So in conclusion, yes there's likely a portion of society that's influenced by Trump. I just don't think there's as large a portion as you believe.

Ok. No prob. I hear you. smile

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Reply #8 posted 02/08/20 5:48am

Pokeno4Money

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noobman said:

Ok. No prob. I hear you. smile


Good discussion, I hope you post here more often. peace

"Be good to yourselves, and each other."
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