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Thread started 08/13/19 6:47am

OldFriends4Sal
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Another violent Chicago weekend leaves 5 dead, nearly 50 injured

For the people who think this is the love of 'Westerns' , This is more like the glorification of 'Mob/Mafia' lifestyles. Chicago's I-Bond law is not a good idea.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

Five people were killed by gunfire and many more injured, including an 8-year-old girl who was shot at a barbecue, in 37 separate shooting episodes in Chicago over the weekend, police said.

.

A tally sent by police to Fox News on Monday said that in addition to the five dead, there were 47 people wounded in the gunfire from 6 p.m. on Friday to 11:59 p.m. on Sunday.

In a news conference on Monday afternoon Chicago, Mayor Lori Lightfoot sounded an oft-heard alarm: "We have way too many guns on the street."

.

She said she just learned that the police have this year taken 6,954 illegal guns off the street, a 20 percent increase over the same period last year."We have too many incidents that are petty disputes that are getting solved by somebody fighting and we still are vexed by these large crowds that gather between 11 and 4 a.m. where people are outside enjoying the summer and unfortunately become the targets of people who want to create havoc in communities by shooting into large crowds."

.

On Saturday around 3:15 a.m. a 19-year-old man was standing on a sidewalk in Humboldt Park, which is on the west side of Chicago, with a group of men when shots were fired, according to police. They said the teen was shot in the armpit and transported to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

.

Also in Humboldt Park, about 15 hours later, police said a 47-year-old man was in a vehicle when "an unknown offender" approached the victim and fired shots.

The man was hit twice and transported to an area hospital in critical condition. He was pronounced dead shortly thereafter.

Police said no one is in custody in either case.

.

Chicago police did not immediately respond to Fox News' request for information related to the other three victims killed by gunfire over the weekend.

.

However, authorities said a drive-by shooting on Chicago's West Side early Sunday wounded six people, including one who is reported in critical condition.

Chicago police said the five women and one man were gathered in the Garfield Park neighborhood for a street party with more than 100 people when someone in a light-colored sedan opened fire.

Around 2:45 a.m. someone walked through Garfield Park and also started shooting, striking the man and women, police said, adding that "at least two people fired back at the offender."

A 25-year-old man was taken to a local hospital in critical condition with a gunshot wound to the back. The five injured women were hospitalized in stable condition.

Police said that leading up to the gunfire, "several altercations occurred within the patrons of the gathering."

No arrests have been made in the case and the shooting remains under investigation by detectives.

.

Another drive-by shooting was reported later on Sunday, during which an 8-year-old girl was hit, according to Chicago police.

They said the girl was at a barbecue in Humboldt Park on the West Side around 3:55 p.m. when someone inside a blue Dodge Charger drove by and opened fire.

Two of the shots grazed 8-year-old Adrianna Barron in her lower leg, according to WBBM-TV.

A witness told Fox 32 that the girl was outside, playing next to her mom when the shooters drove by in the blue car.

"They drove through the block three times, but the first time we thought it was ok because we know them," she told the television station. "Then they pulled around a second and third time, laughed at us and then I heard six to 10 shots."

She added that police just missed the shooters, passing their car as they drove off.

Chardonnay Burks, who identified herself as the girl's 18-year-old sister, told Fox 32 that she was at work when someone called her and said her sister had been shot.

"How are you going to come through shooting when you see kids?" Burks told the station. "They were aiming for somebody else obviously, but my little brother is four and was outside. He could have shot him too."

.

The little girl has been treated and released from the hospital, WBBM-TV reported.

They said no one is in custody in that case.

"We need and we will have a comprehensive plan for what the police department would call these Tier One neighborhoods, the neighborhoods who are most plagued by violence," Lightfoot told reporters on Monday.

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Reply #1 posted 08/13/19 6:53am

OldFriends4Sal
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https://www.foxnews.com/u...ot-10-dead

Chicago has most violent weekend this year: 52 shot, 10 dead

Days after officials touted a slight decrease in crime, Chicago saw its most violent weekend of the year, with 52 people reportedly shot -- including 10 fatally.

The violent spree occurred just days after authorities highlighted a nine percent drop in crime compared to the first five months of 2018.

Department spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said Monday that Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson ordered targeted patrols in certain areas in response to several gang-related incidents since Friday. Guglielmi says those efforts have netted 18 arrests and 92 seized guns since Friday evening.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot has said she's considering replacing Johnson, but will not decide until after a more thorough study of the city's problems, according to WGN-TV.

Guglielmi said police are questioning several people of interest in some of the incidents and detectives have good leads in others. Police have asked anyone with information to contact them.

On Twitter, Guglielmi assailed a program known as I-Bond that allows Cook County offenders to be released on a no-cash bond. The program was implemented in 1982 to address jail overcrowding.

But critics long have said it provides criminals a fast way to get back on the streets.

"Letting gun offenders out on I-Bonds shows there is absolutely no repercussion for carrying illegal guns in Chicago," Guglielmi tweeted Sunday.

Northwestern University reportedly sent an alert to students and faculty Saturday after several people were shot near the Gold Coast campus.

Homicide numbers in Chicago had been continuing a downward trend over the last two years. There were more than 200 fewer homicides in 2018 compared with 2016.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #2 posted 08/13/19 6:57am

RodeoSchro

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These people were murdered by guns - guns which were almost certainly purchased in the gun-promoting zones of Gary, Indiana or southern Wisconsin.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

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Reply #3 posted 08/13/19 8:33am

EmmaMcG

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I love Westerns. I've never shot anyone. American gun culture is not because of a love of westerns. It's more because of the classic cowboy fantasy and the downright stupid belief that owning a gun is a "God-given right". As if God, if it existed, would actually want people to own weapons. But that's another story for another day.

The simple fact is that there are far too many guns, both legal AND illegal, in America. Correcting that problem will not be easy. There is no fast solution to a problem that's hundreds of years old. Stricter gun laws would be a nice start. A President who doesn't cop out and blames video games and immigration and instead, looks at actually introducing these stricter laws would be another step in the right direction. As would a better education system. More investment into youth outreach programs, more effort put into taking kids off the street and getting them out of gangs. There's a lot of things your government could be doing. Unfortunately, as we all know, a lot of this will never happen. It would take a very brave Republican president to speak out against the gun-lovers. And we know that Trump is not that president.

So for the foreseeable future, at least, we'll have to settle for a President who offers his thoughts and prayers to the victims rather than actually doing something to prevent American people from becoming victims.
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Reply #4 posted 08/13/19 10:41am

OldFriends4Sal
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EmmaMcG said:

I love Westerns. I've never shot anyone. American gun culture is not because of a love of westerns. It's more because of the classic cowboy fantasy and the downright stupid belief that owning a gun is a "God-given right". As if God, if it existed, would actually want people to own weapons. But that's another story for another day. The simple fact is that there are far too many guns, both legal AND illegal, in America. Correcting that problem will not be easy. There is no fast solution to a problem that's hundreds of years old. Stricter gun laws would be a nice start. A President who doesn't cop out and blames video games and immigration and instead, looks at actually introducing these stricter laws would be another step in the right direction. As would a better education system. More investment into youth outreach programs, more effort put into taking kids off the street and getting them out of gangs. There's a lot of things your government could be doing. Unfortunately, as we all know, a lot of this will never happen. It would take a very brave Republican president to speak out against the gun-lovers. And we know that Trump is not that president. So for the foreseeable future, at least, we'll have to settle for a President who offers his thoughts and prayers to the victims rather than actually doing something to prevent American people from becoming victims.

Well Westerns would be where the Cowboy fantasy comes from. I doubt it is that though overall. Most Americans did not live that. Maybe Texans. It's not that simple, it is as complex as the ethnic and religious face of the United States. Everyone isn't w.a.s.p. You can have states that experience almost none of this kind of violence. Truth is our government is doing a lot to make our spaces better. There is local(City/County) goverment, State and Federal. Guns gained illegally is a different creature.
.
Also most Latinz and African Americans or others who take part in gun violence most likely do not have the 'God-given right' issue with guns. That would only be a certain domographic of Americans of northern European descendant.

.

A lot of Black Americans involved in a lot of this kind of violence actually do connect with Italian-Mafia/Mob Life. It is also what you will hear in most gangster rap, not cowboys & indians.

Latinx people tend to have a double view, the Mob life and the SWesterner 'cowboy' images of their own cultures.

.

The other part is a culture induced fear. That came from the USA beginnings. It's probably a little similar to Switzerlands fear of invasion, but to a much greater degree.

.

But let's not make this S side of Chicago' issue such a huge nationwide issue. This is a specific South side of Chicago issues. I try to help people rememeber that every state doesn't have the same issues. I've been alive 47yrs and never have I been even close to situation revolving gun violence. And definately not mass shootings.

.

And one of the issues which I brought up and posted about is their I-Bond law. I suspect some of this illogical Bond System is a result of people 'looking out for the poor'. In other places the 'catch and release' issue is a problem. Hopefully the more marijuana become legal and people are not jailed for possession, jails won't use the excuse of overcrowding to not hold fire arm criminals longer.

I-Bonds

An I-Bond, short for Individual Bond, is a personal recognizance bond. This means that you are released when you sign a statement saying you will come to court, without paying any actual money.

https://www.illinoislegal...minal-case

"This report shows that judges are respecting the rights of the accused by releasing eligible pretrial defendants from jail without increasing the threat to public safety," Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans

.

"Letting gun offenders out on I-Bonds shows there is absolutely no repercussion for carrying illegal guns in Chicago,"

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #5 posted 08/13/19 10:48am

OldFriends4Sal
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https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2019/06/03/officials-address-vicious-cycle-of-i-bond-violations-after-violent-weekend/

Officials Address 'Vicious Cycle' Of I-Bond Violations After Violent Weekend

CHICAGO (CBS) — Many of the gun offenders arrested by Chicago police over the weekend walked out of jail on bond, without having to pay a dime.

As of Monday morning, 19 people had been arrested on gun-related charges. By Monday afternoon, 11 were back on the street, some with prior gun offenses.

"We know who a lot of these people are," Chicago Police Supt. Eddie Johnson said. "And how do we know that? Because we keep arresting them over and over and over and over and over again. And it's just a vicious cycle."

In a tweet Sunday night, a Chicago police spokesperson criticized the practice of letting gun offenders out on Individual Recognizance Bonds or "I-Bonds."

An I-Bond allows a defendant to be released without having to pay, on the promise that he or she will return for the next court date.

The tweet said, in part, "Letting gun offenders out on I-Bonds shows there is absolutely no repercussion for carrying illegal guns In Chicago."

For a year-and-a-half period from 2015 to 2016, CBS 2 discovered that I-Bonds for gun offenders were given at least a dozen times.

In one 2016 case, Cardell Brown was charged and convicted of aggravated unlawful use of a weapon. Then when he was on probation he was charged with battery and he walked away on an I-Bond.

"Neither the judge or the prosecutor has a crystal ball," Steven Block, CBS 2 legal analyst, said.

Block said the Chicago Police Department might be oversimplifying the issue.

"Someone will go out and do something bad on bond. That's inevitable, but what we need to look at is how you handle the cases on a whole," he said.

