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Reply #60 posted 11/30/19 7:06pm

PennyPurple

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benni said:

I've attempted suicide twice in my life. Once when I was 10 years old, I tried to drink bleach. The second time when I was 27 years old, I took an overdose of blood thinners. In both cases, I didn't announce that I was thinking about it, just had enough of everything I'd been going through and wanted it over. Bleach didn't work because it burned my eyes and nose and I kept watering it down. My life was painful enough at that time, I didn't want my death to be painful. The 2nd time, my ex husband knew something was wrong when I asked him to keep my son a few extra days. I didn't want my son to be the one to find me. My ex followed me home, pushed his way into my house behind me, asking me what was going on. He saw my medication bottle lying on the table and picked it up. It was empty. He had picked the medicine up for me two days earlier so he knew the bottle shouldn't be empty. He kept asking me what I did and I finally just told him I was tired of dealing with the health issues and I flushed them down the toilet. He picked me up and carried me to the car and took me straight to the hospital. Guess I wasn't a good liar.

My life has improved tremendously since those times. I haven't felt, or thought, that way since I was 27. I guess when it comes to mental pain, problems in life, I would say that "suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem."

When it comes to fatal illnesses, in which someone is going to waste away and suffer, I think it should be between that person and their doctor.

Glad you are still here Benni!


I too think it should be between the person and their doctor. I also think that hospice is a wonderful thing.

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Reply #61 posted 11/30/19 7:23pm

benni

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PennyPurple said:

benni said:

I've attempted suicide twice in my life. Once when I was 10 years old, I tried to drink bleach. The second time when I was 27 years old, I took an overdose of blood thinners. In both cases, I didn't announce that I was thinking about it, just had enough of everything I'd been going through and wanted it over. Bleach didn't work because it burned my eyes and nose and I kept watering it down. My life was painful enough at that time, I didn't want my death to be painful. The 2nd time, my ex husband knew something was wrong when I asked him to keep my son a few extra days. I didn't want my son to be the one to find me. My ex followed me home, pushed his way into my house behind me, asking me what was going on. He saw my medication bottle lying on the table and picked it up. It was empty. He had picked the medicine up for me two days earlier so he knew the bottle shouldn't be empty. He kept asking me what I did and I finally just told him I was tired of dealing with the health issues and I flushed them down the toilet. He picked me up and carried me to the car and took me straight to the hospital. Guess I wasn't a good liar.

My life has improved tremendously since those times. I haven't felt, or thought, that way since I was 27. I guess when it comes to mental pain, problems in life, I would say that "suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem."

When it comes to fatal illnesses, in which someone is going to waste away and suffer, I think it should be between that person and their doctor.

Glad you are still here Benni!


I too think it should be between the person and their doctor. I also think that hospice is a wonderful thing.


Me, too, Penny! Life wasn't easy back then, and to be honest, I am surprised I survived.

I've actually considered going back to work at hospice. I love what I'm doing right now, but hospice was a good place to work, somewhere that you really felt you were making a difference. I know I'm making a difference now, but the clientele has changed dramatically over the past few years, and I don't always feel like I'm reaching them.

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Reply #62 posted 12/01/19 9:09pm

Pokeno4Money

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benni said:

I disagree with this in a sense. When I had attempted suicide at 27, I knew there were those that loved me that would be hurt. I knew my son would be hurt. But the amount of pain I was experiencing at the time (dealing with my childhood) was so deep, so entrenched into my very soul. that I couldn't see a way past it and I was afraid that me staying here was hurting those I loved even more than what my passing would have done.

Today, I'm glad my ex was there and realized what was going on. But at the time, that pain was real and it was real deep, and I could not find a light shining anywhere to pull me out of it. My son was normally able to snap me out of my depression and my PTSD when it was active, but during that one time frame, not even he could reach me. But it didn't mean that I didn't know he loved me and would be hurt, I was just afraid I was causing him more pain by living.


Very true, each person's mind is unique in how they view people and situations. It's never one size fits all. Glad you were able to get through that period in your life and see things in a different light.

"Never let nasty stalkers disrespect you. They start shit, you finish it. Go down to their level, that's the only way they'll understand. You have to handle things yourself."
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Reply #63 posted 12/02/19 4:14am

ThatWhiteDude

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PennyPurple said:

37 years ago today, I lost my beautiful, loving, 62 year grandma to suicide by gun.



5 years ago Dec. 3, I lost my 50 year old step brother to suicide by gun.



25 years ago April 6, I lost my 28 year old step brother to suicide by gun.



I hate, literally hate suicide.



The damage it does to the ones left behind lasts the rest of our lives.

I often wonder if these people knew the damage that their suicide caused to the ones left behind, if they'd actually do it.



Illness was not the cause of any of the above deaths.


Jesus Penny, I'm so sorry for these losses. I can't even imagine what you've been through.
"Like books and BLACK LIVES, Albums still MATTER."


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Reply #64 posted 12/02/19 4:46am

ThatWhiteDude

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I'm lucky I've never lost anyone to suicide. There was a family friend but I was too young back then. But there was one case in my hometown this year that was really shocking. I mean, everyone in town knew about it. Because a 26 year old man stood on a construction crane. But he didn't jump right away, he was up there for 11 hours. What shocked me the most was that some people went there on purpose just to see the man up there. Like, why the fuck would you want to see that? Jesus, some people. The man died but no one knows if he jumped or if he fell, since people who were there said the Crain started to move and then he "fell".

