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Reply #30 posted 01/11/20 6:11am

2freaky4church
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Tweety, explain the fires.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #31 posted 01/11/20 12:40pm

IanRG

2freaky4church1 said:

Tweety, explain the fires.

.

Fire is the rapid oxidation of a material in the exothermic chemical process of combustion, releasing heat, light, and various reaction products. Ignition of these fires has been for a variety of reason but largely due to very dry environments, very hot temperatures, lightning storms with little or no rain and available combustibles. They have been sustained for extended periods (some have been burning since Sept 2019) due to similar reasons, primarily many of these areas are in multiyear drought. This has enabled the fires to spread, grow and combine into what the media is calling "megafires".

.

We have discussed the Australian fires and the political pseudoscience that ignores key reasons for why fire seasons this century in the southern corners of Australia have been trending to be significantly worse than before in the thread The €4,600 Billion Fias...Transition

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Reply #32 posted 01/13/20 5:36am

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7 Australian Animal Rescue Stories That Will Give You Hope

Latest bushfire reports

As of January 9, 2020, bushfires were continuing to rage across southern and eastern parts of Australia and news of animal deaths—already heartbreaking to contemplate a week earlier—were starting to rack up into catastrophic levels nearing close to 1 billion, according to estimates by Chris Dickman, PhD, an expert on Australian biodiversity at the University of Sydney. Some are even in danger of becoming extinct. We've seen devastating images and footage of singed and expired koalas, kangaroos, wombats, and all sorts of rare species since the fires broke out earlier than usual this past September, consuming some 15.6 million acres of land with scant rains bringing only "very temporary" relief, according to NASA. Ready for some cheerful stories? So are we.

1. Koala-sniffing dogs

Both dogs and koalas are adorable in their own right. Put the two together and you have a match made in heartwarming rescue heaven. Several animal training groups, including Working Dogs for Conservation, actually teach dogs how to sniff out live koalas—either by the scent of their scat or the smell of their fur. News circulated in November 2019 on CNN about Bear, a mix of border collie and koolie, who was able to indicate to handlers that koalas were out there—somewhere—in the burnt landscape of an Indigenous Protected Area in Ballina, and that they should deploy to seek them out. Another, springer spaniel, pup, Taylor, was credited with finding eight koalas, including a mother and her joey.

2. Above and beyond

In early January, Australian Broadcasting Company reported that Chad Staples, the director of the Mogo Wildlife Park in New South Wales had taken the duties of his job to the next level. As fires pushed on by rapid winds drew near the zoo, threatening the 200 animals it houses, including tigers, rhinos, and a collection of rare primates, Staples enacted a special rescue plan for some of the animals: he brought them home with him. Thanks to him, red pandas, which are already at risk of extinction, some smaller monkeys, and even a tiger were far from the zoo when the fire hit. And thanks to tireless firefighting efforts in and around the zoo, all animals survived safe and sound. Here's exactly how many red pandas are left in the world.

4. Hunter becomes humanitarian

On January 4, Australia's News shared the smile-worthy and viral story of Patrick Boyle, a 22-year old hunter who had stayed behind in his already-scorched town of Mallacoota, Victoria to rescue wildlife. When rescue efforts were delayed due to the flames that encircled Mallacoota, Hunter explained to various media outlets that he felt that it was his responsibility to do what he could for the region's wildlife. In all, he rescued "eight or nine" koalas, delivering them to a local wildlife shelter being run out of another local's home.

5. Knitters unite

A crisis is always good for getting crafters organized to make a meaningful difference (think, sweaters for penguins after oil spills). The Australian bushfires have been no exception. Knitters (and some sewers and crocheters) from around the world have been stitching up pouches for baby marsupials—koalas, kangaroos, flying foxes, and wombats—to grow in or otherwise recover in, without their mothers available to them, according to the Guardian. Other needle wizzes have been making mittens for the burned paws of koalas and wraps for bats. As of January 7, donations from 40 U.S. States and Puerto Rico, as well as from across Europe and Asia, have flooded into the Animal Rescue Craft Guild, which organized the drive.

