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Reply #30 posted 08/25/19 2:23pm

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Hong Kong police turn water cannon on protesters, fire tear gas

https://www.msn.com/en-us...spartanntp

HONG KONG, Aug 25 (Reuters) - Hong Kong police fired tear gas and water cannon amid running battles with brick-throwing protesters in driving rain on Sunday after violent clashes a day earlier in which police fired tear gas for the first time in more than a week.

At least six petrol bombs were thrown by protesters, some of whom took off down narrow side streets. The water cannon, which had not been used in years of anti-government protests, could not follow.

The Chinese-ruled city's MTR rail operator had suspended some services to try to prevent people gathering but the protesters, calling for democracy for the former British colony, made it to a sports stadium in the vast container port of Kwai Chung, from where they marched to nearby Tsuen Wan.

Some dug up bricks from the pavement and wheeled them away to use as ammunition, others sprayed detergent on the road to make it slippery for the lines of police. Clashes spread in many directions.

The vast majority marched peacefully.

Police had warned earlier they would launch a "dispersal operation" and told people to leave. Hundreds remained long after dusk fell, discussing what to do next, surrounded by empty tear gas canisters, bricks, metal railings and other debris.

"Some radical protesters have removed railings ... and set up barricades with water-filled barriers, bamboo sticks, traffic cones and other objects," they said in a statement.

"Such acts neglect the safety of citizens and road users, paralyzing traffic in the vicinity," the statement said.

Activists threw petrol bombs and bricks on Saturday in the gritty industrial district of Kwun Tong, on the east of the Kowloon peninsula.

'LAST CHANCE'

M. Sung, a 53-year-old software engineer in a black mask emblematic of the many older, middle-class citizens at the march, said he had been at almost every protest and would keep coming.

"We know this is the last chance to fight for 'one country, two systems', otherwise the Chinese Communist Party will penetrate our home city and control everything," he said.

"If we keep a strong mind, we can sustain this movement for justice and democracy. It won’t die," Sung said.

Protesters say they are fighting the erosion of the "one country, two systems" arrangement under which Hong Kong returned to China in 1997 with the promise of continued freedoms not enjoyed on the mainland for 50 years.

The protests, which started over a now-suspended extradition bill, have rocked Hong Kong for three months and plunged the city into its biggest political crisis since the handover.

They also pose a direct challenge for Communist Party leaders in Beijing, who are eager to quell the unrest ahead of the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on Oct. 1.

Beijing has sent a clear warning that forceful intervention is possible, with paramilitary forces holding drills just over the border.

Transport to the airport appeared normal on Sunday, despite protesters' plans for a day-long "stress test" of transport in the international aviation and financial hub.

Police said they strongly condemned protesters "breaching public peace" and that 19 men and 10 women had been arrested after Saturday's violence. More than 700 have been arrested since the demonstrations began in June.

The neighboring gambling territory of Macau, a former Portuguese colony that returned to Chinese rule in 1999, elected former legislature head Ho Iat Seng as its leader on Sunday - the sole approved candidate.

Ho, who has deep ties to China, is expected to cement Beijing's control over the "special administrative region," the same status given to Hong Kong, and distance it from the unrest there.

Slide 1 of 50: Policemen clash with demonstrators on a street during a protest in Hong Kong, on Aug. 25.

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Reply #31 posted 08/26/19 7:55am

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Odd how the right is not condemning the violence.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #32 posted 08/26/19 8:10am

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2freaky4church1 said:

Odd how the right is not condemning the violence.

i think post #6 might hint to it

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Reply #33 posted 08/26/19 8:14am

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Hong Kong Officer Fires Shot, and Police Use Water Cannons at Protest

Slide 1 of 50: A demonstrator throws back a tear gas canister as they clash with riot police during a protest in Hong Kong, China, August 24, 2019. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

HONG KONG — Hong Kong police officers on Sunday drew pistols on protesters who were charging them with sticks, and one fired a warning shot into the air after another officer fell, as a weekend of violent clashes brought an end to nearly two weeks of restraint.