The saddest part was that his sister was there, trying to get him down. I've got two siblings and just the thought of losing one of them in such a way makes me sick to the stomach.


So my thoughts about suicide are that it's not a solution (I'm not talking about people with cancer or something) I know some would argue that emotional pain can be as bad as physical pain, but depression is not like cancer. Yes it's bad but therapy can help. Look, I've got nerve damage for almost three years now and I've yet to find a therapy. Sometimes I lay in bed all day cause it's so bad. And I suffer from panic attacks and this summer was hell cause my doctor wanted me to take a higher dosage of the pills I had. This made my panic attacks way worse to a point were I could not eat or drink, it felt like my body was shutting down. It was the lowest I've ever been. But I got through it, yeah there was a point were I wanted to smash my head on the wall but I got through it. And sometimes people think they can't do that, but it can work, it really can. I know exactly how mental illness can affect a person, and I know a whole lot about chronic pain too. But there's always more ways to go than just one. Suicide is a permanent solution for a temporary problem.

I know I won't suffer from the panic attacks forever, I'm working on it daily, hell I've got a therapist and a coach, I'll fight with everything I've got to never experience the shit I've been through this summer. I know I can go back to the point were I didn't have these attacks. I wasn't born with this, they been triggert by a trauma.


Another story was a girl I knew from FB, she was my age, lost her mom to a stroke. A few days after that, she said goodbye to all of us on FB. The post was over an hour ago when I first saw it and I though it was too late, but then I got my shit together and asked another friend of her if she knows anything. We both found her Boyfriend and told him what happened. He called the cops and they found her in her room. She lived and she was so thankful. Honestly I thought she'd be pissed. But she was grateful. She found a job as a babysitter a few months later and was very happy.
"Like books and BLACK LIVES, Albums still MATTER."


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Reply #65 posted 12/03/19 11:01am

Pokeno4Money

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ThatWhiteDude said:

Suicide is a permanent solution for a temporary problem.


That's a great way of putting it, hopefully it sinks in for those who are on the edge.

"Never let nasty stalkers disrespect you. They start shit, you finish it. Go down to their level, that's the only way they'll understand. You have to handle things yourself."
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Reply #66 posted 12/03/19 1:36pm

IanRG

benni said:

Pokeno4Money said:


I'm very sorry to hear about what you've had to deal with over the years.

You're 100% correct about lifelong damage, especially to those who discover the body.

While it's impossible to ever know what they were thinking that led to the suicide, I do believe many would NOT do it because they'd realize at least one person loves them and doesn't want to lose them. Quite often those who kill themselves believe nobody cares about them, so they don't think anybody will be hurt by their actions.

The really sad thing about it all are those who think for a brief moment that life isn't worth living. If they can just survive the one night of depression, they are fine.

That happened with a relative of mine. She was so depressed about a situation she never should have been in, that she didn't want to go on. But she got through it, and 5 years later she is happy and enjoying life.







I disagree with this in a sense. When I had attempted suicide at 27, I knew there were those that loved me that would be hurt. I knew my son would be hurt. But the amount of pain I was experiencing at the time (dealing with my childhood) was so deep, so entrenched into my very soul. that I couldn't see a way past it and I was afraid that me staying here was hurting those I loved even more than what my passing would have done.

Today, I'm glad my ex was there and realized what was going on. But at the time, that pain was real and it was real deep, and I could not find a light shining anywhere to pull me out of it. My son was normally able to snap me out of my depression and my PTSD when it was active, but during that one time frame, not even he could reach me. But it didn't mean that I didn't know he loved me and would be hurt, I was just afraid I was causing him more pain by living.

.

So glad you survived the childhood sexual abuse and survived and are moving on from the impacts of dealing with this.

.

The higher suicide rates of people sexually abused as children is lifelong and the barriers we learned to put up as children can make it hard to be open enough to those that love us to help us. Decades after the abuse the court case and Royal Commission on the institutional responses to childhood sexual abuse that I was involved with opened old wounds.

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Reply #67 posted 12/05/19 9:17am

maplenpg

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My friend is in a bad way. I don't know to help sad.

#JusticeForShukri http://chng.it/B5mNKrDrzK
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Reply #68 posted 12/05/19 11:20am

IanRG

maplenpg said:

My friend is in a bad way. I don't know to help sad.

.

I know it is Australian but their is good information on suicide prevention from the lifeline site:

.

https://www.lifeline.org....ng-suicide

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Reply #69 posted 12/05/19 4:45pm

PennyPurple

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maplenpg said:

My friend is in a bad way. I don't know to help sad.

Oh no. I'm sorry to hear that.

A MASK ISN'T TOO MUCH TO ASK!!
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Reply #70 posted 12/05/19 9:35pm

benni

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IanRG said:

benni said:



I disagree with this in a sense. When I had attempted suicide at 27, I knew there were those that loved me that would be hurt. I knew my son would be hurt. But the amount of pain I was experiencing at the time (dealing with my childhood) was so deep, so entrenched into my very soul. that I couldn't see a way past it and I was afraid that me staying here was hurting those I loved even more than what my passing would have done.

Today, I'm glad my ex was there and realized what was going on. But at the time, that pain was real and it was real deep, and I could not find a light shining anywhere to pull me out of it. My son was normally able to snap me out of my depression and my PTSD when it was active, but during that one time frame, not even he could reach me. But it didn't mean that I didn't know he loved me and would be hurt, I was just afraid I was causing him more pain by living.