6. Rounding up supplies

The Rescue Collective, a Brisbane-based animal rescue-support organization, has been amassing all manner of supplies to help wildlife and companion animals injured in the bushfires—food, medicine, and other equipment—as well as organizing hubs where those supplies could be stored and parceled out to places in need. As of January 8, it reported on its Facebook page, it had received such a tremendous outpouring of donations that it was taking a temporary break from accepting any more items. No doubt the need will arise again, so stay tuned for more donation calls. But this is clearly a success story highlighting the generosity of so many people around the globe.

7. Finding shelter

As much as we might try to prepare for disasters, environmental emergencies can be devastating for domesticated animals and livestock, as well as wildlife; folks fleeing for their lives may not be able to take their animals with them—how do you evacuate with a flock of sheep?—and sometimes, shelters are not equipped to receive animals, forcing people to leave them behind. But during the bushfires, the Guardian reports that evacuation centers have been welcoming all manner of animals, including dogs, cats, and horses, making an unspeakable tragedy for people losing everything just a little less tragic.

8. The kindness of strangers

In instances where shelters haven't been able to accept animals, regular folks are stepping up to lend assistance. A graduate student named Erin Riley offered up her own paddocks to evacuees needing a place to board their animals; when the need far outgrew the space she had available, she organized a database of volunteers—called Find A Bed—who, similar to her, had come forward to offer a soft place to land for animals, as well as for humans. Now running with the help of 40 volunteers, the service has received offers from 3,500 kind strangers across Australia, Canada, and the United States, according to the Canberra Times.

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if you ever try the lotus position
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Reply #33 posted 01/13/20 5:44am

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Australia drops 4,000 pounds of food to save starving wildlife

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/australia-drops-4000-pounds-of-food-to-save-starving-wildlife/ar-BBYSRKU?ocid=ientp#image=BBWBMoO|40

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The Australian government is using helicopters and airplanes to help feed starving animals displaced by the country's wildfire crisis.

The New South Wales government used aircraft to drop more than 4,000 pounds of food, mostly carrots and sweet potatoes, to colonies of brush-tailed rock-wallabies that were left stranded as massive wildfires ravaged their habitat.

The brush-tailed rock-wallaby was already endangered in southeastern Australia before the fires began in September and government officials said their survival could be complicated further by the ongoing crisis. The fires are estimated to have killed more than a billion animals and scorched more than 8.4 million hectacres -- about twice the size of Maryland.

"Initial fire assessments indicate the habitat of several important Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby populations was burnt in the recent bushfires," New South Wales Environment Minister Matt Kean said Sunday. "The wallabies were already under stress from the ongoing drought, making survival challenging for the wallabies without assistance."

BBYT0Cg.img?h=840&w=1119&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=560&y=641

Over the last week, nearly 2,000 pounds of sweet potatoes and carrots were sent to colonies in the state's Capertee and Wolgan valleys; 2,000 pounds were sent to areas of Yengo National Park; and about 200 pounds of food and water were dropped in the Kangaroo Valley, government officials in New South Wales.

Kean said the drops are one of the most widespread relief efforts of their kind for brush-tailed rock-wallabies. The plan is designed to help maintain the animal colonies and allow them to recover.

"The provision of supplementary food is one of the key strategies we are deploying to promote the survival and recovery of endangered species like the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby," Kean said. "The wallabies typically survive the fire itself, but are then left stranded with limited natural food as the fire takes out the vegetation around their rocky habitat."

The fires have claimed the lives of at least 25 people and destroyed more than 2,000 homes. University of Sydney ecologist Chris Dickman estimated that more than a billion animals have been killed since the fires began in early September, with about 800 million killed in New South Wales alone.

Fire seasons regularly take place in the country, but this year has been particularly devastating. The country experienced one of its hottest and driest years, in part, because of the Indian Ocean dipole, which is a variation in sea surface temperature on the Indian Ocean that drives the weather patterns.

BBYSVXP.img?h=840&w=1119&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=527&y=422

The IOD was in its strongest positive phase in more than 20 years, resulting in conditions that led to cooler sea surface temperatures near Australia and, in turn, less rain for the country.

With the fire season expected to rage for the next few months, Australians are doubtful that wildlife will fully recover.

"I think there's nothing quite to compare with the devastation that's going on over such a large area so quickly. It's a monstrous event in terms of geography and the number of individual animals affected," Dickman said in an interview with NPR last week.

"We know that Australian biodiversity has been going down over the last several decades, and it's probably fairly well known that Australia's got the world's highest rate of extinction for mammals," he added. "It's events like this that may well hasten the extinction process for a range of other species. So, it's a very sad time."