Last month, the Cook County Circuit Court released data showing the frequency of I-Bonds has nearly doubled since new bail practices went into effect in 2017.

But the data doesn't say how many were for gun charges.

The data also shows slight uptick in the number of defendants charged with a violent crime who are released on bond.

"This report shows that judges are respecting the rights of the accused by releasing eligible pretrial defendants from jail without increasing the threat to public safety," Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans said last month in a statement.

The Cook County State's Attorney's Office said it agrees with CPD: It does not recommend I-Bonds in cases involving gun offenses.

In a statement, an office representative said since the beginning of this year, 72% of gun related cases received monetary bail or no bond.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #6 posted 08/13/19 12:47pm

OldFriends4Sal
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I-BONDS CALLED 'A TICKET TO SELL DRUGS IN CHICAGO'

Harvey Lowery, 20, admits he has spent time on the wrong side of the law, selling PCP, an animal tranquilizer known as ''leaf,'' to feed his heroin habit.

He has been arrested so many times he can't remember them all.

''In my life? I don't know, 5, 10, 15, 20 times,'' he says. ''When you're running the streets, getting high, you don't know how many times they lock you up.''

What he does remember is that after some of his most recent arrests he was released from Cook County Jail on a no-cash bond, commonly known as an I- bond.

''I always get the I-bond,'' Lowery brags from his corner hangout at 15th Street and Pulaski Road. ''You get out so fast your mind can't function.''

Records back up at least part of his boast: Twice this year Lowery has been freed from County Jail on no-cash bonds-on Jan. 15 and March 25.

The revolving door at County Jail that lets thousands of offenders back on the street after being locked up a day or two-combined with the high use of drugs-is fueling crime in Chicago, according to Police Supt. LeRoy Martin.

''What the public has to understand is that these people are hoodlums, but they're not stupid,'' Martin said. ''They know the criminal justice system as well as a lot of attorneys.''

For five years, Lowery says, he dealt just enough PCP to pay for his heroin habit. He insists he's straight now.

Lowery proudly declares that he has never been arrested with more than one $10 bag of PCP. After each sale, Lowery says he ran three blocks to where he hid his stash, grabbed another $10 bag and returned to the same corner.

''I know they can't hold you that long'' for possessing one bag, Lowery said. ''I use my head when I'm out there.''

''It's extremely frustrating because we know what's causing this, and yet we are powerless,'' Martin said. ''We're making arrests, but we're arresting the same people over again. We're doing our work over and over again. And the public is the one who has to suffer by this breakdown in the system.''

''It's a very serious concern to me,'' Cook County Sheriff James O'Grady, in charge of the jail, said of the high number of drug defendants being freed on I-bonds. ''We're going into a recycling program. It's not an effective means of combating the drug users.''

A Tribune analysis of records from the Cook County Circuit Court clerk relating to 6,160 defendants released on I-bonds from the jail in June, July and August of 1989 shows that one of four defendants was rearrested in the next six months, some as many as 20 times. One out of three defendants jumped bond and didn't appear at the first court date.

The findings are evidence of what law enforcement officials had feared since the I-bond program intensified almost 2 1/2 years ago in response to a federal court order that prohibits jail overcrowding: Drug dealers and users, burglars and thieves released on the bonds continue to commit crimes.Furthermore, the jail is still bursting at the seams, even though 80,000 defendants have been released on I-bonds in the last 2 1/2 years, some of whom had initially been jailed on $50,000 bonds.

''It's been a ticket to deal drugs in Chicago because they know they're going to get an I-bond,'' one jail correctional officer said.

The I-bond program was instituted after U.S. District Judge Milton Shadur found jail officials in contempt of a 1982 federal court order that required a bed be available for each inmate. When jail officials couldn't reduce the crowding, Shadur ordered defendants released on bonds requiring no cash.

The numbers of drug arrests-and rearrests-are crushing County Jail and the criminal courts.

Last year the jail booked 71,368 defendants-20,870 of them on drug charges-a 44 percent rise in drug bookings over 1988.

And through the first seven months of 1990, bookings on drug charges rose another 11 percent from the 1989 period.

Total admissions have risen as well, though not as sharply as bookings on drug charges.

Many of the inmates released on I-bonds are charged with drug offenses because that's the single biggest and fastest growing category entering the jail. Three out of every 10 defendants booked into jail are charged with drug offenses.

In addition to drug offenses, inmates charged with non-violent crimes, including theft, burglary, weapons violations, criminal damage to property and aggravated assault, can be freed on I-bonds.

On a Friday night in August, Officers Joseph Gorman, 27, and James Smith, 30, assigned to the Marquette District tactical unit, were looking for a suspect who skipped Narcotics Court that morning. He was released on an I-bond a couple of days before, they said.

There were easily 25 people at the suspect's usual hangout, the corner of Kedzie Avenue and 19th Street, as the plainclothes officers drove slowly past in their dusty Chevy Caprice. Despite three separate visits, their suspect was not to be found.

''It gets to the point you know them by their first names,'' Sgt. Michael Divittorio, Gorman's and Smith's supervisor, said of street-level drug dealers.

Gorman, who spends as much as six hours a day in court on drug cases, saw a familiar face Thursday at a preliminary hearing in Narcotics Court: Melvin Stevens, 23, whose record includes arrests for robbery, auto theft, battery and drug possession.

Gorman and Smith had arrested Stevens just two nights earlier after a foot chase and charged him with possession of 14 bags of marijuana laced with PCP. Gorman and Smith had booked Stevens on June 16 on another drug charge.

In court, Stevens was only too happy to tell Gorman how he had gotten out of jail. ''He said on an I-bond,'' Gorman said.

Many dealers learn quickly that carrying too much dope at one time can lead to a stiffer charge, a high cash bond and a long wait in County Jail until trial. It also could mean the difference between probation or prison if convicted.

Standing on the corner of Roosevelt Road and Keeler Avenue is Althatias Goodman, 18, known as ''Sticks'' because of his scrawny build. Goodman was arrested for drug possession last month.

Goodman was arrested for drug possession last month. He could have called his girlfriend to pay a $200 cash bond to obtain his release from County Jail. But instead he sat tight.

''I waited for the I-bond,'' he says.

The wait wasn't long. He was freed on an I-bond two days after his arrest.

Nineteen days earlier, Goodman had received an I-bond on a weapons charge, records show.

Presiding Criminal Court Judge Thomas Fitzgerald last year took the unprecedented step of establishing a Night Narcotics Court consisting of five trial courts. The need was clear: In the first half of 1990, drug possession and delivery charges accounted for just under half of the felony cases filed in Cook County's criminal trial division. And that doesn't include offenses such as robberies and burglaries committed by suspected drug users.

Voluntary drug testing at Night Bond Court, where defendants arrested hours earlier appear for bond hearings, has shown extensive drug use among arrestees. In May, 50 percent of the defendants had cocaine in their blood and another 21 percent tested positive for other drugs.

On most mornings in the Criminal Courts Building, police officers pack jury boxes in three courtrooms waiting to testify at preliminary hearings. If the officers are not at Narcotics Court, the cases are usually tossed out.

Martin said his department's 1990 budget for overtime pay for officers'

court time was exhausted by April.

Gorman, in one 28-day period, said he spent an average of five hours a day in court.

Martin keeps an eye out for complacency among his officers, worrying that some might become less aggressive as the flood of I-bonds continues.

''So far we haven't had that, but they're disgusted.''

-->

Copyright © 2019, Chicago Tribune

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #7 posted 08/13/19 12:56pm

guitarslinger4
4

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OldFriends4Sale said:

EmmaMcG said:

I love Westerns. I've never shot anyone. American gun culture is not because of a love of westerns. It's more because of the classic cowboy fantasy and the downright stupid belief that owning a gun is a "God-given right". As if God, if it existed, would actually want people to own weapons. But that's another story for another day. The simple fact is that there are far too many guns, both legal AND illegal, in America. Correcting that problem will not be easy. There is no fast solution to a problem that's hundreds of years old. Stricter gun laws would be a nice start. A President who doesn't cop out and blames video games and immigration and instead, looks at actually introducing these stricter laws would be another step in the right direction. As would a better education system. More investment into youth outreach programs, more effort put into taking kids off the street and getting them out of gangs. There's a lot of things your government could be doing. Unfortunately, as we all know, a lot of this will never happen. It would take a very brave Republican president to speak out against the gun-lovers. And we know that Trump is not that president. So for the foreseeable future, at least, we'll have to settle for a President who offers his thoughts and prayers to the victims rather than actually doing something to prevent American people from becoming victims.

Well Westerns would be where the Cowboy fantasy comes from. I doubt it is that though overall. Most Americans did not live that. Maybe Texans. It's not that simple, it is as complex as the ethnic and religious face of the United States. Everyone isn't w.a.s.p. You can have states that experience almost none of this kind of violence. Truth is our government is doing a lot to make our spaces better. There is local(City/County) goverment, State and Federal. Guns gained illegally is a different creature.
.
Also most Latinz and African Americans or others who take part in gun violence most likely do not have the 'God-given right' issue with guns. That would only be a certain domographic of Americans of northern European descendant.

.

A lot of Black Americans involved in a lot of this kind of violence actually do connect with Italian-Mafia/Mob Life. It is also what you will hear in most gangster rap, not cowboys & indians.

Latinx people tend to have a double view, the Mob life and the SWesterner 'cowboy' images of their own cultures.

.

The other part is a culture induced fear. That came from the USA beginnings. It's probably a little similar to Switzerlands fear of invasion, but to a much greater degree.

.

But let's not make this S side of Chicago' issue such a huge nationwide issue. This is a specific South side of Chicago issues. I try to help people rememeber that every state doesn't have the same issues. I've been alive 47yrs and never have I been even close to situation revolving gun violence. And definately not mass shootings.

.

And one of the issues which I brought up and posted about is their I-Bond law. I suspect some of this illogical Bond System is a result of people 'looking out for the poor'. In other places the 'catch and release' issue is a problem. Hopefully the more marijuana become legal and people are not jailed for possession, jails won't use the excuse of overcrowding to not hold fire arm criminals longer.

I-Bonds

An I-Bond, short for Individual Bond, is a personal recognizance bond. This means that you are released when you sign a statement saying you will come to court, without paying any actual money.

https://www.illinoislegal...minal-case

"This report shows that judges are respecting the rights of the accused by releasing eligible pretrial defendants from jail without increasing the threat to public safety," Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans

.

"Letting gun offenders out on I-Bonds shows there is absolutely no repercussion for carrying illegal guns in Chicago,"


nod

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Reply #8 posted 08/13/19 1:43pm

EmmaMcG

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OldFriends4Sale said:



EmmaMcG said:


I love Westerns. I've never shot anyone. American gun culture is not because of a love of westerns. It's more because of the classic cowboy fantasy and the downright stupid belief that owning a gun is a "God-given right". As if God, if it existed, would actually want people to own weapons. But that's another story for another day. The simple fact is that there are far too many guns, both legal AND illegal, in America. Correcting that problem will not be easy. There is no fast solution to a problem that's hundreds of years old. Stricter gun laws would be a nice start. A President who doesn't cop out and blames video games and immigration and instead, looks at actually introducing these stricter laws would be another step in the right direction. As would a better education system. More investment into youth outreach programs, more effort put into taking kids off the street and getting them out of gangs. There's a lot of things your government could be doing. Unfortunately, as we all know, a lot of this will never happen. It would take a very brave Republican president to speak out against the gun-lovers. And we know that Trump is not that president. So for the foreseeable future, at least, we'll have to settle for a President who offers his thoughts and prayers to the victims rather than actually doing something to prevent American people from becoming victims.