.

So glad you survived the childhood sexual abuse and survived and are moving on from the impacts of dealing with this.

.

The higher suicide rates of people sexually abused as children is lifelong and the barriers we learned to put up as children can make it hard to be open enough to those that love us to help us. Decades after the abuse the court case and Royal Commission on the institutional responses to childhood sexual abuse that I was involved with opened old wounds.



The suicide rate for survivors is extremely high. But it's because that abuse comes with a lot of baggage, and as you said, the barriers we put up. We were taught not to trust, especially our own feelings, or to trust anyone with our feelings, so it is extremely hard to open up when we're dealing with things. Not to mention the PTSD and reliving it for many years after the fact.

I'm sorry that you had to go through what you did and relive it with the court case. How did it turn out? I don't know if I ever asked you about that. But if you ever need to talk, Ian, I'm just a message away.

Trump: "It was hard to get it aroused and it is hard to get it aroused but we got it aroused."
[narrator voice] He's talking about the "American way."
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Reply #71 posted 12/05/19 10:02pm

benni

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maplenpg said:

My friend is in a bad way. I don't know to help sad.


1. Don't be afraid to ask if your friend is thinking about suicide. There is this old myth that says you don't want to mention suicide to someone who may be thinking about it, for fear of pushing them over the edge. But that is just a myth. Most people want someone to ask them, "Hey, I've noticed you seem really down and you've got a lot on you right now. Are you okay?" Let them respond, and if they seem really deep in their depression, ask them, "Are you thinking about suicide?'

2. If they answer that they are thinking about suicde, ask, "Have you thought about how you would do it?" The reason you ask this question is because you want to know, to find out, whether they have a plan. If they have a plan, if they've thought about how they would do it, then it's advanced beyond just the normal passing thought of, "I ought to just kill myself."

3. If it has advanced to planning to stage, then you need to find out how accessible the plan is. For instance, "I thought I would shoot myself." You would need to ask, "Do you have a gun?" Or, "I thought I would take an overdose of sleeping pills." Ask: "Do you have sleeping pills?" IF they have immediate accessibility to whatever they might use to commit suicide, then you need to remove that accessible item until they can get past the immediate danger they might in.

4. Develop an Emergency Plan and a Suicide prevention Contract: You need to get a verbal (or written) contract that states they will not harm themselves. Establish a plan for them on what they would do before making an attempt. For example: "I promise that I will not harm myself. If I feel that I am preparing to harm myself, I promise to do the following first: 1. Call Maplenpg and let her know that I am not in a good space. Maplenpg will talk with me on the phone or come visit (whichever the two of you agree on) 2. Let Maplenpg keep my sleeping pills, and only give me one when she is with me at night and can watch me take it. (Or let Maplenpg keep my gun and ammo with her until I am passed the dangerous phase.) 3. I will call the Suicide hotline and talk to them when things get really bad. 4. I will go to the local emergency department if I am unable to reach Maplenpg and I don't feel as though the suicide hotline has helped me."

The reason for the contract is because many people that are thinking about suicide, have a plan, and have the means to carry it out, will not carry it out if they have made a promise to someone. They will feel as though they've let that person down and that will weigh heavy on them. It also lets them know that someone cares enough to want to be there for them, even when things get really bad for them. Just knowing there is one person that cares is sometimes enough.

5. If you believe your friend is at risk, that with everything else you did that it was not enough to get her past the critical phase, then you would need to call the police or take her to the emergency room.

One final point, 95% of people that talk about suicide are really crying out for help, they want intervention. But keep in mind, 5% of people are serious about. The 5% that are serious about will not state they are suicidal. You may know that they were going through a period of deep depression, and then one day, suddenly, they seem happy. (And it will be a sudden thing.) They may start giving away items, tell you that they are just cleaning out some junk, but they are very particular about who gets what item. The reason for the sudden change is that they have made up their mind to move forward with suicide. They have a plan, they have the means, and it is immediately accessible to them. They may even have picked out a date. They seem suddenly happier because it's a relief to them, they feel that there is an end to whatever has brought them to that point, and that they will no longer suffer. It's just a relief. It's the ones that don't tell you that they are thinking about suicide, but that you know are extremely depressed, who suddenly seem happy that are most often the ones that we say, "I never saw it coming." But, we do see it coming, because they do give signs (the giving things away, etc). As for the other 95%, as I said, they are really crying out for help. but if they don't feel they've gotten that help, or if they don't feel it was adequate, they may make an attemp. Unfortunately, sometimes, it doesn't go the way they think it will ("Jerry will come home and find me and get me to the hospital in time.") and they end up being successful "accidentally".

But the main point is, don't be afraid to talk with them about suicide. Sometimes, it's just a relief to have someone ask and being able to talk about their feelings.

Trump: "It was hard to get it aroused and it is hard to get it aroused but we got it aroused."
[narrator voice] He's talking about the "American way."
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Reply #72 posted 12/05/19 11:04pm

maplenpg

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IanRG said:

maplenpg said:

My friend is in a bad way. I don't know to help sad.

.

I know it is Australian but their is good information on suicide prevention from the lifeline site:

.

https://www.lifeline.org....ng-suicide

Thanks Ian - actually it was quite reassuring that we are doing many of the things listed in the site already.

#JusticeForShukri http://chng.it/B5mNKrDrzK
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Reply #73 posted 12/05/19 11:07pm

IanRG

benni said:

IanRG said:

.

