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Thread started 08/12/19 6:56pm

OldFriends4Sal
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Russian Nuclear testing...

Asia's China Korea Japan tensions rising, now Russia wants to get in on the tension building.

The blast that killed 5 Russian engineers may have been caused by another failed test of Putin's doomsday missile

A deadly explosion at a missile test site last week may have been caused by a failed test of a nuclear-powered cruise missile, although Russia has yet to say what its engineers were working on at the time of the blast.

Five Russian nuclear scientists were buried Monday after they were killed in an explosion last week. Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation, Russia's state nuclear agency, said they were testing a nuclear-powered engine at the time the blast occurred, BBC reports.

"The rocket tests were carried out on the offshore platform," Rosatom reportedly said in a statement over the weekend. "After the tests were completed, the rocket fuel ignited, followed by detonation. After the explosion, several employees were thrown into the sea."

Rosatom did not clarify what exactly went wrong during testing, explaining only that "there was a confluence of factors, which often happens when testing new technologies."

The Russian defense ministry, by way of Russian state media, said earlier that only two people were killed when a liquid-propellant rocket engine blew up. The story has changed as the death toll has risen, and as some observers spotted a spike in radiation levels; it remains unclear if five is the total death toll from the blast.

The scientists and engineers "tragically died while testing a new special device," Alexei Likhachev, the head of Rosatom, said at the funeral Monday.

AAFIbLQ.img?h=400&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=814&y=315

The men were buried in Sarov, a city known for nuclear research, Bloomberg reports, explaining that experts suspect that what blew up might have been a compact nuclear reactor. Three other individuals were injured by the explosion at Russia's Nyonoksa test range.

"The best thing for their memory will be our further work on the new weapons," Likhachev stated at Monday's funeral. "We are fulfilling the task of the motherland. Its security will be reliably ensured."

US intelligence officials, The New York Times reports, believe that last week's explosion involved a prototype of the 9M730 Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile, a kind of doomsday missile that NATO refers to as SSC-X-9 Skyfall. Several experts have arrived at the same conclusion.

In March 2018, Russian President Vladimir Putin boasted that the missile was "invincible," asserting that the weapon has "an unlimited range, unpredictable trajectory and ability to bypass interception." But, so far, Russia has struggled to get the weapon to fly.

No country has ever fielded a nuclear-powered cruise missile, although the US briefly flirted with the idea decades ago.

"Was this stupid missile worth getting these young men killed?" Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program for the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, rhetorically asked Monday in a Foreign Policy article on the incident.

In the article, he concludes that the weapon tested last week was likely the Burevestnik and argues that an escalating arms race between the US and Russia could lead to more nuclear accidents.

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Reply #1 posted 08/12/19 7:00pm

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Trump: US has better weapons than the 'failed' Russian 'Skyfall' missile

President Trump weighed in on a suspected failed missile explosion in northern Russia, noting U.S. technology is far superior to the "failed" weapon.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trump-us-has-better-weapons-than-the-failed-russian-skyfall-missile/ar-AAFIheN?ocid=spartanntp

The suspected nuclear explosion occurred Thursday off the coast of Russia's Nenoska Missile Test Site, an installation suspected of developing Russia's next generation of advanced missiles. Seven people were reportedly killed.

"The United States is learning much from the failed missile explosion in Russia," Trump tweeted Monday. "We have similar, though more advanced, technology. The Russian 'Skyfall' explosion has people worried about the air around the facility and far beyond. Not good!"

Russian media reported radiation briefly spiked to 200 times the normal rate, according to the New York Times, but these reports were later scrubbed from the websites of Severodvinsk, a small city located 25 miles away from the explosion in Russia's Archangel province. Fears over radiation poisoning caused a run on iodine by local residents, which can protect the thyroid gland from absorbing radiation.

Experts and intelligence officials believe the explosion was the result of a botched test of a nuclear-powered cruise missile known by NATO as the SSC-X-9 Skyfall.