Well Westerns would be where the Cowboy fantasy comes from. I doubt it is that though overall. Most Americans did not live that. Maybe Texans. It's not that simple, it is as complex as the ethnic and religious face of the United States. Everyone isn't w.a.s.p. You can have states that experience almost none of this kind of violence. Truth is our government is doing a lot to make our spaces better. There is local(City/County) goverment, State and Federal. Guns gained illegally is a different creature.
.
Also most Latinz and African Americans or others who take part in gun violence most likely do not have the 'God-given right' issue with guns. That would only be a certain domographic of Americans of northern European descendant.


.


A lot of Black Americans involved in a lot of this kind of violence actually do connect with Italian-Mafia/Mob Life. It is also what you will hear in most gangster rap, not cowboys & indians.


Latinx people tend to have a double view, the Mob life and the SWesterner 'cowboy' images of their own cultures.


.


The other part is a culture induced fear. That came from the USA beginnings. It's probably a little similar to Switzerlands fear of invasion, but to a much greater degree.


.


But let's not make this S side of Chicago' issue such a huge nationwide issue. This is a specific South side of Chicago issues. I try to help people rememeber that every state doesn't have the same issues. I've been alive 47yrs and never have I been even close to situation revolving gun violence. And definately not mass shootings.


.


And one of the issues which I brought up and posted about is their I-Bond law. I suspect some of this illogical Bond System is a result of people 'looking out for the poor'. In other places the 'catch and release' issue is a problem. Hopefully the more marijuana become legal and people are not jailed for possession, jails won't use the excuse of overcrowding to not hold fire arm criminals longer.




I-Bonds


An I-Bond, short for Individual Bond, is a personal recognizance bond. This means that you are released when you sign a statement saying you will come to court, without paying any actual money.


https://www.illinoislegal...minal-case



"This report shows that judges are respecting the rights of the accused by releasing eligible pretrial defendants from jail without increasing the threat to public safety," Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans


.


"Letting gun offenders out on I-Bonds shows there is absolutely no repercussion for carrying illegal guns in Chicago,"



The cowboy fantasy I'm talking about is not one learned from watching westerns. Well, not exclusively anyway. I'm talking about how certain groups of Americans cling to their constitution, specifically the 2nd amendment, as if it actually still means something. The British boogeyman isn't around anymore, it's time you (not you personally, I'm talking about the gun nuts) put away your guns. The problem with that is that "the right to bear arms" is so ingrained in your culture at this stage that it would be impossible to completely ban guns without some kind of uprising from dangerous lunatics. So it's pointless to suggest that you ban guns. That will never happen. However, if stricter laws are introduced, perhaps similar to the ones used in other countries like Australia, then that would almost certainly cut down on these kinds of mass killings. It wouldn't stop them all, but if it prevents even one then it would be a worthwhile endeavour.
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Reply #9 posted 08/13/19 2:16pm

OldFriends4Sal
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EmmaMcG said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Well Westerns would be where the Cowboy fantasy comes from. I doubt it is that though overall. Most Americans did not live that. Maybe Texans. It's not that simple, it is as complex as the ethnic and religious face of the United States. Everyone isn't w.a.s.p. You can have states that experience almost none of this kind of violence. Truth is our government is doing a lot to make our spaces better. There is local(City/County) goverment, State and Federal. Guns gained illegally is a different creature.
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Also most Latinz and African Americans or others who take part in gun violence most likely do not have the 'God-given right' issue with guns. That would only be a certain domographic of Americans of northern European descendant.

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A lot of Black Americans involved in a lot of this kind of violence actually do connect with Italian-Mafia/Mob Life. It is also what you will hear in most gangster rap, not cowboys & indians.

Latinx people tend to have a double view, the Mob life and the SWesterner 'cowboy' images of their own cultures.

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The other part is a culture induced fear. That came from the USA beginnings. It's probably a little similar to Switzerlands fear of invasion, but to a much greater degree.

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But let's not make this S side of Chicago' issue such a huge nationwide issue. This is a specific South side of Chicago issues. I try to help people rememeber that every state doesn't have the same issues. I've been alive 47yrs and never have I been even close to situation revolving gun violence. And definately not mass shootings.

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And one of the issues which I brought up and posted about is their I-Bond law. I suspect some of this illogical Bond System is a result of people 'looking out for the poor'. In other places the 'catch and release' issue is a problem. Hopefully the more marijuana become legal and people are not jailed for possession, jails won't use the excuse of overcrowding to not hold fire arm criminals longer.

I-Bonds

An I-Bond, short for Individual Bond, is a personal recognizance bond. This means that you are released when you sign a statement saying you will come to court, without paying any actual money.

https://www.illinoislegal...minal-case

"This report shows that judges are respecting the rights of the accused by releasing eligible pretrial defendants from jail without increasing the threat to public safety," Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans

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"Letting gun offenders out on I-Bonds shows there is absolutely no repercussion for carrying illegal guns in Chicago,"

The cowboy fantasy I'm talking about is not one learned from watching westerns. Well, not exclusively anyway. I'm talking about how certain groups of Americans cling to their constitution, specifically the 2nd amendment, as if it actually still means something. The British boogeyman isn't around anymore, it's time you (not you personally, I'm talking about the gun nuts) put away your guns. The problem with that is that "the right to bear arms" is so ingrained in your culture at this stage that it would be impossible to completely ban guns without some kind of uprising from dangerous lunatics. So it's pointless to suggest that you ban guns. That will never happen. However, if stricter laws are introduced, perhaps similar to the ones used in other countries like Australia, then that would almost certainly cut down on these kinds of mass killings. It wouldn't stop them all, but if it prevents even one then it would be a worthwhile endeavour.

But that isn't 'cowboy' clinging to constitution 2nd Amendment is about their New World vs British rule 'fight' followed by a degree of 'anti-government'. This is why you find more of it in the Republican party, because they are also about 'less government'

The developement of what became the United States of America, is varied story. Where different countries had 'ownership' of various parts of the land. And wars were still being fought. Until finally the Civil war in the 1860s. So 'cowboy' fantasy isn't honest to the real story of America's varied development.

The 2nd Amendment still means something, but something very different from how and why it started. But it isn't a cowboy fantasy that has settled in, but a fear, that settled in.

Now, as I said before, every discussion about Guns & the USA cannot be about Western/cowboy fantasies and Trump. As I said it is more diverse than that. And it is not just about the issues of 'W.A.S.P.' men. Chicago's demographics of the South side is beyond that.

And law abiding citizens having guns overall is not a problem nor an issue. This issues is about criminals. And a system ruling in Chicago that let's a criminal out of prison 'for free'. Please read through the information I posted. Because it's more specific about Chicago and Illinois.

Chicago IL is a GREAT place to live and visit. But there is a serioius issue in the S side that has people perplexed. And cowboy fantasies and the 2nd Amendment is not it. I would wish to arm the innocents that are 'prisoners' to these people with vendettas as Mafia pathologies.

Image result for 2nd amendment definition

Image result for Union states

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Reply #10 posted 08/13/19 2:40pm

IanRG

In many ways it is easier to look at the odd occasions of gun violence and ignore the higher use of guns in crimes or domestics or in accidents and suicides. It is easier to isolate the causes and solutions in the mass shootings or political violence (if not to find the political will to make and fund the changes needed) than to solve the overall issue.

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However, part of the solution here must be a focus on the number of guns (legal and illegal) and how freely these are carried and used and why. Before the guns before people jump in, that Switzeralnd can have higher levels of gun ownership but low levels of gun violence shows it is a multifactoral matrix of issues and solutions, not just this one factor. For example, Australia and New Zealand's gun buy backs following Port Arthur and Christchurch worked for us but, given fear is major driver in the US, it would be less effective there (and a hell of lot more expensive)

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Reply #11 posted 08/13/19 3:29pm

PennyPurple

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Chicago shootings have nothing to do with westerns. lol


It's gang and thug related.

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Reply #12 posted 08/13/19 4:23pm

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IanRG said:

In many ways it is easier to look at the odd occasions of gun violence and ignore the higher use of guns in crimes or domestics or in accidents and suicides. It is easier to isolate the causes and solutions in the mass shootings or political violence (if not to find the political will to make and fund the changes needed) than to solve the overall issue.

.

However, part of the solution here must be a focus on the number of guns (legal and illegal) and how freely these are carried and used and why. Before the guns before people jump in, that Switzeralnd can have higher levels of gun ownership but low levels of gun violence shows it is a multifactoral matrix of issues and solutions, not just this one factor. For example, Australia and New Zealand's gun buy backs following Port Arthur and Christchurch worked for us but, given fear is major driver in the US, it would be less effective there (and a hell of lot more expensive)

The problem is not 'legal' gun owners. It's criminals, and criminals who are being arrested, but because of a quirky law, they get out without bail. Part of this issue falls on the more liberal side of politics looking out for the 'poor' sorta like 'Catch & Release' More 'neigborhood /gang related. Might be similar to what's happening in Mexico.

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With this situation in Chicago, you're dealing with poor and working class Black, White, Latinx, Italian etc probably Asians too. It's almost like this South section is isolated from the metrop Chicago.

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My use os Switzerland was not a comparison of gun violence, but the fear of _ in why you can go to Switzerland and everyone is carrying; at the beach the store the park etc. That was about looking at why the hold on guns in America exists in a certain (legal) demographic. The fear is similar just on a different scale. It is not about Westerns or love of cowboys.

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And yes citizens giving up their legal guns would be suicide, in this section. The law of I-Bonds needs to be changed and only used on non violent people and people who are not a threat to society. That would help a poor person arrested for lack of child support, or possession of a few blunts. But it is people with criminal records of drug drealing or gun/gang violence taking advantage of this.

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Reply #13 posted 08/13/19 4:35pm

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PennyPurple said:

Chicago shootings have nothing to do with westerns. lol


It's gang and thug related.

lol I don't even know where that began lol I sure would like to know.

"Americans, they watch Westerns and don't have anything else to do but play Cowboys & Indians"

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Reply #14 posted 08/13/19 4:44pm

EmmaMcG

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Jesus, why do people keep talking about cowboys? Hahaha, some people take everything literally. When I said that the gun nuts are wannabe cowboys, I wasn't saying that they were influenced by John Wayne or Lee Van Cleef. I was merely bringing up the fact that gun culture in certain sections of America is a by-product of the old West. Generation after generation has been brought up thinking that its normal to own a gun. Because the constitution tells them so. It's not normal!