So glad you survived the childhood sexual abuse and survived and are moving on from the impacts of dealing with this.

.

The higher suicide rates of people sexually abused as children is lifelong and the barriers we learned to put up as children can make it hard to be open enough to those that love us to help us. Decades after the abuse the court case and Royal Commission on the institutional responses to childhood sexual abuse that I was involved with opened old wounds.



The suicide rate for survivors is extremely high. But it's because that abuse comes with a lot of baggage, and as you said, the barriers we put up. We were taught not to trust, especially our own feelings, or to trust anyone with our feelings, so it is extremely hard to open up when we're dealing with things. Not to mention the PTSD and reliving it for many years after the fact.

I'm sorry that you had to go through what you did and relive it with the court case. How did it turn out? I don't know if I ever asked you about that. But if you ever need to talk, Ian, I'm just a message away.

.

The court case was successful and he is in gaol for what he did to 19 children through his voluntary roles in the Anglican Church and orphanage. He was further charged for what he did to more children, including those through the Baptist Church. Unfortunately the Priest who was the paediphile ring leader and recruited the person who abused me died before he could face justice (at least on Earth). Other than reliving this through the police investigation, court preparation and the court hearing, the worst part of this was to find out that my childhood best friend was also a survivor - showing how effective abusers can be in isolating their victims even from each other and why it can be hard to help survivors if they become suicidal.

.

The Bishop who covered up the abuse of me and others lied to the Royal Commission and was called on this in the Commission's finding. He is yet to face any charges. The next Bishop was on a path to be a candidate to be put to the Queen to be Archbishop of Canterbury but a member of our local Synod at his time in our diocese was later on General Synod when this Bishop's name came up. This Bishop had covered up the abuse of that Synod member's daughter, so he was quietly removed from consideration. Following the Royal Commission, this Bishop was removed from his role as an Archbishop. He is also yet to face any charges. The key enabler of the local Anglican ring, the Dean of the local cathedral has been charged for the abuse he personally did, but not for protecting and encouraging the paediphile ring.

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Reply #74 posted 12/05/19 11:12pm

maplenpg

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PennyPurple said:

maplenpg said:

My friend is in a bad way. I don't know to help sad.

Oh no. I'm sorry to hear that.

Thank you Penny hug

#JusticeForShukri http://chng.it/B5mNKrDrzK
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Reply #75 posted 12/05/19 11:17pm

maplenpg

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benni said:

maplenpg said:

My friend is in a bad way. I don't know to help sad.


1. Don't be afraid to ask if your friend is thinking about suicide. There is this old myth that says you don't want to mention suicide to someone who may be thinking about it, for fear of pushing them over the edge. But that is just a myth. Most people want someone to ask them, "Hey, I've noticed you seem really down and you've got a lot on you right now. Are you okay?" Let them respond, and if they seem really deep in their depression, ask them, "Are you thinking about suicide?'

2. If they answer that they are thinking about suicde, ask, "Have you thought about how you would do it?" The reason you ask this question is because you want to know, to find out, whether they have a plan. If they have a plan, if they've thought about how they would do it, then it's advanced beyond just the normal passing thought of, "I ought to just kill myself."

3. If it has advanced to planning to stage, then you need to find out how accessible the plan is. For instance, "I thought I would shoot myself." You would need to ask, "Do you have a gun?" Or, "I thought I would take an overdose of sleeping pills." Ask: "Do you have sleeping pills?" IF they have immediate accessibility to whatever they might use to commit suicide, then you need to remove that accessible item until they can get past the immediate danger they might in.

4. Develop an Emergency Plan and a Suicide prevention Contract: You need to get a verbal (or written) contract that states they will not harm themselves. Establish a plan for them on what they would do before making an attempt. For example: "I promise that I will not harm myself. If I feel that I am preparing to harm myself, I promise to do the following first: 1. Call Maplenpg and let her know that I am not in a good space. Maplenpg will talk with me on the phone or come visit (whichever the two of you agree on) 2. Let Maplenpg keep my sleeping pills, and only give me one when she is with me at night and can watch me take it. (Or let Maplenpg keep my gun and ammo with her until I am passed the dangerous phase.) 3. I will call the Suicide hotline and talk to them when things get really bad. 4. I will go to the local emergency department if I am unable to reach Maplenpg and I don't feel as though the suicide hotline has helped me."

The reason for the contract is because many people that are thinking about suicide, have a plan, and have the means to carry it out, will not carry it out if they have made a promise to someone. They will feel as though they've let that person down and that will weigh heavy on them. It also lets them know that someone cares enough to want to be there for them, even when things get really bad for them. Just knowing there is one person that cares is sometimes enough.

5. If you believe your friend is at risk, that with everything else you did that it was not enough to get her past the critical phase, then you would need to call the police or take her to the emergency room.

One final point, 95% of people that talk about suicide are really crying out for help, they want intervention. But keep in mind, 5% of people are serious about. The 5% that are serious about will not state they are suicidal. You may know that they were going through a period of deep depression, and then one day, suddenly, they seem happy. (And it will be a sudden thing.) They may start giving away items, tell you that they are just cleaning out some junk, but they are very particular about who gets what item. The reason for the sudden change is that they have made up their mind to move forward with suicide. They have a plan, they have the means, and it is immediately accessible to them. They may even have picked out a date. They seem suddenly happier because it's a relief to them, they feel that there is an end to whatever has brought them to that point, and that they will no longer suffer. It's just a relief. It's the ones that don't tell you that they are thinking about suicide, but that you know are extremely depressed, who suddenly seem happy that are most often the ones that we say, "I never saw it coming." But, we do see it coming, because they do give signs (the giving things away, etc). As for the other 95%, as I said, they are really crying out for help. but if they don't feel they've gotten that help, or if they don't feel it was adequate, they may make an attemp. Unfortunately, sometimes, it doesn't go the way they think it will ("Jerry will come home and find me and get me to the hospital in time.") and they end up being successful "accidentally".