"Our working hypothesis is that the event in Russia yesterday was related to Russia's nuclear-powered cruise missile, the 9M730 Burevestnik (NATO name: SSC-X-9 Skyfall," Jeffrey Lewis, an arms control expert at the Middlebury Institute, said Friday on Twitter. "Possibly a botched recovery effort involving the Serebryanka [...]"

The Serebryanka is a Russian nuclear fuel carrier, which an image from Planet Labs shows was near the test site at the time of the incident. The ship was last reported as of Monday in Murmansk, a port 355 miles from Severodvinsk.

Russia is believed to have conducted a partially successful test of the Skyfall on Jan. 29, preceding the Trump administration's announcement removing the U.S. from the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty on Feb. 2. The missile's small nuclear reactor theoretically makes it capable of traveling across the globe for an indefinite amount of time. It is also believed to be capable of avoiding conventional missile defense systems.

This isn't the first incident involving the Skyfall. Russian Navy ships were sent to search for the remains of a Skyfall missile in August after it landed off the coast of northern Russia in March 2018 during a failed test. Putin unveiled the missile that same month, bragging that it renders defense systems "useless." He went on to make a thinly-veiled threat against the U.S.

"I want to tell all those who have fueled the arms race over the last 15 years, sought to win unilateral advantages over Russia, introduced unlawful sanctions aimed to contain our country's development ... you have failed to contain Russia," he said.

"Nobody listened to us. Well listen to us now."

a man wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone

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Reply #2 posted 08/12/19 7:05pm

lollipop2

OldFriends4Sale said:

Asia's China Korea Japan tensions rising, now Russia wants to get in on the tension building.

The blast that killed 5 Russian engineers may have been caused by another failed test of Putin's doomsday missile

A deadly explosion at a missile test site last week may have been caused by a failed test of a nuclear-powered cruise missile, although Russia has yet to say what its engineers were working on at the time of the blast.

Five Russian nuclear scientists were buried Monday after they were killed in an explosion last week. Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation, Russia's state nuclear agency, said they were testing a nuclear-powered engine at the time the blast occurred, BBC reports.

"The rocket tests were carried out on the offshore platform," Rosatom reportedly said in a statement over the weekend. "After the tests were completed, the rocket fuel ignited, followed by detonation. After the explosion, several employees were thrown into the sea."

Rosatom did not clarify what exactly went wrong during testing, explaining only that "there was a confluence of factors, which often happens when testing new technologies."

The Russian defense ministry, by way of Russian state media, said earlier that only two people were killed when a liquid-propellant rocket engine blew up. The story has changed as the death toll has risen, and as some observers spotted a spike in radiation levels; it remains unclear if five is the total death toll from the blast.

The scientists and engineers "tragically died while testing a new special device," Alexei Likhachev, the head of Rosatom, said at the funeral Monday.

AAFIbLQ.img?h=400&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=814&y=315

The men were buried in Sarov, a city known for nuclear research, Bloomberg reports, explaining that experts suspect that what blew up might have been a compact nuclear reactor. Three other individuals were injured by the explosion at Russia's Nyonoksa test range.

"The best thing for their memory will be our further work on the new weapons," Likhachev stated at Monday's funeral. "We are fulfilling the task of the motherland. Its security will be reliably ensured."

US intelligence officials, The New York Times reports, believe that last week's explosion involved a prototype of the 9M730 Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile, a kind of doomsday missile that NATO refers to as SSC-X-9 Skyfall. Several experts have arrived at the same conclusion.

In March 2018, Russian President Vladimir Putin boasted that the missile was "invincible," asserting that the weapon has "an unlimited range, unpredictable trajectory and ability to bypass interception." But, so far, Russia has struggled to get the weapon to fly.

No country has ever fielded a nuclear-powered cruise missile, although the US briefly flirted with the idea decades ago.

"Was this stupid missile worth getting these young men killed?" Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program for the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, rhetorically asked Monday in a Foreign Policy article on the incident.

In the article, he concludes that the weapon tested last week was likely the Burevestnik and argues that an escalating arms race between the US and Russia could lead to more nuclear accidents.

uh, that report that Russia claimed to already have the missile...had me worried ...but they are only testing it......I hope they never succeed...