American gun laws don't help either. A number of people on this very site have claimed to own a gun for the purpose of self defence. One guy even claimed that if someone, who was unarmed by the way, attacked him he would have no hesitatation in shooting that person dead. These kinds of people are allowed to own a gun in America. That's fucking deranged. Like I said before, it's unrealistic to expect people to just "give up their guns". That's never going to happen. But preventing maniacs from purchasing guns legally is not outside the realm of possibility.
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Reply #15 posted 08/13/19 5:25pm

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EmmaMcG said:

Jesus, why do people keep talking about cowboys? Hahaha, some people take everything literally. When I said that the gun nuts are wannabe cowboys, I wasn't saying that they were influenced by John Wayne or Lee Van Cleef. I was merely bringing up the fact that gun culture in certain sections of America is a by-product of the old West. Generation after generation has been brought up thinking that its normal to own a gun. Because the constitution tells them so. It's not normal! American gun laws don't help either. A number of people on this very site have claimed to own a gun for the purpose of self defence. One guy even claimed that if someone, who was unarmed by the way, attacked him he would have no hesitatation in shooting that person dead. These kinds of people are allowed to own a gun in America. That's fucking deranged. Like I said before, it's unrealistic to expect people to just "give up their guns". That's never going to happen. But preventing maniacs from purchasing guns legally is not outside the realm of possibility.

LOL because it's not correct love, we are trying to explain that to you. This situation in Chicago is not priviledged WASPs from way back in the early days.

.

Your dealing with different regions of the US: the Union states, the Border states, the Confederate state, the Plain and Territory states and then you had other areas that were different. It's why I try to explain, when dealing with different regions, states, ethnicities etc your going to have very different background reasons. Florida is much different from Texas. Remember the old West was not the same as Georgia, S Carolina, Alabama etc, vs Mississipi which was French territory for a long time and gave us the Creole and Cajun cultures. The slaves, Irish Native and African that escaped to Florida and that regions whole philosophies of laws and beliefs, Wyoming, Utah and certain areas that have 'undocumented' polygamous marriages via the Mormons. I mean it's just different. We haven't even touch on New York state and New York City with all it's boroughs.

.

But again it's not because of the Wild Wild West lol

Well is it normal for people in Switzerland to carry guns everywhere they go?

Yeah guns by nature are not 'normal'.

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Yeah, if someone attacks you, you don't know how it will turn out, they could kill you. You don't need a gun to kill someone, or disable someone. What about in the case of rape? or home burglaries. Why should their life be more important than yours? Certain places have laws about what you can and cannot do to someone who breaks into your home. The criminal can actually sue you.

.

But again, I'm still trying to get you to understand and just focus on Chicago, IL, if your that interested. Or else we are just talking about the same thing over and over cut in paste conversatiions in every thread.

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The big issue, with Chicago is a law, the I-BONDS law. Once you get em behind bars, don't make it easy for them to get out again. You have liberals who 'go overboard' for the poor and too often that also encompasses 'criminals'. The lines are blurred.

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Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
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Reply #16 posted 08/14/19 1:51am

EmmaMcG

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OldFriends4Sale said:



EmmaMcG said:


Jesus, why do people keep talking about cowboys? Hahaha, some people take everything literally. When I said that the gun nuts are wannabe cowboys, I wasn't saying that they were influenced by John Wayne or Lee Van Cleef. I was merely bringing up the fact that gun culture in certain sections of America is a by-product of the old West. Generation after generation has been brought up thinking that its normal to own a gun. Because the constitution tells them so. It's not normal! American gun laws don't help either. A number of people on this very site have claimed to own a gun for the purpose of self defence. One guy even claimed that if someone, who was unarmed by the way, attacked him he would have no hesitatation in shooting that person dead. These kinds of people are allowed to own a gun in America. That's fucking deranged. Like I said before, it's unrealistic to expect people to just "give up their guns". That's never going to happen. But preventing maniacs from purchasing guns legally is not outside the realm of possibility.


LOL because it's not correct love, we are trying to explain that to you. This situation in Chicago is not priviledged WASPs from way back in the early days.


.


Your dealing with different regions of the US: the Union states, the Border states, the Confederate state, the Plain and Territory states and then you had other areas that were different. It's why I try to explain, when dealing with different regions, states, ethnicities etc your going to have very different background reasons. Florida is much different from Texas. Remember the old West was not the same as Georgia, S Carolina, Alabama etc, vs Mississipi which was French territory for a long time and gave us the Creole and Cajun cultures. The slaves, Irish Native and African that escaped to Florida and that regions whole philosophies of laws and beliefs, Wyoming, Utah and certain areas that have 'undocumented' polygamous marriages via the Mormons. I mean it's just different. We haven't even touch on New York state and New York City with all it's boroughs.




.



But again it's not because of the Wild Wild West lol



Well is it normal for people in Switzerland to carry guns everywhere they go?



Yeah guns by nature are not 'normal'.


.


Yeah, if someone attacks you, you don't know how it will turn out, they could kill you. You don't need a gun to kill someone, or disable someone. What about in the case of rape? or home burglaries. Why should their life be more important than yours? Certain places have laws about what you can and cannot do to someone who breaks into your home. The criminal can actually sue you.


.



But again, I'm still trying to get you to understand and just focus on Chicago, IL, if your that interested. Or else we are just talking about the same thing over and over cut in paste conversatiions in every thread.


.


The big issue, with Chicago is a law, the I-BONDS law. Once you get em behind bars, don't make it easy for them to get out again. You have liberals who 'go overboard' for the poor and too often that also encompasses 'criminals'. The lines are blurred.



First things first, don't call me "love". Ever!

Also, what part of "certain sections of America" don't you understand? I know that's not the case across the whole country, which is why I specifically said "certain sections of America". And, I still can't believe that you keep telling me that it's not the wild wild west. Like, do you seriously take every single comment that literally? You're like Drax from Guardians of the Galaxy.

I was referring to your country's overall problem with gun violence in general terms. I know that different regions have different laws, cultures etc but America, as a whole, has a massive gun problem. And it's not not necessarily the guns that are the issue. You look at the statistics of all the countries where guns are legal and compare the amount of mass shootings across those countries. America, as a country, is well out in front. Why is that? Perhaps it's the fact that gun laws across the country are not strict enough? Perhaps it's the fact that a lot of Americans are brought up with a military mindset and believe that life's problems can be cured by killing the other guy? Maybe there's not enough effort being put in by authority figures to keep young, disadvantaged kids out of street gangs? Maybe the education system across the country focuses too much on bullshit like trigonometry and other useless subjects and not enough on actual life skills? Maybe it's all of these things and more.

And like I said before on this thread and others, I know there's no easy fix for these issues. But it seems like there's no willingness from those in authority to actually do anything about it. After those shootings last week, your moron of a president blamed violent video games and the rise of immigration. Well, violent video games are sold all over the world and you rarely, if ever, hear of mass shootings in countries like Japan, where these kinds of games are most popular. I'm not even going to get into how stupid his comment on immigration was, besides its clear he was trying to work a tragedy in favour of his agenda so there's really no point going into it. The point I'm making is that rather than actually intervening and doing something that might prevent these kinds of shootings, your own president completely bottled it, proving his own cowardice again. And if your president won't act, how likely is it that local governments will act. After all, if the president gets away with it, why should they rock the boat?

Now, in regards to Chicago, and Chicago alone, that I Bonds law is one of the most ridiculous things I've ever heard of. Getting rid of that law is another thing that may prevent these kinds of shootings, and other crimes in general, in the future. If someone is getting arrested over and over again, this law should no longer apply to them.
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Reply #17 posted 08/14/19 5:57am

2elijah

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EmmaMcG said:

OldFriends4Sale said:



EmmaMcG said:


Jesus, why do people keep talking about cowboys? Hahaha, some people take everything literally. When I said that the gun nuts are wannabe cowboys, I wasn't saying that they were influenced by John Wayne or Lee Van Cleef. I was merely bringing up the fact that gun culture in certain sections of America is a by-product of the old West. Generation after generation has been brought up thinking that its normal to own a gun. Because the constitution tells them so. It's not normal! American gun laws don't help either. A number of people on this very site have claimed to own a gun for the purpose of self defence. One guy even claimed that if someone, who was unarmed by the way, attacked him he would have no hesitatation in shooting that person dead. These kinds of people are allowed to own a gun in America. That's fucking deranged. Like I said before, it's unrealistic to expect people to just "give up their guns". That's never going to happen. But preventing maniacs from purchasing guns legally is not outside the realm of possibility.


LOL because it's not correct love, we are trying to explain that to you. This situation in Chicago is not priviledged WASPs from way back in the early days.


.


Your dealing with different regions of the US: the Union states, the Border states, the Confederate state, the Plain and Territory states and then you had other areas that were different. It's why I try to explain, when dealing with different regions, states, ethnicities etc your going to have very different background reasons. Florida is much different from Texas. Remember the old West was not the same as Georgia, S Carolina, Alabama etc, vs Mississipi which was French territory for a long time and gave us the Creole and Cajun cultures. The slaves, Irish Native and African that escaped to Florida and that regions whole philosophies of laws and beliefs, Wyoming, Utah and certain areas that have 'undocumented' polygamous marriages via the Mormons. I mean it's just different. We haven't even touch on New York state and New York City with all it's boroughs.




.



But again it's not because of the Wild Wild West lol



Well is it normal for people in Switzerland to carry guns everywhere they go?



Yeah guns by nature are not 'normal'.


.


Yeah, if someone attacks you, you don't know how it will turn out, they could kill you. You don't need a gun to kill someone, or disable someone. What about in the case of rape? or home burglaries. Why should their life be more important than yours? Certain places have laws about what you can and cannot do to someone who breaks into your home. The criminal can actually sue you.


.



But again, I'm still trying to get you to understand and just focus on Chicago, IL, if your that interested. Or else we are just talking about the same thing over and over cut in paste conversatiions in every thread.


.


The big issue, with Chicago is a law, the I-BONDS law. Once you get em behind bars, don't make it easy for them to get out again. You have liberals who 'go overboard' for the poor and too often that also encompasses 'criminals'. The lines are blurred.



First things first, don't call me "love". Ever!

Also, what part of "certain sections of America" don't you understand? I know that's not the case across the whole country, which is why I specifically said "certain sections of America". And, I still can't believe that you keep telling me that it's not the wild wild west. Like, do you seriously take every single comment that literally? You're like Drax from Guardians of the Galaxy.

I was referring to your country's overall problem with gun violence in general terms. I know that different regions have different laws, cultures etc but America, as a whole, has a massive gun problem. And it's not not necessarily the guns that are the issue. You look at the statistics of all the countries where guns are legal and compare the amount of mass shootings across those countries. America, as a country, is well out in front. Why is that? Perhaps it's the fact that gun laws across the country are not strict enough? Perhaps it's the fact that a lot of Americans are brought up with a military mindset and believe that life's problems can be cured by killing the other guy? Maybe there's not enough effort being put in by authority figures to keep young, disadvantaged kids out of street gangs? Maybe the education system across the country focuses too much on bullshit like trigonometry and other useless subjects and not enough on actual life skills? Maybe it's all of these things and more.