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Reply #34 posted 01/13/20 6:04am

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Sheep graze in a field shrouded with smoke haze near at Burragate, on Jan. 11.

Residents collect donated items in the town Mogo in New South Wales, where a bushfire destroyed homes and businesses, on Jan. 11.

A Rural Fire Service firefighter Trevor Stewart views a flank of a fire on Jan. 11, in Tumburumba.

A ram looks for food in a burnt-out orange tree on the property of Chris Post which was affected by bushfire on New Year's Eve 2019, in Verona, New South Wales, on Jan. 10.

Cows stand in the field with bushfire burning in the background, in Kangaroo Island on Jan. 9.

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Reply #35 posted 01/13/20 9:54am

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Sharnie Moren and her 18-month-old daughter Charlotte look on as thick smoke rises from bushfires near Nana Glen, near Coffs Harbour, Australia, November 12, 2019.

Residents look on as flames burn through bush on January 04, 2020 in Lake Tabourie, Australia.

Smoke billows during bushfires in Bairnsdale, Victoria, Australia, December 30, 2019 in this picture obtained from social media. Picture taken December 30, 2019.

Trees are burned black after a bushfire in Old Bar, 350km north of Sydney on November 10, 2019.

Thick plumes of smoke rise from bushfires at the coast of East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia January 4, 2020 in this aerial picture taken from AMSA Challenger jet.

A helicopter drops fire retardent to protect a property in Balmoral, 150 kilometres southwest of Sydney on December 19, 2019.

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Reply #36 posted 01/16/20 5:26am

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Thunderstorms sweep across Australia's bushfire-ravaged east coastBy Lidia Kelly

10 hrs ago

.

A note to MSN readers: Microsoft News US is supporting relief efforts in Australia to help those affected by the recent bushfires. Please consider making a donation today to the organizations helping communities across the country.

MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Thunderstorms and heavy rain swept across parts of Australia's east coast on Thursday, bringing hope that some of the fierce bushfires razing the country will be extinguished - or at least slowed.

Officials warned, however, that short, intense thunderstorms could lead to flash flooding, while lightning brought the risk of new fires being ignited.

"We're expecting unsettled weather for the next four or five days or so at least," Jake Phillips, a senior meteorologist at the Bureau of Meteorology told Australian Broadcasting Corp radio. "The rainfall in some areas might be useful and in other spots it might only be a millimetre or two."

"There are risks associated with it, so it's not always necessarily a great thing, particularly if we get the rainfall really quickly. What we really need is soaking, steady rain."

Australia has been battling its worst bushfire season on record since September, with fires killing 29 people and millions of animals, and destroying more than 2,500 homes while razing bushland across an area the size of Bulgaria.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
https://prince.org/msg/7/464433 9.24.2020
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Reply #37 posted 01/16/20 12:45pm

IanRG

OldFriends4Sale said:

Thunderstorms sweep across Australia's bushfire-ravaged east coastBy Lidia Kelly

10 hrs ago

.

A note to MSN readers: Microsoft News US is supporting relief efforts in Australia to help those affected by the recent bushfires. Please consider making a donation today to the organizations helping communities across the country.

MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Thunderstorms and heavy rain swept across parts of Australia's east coast on Thursday, bringing hope that some of the fierce bushfires razing the country will be extinguished - or at least slowed.

Officials warned, however, that short, intense thunderstorms could lead to flash flooding, while lightning brought the risk of new fires being ignited.

"We're expecting unsettled weather for the next four or five days or so at least," Jake Phillips, a senior meteorologist at the Bureau of Meteorology told Australian Broadcasting Corp radio. "The rainfall in some areas might be useful and in other spots it might only be a millimetre or two."

"There are risks associated with it, so it's not always necessarily a great thing, particularly if we get the rainfall really quickly. What we really need is soaking, steady rain."

Australia has been battling its worst bushfire season on record since September, with fires killing 29 people and millions of animals, and destroying more than 2,500 homes while razing bushland across an area the size of Bulgaria.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

.

The rain is putting out many of the fires - but it is just bringing the bigger / more dangerous ones under control. Without sustained rain, these will flare up again as soon as the rain stops and the air moisture drops again. But for most of us it is welcome relief

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Reply #38 posted 01/22/20 2:45am

olb99

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CherryMoon57 said:

Prayers and donations aren't mutually exclusive nor will either of them hurt anyone.