But the main point is, don't be afraid to talk with them about suicide. Sometimes, it's just a relief to have someone ask and being able to talk about their feelings.

Thank you Benni - as with Ian, it's a relief that we are doing many of these things already, especially talking about suicide, which I'm sure helps. I don't want to give out too much information on here about the details (gosh I'm paranoid - as if anyone I know reads Prince.org P&R), but I will take on board all of your points to make sure we continue to do the best we can.

#JusticeForShukri http://chng.it/B5mNKrDrzK
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Reply #76 posted 12/06/19 7:27am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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For those who may be familiar, 'cutting' This is something sorta became 'common' maybe 10+ yrs ago? My friend Angela, found out her daughter was doing this around high school age, and clearly was struggling with depression. She would say things on her FB page that always set off my warning signals. I did talk to her mother about it. And the cutting a married couple knew about it(she talked to them) before the mother knew. . It cutting something that has led up to suicide in younger people that you know of?
#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #77 posted 12/06/19 10:41am

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Military Suicide Rates Hit Record High in 2018

The suicide rate for active-duty U.S. military members in 2018 was the highest on record since the Defense Department began tracking self-inflicted deaths in 2001.

Officials said Thursday that 2018's rate of 24.8 deaths per 100,000 service members is comparable to age and gender-adjusted civilian rates, but added that fact is "hardly comforting," given that "the numbers aren't moving in the right direction."

A new DoD publication, the 2018 Annual Suicide Report, released Thursday confirms that 325 active-duty personnel took their own lives last year, up from 285 in 2017 and 280 the previous year.

According to the report, the National Guard, which experienced 135 suicides in 2018, had the highest suicide rate among the three components, including the Reserves. Its rate of 30.6 per 100,000 was higher than the civilian rate when adjusted for age and gender.

...

Across the Reserves, 81 members died by suicide, a rate of 22.9 per 100,000.

The Pentagon has long struggled to address the problem of suicides in the ranks, attacking the issue with renewed fervor in 2012, when the number of deaths, 319, and the rate, 22.7 per 100,000, were the highest since the DoD began tracking the data following the 9/11 attacks.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Wednesday that the current trend is a result of being "caught up in what some call a national epidemic of suicide among our youth."

"And not just our youth, but it's something we continue to wrestle with," he said, speaking to reporters following a visit to Norfolk, Virginia, where investigators are looking into the deaths of three sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier George H.W. Bush.

Pentagon officials speaking Thursday did not try to explain why service members die by suicide but said the data is needed to better understand behaviors and create programs to prevent the deaths.

"Supporting our military personnel is not only a critical mission to the Department of Defense, it is a sacred obligation," said Elizabeth Van Winkle, executive director for Force Resiliency in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness. "We in the department must do all we can to prevent this tragedy, and we will use the information from this report to inform our efforts."

Military suicides began increasing in 2006 and climbed to a new record, 310, in 2009. They leveled off for several years before climbing again, reaching another high in 2012. At that time, leaders threw their focus behind suicide prevention programs and outreach; in 2014, they implemented policies that allowed commanders to discuss access to firearms with at-risk personnel and be equipped to handle voluntary surrender of weapons at a service member's request.

But firearms continue to be the most common method of suicide, according to the report, with 60% of active-duty personnel, 62% of reserve members and nearly 70% of National Guardsmen taking their own lives with a gun.

Pentagon officials said that, since suicide is often an impulsive decision, the department is developing initiatives on "safe storage of lethal means," including firearms and medications.

"One of the initiatives we are working toward is chaplains providing counseling on access to lethal means training, in addition to other gate-keepers," said Karen Orvis, director of the Defense Suicide Prevention Office.

.

https://www.military.com/...-2018.html

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

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What's the matter with your life
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Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #78 posted 12/06/19 12:29pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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moderator

.

Megachurch pastor Jarrid Wilson, known for his mental health advocacy, dies by suicide

"Sometimes people may think that as pastors or spiritual leaders we are somehow above the pain and struggles of everyday people," the church's senior pastor wrote.

Sept. 11, 2019, 7:52 AM EDT / Updated Sept. 11, 2019, 6:26 PM EDT

By Ben Kesslen

A megachurch pastor in Southern California known for his mental health advocacy died by suicide on Monday, church officials said in a statement.

Jarrid Wilson had been a pastor with Harvest Christian Fellowship Church for about 18 months. In 2016, he founded Anthem of Hope, a Christian organization meant to "amplify hope" for those struggling with mental health and substance use issues.

He was 30, according to Religion News Service.

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Open about his battle with depression, Wilson spoke often of his struggles online and in his work as a pastor.

"Loving Jesus doesn't always cure suicidal thoughts," Wilson wrote on Twitter shortly before his death. "But that doesn't mean Jesus doesn't offer us companionship and comfort."

On social media, family and colleagues mourned Wilson's death.

"I love you forever, Thomas Jarrid Wilson, but I have to say that you being gone has completely ripped my heart out of my chest," Wilson's wife, Juli, wrote on Instagram. "Suicide doesn't get the last word. I won't let it."