And like I said before on this thread and others, I know there's no easy fix for these issues. But it seems like there's no willingness from those in authority to actually do anything about it. After those shootings last week, your moron of a president blamed violent video games and the rise of immigration. Well, violent video games are sold all over the world and you rarely, if ever, hear of mass shootings in countries like Japan, where these kinds of games are most popular. I'm not even going to get into how stupid his comment on immigration was, besides its clear he was trying to work a tragedy in favour of his agenda so there's really no point going into it. The point I'm making is that rather than actually intervening and doing something that might prevent these kinds of shootings, your own president completely bottled it, proving his own cowardice again. And if your president won't act, how likely is it that local governments will act. After all, if the president gets away with it, why should they rock the boat?

Now, in regards to Chicago, and Chicago alone, that I Bonds law is one of the most ridiculous things I've ever heard of. Getting rid of that law is another thing that may prevent these kinds of shootings, and other crimes in general, in the future. If someone is getting arrested over and over again, this law should no longer apply to them.


Just read your post. Good points. If we look at poverty in so many communities in America, and if this country actually did something major about it, many youth from these communities, not all, wouldn’t fall prey to gangs, which then means illegal guns getting in their hands, and finding easy, illegal ways to get money, because they’re desperate ‘to have’, ‘to survive’.

For example, within ‘some’ high crime areas of communities like Chicago, they lack the necessary resources that could help prevent the situations, some residents find themselves fighting alone. Having employers/government/real estate investors, etc., build up those communities, instead of building expensive condos and pushing the poor out. Providing the necessary resources for many lower-income to improve their lives. For example, job training, continuing education programs for parents, affordable daycare services, after school programs, mental health/family counseling, improving and funding public schools with up-to-date educational materials/equipment; hire more teachers, and smaller classrooms, free lunch for all students, would help get rid of the shaming towards lower-income kids as being subjected to bullying for not being able to afford lunch.

Often times our country never wants to get to the ‘root of our societal ills’ until a tragedy happens, and we ask why? It’s bad enough so many shut their eyes to the extreme and long history of racism as well. Many rather close their eyes and sugarcoat it. Now look what’s happening because nobody wants to fix or talk about the ugly reality of the big ‘R’, and some are acting out their hate with the gun, as well as, many with anger and depression issues.

America is supposedly a rich country yet we have homelessness, poverty, gun violence and other crimes, failing public education system in many communities, racism, sexism, many corrupt elected officials, just to name a few.


Getting back to the gun issue, unfortunately this is a country obsessed with handling its problems/biases with guns, whether it’s a big or small issue.

Anyway I could go on, but that would take up at least 100 pages. Just wanted to acknowledge the very good points you mentioned in your post, regarding America and guns.
[Edited 8/14/19 6:11am]
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Reply #18 posted 08/14/19 7:03am

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Chicago's Awful Divide

Americans are flocking to big cities to find good jobs—opportunities that remain disproportionately out of reach for the poorest residents already living there.

Alana Semuels

Mar 28, 2018

https://www.theatlantic.c...ty/556649/

CHICAGO—Americans hear a lot these days about the country's urban-rural divide. Rural counties are poorer; urban ones richer. Rural areas are losing jobs; urban ones are gaining them. People with a college education are leaving rural areas. They're moving to urban places.

Behind this divergence lies a straightforward story: The twin forces of globalization and technological change are enriching a handful of big urban areas, while resources are drained from the heartland, leaving it often devoid of opportunity and prosperity. But this neat division, rural versus urban, erases another part of the story of America's changing economy: the pressure that those twin forces are exerting within cities, pulling some people up to the very top while pushing others to an unforgiving bottom. In some prosperous cities, such as Chicago, where the number of wealthy census tracts has grown fourfold since 1970, people at the bottom are struggling as much as they always have, if not more—illustrating that it's not just the white rural poor who are being left behind in today's economy. The disconnect is why Andrew Diamond, the author of Chicago on the Make, has called Chicago "a combination of Manhattan smashed against Detroit."

Like many of America's biggest cities, Chicago has thrived in the globalized world—at least on a superficial level. The evidence is everywhere, from the gleaming office towers and condos going up alongside the river to the prosperous international companies like Motorola Solutions, the whiskey giant Beam Suntory, and GE Healthcare that have relocated their headquarters to downtown. In May, the unemployment rate for the Chicago metropolitan area sank to 4.1 percent, the lowest since the government started tracking it in 1976. (It has since ticked back up to 5.3 percent.) Almost one-quarter of households in the city of Chicago earned more than $100,000 a year in 2016, according to census data. These factors are part of why Chicago was one of just four U.S. cities to be named one of PricewaterhouseCoopers's "Cities of Opportunity," in its periodic report on places that foster economic innovation and "common wellbeing."

But this prosperity isn't filtering down to people like Brastell Travis, a 21-year-old who lives in the city's Englewood neighborhood. Many mainstream economists believe that it should: In theory, people who live in booming cities with a highly educated population will have more opportunities than those in rural areas because the successful workers in cities will spend money, creating jobs for less-educated people. For each new job for an educated worker in a city, five additional jobs are created for people like construction workers, waiters, and hairdressers, according to research by Enrico Moretti, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. Someone like Travis, who has lived in Chicago his whole life, just miles from this growth, should be surrounded by good job opportunities.

Travis couldn't afford college, but he wanted a good, steady job with a solid paycheck, so he decided to become a welder like his grandmother before him. But after taking a 13-week course to get a welding certificate, Travis hasn't been able to find a full-time job in Chicago. He's currently piecing together two part-time jobs that both pay minimum wage. Part of the problem, he told me, is that kids that grow up in neighborhoods like his often don't know how to apply to jobs or where to seek out help. "I think there's not as many resources as there are in other neighborhoods," he told me. Meanwhile, because of where he went to high school, he can't apply for jobs in certain neighborhoods, because he could become a target of violence if he goes to the wrong areas of town, he said.

lead_720_405.jpg?mod=1533691929

Why are large swaths of Chicago's population unable to get ahead? There are two main reasons. The first and most obvious is the legacy of segregation that has made it difficult for poor black families to gain access to the economic activity in other parts of the city. This segregation has meant that African Americans live near worse educational opportunities and fewer jobs than other people in Chicago. City leaders in Chicago have exacerbated this segregation over the years, according to Diamond, channeling money downtown and away from the poor neighborhoods. "Public policies played a huge role in reinforcing the walls around the ghetto," he told me.

The second factor is the disappearance of industrial jobs in factories, steel plants, and logistics companies. Half a century ago, people with little education could find good jobs in the behemoths that dotted Chicago's south and west sides. Now, most of those factories have moved overseas or to the suburbs, and there are fewer employment opportunities here for people without much education. Chicago underscores that it's not just white, rural Americans who have been hard hit by the disappearance of manufacturing jobs.

These two factors have compounded each other, with people stuck in segregated neighborhoods, unable to access the education or job opportunities that could help get them out. Meanwhile, the middle-class black families that once sustained neighborhoods in Chicago continue to leave for even better opportunities—Chicago lost 181,000 black residents between 2000 and 2010, most of them middle-class people who could afford to pick up and move elsewhere—which further widens the gulf between the rich and poor.

The repercussions of missing out on this economic boom are huge for people like Brastell Travis. There are jobs in the suburbs, but he can't get to them to even apply—he doesn't have a car. He can't travel to many neighborhoods in Chicago, he told me, because of gang turf wars that often end up harming innocent people from one neighborhood who end up in another. When he applies to jobs, he's told he needs a college education. "In school, they tell you to go to college, but I don't have the grades," he told me. "They don't tell you how to find a job."

For a long time, Chicago represented a step up for many African Americans. Some 6 million of them left the oppression and violence of the Jim Crow South for industrial cities like Chicago during the Great Migration, which began in 1916. African Americans who settled in northern cities like Chicago, New York, and Detroit earned at least twice as much as those who stayed in the South in 1930, according to work by Leah Boustan, an economics professor at Princeton.

Many jobs were located along rail routes outside of Chicago's central Loop area. By the mid-1950s in North Lawndale, for instance, a predominantly black neighborhood on Chicago's west side, a Western Electric plant employed over 43,000 workers, an International Harvester plant had employed 14,000 workers, and the headquarters of Sears, Roebuck and Company employed 10,000 people, as the Harvard sociologist William Julius Wilson documented in his 1996 book, When Work Disappears. People employed in manufacturing spent money on goods and services, creating jobs in the neighborhoods where they lived. For every black man who worked at a factory, others found jobs at restaurants and grocery stores and shopping centers where manufacturing workers spent their money, most of which were located near where workers lived, in the city's south and west sides.

Of course, not everything was rosy for black Chicago residents, even during manufacturing's heyday. As my colleague Ta-Nehisi Coates documents in his seminal June 2014 cover story, "The Case for Reparations," African Americans with the money to buy homes in Chicago were prevented from doing so by policies like redlining, which made it impossible to get a federally backed loan for homes in majority-black neighborhoods. African Americans were also kept out of certain neighborhoods through racially restrictive covenants—Coates writes that half of Chicago's neighborhoods were effectively off-limits to blacks by the 1940s. At the same time, the Chicago Housing Authority was building public housing in predominantly black neighborhoods, further amplifying segregation. And when black residents did finally begin moving into majority white neighborhoods, real-estate agents encouraged white homeowners to list their homes for sale and decamp for the suburbs, telling them their home values would soon drop.

https://www.theatlantic.c...ty/556649/

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Reply #19 posted 08/14/19 7:07am

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CHICAGO (CBS) — Dozens of people were shot in Chicago over the weekend, including two mass shootings in less than three hours on Sunday. In all, seven people were killed and 46 others were wounded in shootings since Friday evening.More than a dozen people were wounded, one of them fatally, in a pair of mass shootings in the Lawndale neighborhood early Sunday.

The first shooting happened around 1:20 a.m. near Roosevelt and Francisco in Douglas Park.

Police said a group of people was standing in the park, when someone opened fire from a black Chevrolet Camaro. Seven people were wounded:

• A 21-year-old man shot in the groin was taken to Mount Sinai Hospital in critical condition;
• A 25-year-old woman shot in the arm and leg was taken to Mount Sinai, where she was stabilized;
• A 20-year-old man shot in the right side was taken to Stroger Hospital, where he was stabilized;
• A 19-year-old woman shot in the right leg was taken to Stroger, where she was stabilized;
• A 22-year-old woman was taken to Mount Sinai, where she was stabilized;
• A 21-year-old man shot in the left leg was taken to Mount Sinai, where he was stabilized;
• A 23-year-old man shot in the chest and hand took himself to Mount Sinai, where he was stabilized.

Less than three hours later, eight people were shot in Lawndale, near 18th and Kildare around 3:45 a.m., when unknown s hooters opened fire on a large group of people at a block party. One man, 33-year-old Demetrius Flowers, was killed, and seven other people were wounded:

• A 35-year-old man shot in the forehead was taken to Mount Sinai, where he was stabilized;
• A 28-year-old man shot in the hip was taken to Mount Sinai, where he was stabilized;
• A 27-year-old man shot in the foot was taken to Mount Sinai, where he was stabilized;
• A 28-year-old man shot in the leg Mount Sinai, where he was treated and released;
• A 14-year-old boy was shot in the thigh, and was taken to Stroger, where he was stabilized;
• A 21-year-old woman suffered a graze wound to the thumb, and was treated and released at St. Margaret Hospital;
• A 19-year-old woman was shot in the head, and was taken to Stroger, where she was treated and released.