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Reply #3 posted 08/13/19 10:54am

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lollipop2 said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Asia's China Korea Japan tensions rising, now Russia wants to get in on the tension building.

The blast that killed 5 Russian engineers may have been caused by another failed test of Putin's doomsday missile

A deadly explosion at a missile test site last week may have been caused by a failed test of a nuclear-powered cruise missile, although Russia has yet to say what its engineers were working on at the time of the blast.

Five Russian nuclear scientists were buried Monday after they were killed in an explosion last week. Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation, Russia's state nuclear agency, said they were testing a nuclear-powered engine at the time the blast occurred, BBC reports.

"The rocket tests were carried out on the offshore platform," Rosatom reportedly said in a statement over the weekend. "After the tests were completed, the rocket fuel ignited, followed by detonation. After the explosion, several employees were thrown into the sea."

Rosatom did not clarify what exactly went wrong during testing, explaining only that "there was a confluence of factors, which often happens when testing new technologies."

The Russian defense ministry, by way of Russian state media, said earlier that only two people were killed when a liquid-propellant rocket engine blew up. The story has changed as the death toll has risen, and as some observers spotted a spike in radiation levels; it remains unclear if five is the total death toll from the blast.

The scientists and engineers "tragically died while testing a new special device," Alexei Likhachev, the head of Rosatom, said at the funeral Monday.

AAFIbLQ.img?h=400&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=814&y=315

The men were buried in Sarov, a city known for nuclear research, Bloomberg reports, explaining that experts suspect that what blew up might have been a compact nuclear reactor. Three other individuals were injured by the explosion at Russia's Nyonoksa test range.

"The best thing for their memory will be our further work on the new weapons," Likhachev stated at Monday's funeral. "We are fulfilling the task of the motherland. Its security will be reliably ensured."

US intelligence officials, The New York Times reports, believe that last week's explosion involved a prototype of the 9M730 Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile, a kind of doomsday missile that NATO refers to as SSC-X-9 Skyfall. Several experts have arrived at the same conclusion.

In March 2018, Russian President Vladimir Putin boasted that the missile was "invincible," asserting that the weapon has "an unlimited range, unpredictable trajectory and ability to bypass interception." But, so far, Russia has struggled to get the weapon to fly.

No country has ever fielded a nuclear-powered cruise missile, although the US briefly flirted with the idea decades ago.

"Was this stupid missile worth getting these young men killed?" Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program for the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, rhetorically asked Monday in a Foreign Policy article on the incident.

In the article, he concludes that the weapon tested last week was likely the Burevestnik and argues that an escalating arms race between the US and Russia could lead to more nuclear accidents.

uh, that report that Russia claimed to already have the missile...had me worried ...but they are only testing it......I hope they never succeed...

Well a few scientists died as a result. And why there are testing is more worrisome than the actual testing. Like Kim Jong Un's test firing.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

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Reply #4 posted 08/13/19 4:41pm

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Trump admin quiet on Moscow protests while defending Hong Kong's demonstrations

The response to Moscow's demonstrations is also in sharp contrast to those in Hong Kong.

The State Department spokesperson issued three statements on Hong Kong, each urging "all sides to exercise restraint and refrain from violence" while underscoring support for protesters' "freedoms of speech and assembly" and expressing concern about the "erosion of Hong Kong's autonomy."

On Monday, a spokesperson reinforced U.S. support for the demonstrations by adding, "[We] remain staunch in our support for freedom of expression and freedom of peaceful assembly in Hong Kong," and urging, "Beijing to adhere to its commitments ... to allow Hong Kong to exercise a high degree of autonomy."

Other Western countries have also been outspoken. Germany's Foreign Minister, for example, called for "all peaceful demonstrators to be released soon" and "all independent candidates who meet the requirements to be allowed to run for election" in a statement on Aug. 4.

The response to Moscow's demonstrations is also in sharp contrast to those in Hong Kong.

The State Department spokesperson issued three statements on Hong Kong, each urging "all sides to exercise restraint and refrain from violence" while underscoring support for protesters' "freedoms of speech and assembly" and expressing concern about the "erosion of Hong Kong's autonomy."

