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Thread started 01/13/20 6:51am

guitarslinger4
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The Blue State Exodus

Interesting article about people migrating from blue states to red and how this affects representation in the House.

https://thehill.com/opini...mentum?amp

Seven states are projected to gain one or more congressional seats after the 2020 election; 10 states are projected lose one seat.

>The red-state leader is Texas, with a projected pickup of three congressional seats following the 2020 census - and that after [gaining four congressional seats](https://ballotpedia.org/Texas_gains_four_congressional_seats_from_2010_Census) after the 2010 election. Florida will pick up two seats, and Arizona, Colorado, Montana, North Carolina and Oregon will each gain one, according to the analysis.

>All 10 losing states - Alabama, California, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and West Virginia - lose only one seat.


[b]One of the more interesting paragraphs from the story was this though:[b/]

But that trend also highlights a problem: Some of the people fleeing destructive blue-state taxes and regulations appear to drag their pro-big-government philosophy with them - apparently oblivious to the fact that those policies destroyed the state they are trying to escape.


[b]I grew up in NY State and at least in the upstate area, things are getting more expensive and the people living there are getting less for what they're contributing. My folks have lived there all their lives but are thinking about leaving because they're living on fixed incomes and it doesn't seem like Gov Cuomo cares about anything but his own agenda.

I live in Nashville now and we've gotten a metric ton of California people who've moved to TN, but a lot of them are so find of Cali and how they do things there which I don't understand. Why would you leave a place you really like?
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Reply #1 posted 01/13/20 6:55am

benni

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They are in for a rude awakening. I live in a red state and we are low in many areas, such as education, infrastructure, etc. We are high in crime, especially crimes against women (SC is ranked 5 nationwide). They may be trying to escape taxes, and that is the reason why our infrastructure is crumbling, our education is low, and crimes are high. Not a good pay off in the long run.

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Reply #2 posted 01/13/20 6:29pm

guitarslinger4
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benni said:

They are in for a rude awakening. I live in a red state and we are low in many areas, such as education, infrastructure, etc. We are high in crime, especially crimes against women (SC is ranked 5 nationwide). They may be trying to escape taxes, and that is the reason why our infrastructure is crumbling, our education is low, and crimes are high. Not a good pay off in the long run.


If we're talking about people who don't have kids and are already married or in relationships, they probably don't care about some of those things. You can avoid crime by moving to more rural or suburban areas too.

I think escaping taxes is part of the story for sure, but just overall cost of living is way lower here in Tennessee for example than it is in states that are even adjacent to us by a lot. And our housing costs are starting to go up here in Nashville because we have a lot of folks from wealthier states moving in that can afford much higher prices than a lot of people already living here, so there's a shortage of good available AFFORDABLE housing, at least in this city. But even in Clarksville, 45 min away it's getting to be the same story.

[Edited 1/13/20 18:31pm]

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Reply #3 posted 01/13/20 9:18pm

jjhunsecker

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I'm curious- are the people who are moving to these Red States from Blue States moving mainly to rural areas, or are they moving to the Cities in those States that have at least some of the amneties that they are used to, and hope to expand upon in their new areas ? For instance, are people mainly moving to small out of the way towns in Texas, or are they moving to Austin and Dallas, perhaps places where educated, socially liberal people might feel more at home ?

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Reply #4 posted 01/14/20 1:24pm

Deadflow3r

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guitarslinger44 said:

Interesting article about people migrating from blue states to red and how this affects representation in the House. https://thehill.com/opini...mentum?amp
Seven states are projected to gain one or more congressional seats after the 2020 election; 10 states are projected lose one seat. >The red-state leader is Texas, with a projected pickup of three congressional seats following the 2020 census - and that after [gaining four congressional seats](https://ballotpedia.org/Texas_gains_four_congressional_seats_from_2010_Census) after the 2010 election. Florida will pick up two seats, and Arizona, Colorado, Montana, North Carolina and Oregon will each gain one, according to the analysis. >All 10 losing states - Alabama, California, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and West Virginia - lose only one seat.
[b]One of the more interesting paragraphs from the story was this though:[b/]
But that trend also highlights a problem: Some of the people fleeing destructive blue-state taxes and regulations appear to drag their pro-big-government philosophy with them - apparently oblivious to the fact that those policies destroyed the state they are trying to escape.
[b]I grew up in NY State and at least in the upstate area, things are getting more expensive and the people living there are getting less for what they're contributing. My folks have lived there all their lives but are thinking about leaving because they're living on fixed incomes and it doesn't seem like Gov Cuomo cares about anything but his own agenda. I live in Nashville now and we've gotten a metric ton of California people who've moved to TN, but a lot of them are so find of Cali and how they do things there which I don't understand. Why would you leave a place you really like?