Flowers' father, said it's the second son he's lost to violence.

"Please stop. It's killing our families, it's destroying the fiber of our communities. We have to stop this senseless killing, because if we don't, there's nothing going to be left. There's nothing going to be left," Keith Flowers said.

No one was in custody for either of the mass shootings in Lawndale.

Meantime, the most recent fatal shooting happened around 10:15 p.m. Sunday near 69th and Wentworth in the Greater Grand Crossing neighborhood. Police said the victims were driving south on Wentworth, when someone in a silver sedan pulled up and started shooting.

The driver, a 21-year-old man, then crashed into a light box. He was pronounced dead at the scene, from multiple gunshot wounds to his torso. A 20-year-old woman was shot in the left arm, and was stabilized at the University of Chicago Medical Center.

https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2019/08/05/weekend-gun-violence-mass-shootings/

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Reply #20 posted 08/14/19 7:22am

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RodeoSchro said:

These people were murdered by guns - guns which were almost certainly purchased in the gun-promoting zones of Gary, Indiana or southern Wisconsin.

Or stolen. Illinois and Chicago is big enough for underground sales, that these people don't have to travel to Wisconsin.

I don't think it was here, but I just read a story of a crash and grab where a Gun shop was robbed.

I suspect the murderers/shooters in these cases are legally purchasing guns.

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Reply #21 posted 08/14/19 7:31am

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take conversations all around the world and to other states, but come right back to a defined called out issue in Chicago which has a direct impact on these troubles.

I-BONDS CALLED 'A TICKET TO SELL DRUGS IN CHICAGO'

Matt O'ConnorCHICAGO TRIBUNE

Harvey Lowery, 20, admits he has spent time on the wrong side of the law, selling PCP, an animal tranquilizer known as ''leaf,'' to feed his heroin habit.

He has been arrested so many times he can't remember them all.

''In my life? I don't know, 5, 10, 15, 20 times,'' he says. ''When you're running the streets, getting high, you don't know how many times they lock you up.''

What he does remember is that after some of his most recent arrests he was released from Cook County Jail on a no-cash bond, commonly known as an I- bond.

''I always get the I-bond,'' Lowery brags from his corner hangout at 15th Street and Pulaski Road. ''You get out so fast your mind can't function.''

Records back up at least part of his boast: Twice this year Lowery has been freed from County Jail on no-cash bonds-on Jan. 15 and March 25.

The revolving door at County Jail that lets thousands of offenders back on the street after being locked up a day or two-combined with the high use of drugs-is fueling crime in Chicago, according to Police Supt. LeRoy Martin.

''What the public has to understand is that these people are hoodlums, but they're not stupid,'' Martin said. ''They know the criminal justice system as well as a lot of attorneys.''

For five years, Lowery says, he dealt just enough PCP to pay for his heroin habit. He insists he's straight now.

Lowery proudly declares that he has never been arrested with more than one $10 bag of PCP. After each sale, Lowery says he ran three blocks to where he hid his stash, grabbed another $10 bag and returned to the same corner.

''I know they can't hold you that long'' for possessing one bag, Lowery said. ''I use my head when I'm out there.''

.

''It's extremely frustrating because we know what's causing this, and yet we are powerless,'' Martin said. ''We're making arrests, but we're arresting the same people over again. We're doing our work over and over again. And the public is the one who has to suffer by this breakdown in the system.''

''It's a very serious concern to me,'' Cook County Sheriff James O'Grady, in charge of the jail, said of the high number of drug defendants being freed on I-bonds. ''We're going into a recycling program. It's not an effective means of combating the drug users.''

A Tribune analysis of records from the Cook County Circuit Court clerk relating to 6,160 defendants released on I-bonds from the jail in June, July and August of 1989 shows that one of four defendants was rearrested in the next six months, some as many as 20 times. One out of three defendants jumped bond and didn't appear at the first court date.

The findings are evidence of what law enforcement officials had feared since the I-bond program intensified almost 2 1/2 years ago in response to a federal court order that prohibits jail overcrowding: Drug dealers and users, burglars and thieves released on the bonds continue to commit crimes.

Furthermore, the jail is still bursting at the seams, even though 80,000 defendants have been released on I-bonds in the last 2 1/2 years, some of whom had initially been jailed on $50,000 bonds.

.

''It's been a ticket to deal drugs in Chicago because they know they're going to get an I-bond,'' one jail correctional officer said.

The I-bond program was instituted after U.S. District Judge Milton Shadur found jail officials in contempt of a 1982 federal court order that required a bed be available for each inmate. When jail officials couldn't reduce the crowding, Shadur ordered defendants released on bonds requiring no cash.

.

The numbers of drug arrests-and rearrests-are crushing County Jail and the criminal courts.

Last year the jail booked 71,368 defendants-20,870 of them on drug charges-a 44 percent rise in drug bookings over 1988.

And through the first seven months of 1990, bookings on drug charges rose another 11 percent from the 1989 period.

Total admissions have risen as well, though not as sharply as bookings on drug charges.

Many of the inmates released on I-bonds are charged with drug offenses because that's the single biggest and fastest growing category entering the jail. Three out of every 10 defendants booked into jail are charged with drug offenses.

In addition to drug offenses, inmates charged with non-violent crimes, including theft, burglary, weapons violations, criminal damage to property and aggravated assault, can be freed on I-bonds.

On a Friday night in August, Officers Joseph Gorman, 27, and James Smith, 30, assigned to the Marquette District tactical unit, were looking for a suspect who skipped Narcotics Court that morning. He was released on an I-bond a couple of days before, they said.

.

There were easily 25 people at the suspect's usual hangout, the corner of Kedzie Avenue and 19th Street, as the plainclothes officers drove slowly past in their dusty Chevy Caprice. Despite three separate visits, their suspect was not to be found.

''It gets to the point you know them by their first names,'' Sgt. Michael Divittorio, Gorman's and Smith's supervisor, said of street-level drug dealers.

Gorman, who spends as much as six hours a day in court on drug cases, saw a familiar face Thursday at a preliminary hearing in Narcotics Court: Melvin Stevens, 23, whose record includes arrests for robbery, auto theft, battery and drug possession.

Gorman and Smith had arrested Stevens just two nights earlier after a foot chase and charged him with possession of 14 bags of marijuana laced with PCP. Gorman and Smith had booked Stevens on June 16 on another drug charge.

In court, Stevens was only too happy to tell Gorman how he had gotten out of jail. ''He said on an I-bond,'' Gorman said.

Many dealers learn quickly that carrying too much dope at one time can lead to a stiffer charge, a high cash bond and a long wait in County Jail until trial. It also could mean the difference between probation or prison if convicted.

Standing on the corner of Roosevelt Road and Keeler Avenue is Althatias Goodman, 18, known as ''Sticks'' because of his scrawny build. Goodman was arrested for drug possession last month.

He could have called his girlfriend to pay a $200 cash bond to obtain his release from County Jail. But instead he sat tight.

''I waited for the I-bond,'' he says.

The wait wasn't long. He was freed on an I-bond two days after his arrest.

Nineteen days earlier, Goodman had received an I-bond on a weapons charge, records show.

Presiding Criminal Court Judge Thomas Fitzgerald last year took the unprecedented step of establishing a Night Narcotics Court consisting of five trial courts. The need was clear: In the first half of 1990, drug possession and delivery charges accounted for just under half of the felony cases filed in Cook County's criminal trial division. And that doesn't include offenses such as robberies and burglaries committed by suspected drug users.

Voluntary drug testing at Night Bond Court, where defendants arrested hours earlier appear for bond hearings, has shown extensive drug use among arrestees. In May, 50 percent of the defendants had cocaine in their blood and another 21 percent tested positive for other drugs.

On most mornings in the Criminal Courts Building, police officers pack jury boxes in three courtrooms waiting to testify at preliminary hearings. If the officers are not at Narcotics Court, the cases are usually tossed out.

Martin said his department's 1990 budget for overtime pay for officers'

court time was exhausted by April.

Gorman, in one 28-day period, said he spent an average of five hours a day in court.

Martin keeps an eye out for complacency among his officers, worrying that some might become less aggressive as the flood of I-bonds continues.

''So far we haven't had that, but they're disgusted.''

http://www.chicagotribune...story.html

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Reply #22 posted 08/14/19 9:40am

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OldFriends4Sale said:

RodeoSchro said:

These people were murdered by guns - guns which were almost certainly purchased in the gun-promoting zones of Gary, Indiana or southern Wisconsin.

Or stolen. Illinois and Chicago is big enough for underground sales, that these people don't have to travel to Wisconsin.

I don't think it was here, but I just read a story of a crash and grab where a Gun shop was robbed.

I suspect the murderers/shooters in these cases are legally purchasing guns.



Where do you think the guns that were stolen came from?

You seriously don't think all these hoods are breaking into rich peoples' homes to steal guns they can use on crime sprees, do you?

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Reply #23 posted 08/14/19 9:42am

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RodeoSchro said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Or stolen. Illinois and Chicago is big enough for underground sales, that these people don't have to travel to Wisconsin.

I don't think it was here, but I just read a story of a crash and grab where a Gun shop was robbed.

I suspect the murderers/shooters in these cases are legally purchasing guns.



Where do you think the guns that were stolen came from?

You seriously don't think all these hoods are breaking into rich peoples' homes to steal guns they can use on crime sprees, do you?

do you have evidence that they came from the states you stated?

Did I say they came from rich peoples homes? Why would you use that? I guy I work with (not rich at all) had guns, he talked about them in the local bar he frequents, a few days later, someone broke into his house and stole them. A few were recovered. The others not, and law officials only gave back 1.

How does gun shop equal rich people?

No matter where or how they get the guns, Chicago's big issue is their legal system and the I-BOND clause

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Reply #24 posted 08/14/19 11:23am

RodeoSchro

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OldFriends4Sale said:

RodeoSchro said:



Where do you think the guns that were stolen came from?

You seriously don't think all these hoods are breaking into rich peoples' homes to steal guns they can use on crime sprees, do you?

do you have evidence that they came from the states you stated?

Did I say they came from rich peoples homes? Why would you use that? I guy I work with (not rich at all) had guns, he talked about them in the local bar he frequents, a few days later, someone broke into his house and stole them. A few were recovered. The others not, and law officials only gave back 1.

How does gun shop equal rich people?

No matter where or how they get the guns, Chicago's big issue is their legal system and the I-BOND clause



You'd better believe I have evidence! And I'm not one of those "debaters" who would tell you to do your own research.

BTW - there are no gun shops in Chicago. So whatever gun shop was robbed, wasn't robbed in Chicago.

And it DOES matter how crooks get the guns. If you stop the crooks' gun supply, you stop the gun crimes. That's pretty dang simple logic, wouldn't you agree? (Please don't reply with something like, "But there are so many guns now that what good would it do to stop the flow of more guns?" That's like saying, "We could treat your cancer but there will still be cancer cells in your body, so why bother?")