On Monday, a spokesperson reinforced U.S. support for the demonstrations by adding, "[We] remain staunch in our support for freedom of expression and freedom of peaceful assembly in Hong Kong," and urging, "Beijing to adhere to its commitments ... to allow Hong Kong to exercise a high degree of autonomy."

Others in the administration have not been quite as vocal, deferring more to Chinese authority over the territory. Hong Kong is a specially administered region -- a part of China, but with its own capitalist economic system and a degree of political autonomy.

"That's between Hong Kong and that's between China because Hong Kong is a part of China. They will have to deal with that themselves," Trump said on Aug. 1.

Regardless of the U.S. response, both Russia and China have accused the U.S. of interfering in their affairs. Russia summoned a senior U.S. diplomat from the embassy in Moscow over an embassy advisory to U.S. citizens warned about the protests and included a map of their route -- which the Foreign Ministry said amounted to incitement. Beijing has accused Washington of backing protests, which the State Department denied -- a growing spat that escalated Friday with accusations of "thuggish" behavior.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/trump-admin-quiet-on-moscow-protests-while-defending-hong-kongs-demonstrations/ar-AAFI9QJ?ocid=spartanntp

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Law enforcement officers stand guard during a rally to demand authorities allow opposition candidates to run in the upcoming local election in Moscow, Aug. 10, 2019.

Law enforcement officers stand guard during a rally to demand authorities allow opposition candidates to run in the upcoming local election in Moscow, Aug. 10, 2019.

a group of people in uniform: Law enforcement officers detain Daria Sosnovskaya after a rally to demand authorities allow opposition candidates to run in the upcoming local election in Moscow, Aug. 10, 2019.

Law enforcement officers detain Daria Sosnovskaya after a rally to demand authorities allow opposition candidates to run in the upcoming local election in Moscow, Aug. 10, 2019.

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Reply #5 posted 08/14/19 6:54am

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Russian villagers told to leave — no, stay — following missile test explosion

MOSCOW —Four days after a missile carrying nuclear materials exploded on a platform on the White Sea, military officials came to the little nearby village of Nyonoksa and told residents that they should evacuate for a few hours on Wednesday.

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Amid a decided lack of information about the hazards posed by the blast in the northern region of Arkhangelsk, the Russian press and social media leaped on the story.

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Residents told local news organizations that they had been informed this was no big deal but that they should board a train that would take them away. Some said they'd rather walk off into the forest.

It took most of Tuesday for officials to realize how damaging this looked given the nuclear materials involved in the accident. Arkhangelsk Gov. Igor Orlov insisted it wasn't an evacuation but a "routine measure."

Finally, on Tuesday evening, a military spokesman told the Interfax news agency that an unspecified "event" planned for Wednesday had been canceled, thus obviating the need for the evacuation.

About 450 people are said to live in the village, which abuts a military testing range.

The missile blew up Thursday evening, killing five workers from the Federal Nuclear Center. American experts, as well as President Trump, have suggested that it was an experimental nuclear-powered cruise missile designated as Skyfall by NATO and as Burevestnik — or Stormy Petrel — by the Russians.

A resident of Nyonoksa told ArkhangelskOnline that the village has been evacuated before, presumably because of the hazards of tests or other military activity nearby. Several years ago, the resident said, part of a burning missile fell on a house in the village and set it afire.

The website reported that military officials had met with the villagers Monday to tell them they'd have to leave.

"They said that there were no changes in the radiation background and there was nothing to worry about," said the resident, who asked not to be identified. "And that everything is fine both in our village and there, in the military town. The situation is checked by experts."

In Moscow, President Vladimir Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, said "security is fully ensured" for residents in the region by the relevant government agencies.

Local officials conducted a study of soil, sand, river and seawater samples from several points in the region and reported no excess levels of radiation, according to media reports.

A short jump in gamma radiation was detected in the nearby city of Severodvinsk immediately after the explosion, about six to 16 times the usual background dosage, a government agency called Rosprirodnadzor, or the Natural Resources Management Service, told 29.ru.