In addition to his wife, Wilson is survived by two sons, Finch and Denham.

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Greg Laurie, senior pastor at the Harvest megachurch, described Wilson in a statement as a "vibrant" person, "always serving and helping others."

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/megachurch-pastor-jarrid-wilson-known-his-mental-health-advocacy-dies-n1052301?fbclid=IwAR1dfMhmHlZCe7aObmZt0bE2rSU_ivBzz7ADlsTfSh5OAGxTpMUcvMP7vqI

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #79 posted 12/06/19 1:40pm

IanRG

OldFriends4Sale said:

Military Suicide Rates Hit Record High in 2018

The suicide rate for active-duty U.S. military members in 2018 was the highest on record since the Defense Department began tracking self-inflicted deaths in 2001.


Officials said Thursday that 2018's rate of 24.8 deaths per 100,000 service members is comparable to age and gender-adjusted civilian rates, but added that fact is "hardly comforting," given that "the numbers aren't moving in the right direction."

...

Pentagon officials said that, since suicide is often an impulsive decision, the department is developing initiatives on "safe storage of lethal means," including firearms and medications.


"One of the initiatives we are working toward is chaplains providing counseling on access to lethal means training, in addition to other gate-keepers," said Karen Orvis, director of the Defense Suicide Prevention Office.

.

https://www.military.com/...-2018.html

.

Wow, they have only been tracking suicides since 2001 - this is just a different version of "don't ask, don't tell".

.

If they succeed in these measures above, then with all the weapons and stresses in these occupations, people in the military will be safer than the general community.

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Reply #80 posted 12/06/19 2:20pm

IanRG

Many years ago a member of the Org very likely suicided.

.

This was when there were a number of Prince fans who came to know about Prince through being JWs (Jehovah's Witnesses). Some would engage in religious discussions here but these discussions would often expose them to highly critical posts and risks of apostasy if these lead to thoughts contrary to the teachings of the Governing Body. They progressively stopped discussing their beliefs here.

.

Before this, there was a person who had struggled through two periods of disfellowship and apostacy - one as a child and the second due to relationship with a non-JW. The trigger was that her BFF had just been apostatized. Her posts here got darker and darker and more desperate. The animity of people here meant all I could do was Org Note as many known JWs here to see if they could help her. She stopped posting and I do not know how it worked out.

.

It has been stated that the suicide rate of JWs, especially those in, at risk of Apostacy or who have been required to break all contact with a family member or friend in apostacy is 5 to 10 times the general rates but I cannot vouch for the validity of these stats.

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Reply #81 posted 12/06/19 2:47pm

wildgoldenhone
y

OldFriends4Sale said:

For those who may be familiar, 'cutting' This is something sorta became 'common' maybe 10+ yrs ago? My friend Angela, found out her daughter was doing this around high school age, and clearly was struggling with depression. She would say things on her FB page that always set off my warning signals. I did talk to her mother about it. And the cutting a married couple knew about it(she talked to them) before the mother knew.

.
It cutting something that has led up to suicide in younger people that you know of?

Cutting isn't necessarily about suicide, it's about emotional pain and not being able to deal with them. I once saw a tv movie and that was the girls was of finding relief from the problems that she wasn't able to deal with.

It can also be part of Borderline Personality Disorder. And I think it's completely different from self-destructive behavior. One thing in common though is the state of mind and emotional health of the person.
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Reply #82 posted 12/06/19 2:54pm

wildgoldenhone
y

OldFriends4Sale said:

Military Suicide Rates Hit Record High in 2018



The suicide rate for active-duty U.S. military members in 2018 was the highest on record since the Defense Department began tracking self-inflicted deaths in 2001.



Officials said Thursday that 2018's rate of 24.8 deaths per 100,000 service members is comparable to age and gender-adjusted civilian rates, but added that fact is "hardly comforting," given that "the numbers aren't moving in the right direction."



A new DoD publication, the 2018 Annual Suicide Report, released Thursday confirms that 325 active-duty personnel took their own lives last year, up from 285 in 2017 and 280 the previous year.



According to the report, the National Guard, which experienced 135 suicides in 2018, had the highest suicide rate among the three components, including the Reserves. Its rate of 30.6 per 100,000 was higher than the civilian rate when adjusted for age and gender.



...



Across the Reserves, 81 members died by suicide, a rate of 22.9 per 100,000.


The Pentagon has long struggled to address the problem of suicides in the ranks, attacking the issue with renewed fervor in 2012, when the number of deaths, 319, and the rate, 22.7 per 100,000, were the highest since the DoD began tracking the data following the 9/11 attacks.


Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Wednesday that the current trend is a result of being "caught up in what some call a national epidemic of suicide among our youth."



"And not just our youth, but it's something we continue to wrestle with," he said, speaking to reporters following a visit to Norfolk, Virginia, where investigators are looking into the deaths of three sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier George H.W. Bush.



Pentagon officials speaking Thursday did not try to explain why service members die by suicide but said the data is needed to better understand behaviors and create programs to prevent the deaths.


"Supporting our military personnel is not only a critical mission to the Department of Defense, it is a sacred obligation," said Elizabeth Van Winkle, executive director for Force Resiliency in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness. "We in the department must do all we can to prevent this tragedy, and we will use the information from this report to inform our efforts."