Here are all the stats you'll ever need re: Where Guns Used In Chicago Crimes Come From.

https://robinkelly.house....-come-from

(From Illinois Congresswoman Robin Kelly's congressional site)


There are no gun shops in Chicago, but the city is inundated with firearms.


Police have seized more than 5,600 illegally-possessed guns in Chicago this year alone, including 60 the weekend of August 3-5, when 66 people were shot and 12 killed between Friday evening and Sunday morning. <snip>

About six in ten “crime guns” seized by Chicago Police originated from gun shops outside of Illinois, according to a 2017 report issued by the department. Crime guns are defined by law enforcement as those that are “illegally possessed, used, or suspected to be used in furtherance of a crime.”


In about 95 percent of cases, the person found in possession of a crime gun is not the original purchaser of the weapon, the report said.

https://www.usnews.com/ne...urder-rate


WHAT ARE THE SOURCES OF ILLEGAL CHICAGO GUNS?


According to the Trace Report, about 40 percent of illegally used or possessed firearms recovered in Chicago from 2013 to 2016 came from dealers in Illinois. The remaining 60 percent came from states with less regulation over firearms. Indiana accounted for about 1 in 5 of these weapons, followed by Mississippi and Wisconsin. The report says these trends have been consistent over the past decade. In the same time span, seven gun or sporting goods stores in Illinois were the top 10 source dealers of recovered weapons in Chicago. Three others were in Indiana.

https://www.nbcchicago.co...16983.html


Nearly 60 percent of guns recovered in Chicago come from out-of-state dealers, with more than 20 percent traced back to Indiana, according to a newly released report on the city’s violence.


The 2017 Gun Trace Report released Sunday also showed that nearly a quarter of the guns recovered in Chicago were sold by just ten federally licensed firearms dealers (seven in Illinois and three in northwest Indiana).


https://www.washingtonpos...came-from/

But as a report released earlier this year by the office of Mayor Rahm Emanuel (D) reveals, most of the guns recovered in Chicago came from outside the state.

Only 40 percent of the guns recovered in the city were purchased in Illinois, the report read, including hundreds purchased at gun shops outside city boundaries. <snip>

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Reply #25 posted 08/14/19 12:59pm

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dude, you are energetic for sure. In none of my posts did I say the gun shop was in Chicago. As I also did not say the guns came from rich peoples homes. Doing this kinda throws things off man. It confuses things...

It doesn't matter, the issue I'm looking at concerning Chicago is their I-Bond law.

thanks for the info, I'll read it after dinner

RodeoSchro said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

do you have evidence that they came from the states you stated?

Did I say they came from rich peoples homes? Why would you use that? I guy I work with (not rich at all) had guns, he talked about them in the local bar he frequents, a few days later, someone broke into his house and stole them. A few were recovered. The others not, and law officials only gave back 1.

How does gun shop equal rich people?

No matter where or how they get the guns, Chicago's big issue is their legal system and the I-BOND clause



You'd better believe I have evidence! And I'm not one of those "debaters" who would tell you to do your own research.

BTW - there are no gun shops in Chicago. So whatever gun shop was robbed, wasn't robbed in Chicago.

And it DOES matter how crooks get the guns. If you stop the crooks' gun supply, you stop the gun crimes. That's pretty dang simple logic, wouldn't you agree? (Please don't reply with something like, "But there are so many guns now that what good would it do to stop the flow of more guns?" That's like saying, "We could treat your cancer but there will still be cancer cells in your body, so why bother?")

Here are all the stats you'll ever need re: Where Guns Used In Chicago Crimes Come From.

https://robinkelly.house....-come-from

(From Illinois Congresswoman Robin Kelly's congressional site)


There are no gun shops in Chicago, but the city is inundated with firearms.


Police have seized more than 5,600 illegally-possessed guns in Chicago this year alone, including 60 the weekend of August 3-5, when 66 people were shot and 12 killed between Friday evening and Sunday morning. <snip>

About six in ten “crime guns” seized by Chicago Police originated from gun shops outside of Illinois, according to a 2017 report issued by the department. Crime guns are defined by law enforcement as those that are “illegally possessed, used, or suspected to be used in furtherance of a crime.”


In about 95 percent of cases, the person found in possession of a crime gun is not the original purchaser of the weapon, the report said.

https://www.usnews.com/ne...urder-rate


WHAT ARE THE SOURCES OF ILLEGAL CHICAGO GUNS?


According to the Trace Report, about 40 percent of illegally used or possessed firearms recovered in Chicago from 2013 to 2016 came from dealers in Illinois. The remaining 60 percent came from states with less regulation over firearms. Indiana accounted for about 1 in 5 of these weapons, followed by Mississippi and Wisconsin. The report says these trends have been consistent over the past decade. In the same time span, seven gun or sporting goods stores in Illinois were the top 10 source dealers of recovered weapons in Chicago. Three others were in Indiana.

https://www.nbcchicago.co...16983.html


Nearly 60 percent of guns recovered in Chicago come from out-of-state dealers, with more than 20 percent traced back to Indiana, according to a newly released report on the city’s violence.


The 2017 Gun Trace Report released Sunday also showed that nearly a quarter of the guns recovered in Chicago were sold by just ten federally licensed firearms dealers (seven in Illinois and three in northwest Indiana).


https://www.washingtonpos...came-from/

But as a report released earlier this year by the office of Mayor Rahm Emanuel (D) reveals, most of the guns recovered in Chicago came from outside the state.

Only 40 percent of the guns recovered in the city were purchased in Illinois, the report read, including hundreds purchased at gun shops outside city boundaries. <snip>

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Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #26 posted 08/14/19 2:13pm

onlyforaminute

I know little to nothing about Chicago culture and its history of mobsters but growing up in the west I would say the wild, wild west mentality is very present across a multitude of cultures. It's in our everyday language, its been updated in our shows. I hadn't even thought about it until i listened to the commentary below but what he said about his daughters is common speech that's said all the time. Gunslinging is woven into the foundation of the culture.

https://www.npr.org/templ...Id=6608070
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Reply #27 posted 08/14/19 2:32pm

uPtoWnNY

OldFriends4Sale said:

Chicago's Awful Divide

Americans are flocking to big cities to find good jobs—opportunities that remain disproportionately out of reach for the poorest residents already living there.

Alana Semuels

Mar 28, 2018

https://www.theatlantic.c...ty/556649/

CHICAGO—Americans hear a lot these days about the country's urban-rural divide. Rural counties are poorer; urban ones richer. Rural areas are losing jobs; urban ones are gaining them. People with a college education are leaving rural areas. They're moving to urban places.

Behind this divergence lies a straightforward story: The twin forces of globalization and technological change are enriching a handful of big urban areas, while resources are drained from the heartland, leaving it often devoid of opportunity and prosperity. But this neat division, rural versus urban, erases another part of the story of America's changing economy: the pressure that those twin forces are exerting within cities, pulling some people up to the very top while pushing others to an unforgiving bottom. In some prosperous cities, such as Chicago, where the number of wealthy census tracts has grown fourfold since 1970, people at the bottom are struggling as much as they always have, if not more—illustrating that it's not just the white rural poor who are being left behind in today's economy. The disconnect is why Andrew Diamond, the author of Chicago on the Make, has called Chicago "a combination of Manhattan smashed against Detroit."

Like many of America's biggest cities, Chicago has thrived in the globalized world—at least on a superficial level. The evidence is everywhere, from the gleaming office towers and condos going up alongside the river to the prosperous international companies like Motorola Solutions, the whiskey giant Beam Suntory, and GE Healthcare that have relocated their headquarters to downtown. In May, the unemployment rate for the Chicago metropolitan area sank to 4.1 percent, the lowest since the government started tracking it in 1976. (It has since ticked back up to 5.3 percent.) Almost one-quarter of households in the city of Chicago earned more than $100,000 a year in 2016, according to census data. These factors are part of why Chicago was one of just four U.S. cities to be named one of PricewaterhouseCoopers's "Cities of Opportunity," in its periodic report on places that foster economic innovation and "common wellbeing."

But this prosperity isn't filtering down to people like Brastell Travis, a 21-year-old who lives in the city's Englewood neighborhood. Many mainstream economists believe that it should: In theory, people who live in booming cities with a highly educated population will have more opportunities than those in rural areas because the successful workers in cities will spend money, creating jobs for less-educated people. For each new job for an educated worker in a city, five additional jobs are created for people like construction workers, waiters, and hairdressers, according to research by Enrico Moretti, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. Someone like Travis, who has lived in Chicago his whole life, just miles from this growth, should be surrounded by good job opportunities.

Travis couldn't afford college, but he wanted a good, steady job with a solid paycheck, so he decided to become a welder like his grandmother before him. But after taking a 13-week course to get a welding certificate, Travis hasn't been able to find a full-time job in Chicago. He's currently piecing together two part-time jobs that both pay minimum wage. Part of the problem, he told me, is that kids that grow up in neighborhoods like his often don't know how to apply to jobs or where to seek out help. "I think there's not as many resources as there are in other neighborhoods," he told me. Meanwhile, because of where he went to high school, he can't apply for jobs in certain neighborhoods, because he could become a target of violence if he goes to the wrong areas of town, he said.

lead_720_405.jpg?mod=1533691929

Why are large swaths of Chicago's population unable to get ahead? There are two main reasons. The first and most obvious is the legacy of segregation that has made it difficult for poor black families to gain access to the economic activity in other parts of the city. This segregation has meant that African Americans live near worse educational opportunities and fewer jobs than other people in Chicago. City leaders in Chicago have exacerbated this segregation over the years, according to Diamond, channeling money downtown and away from the poor neighborhoods. "Public policies played a huge role in reinforcing the walls around the ghetto," he told me.

The second factor is the disappearance of industrial jobs in factories, steel plants, and logistics companies. Half a century ago, people with little education could find good jobs in the behemoths that dotted Chicago's south and west sides. Now, most of those factories have moved overseas or to the suburbs, and there are fewer employment opportunities here for people without much education. Chicago underscores that it's not just white, rural Americans who have been hard hit by the disappearance of manufacturing jobs.

These two factors have compounded each other, with people stuck in segregated neighborhoods, unable to access the education or job opportunities that could help get them out. Meanwhile, the middle-class black families that once sustained neighborhoods in Chicago continue to leave for even better opportunities—Chicago lost 181,000 black residents between 2000 and 2010, most of them middle-class people who could afford to pick up and move elsewhere—which further widens the gulf between the rich and poor.

The repercussions of missing out on this economic boom are huge for people like Brastell Travis. There are jobs in the suburbs, but he can't get to them to even apply—he doesn't have a car. He can't travel to many neighborhoods in Chicago, he told me, because of gang turf wars that often end up harming innocent people from one neighborhood who end up in another. When he applies to jobs, he's told he needs a college education. "In school, they tell you to go to college, but I don't have the grades," he told me. "They don't tell you how to find a job."

For a long time, Chicago represented a step up for many African Americans. Some 6 million of them left the oppression and violence of the Jim Crow South for industrial cities like Chicago during the Great Migration, which began in 1916. African Americans who settled in northern cities like Chicago, New York, and Detroit earned at least twice as much as those who stayed in the South in 1930, according to work by Leah Boustan, an economics professor at Princeton.