They're not mutually exclusive, you're right. I wouldn't say prayer is harmless, though. If it leads to inaction, it can be harmful. In a passive way, but still.

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Reply #39 posted 01/29/20 3:38pm

CherryMoon57

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olb99 said:

CherryMoon57 said:

Prayers and donations aren't mutually exclusive nor will either of them hurt anyone.

They're not mutually exclusive, you're right. I wouldn't say prayer is harmless, though. If it leads to inaction, it can be harmful. In a passive way, but still.

Inaction and action at the wrong time can be harmful. Prayer in itself is harmless regardless of the timing. If anything it helps us take a moment to care and reflect upon a situation. Caring helps towards taking the right action(s). And when God answers, that's a bonus.

Life Matters
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Reply #40 posted 01/30/20 12:55am

toejam

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CherryMoon57 said:

olb99 said:

They're not mutually exclusive, you're right. I wouldn't say prayer is harmless, though. If it leads to inaction, it can be harmful. In a passive way, but still.

Inaction and action at the wrong time can be harmful. Prayer in itself is harmless regardless of the timing. If anything it helps us take a moment to care and reflect upon a situation. Caring helps towards taking the right action(s). And when God answers, that's a bonus.

.

Why not just cut the middle-man and care and reflect upon the situation? You can take that moment without praying. Prayer study shows that God answers at about the rate we would expect if he is a superstition with only placebo and coincidental effect.

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[Edited 1/30/20 0:56am]

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Reply #41 posted 01/30/20 3:51am

CherryMoon57

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toejam said:

CherryMoon57 said:

Inaction and action at the wrong time can be harmful. Prayer in itself is harmless regardless of the timing. If anything it helps us take a moment to care and reflect upon a situation. Caring helps towards taking the right action(s). And when God answers, that's a bonus.

.

Why not just cut the middle-man and care and reflect upon the situation? You can take that moment without praying. Prayer study shows that God answers at about the rate we would expect if he is a superstition with only placebo and coincidental effect.

.

[Edited 1/30/20 0:56am]


'Prayer study'? I thought you wanted to cut the middle-men...

Life Matters
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Reply #42 posted 01/31/20 5:16am

olb99

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CherryMoon57 said:

olb99 said:

They're not mutually exclusive, you're right. I wouldn't say prayer is harmless, though. If it leads to inaction, it can be harmful. In a passive way, but still.

Inaction and action at the wrong time can be harmful. Prayer in itself is harmless regardless of the timing. If anything it helps us take a moment to care and reflect upon a situation. Caring helps towards taking the right action(s). And when God answers, that's a bonus.

.

I don't know. Let's say somebody hesitates between asking God for help (by praying) or giving money to a charity. Let's say she decides to pray. After 10-15 minutes of talking to God, she's left with the feeling that she's done her part (i.e. asking God to help all those people who desperately need help), so she doesn't feel the need to give money anymore. Is that good? Bad? Neutral?

.

An atheist doesn't have the option to pray. Yes, he can think about the situation in his shower (or anywhere he likes), but I don't think it's the same as praying. He will never come to the conclusion that his shower actually changed anything in the world (i.e. actually caused any effect outside of his brain).

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Reply #43 posted 01/31/20 5:34am

IanRG

olb99 said:

CherryMoon57 said:

Inaction and action at the wrong time can be harmful. Prayer in itself is harmless regardless of the timing. If anything it helps us take a moment to care and reflect upon a situation. Caring helps towards taking the right action(s). And when God answers, that's a bonus.

.

I don't know. Let's say somebody hesitates between asking God for help (by praying) or giving money to a charity. Let's say she decides to pray. After 10-15 minutes of talking to God, she's left with the feeling that she's done her part (i.e. asking God to help all those people who desperately need help), so she doesn't feel the need to give money anymore. Is that good? Bad? Neutral?

.

An atheist doesn't have the option to pray. Yes, he can think about the situation in his shower (or anywhere he likes), but I don't think it's the same as praying. He will never come to the conclusion that his shower actually changed anything in the world (i.e. actually caused any effect outside of his brain).

.