The police on Sunday fired rounds of tear gas and plastic bullets at protesters who threw bricks and firebombs. They also used water cannon trucks for the first time since protests began in June. What were initially demonstrations over an unpopular bill that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China have since expanded to include demands for greater democracy in the semiautonomous Chinese region.

The confrontations in the Tsuen Wan area followed a peaceful march by over 10,000 people. But in a pattern that has been established for months, more aggressive protesters began building barriers on city streets using sidewalk railings and bamboo poles. Soon, large numbers of police officers in riot gear arrived.

By early evening, the air was swirling with tear gas. The police unleashed water cannons against barriers and in the general direction of protesters.

“I don’t totally agree with what students do now, such as throwing bricks,” said Celine Wong, 38, a nurse at a private clinic who joined the march. “However, what they do is eclipsed by the violence performed by the government now.”

As the protest appeared to subside at night, a small group of demonstrators smashed up the entryway of a mah-jongg parlor they said had sheltered men who had attacked them weeks earlier. Then a group clashed with the police.

Jay Lau, 30, said he saw a small group of officers fighting with protesters wielding bamboo sticks and metal rods. The protesters were pushing the officers down Sha Tsui Road when, suddenly, Mr. Lau said, he heard a gunshot. He said he did not see who fired.

a group of people in uniform: Police officers aimed guns at protesters in the Tsuen Wan district of Hong Kong on Sunday. The confrontations followed a peaceful march by more than 10,000 people.

Speaking to reporters early Monday, a police spokeswoman said that six officers raised their revolvers, and that one fired a warning shot into the air after the protesters had put the officers’ lives in danger.

“The escalating illegal and violent acts of radical protesters are not only outrageous, they also push Hong Kong to the verge of a very dangerous situation,” the police said in a statement.

The episode mirrored a similar encounter in 2016, when a police officer drew his gun and fired into the air after a colleague was charged by protesters.

Earlier Sunday, people who said they were relatives of the Hong Kong police rallied under pouring rain to criticize the government for its inability to find a solution to the crisis that has left front-line officers clashing with protesters for weeks on end.

The protests began in June over a bill that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China. Since suspending the legislation that set off the protests, Hong Kong’s leader, Carrie Lam, has done little to respond to the protests, leaving the police force as the most public face of the government.

The protest by police supporters on Sunday was small, with about 200 people attending, and police officials said it did not represent the views of the whole force. But the organizers’ concerns that respect for the police force is eroding can be seen in confrontational protests, when officers are often bombarded with abuse from residents and bystanders.

Ivy Yuen, 40, works for a trading company in Hong Kong and has regularly attended this summer’s protests. But she came to the police families’ rally on Sunday because, she said, she could sympathize with the difficult position that officers had found themselves in.

“There are still some good policemen working for Hong Kong,” she said. “Unfortunately, the government chooses not to do anything.”

“We are all so helpless in this moment,” she continued, “everybody in Hong Kong: those against the protesters, the protesters themselves, the police, everybody.”

A march on Saturday ended with the police fir...protesters who had thrown rocks and at least one gasoline bomb. That clash ended a nearly two-week period of relative calm that saw some standoffs, but not the use of tear gas.

It also followed two large, peaceful demonstrations that showed the continued strength and unity of the protest movement: a march by hundreds of thou...e week ago and the formation of human chains, illuminated by cellphone lights, across miles of Hong Kong on Friday.

The police said that in Saturday’s protests, they arrested 19 men and 10 women, ages 17 to 52, during dispersal operations in the Kwun Tong, Wong Tai Sin and Sham Shui Po neighborhoods. A friend of Ventus Lau, the organizer of the Kwun Tong march, said he had also been arrested.

On Sunday, the police arrested 36 people, ages 12 to 48.