This makes me laugh because I live in Massachusetts and we get tons of people moving here from all over the world. they are very capable of talking about the country they left behind and how much they love it, whether being asked or not. There is a point where when you go on and on about how terrific the place you left was people will ask you "why don't you go back?" It has nothing to do with not liking your country of origin, it's just your obvious unhappiness with where you are now. I honestly can see this happening with people leaving their home state. Each state has it's own constitutiona and their own laws. They have different personalities. That is why we are the United States of America, and not the United People of America. Each state has a right to define itself, unless their laws go contrary to Federal laws. A state will change the character of a group of individuals faster then a group of individuals will change the character of a state.

There came a time when the risk of remaining tight in the bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. Anais Nin.
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Reply #5 posted 01/14/20 6:40pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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too many of these fools leave their states to escape the draconian liberal policies but then vote for more of same... which is for anyone with an education and halfway decent job/income always ALWAYS against their interests... but whatever... the virus is out we will all suffer... as the saying goes... you can vote you way into oppression but you will need to shoot your way out.

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #6 posted 01/15/20 8:31am

jjhunsecker

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My question is this : besides lower taxes (and as Benni points out, lesser and lower quality services), what does life in a Red State really offer to an educated person from a Blue State, unless all they want is to get away from everything? And as Nicholas Kristof points out in his new book which is mainly about the rural area he was raised in, these areas have more than their share of social problems like alcoholism and drug abuse and mental illness and family disintegration.
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Reply #7 posted 01/15/20 12:40pm

DiminutiveRock
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benni said:

They are in for a rude awakening. I live in a red state and we are low in many areas, such as education, infrastructure, etc. We are high in crime, especially crimes against women (SC is ranked 5 nationwide). They may be trying to escape taxes, and that is the reason why our infrastructure is crumbling, our education is low, and crimes are high. Not a good pay off in the long run.

^ True. Taxes are high and housing is short and has gotten increasingly expensive in some areas. For people who move here and cannot afford to stay - I get it. California is still the 5th largest economy in the world and has a steady stream of people coming here for eduation and careers.

With so many people here - the infrastructure needs caring for and as a community we must all pay for the common use of such things as highays and bridges, sanitation, etc.

"Families are torn apart, men women and children are separated. Children come home from school to find their parents have gone missing." - Anne Frank
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Reply #8 posted 01/15/20 12:50pm

DiminutiveRock
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jjhunsecker said:

I'm curious- are the people who are moving to these Red States from Blue States moving mainly to rural areas, or are they moving to the Cities in those States that have at least some of the amneties that they are used to, and hope to expand upon in their new areas ? For instance, are people mainly moving to small out of the way towns in Texas, or are they moving to Austin and Dallas, perhaps places where educated, socially liberal people might feel more at home ?

^ Good points, JJ. Of my Cali friends who have moved out of state - they have relocated to urban areas along the Pacific Northwest (WA or OR) or moved to places like DC or NYC. Some moved to NV CO or ID as well. None of them wentto rural areas and some moved for career purposes.

"Families are torn apart, men women and children are separated. Children come home from school to find their parents have gone missing." - Anne Frank
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Reply #9 posted 01/15/20 3:51pm

uPtoWnNY

jjhunsecker said:

My question is this : besides lower taxes (and as Benni points out, lesser and lower quality services), what does life in a Red State really offer to an educated person from a Blue State, unless all they want is to get away from everything? And as Nicholas Kristof points out in his new book which is mainly about the rural area he was raised in, these areas have more than their share of social problems like alcoholism and drug abuse and mental illness and family disintegration.

That's why I'm staying in NY, because of the quality of services. I have family in the south - an inch of snow and their whole area shuts down, including schools. Weak sauce, lol.