Or the atheist could think, in the shower or wherever, about others helping by a combination of prayer and action, get on the internet and post the types of comments we see here and walk away thinking they have done their part. Yet all they have done is push their beliefs because some used the P word.

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Reply #44 posted 01/31/20 8:17am

olb99

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IanRG said:

olb99 said:

.

I don't know. Let's say somebody hesitates between asking God for help (by praying) or giving money to a charity. Let's say she decides to pray. After 10-15 minutes of talking to God, she's left with the feeling that she's done her part (i.e. asking God to help all those people who desperately need help), so she doesn't feel the need to give money anymore. Is that good? Bad? Neutral?

.

An atheist doesn't have the option to pray. Yes, he can think about the situation in his shower (or anywhere he likes), but I don't think it's the same as praying. He will never come to the conclusion that his shower actually changed anything in the world (i.e. actually caused any effect outside of his brain).

.

Or the atheist could think, in the shower or wherever, about others helping by a combination of prayer and action, get on the internet and post the types of comments we see here and walk away thinking they have done their part. Yet all they have done is push their beliefs because some used the P word.

.

That would be foolish, indeed.

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Reply #45 posted 02/04/20 6:16am

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WOW WTF I cannot believe you people turned this into a Religious debate!!!

WHY can't ORG members who have been around here since forever learn to report troll posts are not feed that shit?

* please no one reply in any way to this

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
https://prince.org/msg/7/464433 9.24.2020
if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?
#IDEFINEME
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Reply #46 posted 02/04/20 8:05am

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'A callous act of animal cruelty': Koalas found starving, injured on private land in AustraliaJordan Culver, USA TODAY

10 hrs ago

Australian officials are investigating how droves of koalas, iconic figures in the nation's landscape and considered among the world's most adorable animals, have been starved and injured on a private stretch of land under development.

More than 30 koalas in the Australian state of Victoria had to be euthanized due to their weakened conditions.

Victoria's Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) on Sunday issued a statement saying it was investigating an incident involving "a significant number of injured and starving koalas on a private property."

Approximately 31 koalas have been euthanized, Victoria's Chief Conservation Regulator Kate Gavens, said in an email to USA TODAY. According to the Gavens, the property — recently returned to the landowner — was a blue gum tree plantation operating under a lease agreement.DELWP arrived on the scene Friday and removed about 30 koalas from the property, according to its statement. Roughly 50 more koalas were removed Sunday, DELWP added.

"Unfortunately, a number of koalas have had to be euthanized on site due to injuries or starvation," DELWP said in its statement.

Koalas are sought-after images for tourist photography, along with Australia's other iconic resident, the kangaroo. Both are considered symbolic boons to Australia's tourism industry, generating over a billion dollars a year in plush toy merchandise, toys, games, and cartoon appearances.

Gavens added a deer-proof fence stopped the koalas from leaving the property.

"The Conservation Regulator's Major Investigations team is leading the investigation into how this incident happened and who was responsible," Gavens said.

Some koalas starved to death and others were apparently bulldozed, the BBC reported.

"There are still an estimated 75 koalas left in the area and it is expected these will take another three days to capture and triage," Gavens said.

Thirty-four koalas were released into local Mount Richmond National Park, which is nearby. The remaining koalas that have been processed so far are being "rehabilitated with a local wildlife carer," Gavens said.

"The Conservation Regulator is taking this matter very seriously and is investigating the events that led to this incident," DELWP said in its statement. "There are penalties for killing, harassing or disturbing wildlife and for animal cruelty under Victorian law."

DELWP added, "Wildlife are protected under the Wildlife Act 1975. Killing, harassing or disturbing wildlife can attract a penalty of up to $8000 and an additional fine of more than $800 per head of wildlife."

The Australian Forest Products Association (AFPA) put out a statement of its own calling the deaths of the koalas "senseless." The AFPA "is the peak national industry body representing the resources, processing, and pulp, paper and bioproduct industries covering the forest products value chain," according to its website.

AFPA CEO Ross Hampton said, "It is unclear as yet who bulldozed the trees with the koalas apparently still in them, but it is absolutely certain that this was not a plantation or a forestry company. "

"All those who work in our forest industries join with the community in appalled shock at what appears to be a callous act of animal cruelty," Hampton said in the statement.

Hampton added the harvest of the area ended in November and the land was turned back over to the owner "before Christmas."

Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D'Ambrosio said she was "appalled" in a statement on Twitter.

"The Conservation Regulator is investigating the circumstances that lead to this incident," she said. "There are significant penalties for killing, harassing and disturbing wildlife and additional penalties for animal cruelty."

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

#ALBUMSSTILLMATTER
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if you ever try the lotus position
Try it while you're being strangled
Do U understand what I'm saying?
#IDEFINEME
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Reply #47 posted 02/09/20 10:41am

KoolEaze

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IanRG said:

The rain is putting out many of the fires - but it is just bringing the bigger / more dangerous ones under control. Without sustained rain, these will flare up again as soon as the rain stops and the air moisture drops again. But for most of us it is welcome relief

That´s good news but ...I haven´t heard or seen anything in the news lately. Are the fires under control now? And is there an estimate on how long it will take to reforest that area and repopulate the species that suffered the most?

The thing with disasters like this one is that at some point they just stop broadcasting about it even though the problem is still there, and many people then assume that the fires have stopped.

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"
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Reply #48 posted 02/09/20 11:30am

IanRG

KoolEaze said:

IanRG said:

The rain is putting out many of the fires - but it is just bringing the bigger / more dangerous ones under control. Without sustained rain, these will flare up again as soon as the rain stops and the air moisture drops again. But for most of us it is welcome relief

That´s good news but ...I haven´t heard or seen anything in the news lately. Are the fires under control now? And is there an estimate on how long it will take to reforest that area and repopulate the species that suffered the most?

The thing with disasters like this one is that at some point they just stop broadcasting about it even though the problem is still there, and many people then assume that the fires have stopped.

.

Yes, after a brief flare-up following the rain above, the current heavy rain has ended the crisis. There are 72 bush fire incidents in NSW this morning - all small, under control, low threat or just advisories.

.

The Australian bush regenerates very quickly - it is a bit a vicious cycle: the types of trees that make the fires worse (eucalypts and acacias) need fires to reseed (low-intensity fires are best). Areas not subjected to frequent low-intensity fires to control fuel stocks in the short term are generally safer in the long term because they have fewer eucalypts and acacias.

.

Many of the areas affected by fires will be fine and are reshooting now. The problem areas are those affected by the high intensity super large fires, the flora here will take years to recover and much of it will be changed. The fauna is the worry - several species may have been wiped out already or will be under severe threat as a result of starvation and lack of safe water.

.

The wombat is an amazing animal - not only did their extensive underground warrens provide safe places for other animals to hide in, but their digging for water has provided water for other animals as well. Wombats are so developed for digging that they are the only marsupials with a reverse pouch - it opens at the bottom so it does not fill with dirt while the wombat digs.

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Reply #49 posted 02/12/20 12:57pm

KoolEaze

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IanRG said:

KoolEaze said:

That´s good news but ...I haven´t heard or seen anything in the news lately. Are the fires under control now? And is there an estimate on how long it will take to reforest that area and repopulate the species that suffered the most?

The thing with disasters like this one is that at some point they just stop broadcasting about it even though the problem is still there, and many people then assume that the fires have stopped.

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Yes, after a brief flare-up following the rain above, the current heavy rain has ended the crisis. There are 72 bush fire incidents in NSW this morning - all small, under control, low threat or just advisories.

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The Australian bush regenerates very quickly - it is a bit a vicious cycle: the types of trees that make the fires worse (eucalypts and acacias) need fires to reseed (low-intensity fires are best). Areas not subjected to frequent low-intensity fires to control fuel stocks in the short term are generally safer in the long term because they have fewer eucalypts and acacias.

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Many of the areas affected by fires will be fine and are reshooting now. The problem areas are those affected by the high intensity super large fires, the flora here will take years to recover and much of it will be changed. The fauna is the worry - several species may have been wiped out already or will be under severe threat as a result of starvation and lack of safe water.

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The wombat is an amazing animal - not only did their extensive underground warrens provide safe places for other animals to hide in, but their digging for water has provided water for other animals as well. Wombats are so developed for digging that they are the only marsupials with a reverse pouch - it opens at the bottom so it does not fill with dirt while the wombat digs.

Thanks for the reply. Seems that there is still a little bit of hope but I am very sad for all the endangered species, and of course for all the people who´ve lost their homes. neutral

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"
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