Many jobs were located along rail routes outside of Chicago's central Loop area. By the mid-1950s in North Lawndale, for instance, a predominantly black neighborhood on Chicago's west side, a Western Electric plant employed over 43,000 workers, an International Harvester plant had employed 14,000 workers, and the headquarters of Sears, Roebuck and Company employed 10,000 people, as the Harvard sociologist William Julius Wilson documented in his 1996 book, When Work Disappears. People employed in manufacturing spent money on goods and services, creating jobs in the neighborhoods where they lived. For every black man who worked at a factory, others found jobs at restaurants and grocery stores and shopping centers where manufacturing workers spent their money, most of which were located near where workers lived, in the city's south and west sides.

Of course, not everything was rosy for black Chicago residents, even during manufacturing's heyday. As my colleague Ta-Nehisi Coates documents in his seminal June 2014 cover story, "The Case for Reparations," African Americans with the money to buy homes in Chicago were prevented from doing so by policies like redlining, which made it impossible to get a federally backed loan for homes in majority-black neighborhoods. African Americans were also kept out of certain neighborhoods through racially restrictive covenants—Coates writes that half of Chicago's neighborhoods were effectively off-limits to blacks by the 1940s. At the same time, the Chicago Housing Authority was building public housing in predominantly black neighborhoods, further amplifying segregation. And when black residents did finally begin moving into majority white neighborhoods, real-estate agents encouraged white homeowners to list their homes for sale and decamp for the suburbs, telling them their home values would soon drop.

https://www.theatlantic.c...ty/556649/

I get depressed every time I read shit like this, and thankful I had the family structure I did growing up in the South Bronx projects. We lived at St. Mary's, which during my childhood (in the 60s), was considered the cream of the crop. Both my parents worked, my brother & I never suffered for anything, and my folks were able to give us a parochial school education. Many of my friends were in similar situations to mine. Unfortunately, over time, more of the wrong people started moving in and the neighborhood went to shit. The families who had loot like mine moved to the suburbs.

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Reply #28 posted 08/14/19 3:03pm

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onlyforaminute said:

I know little to nothing about Chicago culture and its history of mobsters but growing up in the west I would say the wild, wild west mentality is very present across a multitude of cultures. It's in our everyday language, its been updated in our shows. I hadn't even thought about it until i listened to the commentary below but what he said about his daughters is common speech that's said all the time. Gunslinging is woven into the foundation of the culture. https://www.npr.org/templ...Id=6608070


it's not. in order for that to be, people would have to be a part of that culture. I'm telling you all over and over that that is a certain demographic.
.
Italians for example, were not a part of Americas earlier development, they came over in the early 1900s and and most left and went back to Italy/Sicily others settled in Canada or Brazil. then there was a 2nd wave later. They don't have the 'westerns' history, they do have Mafia history. A lot of people non-Italian are into Italian Mafia culture, Mob life, and that history is heavily a part of Chicago too. You cannot look at this from a far removed perspective. Those of us who live in America, understand the dynamics. We understand the cultures and subcultures. Prince himself was a 'fan' of Mafia movies etc and incorporated some of that in some of his scene.

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Everyone is not gunslinging lol earlies and demographics that have that "Western" heritage will have it. But other parts like the South or North eastern states, were not the wild wild west. Many were farmers, many were in the cities or academic/arts regions. The north eastern Ocean/Sea cultures. 'Gunslinging is not woven into the foundation of American culture. And again, a broad stroked brushing of American culture is not accurate. You cannot say "I know little to nothing about Chicago culture and it's history" and then say but gunslinging is woven into the culture foundation.

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This thread is not about general gun issues. It is about the S side of Chicago. This is no the 'West' it is not the South, it's not the SW. and their 'catch n release' I-BOND law that allows a convicted criminal to walk back on the streets within a short period of time, for free even.

.

I mean what is the point of providing information on the topic if it is waved away in preference for some wild wild west culture.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #29 posted 08/14/19 3:07pm

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uPtoWnNY said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Chicago's Awful Divide

Americans are flocking to big cities to find good jobs—opportunities that remain disproportionately out of reach for the poorest residents already living there.

Alana Semuels

Mar 28, 2018

https://www.theatlantic.c...ty/556649/

CHICAGO—Americans hear a lot these days about the country's urban-rural divide. Rural counties are poorer; urban ones richer. Rural areas are losing jobs; urban ones are gaining them. People with a college education are leaving rural areas. They're moving to urban places.

Behind this divergence lies a straightforward story: The twin forces of globalization and technological change are enriching a handful of big urban areas, while resources are drained from the heartland, leaving it often devoid of opportunity and prosperity. But this neat division, rural versus urban, erases another part of the story of America's changing economy: the pressure that those twin forces are exerting within cities, pulling some people up to the very top while pushing others to an unforgiving bottom. In some prosperous cities, such as Chicago, where the number of wealthy census tracts has grown fourfold since 1970, people at the bottom are struggling as much as they always have, if not more—illustrating that it's not just the white rural poor who are being left behind in today's economy. The disconnect is why Andrew Diamond, the author of Chicago on the Make, has called Chicago "a combination of Manhattan smashed against Detroit."

Like many of America's biggest cities, Chicago has thrived in the globalized world—at least on a superficial level. The evidence is everywhere, from the gleaming office towers and condos going up alongside the river to the prosperous international companies like Motorola Solutions, the whiskey giant Beam Suntory, and GE Healthcare that have relocated their headquarters to downtown. In May, the unemployment rate for the Chicago metropolitan area sank to 4.1 percent, the lowest since the government started tracking it in 1976. (It has since ticked back up to 5.3 percent.) Almost one-quarter of households in the city of Chicago earned more than $100,000 a year in 2016, according to census data. These factors are part of why Chicago was one of just four U.S. cities to be named one of PricewaterhouseCoopers's "Cities of Opportunity," in its periodic report on places that foster economic innovation and "common wellbeing."

But this prosperity isn't filtering down to people like Brastell Travis, a 21-year-old who lives in the city's Englewood neighborhood. Many mainstream economists believe that it should: In theory, people who live in booming cities with a highly educated population will have more opportunities than those in rural areas because the successful workers in cities will spend money, creating jobs for less-educated people. For each new job for an educated worker in a city, five additional jobs are created for people like construction workers, waiters, and hairdressers, according to research by Enrico Moretti, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. Someone like Travis, who has lived in Chicago his whole life, just miles from this growth, should be surrounded by good job opportunities.

Travis couldn't afford college, but he wanted a good, steady job with a solid paycheck, so he decided to become a welder like his grandmother before him. But after taking a 13-week course to get a welding certificate, Travis hasn't been able to find a full-time job in Chicago. He's currently piecing together two part-time jobs that both pay minimum wage. Part of the problem, he told me, is that kids that grow up in neighborhoods like his often don't know how to apply to jobs or where to seek out help. "I think there's not as many resources as there are in other neighborhoods," he told me. Meanwhile, because of where he went to high school, he can't apply for jobs in certain neighborhoods, because he could become a target of violence if he goes to the wrong areas of town, he said.

lead_720_405.jpg?mod=1533691929

Why are large swaths of Chicago's population unable to get ahead? There are two main reasons. The first and most obvious is the legacy of segregation that has made it difficult for poor black families to gain access to the economic activity in other parts of the city. This segregation has meant that African Americans live near worse educational opportunities and fewer jobs than other people in Chicago. City leaders in Chicago have exacerbated this segregation over the years, according to Diamond, channeling money downtown and away from the poor neighborhoods. "Public policies played a huge role in reinforcing the walls around the ghetto," he told me.

The second factor is the disappearance of industrial jobs in factories, steel plants, and logistics companies. Half a century ago, people with little education could find good jobs in the behemoths that dotted Chicago's south and west sides. Now, most of those factories have moved overseas or to the suburbs, and there are fewer employment opportunities here for people without much education. Chicago underscores that it's not just white, rural Americans who have been hard hit by the disappearance of manufacturing jobs.

These two factors have compounded each other, with people stuck in segregated neighborhoods, unable to access the education or job opportunities that could help get them out. Meanwhile, the middle-class black families that once sustained neighborhoods in Chicago continue to leave for even better opportunities—Chicago lost 181,000 black residents between 2000 and 2010, most of them middle-class people who could afford to pick up and move elsewhere—which further widens the gulf between the rich and poor.

The repercussions of missing out on this economic boom are huge for people like Brastell Travis. There are jobs in the suburbs, but he can't get to them to even apply—he doesn't have a car. He can't travel to many neighborhoods in Chicago, he told me, because of gang turf wars that often end up harming innocent people from one neighborhood who end up in another. When he applies to jobs, he's told he needs a college education. "In school, they tell you to go to college, but I don't have the grades," he told me. "They don't tell you how to find a job."

For a long time, Chicago represented a step up for many African Americans. Some 6 million of them left the oppression and violence of the Jim Crow South for industrial cities like Chicago during the Great Migration, which began in 1916. African Americans who settled in northern cities like Chicago, New York, and Detroit earned at least twice as much as those who stayed in the South in 1930, according to work by Leah Boustan, an economics professor at Princeton.

Many jobs were located along rail routes outside of Chicago's central Loop area. By the mid-1950s in North Lawndale, for instance, a predominantly black neighborhood on Chicago's west side, a Western Electric plant employed over 43,000 workers, an International Harvester plant had employed 14,000 workers, and the headquarters of Sears, Roebuck and Company employed 10,000 people, as the Harvard sociologist William Julius Wilson documented in his 1996 book, When Work Disappears. People employed in manufacturing spent money on goods and services, creating jobs in the neighborhoods where they lived. For every black man who worked at a factory, others found jobs at restaurants and grocery stores and shopping centers where manufacturing workers spent their money, most of which were located near where workers lived, in the city's south and west sides.

Of course, not everything was rosy for black Chicago residents, even during manufacturing's heyday. As my colleague Ta-Nehisi Coates documents in his seminal June 2014 cover story, "The Case for Reparations," African Americans with the money to buy homes in Chicago were prevented from doing so by policies like redlining, which made it impossible to get a federally backed loan for homes in majority-black neighborhoods. African Americans were also kept out of certain neighborhoods through racially restrictive covenants—Coates writes that half of Chicago's neighborhoods were effectively off-limits to blacks by the 1940s. At the same time, the Chicago Housing Authority was building public housing in predominantly black neighborhoods, further amplifying segregation. And when black residents did finally begin moving into majority white neighborhoods, real-estate agents encouraged white homeowners to list their homes for sale and decamp for the suburbs, telling them their home values would soon drop.

https://www.theatlantic.c...ty/556649/

I get depressed every time I read shit like this, and thankful I had the family structure I did growing up in the South Bronx projects. We lived at St. Mary's, which during my childhood (in the 60s), was considered the cream of the crop. Both my parents worked, my brother & I never suffered for anything, and my folks were able to give us a parochial school education. Many of my friends were in similar situations to mine. Unfortunately, over time, more of the wrong people started moving in and the neighborhood went to shit. The families who had loot like mine moved to the suburbs.

What do you think could have happened to stop that influx? I mean I've even seen it happen in a suburb that my uncle and his family lived in.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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