Military suicides began increasing in 2006 and climbed to a new record, 310, in 2009. They leveled off for several years before climbing again, reaching another high in 2012. At that time, leaders threw their focus behind suicide prevention programs and outreach; in 2014, they implemented policies that allowed commanders to discuss access to firearms with at-risk personnel and be equipped to handle voluntary surrender of weapons at a service member's request.



But firearms continue to be the most common method of suicide, according to the report, with 60% of active-duty personnel, 62% of reserve members and nearly 70% of National Guardsmen taking their own lives with a gun.



Pentagon officials said that, since suicide is often an impulsive decision, the department is developing initiatives on "safe storage of lethal means," including firearms and medications.


"One of the initiatives we are working toward is chaplains providing counseling on access to lethal means training, in addition to other gate-keepers," said Karen Orvis, director of the Defense Suicide Prevention Office.



.


https://www.military.com/...-2018.html


Those in the military can develop PTSD due to seeing atrocious tragedies and possibly guilt if they took others lives. Their consciences probably are tormented and they can't unsee all bloodshed and death they saw. It's like every time they close their eyes, a face frozen in terror haunts them. Maybe to end the pain, they feel their only way to stop the flashbacks is to end their life.
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Reply #83 posted 12/07/19 10:12am

PeggyO

Re: cutting. I read that the physical pain incurred while cutting helps to over-ride the emotional pain and provides a sense of calm.

Cutting may imply depression but not necessarily suicidality.

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Reply #84 posted 12/07/19 10:15pm

Pokeno4Money

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PeggyO said:

Re: cutting. I read that the physical pain incurred while cutting helps to over-ride the emotional pain and provides a sense of calm.

Cutting may imply depression but not necessarily suicidality.


Very true, as strange as it sounds.

Today during my weekly 10K walk, I came across a bench on top of a tall bridge overlooking a huge body of water. Across the entire length of the bench, in big letters, was an advertisement for a suicide hotline. This is just one example of how many people deal with suicidal thoughts each day.

"Never let nasty stalkers disrespect you. They start shit, you finish it. Go down to their level, that's the only way they'll understand. You have to handle things yourself."
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Reply #85 posted 12/10/19 10:55am

benni

avatar

IanRG said:

benni said:



The suicide rate for survivors is extremely high. But it's because that abuse comes with a lot of baggage, and as you said, the barriers we put up. We were taught not to trust, especially our own feelings, or to trust anyone with our feelings, so it is extremely hard to open up when we're dealing with things. Not to mention the PTSD and reliving it for many years after the fact.

I'm sorry that you had to go through what you did and relive it with the court case. How did it turn out? I don't know if I ever asked you about that. But if you ever need to talk, Ian, I'm just a message away.

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The court case was successful and he is in gaol for what he did to 19 children through his voluntary roles in the Anglican Church and orphanage. He was further charged for what he did to more children, including those through the Baptist Church. Unfortunately the Priest who was the paediphile ring leader and recruited the person who abused me died before he could face justice (at least on Earth). Other than reliving this through the police investigation, court preparation and the court hearing, the worst part of this was to find out that my childhood best friend was also a survivor - showing how effective abusers can be in isolating their victims even from each other and why it can be hard to help survivors if they become suicidal.

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The Bishop who covered up the abuse of me and others lied to the Royal Commission and was called on this in the Commission's finding. He is yet to face any charges. The next Bishop was on a path to be a candidate to be put to the Queen to be Archbishop of Canterbury but a member of our local Synod at his time in our diocese was later on General Synod when this Bishop's name came up. This Bishop had covered up the abuse of that Synod member's daughter, so he was quietly removed from consideration. Following the Royal Commission, this Bishop was removed from his role as an Archbishop. He is also yet to face any charges. The key enabler of the local Anglican ring, the Dean of the local cathedral has been charged for the abuse he personally did, but not for protecting and encouraging the paediphile ring.


I'm glad that the majority of them have paid for the crimes they committed. Too often, that's just not the case. I often wonder how different my life might have been if I had been able to see my abusers jailed for their crimes, instead of me being ostracized by my family. I always believed it was well-known to all members of my family what I was going through, because I did come forward at 14 and told, but a few years ago, I found out that (at least) some were not aware and they asked me why I didn't tell. I had to explain that I did tell, that I even reported it to the legal authorities, but nothing was done. They said, "No, why didn't you tell us? We would have came and got you." For me, personally, I thought they already knew and didn't care, and lived through most of my life believing no one cared what was done to me. Knowin, in hindsight, that if I had told other family members what I was going through, I might have gotten out of the situation earlier, really doesn't help and added a new element of self-blame. But we get through what we have to get through and we survive.

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Reply #86 posted 12/10/19 11:07am

benni

avatar

OldFriends4Sale said:

For those who may be familiar, 'cutting' This is something sorta became 'common' maybe 10+ yrs ago? My friend Angela, found out her daughter was doing this around high school age, and clearly was struggling with depression. She would say things on her FB page that always set off my warning signals. I did talk to her mother about it. And the cutting a married couple knew about it(she talked to them) before the mother knew. . It cutting something that has led up to suicide in younger people that you know of?


Cutting isn't related to increased suicide, though there are those that will engage in more serious forms of self-harm which can result in a sort of suicide. Forms of self-harm have been around for a very long time, even in ancient times, cutting was used as a form of ritual practice in some religions. All religions actually have some form of self-harm that is used ritualistically, including Hinduism, Catholocism, and Islam.