A website called Dvina Today reported that 10 workers at the Arkhangelsk Regional Clinical Hospital who had treated the victims of the explosion flew to Moscow on Monday evening and were taken to the Federal Medical and Biophysical Center. That is where three nuclear workers who were hurt in the explosion are being treated for burns and other trauma. There was no word on why the Arkhangelsk doctors were taken there.

will.englund@washpost.com

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/russian-villagers-told-to-leave-%e2%80%94-no-stay-%e2%80%94-following-missile-test-explosion/ar-AAFKnBF?ocid=ientp

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Reply #6 posted 08/14/19 1:02pm

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Russia says radiation spiked 4 to 16 times above normal after explosion

The radiation spike that followed the apparent explosion of a nuclear-powered missile engine in Russia -- an event that left seven dead and has been cloaked in secrecy -- was higher than previously indicated by the country's officials, Russian government weather agency on Tuesday said.

The news comes amid conflicting reports that authorities were preparing to evacuate a village close to the Arctic test site where the blast occurred and that doctors who had treated engineers injured in the blast had signed non-disclosure agreements.

Roshydromet, a state weather monitoring body, said Tuesday its sensors in a city near the Nenoksa Missile Test Site on Russia's northern Arctic coast had picked up a spike in background radiation levels four to 16 times above the norm immediately after the blast on Friday when what officials have confirmed was a nuclear-powered missile engine exploded on a floating launch pad. The spike lasted about an hour and half, before levels returned to normal, the agency said.

The spike was still low, but above what Russian authorities said on Sunday, when officials from a nuclear research center noted the spike had been double the norm...

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

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Reply #7 posted 08/14/19 3:31pm

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Russia flies nuclear-capable bombers to region facing Alaska

By Andrew Osborn
2 hrs ago

MOSCOW, Aug 14 (Reuters) - Russia said on Wednesday it had flown two nuclear-capable TU-160 bombers to a far eastern Russian region opposite Alaska as part of a training exercise that state media said showed Moscow's ability to park nuclear arms on the United States' doorstep.

FILE: Russian Tu-160 Supersonic Bomber flies during a military parade marking the Belarus Independence Day in Minsk, Belarus July 3, 2019. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko© Thomson Reuters FILE: Russian Tu-160 Supersonic Bomber flies during a military parade marking the Belarus Independence Day in Minsk, Belarus July 3, 2019. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

The Tupolev TU-160 strategic bomber, nicknamed the White Swan in Russia, is a supersonic Soviet-era aircraft capable of carrying up to 12 short-range nuclear missiles and of flying 12,000 km (7,500 miles) non-stop without re-fueling.

Russia's Ministry of Defence said in a statement that the planes had covered a distance of more than 6,000 km (3,728 miles) in over eight hours from their home base in western Russia to deploy in Anadyr in the Chukotka region, which faces Alaska.

The flight was part of a tactical exercise that would last until the end of this week, it said, and was designed to rehearse the air force's ability to rebase to operational air fields and to practice air-to-air refueling.

Footage released by the Defence Ministry showed the planes taking off in darkness and landing in daylight at an airfield set amid flat grassy terrain in the Russian far east.

The flight comes amid heightened tensions over arms control between Moscow and Washington. The United States withdrew from a landmark nuclear missile pact with Russia this month after determining that Moscow was violating that treaty, an accusation the Kremlin denied.

The U.S. ambassador to Moscow said earlier on Wednesday that another arms treaty, the last major nuclear pact between Russia and the United States, was outdated and flawed and could be scrapped when it expires in 2021 and replaced with something else.

And on Tuesday, the Kremlin boasted that it was winning the race to develop new cutting-edge nuclear weapons despite a mysterious rocket accident last week in northern Russia that killed at least five people and caused a brief spike in radiation levels.

"20 MINUTES FROM ALASKA"

Russian government newspaper Rossiiskaya Gazeta said on its website on Wednesday that the TU-160s' flight showed Moscow's ability to base nuclear bombers within 20 minutes flight time from U.S. territory.

