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Thread started 08/30/19 6:47am

2elijah

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Historical Context: Facts about the Slave Trade and Slavery

By Steven Mintz



For informational purposes. Feel free to discuss.

This is a short excerpt from the article, which focuses on the Domestic Slavery Trade in the U.S. of African Americans/Black Americans (born in U.S. around the era of continued slavery) and were descendants of early Africans enslaved in the U.S.


https://www.gilderlehrman...nd-slavery


DOMESTIC SLAVE TRADE

“The domestic slave trade in the US distributed the African American population throughout the South in a migration that greatly surpassed in volume the Atlantic Slave Trade to North America.

Though Congress outlawed the African slave trade in 1808, domestic slave trade flourished, and the slave population in the US nearly tripled over the next 50 years.

The domestic trade continued into the 1860s and displaced approximately 1.2 million men, women, and children, the vast majority of whom were born in America.


To be "sold down the river" was one of the most dreaded prospects of the enslaved population. Some destinations, particularly the Louisiana sugar plantations, had especially grim reputations. But it was the destruction of family that made the domestic slave trade so terrifying.

PROFITABILITY

Prices of slaves varied widely over time, due to factors including supply, and changes in prices of commodities such as cotton. Even considering the relative expense of owning and keeping a slave, slavery was profitable.

In order to ensure the profitability of slaves, and to produce maximum "return on investment," slave owners generally supplied only the minimum food and shelter needed for survival, and forced their slaves to work from sunrise to sunset.

Although young adult men had the highest expected levels of output, young adult women had value over and above their ability to work in the fields; they were able to have children who by law were also slaves of the owner of the mother. Therefore, the average price of female slaves was higher than their male counterparts up to puberty age. Men around the age of 25-years-old were the most "valuable."

Slaveholding became more concentrated over time, particularly as slavery was abolished in the northern states. The fraction of households owning slaves fell from 36 percent in 1830 to 25 percent in 1860.

During the Civil War, roughly 180,000 black men served in the Union Army, and another 29,000 served in the Navy. Three-fifths of all black troops were former slaves.”
[Edited 8/30/19 6:51am]
“Uncomfortable conversations creates change” — Anonymous
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Reply #1 posted 08/30/19 8:58am

poppys

Very informational. Thanks for posting.

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Reply #2 posted 09/05/19 10:00am

2elijah

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Interesting article from last year, about Black Americans who were enslaved in parts of the South, until the 1960s. It’s unfortunate that many think slavery ended in 1865; 154 years ago, when in fact it was still happening well into the 1960s.

https://www.google.com/am...-the-1960s


Blacks Were Enslaved Well into the 1960s


By Antoinette Harrell ; as told to Justin Fornal
Feb 28 2018, 12:00am

“More than 100 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, there were black people in the Deep South who had no idea they were free. These people were forced to work, violently tortured, and raped.”

These stories are more common than you think. There were also Polish, Hungarian, and Italian immigrants, as well other nationalities, who got caught up in these situations in the American South. But the vast majority of 20th-century slaves were of African descent.”
[Edited 9/5/19 10:11am]
“Uncomfortable conversations creates change” — Anonymous
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