Cutting is more about using it as a coping mechanism, when they are holding in all of this pain and don't feel like they can share that pain with anyone else, that it is a form of "releasing the pain". It's an emotional release for them. I think when I was around 8 or 9, I considered it one time. I have a scar around my right ankle, from where someone had broken a soda bottle and threw the bottom round part of that soda bottle at me, as I was running away. (I was 6.) It managed to slice through my ankle, about halfway through my leg. I was hurting so bad that I wanted to reopen that wound as a way of showing that pain. I had started to and realized that it hurt and stopped. I'm a chicken when it comes to making myself physically hurt as a response to the emotional pain, so I never engaged in that form of emotional release. But, there are times when I've met other cutters and thought, "There but by the Grace of God, go I."

Trump: "It was hard to get it aroused and it is hard to get it aroused but we got it aroused."
[narrator voice] He's talking about the "American way."
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Reply #87 posted 12/10/19 11:14am

benni

avatar

wildgoldenhoney said:

OldFriends4Sale said:
For those who may be familiar, 'cutting' This is something sorta became 'common' maybe 10+ yrs ago? My friend Angela, found out her daughter was doing this around high school age, and clearly was struggling with depression. She would say things on her FB page that always set off my warning signals. I did talk to her mother about it. And the cutting a married couple knew about it(she talked to them) before the mother knew. . It cutting something that has led up to suicide in younger people that you know of?
Cutting isn't necessarily about suicide, it's about emotional pain and not being able to deal with them. I once saw a tv movie and that was the girls was of finding relief from the problems that she wasn't able to deal with. It can also be part of Borderline Personality Disorder. And I think it's completely different from self-destructive behavior. One thing in common though is the state of mind and emotional health of the person.


Borderline Personality Disorders are EXTREMELY difficult to work with. When I worked at a state run mental hospital back in the 90s, we had a woman with BPD that caused a lot of nurses and aides to retire early. She actually broke the neck of one of the nurses there. They finally moved her to a female prison, because we realized that even as a mental insitution, we were not equipped to work with her and keep everyone safe. But interestingly, most individuals with BPD are sexual abuse trauma survivors. And I think, a lot of people that engage in cutting also have some kind of traumatic or deeply emotional event that occurred in their lives, so it makes sense that BPD individuals might engage in self-harm behaviors.

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Reply #88 posted 12/15/19 5:00pm

wildgoldenhone
y

benni said:



OldFriends4Sale said:


For those who may be familiar, 'cutting' This is something sorta became 'common' maybe 10+ yrs ago? My friend Angela, found out her daughter was doing this around high school age, and clearly was struggling with depression. She would say things on her FB page that always set off my warning signals. I did talk to her mother about it. And the cutting a married couple knew about it(she talked to them) before the mother knew. . It cutting something that has led up to suicide in younger people that you know of?


Cutting isn't related to increased suicide, though there are those that will engage in more serious forms of self-harm which can result in a sort of suicide. Forms of self-harm have been around for a very long time, even in ancient times, cutting was used as a form of ritual practice in some religions. All religions actually have some form of self-harm that is used ritualistically, including Hinduism, Catholocism, and Islam.

Cutting is more about using it as a coping mechanism, when they are holding in all of this pain and don't feel like they can share that pain with anyone else, that it is a form of "releasing the pain". It's an emotional release for them. I think when I was around 8 or 9, I considered it one time. I have a scar around my right ankle, from where someone had broken a soda bottle and threw the bottom round part of that soda bottle at me, as I was running away. (I was 6.) It managed to slice through my ankle, about halfway through my leg. I was hurting so bad that I wanted to reopen that wound as a way of showing that pain. I had started to and realized that it hurt and stopped. I'm a chicken when it comes to making myself physically hurt as a response to the emotional pain, so I never engaged in that form of emotional release. But, there are times when I've met other cutters and thought, "There but by the Grace of God, go I."


Can you clarify what types of self harm you're referring to?
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Reply #89 posted 12/15/19 6:02pm

benni

avatar

wildgoldenhoney said:

benni said:


Cutting isn't related to increased suicide, though there are those that will engage in more serious forms of self-harm which can result in a sort of suicide. Forms of self-harm have been around for a very long time, even in ancient times, cutting was used as a form of ritual practice in some religions. All religions actually have some form of self-harm that is used ritualistically, including Hinduism, Catholocism, and Islam.

Cutting is more about using it as a coping mechanism, when they are holding in all of this pain and don't feel like they can share that pain with anyone else, that it is a form of "releasing the pain". It's an emotional release for them. I think when I was around 8 or 9, I considered it one time. I have a scar around my right ankle, from where someone had broken a soda bottle and threw the bottom round part of that soda bottle at me, as I was running away. (I was 6.) It managed to slice through my ankle, about halfway through my leg. I was hurting so bad that I wanted to reopen that wound as a way of showing that pain. I had started to and realized that it hurt and stopped. I'm a chicken when it comes to making myself physically hurt as a response to the emotional pain, so I never engaged in that form of emotional release. But, there are times when I've met other cutters and thought, "There but by the Grace of God, go I."

Can you clarify what types of self harm you're referring to?


Cutting or burning is one form of self-harm and it can be fatal if they accidentally go too deep and nick an artery. There is also the fear of infection turning septic. These are more accidental when they result in death.

Poisoning themselves is another form of self-harm and is a more dangerous form of self-harm. It's accidental too, but tends to be much more fatal I believe than cutting. (I haven't looked at the research on this in some time.)




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