"The distance from Anadyr to Alaska is less than 600 km (372 miles) - for the TU-160 that takes 20 minutes including take-off and gaining altitude," it said.

"Moreover the capabilities of the missiles which the plane carries would allow it to launch them without leaving Russian airspace. If necessary, the bombers' first target could be radar stations and the positions of interceptor missiles which are part of the U.S. missile defense system."

TU-160s, codenamed Blackjacks by NATO, have flown in the past from bases in Russia to Syria where they have bombed forces opposed to President Bashar al-Assad, one of Moscow’s closest Middle East allies.

The Defence Ministry said a total of around 10 TU-160 bombers and TU-95MS and IL-78 planes were involved in the exercise, suggesting it covered other areas too.

Russia is in the process of modernizing the TU-160. President Vladimir Putin last year praised the upgraded version after watching it in flight, saying it would beef up Russia’s nuclear weapons capability.

Ten of the modernized TU-160M nuclear bombers are due to be delivered to the Russian Air Force at a cost of 15 billion roubles ($227 million) each between now and 2027.

Tupolev, the plane’s manufacturer, says the modernized version will be 60 percent more effective than the older version with significant improvements to its weaponry, navigation and avionics.

A similar flight was made a year ago to Anadyr, where state media say the local air field has been modernized to be able to receive bigger planes like the TU-160.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/russia-flies-nuclear-capable-bombers-to-region-facing-alaska/ar-AAFO4uH?ocid=spartanntp

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Reply #8 posted 08/15/19 5:13am

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There are some seriously serious things going on in the world right now.

Open your heart open your mind
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Reply #9 posted 08/17/19 7:25pm

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What a mysterious explosion tells us about Russia's 'doomsday weapon'

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/what-a-mysterious-explosion-tells-us-about-russias-doomsday-weapon/ar-AAFVFiU?ocid=spartanntp

An explosion. An abruptly-canceled village evacuation. Five dead nuclear experts. And a few traces of radioactive iodine in the air over the northern Norwegian coastline.

These are the fingerprints of what appears to have been Russia's latest failed bid to test its Burevestnik missile, also known as Skyfall.

It's claimed by its owner, Russian President Vladimir Putin, to have unlimited range and be able to outflank all US air defenses. But this month, it proved, for a Kremlin keen to emphasize its growing military muscle, yet another high-profile hiccup.

It wouldn't be the first time that a test of the missile wasn't entirely successful, according to US officials.

But what is Skyfall? In truth, analysts don't really know, but their guesswork leads them to believe it's a form of cruise missile designed around a nuclear reactor.

The spiking of radiation levels in the area, potentially reaching as far away as Norway, lends credibility to the theories.

Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, declined to confirm wides...peculation that the accident involved a nuclear-powered cruise missile, but said the mishap would not set back Russian efforts to develop advanced military capabilities.

Peskov said that only experts could speak with authority on such matters, but added: "Accidents, unfortunately, happen. They are tragedies. But in this particular case, it is important for us to remember those heroes who lost their lives in this accident."

Jon Hawkes, associate director of land warfare at Jane's IHS Markit, said the system could work one of two ways. It could be an "air-breathing engine employing a small nuclear reactor core to heat incoming air that is expelled to generate thrust."

Or it could be a "nuclear thermal rocket engine, where the nuclear core is used to heat a liquid fuel such as hydrogen before expelling it through a nozzle to produce thrust."

'Doomsday weapon'

Yet he added, "given the Russians are claiming unlimited range, then one would assume it has to be along the lines of the first option, as the hydrogen fuel device would have a limit to its range."

The major problem with the 9M370, or SSC-X-9 Skyfall (as NATO calls it), is the exhaust. You can't use a nuclear reactor to power a rocket without likely creating a form of dirty bomb on wings.

"This is a doomsday weapon really," said Dr Mark Galeotti, from Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies.

"It's not something that could be deployed in anything other than a full-scale nuclear war. It is a cruise missile that can stay in the air for a long time, but it is belching out radioactive plumes behind it."