Plus, it's the best place for graphic designers, especially ones like me, who work in the apparel industry. If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.

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Reply #10 posted 01/15/20 4:19pm

guitarslinger4
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jjhunsecker said:

I'm curious- are the people who are moving to these Red States from Blue States moving mainly to rural areas, or are they moving to the Cities in those States that have at least some of the amneties that they are used to, and hope to expand upon in their new areas ? For instance, are people mainly moving to small out of the way towns in Texas, or are they moving to Austin and Dallas, perhaps places where educated, socially liberal people might feel more at home ?


People from especially more liberal states like NY or California move primarily to urban locations. I dont think you'd find a lot of those types of folks aiming to move to more rural spots unless they were tired of city life.

Cost of living is a big reason why I think a lot of people move, followed by taxes and maybe political policy. Someone from a state with high income levels can come to a place like TN or FL and get way more house for their money than they could in their home state, depending on the area.

[Edited 1/15/20 16:20pm]

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Reply #11 posted 01/15/20 4:27pm

guitarslinger4
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uPtoWnNY said:

jjhunsecker said:

My question is this : besides lower taxes (and as Benni points out, lesser and lower quality services), what does life in a Red State really offer to an educated person from a Blue State, unless all they want is to get away from everything? And as Nicholas Kristof points out in his new book which is mainly about the rural area he was raised in, these areas have more than their share of social problems like alcoholism and drug abuse and mental illness and family disintegration.

That's why I'm staying in NY, because of the quality of services. I have family in the south - an inch of snow and their whole area shuts down, including schools. Weak sauce, lol.

Plus, it's the best place for graphic designers, especially ones like me, who work in the apparel industry. If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.


For you, a place like NYC sounds perfect. For me, I don't know how I'd make enough there not to live like a junkie (I'm in the music industry.)

Also, we don't get anywhere near as much snow down here than you do in NY, and because of that, we don't have the snow removal equipment. But I like days where there's too much snow to go anywhere here, and with the way a lot of southerners drive in the snow, it' sbest to just stay in. lol

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Reply #12 posted 01/15/20 6:30pm

jjhunsecker

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guitarslinger44 said:



jjhunsecker said:


I'm curious- are the people who are moving to these Red States from Blue States moving mainly to rural areas, or are they moving to the Cities in those States that have at least some of the amneties that they are used to, and hope to expand upon in their new areas ? For instance, are people mainly moving to small out of the way towns in Texas, or are they moving to Austin and Dallas, perhaps places where educated, socially liberal people might feel more at home ?




People from especially more liberal states like NY or California move primarily to urban locations. I dont think you'd find a lot of those types of folks aiming to move to more rural spots unless they were tired of city life.

Cost of living is a big reason why I think a lot of people move, followed by taxes and maybe political policy. Someone from a state with high income levels can come to a place like TN or FL and get way more house for their money than they could in their home state, depending on the area.

[Edited 1/15/20 16:20pm]



Some of us love the diversity of a place like NY , not only of people, but of experiences. New York made me, and while I could enjoy visiting a different type of place, I need the energy and the variety of a big city
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Reply #13 posted 01/15/20 8:23pm

uPtoWnNY

guitarslinger44 said:

uPtoWnNY said:

That's why I'm staying in NY, because of the quality of services. I have family in the south - an inch of snow and their whole area shuts down, including schools. Weak sauce, lol.

Plus, it's the best place for graphic designers, especially ones like me, who work in the apparel industry. If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.


For you, a place like NYC sounds perfect. For me, I don't know how I'd make enough there not to live like a junkie (I'm in the music industry.)

Also, we don't get anywhere near as much snow down here than you do in NY, and because of that, we don't have the snow removal equipment. But I like days where there's too much snow to go anywhere here, and with the way a lot of southerners drive in the snow, it' sbest to just stay in. lol

You can survive in NYC - just live within your means. Living in Manhattan is a no-no unless you're rich or poor. The outer boroughs or Jersey are your best bet. Transportation is reasonable - I take the bus & subway to work, which costs $5.50 a day. Aside from basic living expenses, I have very little debt - I owe @$700 on my credit card. Plus I'm single, no kids, no baby mamas, none of that shit. I was taught to save more than I spend. That's how I was able to survive when I got laid off in 2011 and could get part-time work for a couple of years.

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