The US indeed had a similar program in the 1960s, called Project Pluto, which was abandoned as they concluded it was too dangerous at the time.

When Putin launched the missile with great fanfare in March 2018 he extolled its unlimited range -- that it could circle the globe many times and then fire itself at its target from an unexpected angle, perhaps even days after launch.

Is Putin bothered that it doesn't appear so far to have worked that well? Not really, said Galeotti.

"Vladimir Putin's Russia is basically trying to puff itself up," he said. "It is trying to look more militarily formidable than it is. Although they don't like the fact that this failed, the fact that we are talking about the latest Russian military technology is definitely something of a plus."

US officials told CNN it's been tested a few times, but never fully successfully. How far along the project is, and how big a setback this, is is anyone's guess.

.....

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/what-a-mysterious-explosion-tells-us-about-russias-doomsday-weapon/ar-AAFVFiU?ocid=spartanntp#image=AAFVFiU_1|2

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Reply #10 posted 08/19/19 1:07pm

jaawwnn

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Well, we let the USA have nukes and they have actually used them on civilians in the past so i dont see what the issue is here aside from more wasting of money in Russia and escalating pseudo-red scare tactics in the US.
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Reply #11 posted 08/21/19 10:13am

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HELSINKI (Reuters) - Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that a deadly blast at a military site in northern Russia earlier this month had taken place during a weapons system test.

Speaking alongside Finnish President Sauli Niinisto in Helsinki, Putin said that Moscow could not reveal everything about the blast because of its military nature.

He did not reveal which weapons system was being tested at the time of the blast.

The Russian leader stressed the need for a better system to exchange information on such accidents in the future.

Russia's state nuclear agency said this month that five of its staff members were killed and three others injured in a blast involving "isotope power sources" that took place during a rocket test on a sea platform on Aug. 8.

Putin said this week that there was no risk of increased radiation levels following the blast.

(Reporting by Olesya Astakhova and Anne Kauranen; Writing by Gabrielle Tétrault-Farber; Editing by Andrew Osborn)

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/putin-says-deadly-military-blast-occurred-during-weapons-system-test/ar-AAG7Q25?ocid=ientp

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Reply #12 posted 08/23/19 9:31am

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Putin orders reciprocal Russian response to U.S. missile testBy Andrew Osborn and Anton Kolodyazhnyy

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday ordered a like-for-like response to a recent U.S. missile test, which he said showed that Washington aimed to deploy previously banned missiles around the world.

The Pentagon said on Monday it had tested a conventionally-configured cruise missile that hit its target after more than 500 km (310 miles) of flight, its first such test since the demise of a landmark nuclear pact this month.

Washington formally withdrew from the Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) on Aug. 2 after accusing Moscow of violating it, a charge dismissed by the Kremlin.

The pact had prohibited land-based missiles with a range of 310-3,400 miles, reducing the ability of both countries to launch a nuclear strike at short notice.

Putin told his Security Council on Friday that Russia could not stand idly by, and that U.S. talk of deploying new missiles in the Asia-Pacific region "affects our core interests as it is close to Russia's borders".

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said this month he was in favor of placing ground-launched intermediate-range missiles in Asia relatively soon, and Putin complained this week that the United States was now in a position to deploy its new land-based missile in Romania and Poland.
"All this leaves no doubts that the real intention of the United States (in exiting the INF pact) was to ... untie its hands to deploy previously banned missiles in different regions of the world," said Putin.

"We have never wanted, do not want and will not be drawn into a costly, economically destructive arms race. That said, in the light of unfolding circumstances, I'm ordering the Defence Ministry, the Foreign Ministry and other appropriate agencies to analyze the threat to our country posed by U.S. actions, and to take exhaustive measures to prepare a reciprocal response."

Despite his order, Putin said Russia remained open to talks with the United States aimed at restoring trust and strengthening international security.

The United States has said it has no imminent plans to deploy new land-based missiles in Europe.

(Additional reporting by Anastasia Teterevleva and Maria Kiselyeva; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/putin-orders-reciprocal-russian-response-to-us-missile-test/ar-AAGdUgH?ocid=ientp

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

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What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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