The rally by supporters of the police, organized under the slogan “We Are Not Enemies,” criticized the government’s use of the police force to manage a political crisis. Its organizers called for an independent...nvestigate the cause of the protests and the official response, and said that misbehavior by some officers was causing the relationship between police officers and the public to “fall into a tragic abyss.”

Police commanders distanced the force from the event. Foo Yat-ting, a senior police superintendent, said, “It does not represent the police force or the four police associations at all.”

a group of people standing in front of a building: A police vehicle equipped with a water cannon in Tsuen Wan on Sunday. It was the first time since since the protests began that the trucks were used.

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https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/hong-kong-officer-fires-shot-and-police-use-water-cannons-at-protest/ar-AAGiIup?ocid=spartanntp

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Reply #34 posted 08/26/19 8:16am

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a group of people on a city street: In a pattern that has been established for months, more aggressive protesters began building barriers on city streets.

Slide 6 of 50: Riot police officers raise a warning flag as they stand guard during a protest in Hong Kong, China, August 25, 2019.

Slide 7 of 50: Policemen clash with demonstrators on a street during a protest in Hong Kong, on Aug. 25.

Slide 10 of 50: Demonstrators, some using laser pointers toward police lines during a protest on Aug. 25.

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Reply #35 posted 08/27/19 7:02pm

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In Hong Kong, Life Goes On (Despite the Whiff of Tear Gas)

HONG KONG — Most of Hong Kong’s newspapers carried the same photo on their front pages Monday: a police officer in riot gear, his eyes wide, pointing a revolver at protesters. The photo, also beamed around the world on satellite television, captured a single, electrifying moment in months of demonstrations, which have often been described as “paralyzing” and “roiling” this city of seven million people.

AAGou4Z.img?h=351&w=624&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=1178&y=645

© Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times The Mong Kok district in Hong Kong on Tuesday. “Just because Hong Kong has a huge problem now doesn’t mean we have to put our lives on hold,” a fish ball vendor said. “We are all worried, but life goes on.”

.

But other images tell another, less tantalizing version of events: that despite the protests, life is proceeding relatively normally.

In a video recorded by a New York Times reporter, students in a baking class barely batted an eye last weekend when black-clad protesters surrounded their classroom in a shopping mall. In a photo that spread across social media this month, a man at a street stall nonchalantly purchased fish balls, a popular snack, as smoke from a tear-gas canister swirled around him.

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In short: This bastion of capitalism on China’s southern coast is still going about its business. The ATMs are dispensing cash. The stock market is filling orders, although it has lost $300 billion in market value since June and many economists predict the territory could soon fall into recession.

AAGou53.img?h=351&w=624&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=765&y=502

High-end restaurants are taking reservations. Street vendors are hawking their wares. And with few — but very notable — exceptions, the trains are running on time and the airport, the world’s seventh busiest, is operational. (Protesters, however, have vowed to disrupt the airport again on Sunday.)

Lawyers, civil servants, accountants, teachers and aviation employees have all held demonstrations in recent weeks — an indication of broad antigovernment sentiment — only to return to their jobs after a few hours, a sign that showing up to work is still a priority. Citywide transportation shutdowns and days-long general strikes have yet to materialize. The school year is set to start next week, right on schedule.

“Yes, of course people are still eating and working,” said Jeffrey Mok, 33, an employee at a roadside fish ball shop in Kowloon. “Those office workers who buy their breakfast here still come every morning, and they go to work just like that.”

“Just because Hong Kong has a huge problem now doesn’t mean we have to put our lives on hold,” he said, summing up the sentiment of many. “We are all worried, but life goes on.”

The worries are real. Most residents have seen nothing like this in their lifetime. The “one country, two systems” arrangement under which China took back the onetime British colony in 1997, promising decades of freedom and relative autonomy, has never looked so fragile.

And yet the city goes on. So confident are the protesters that its ubiquitous 7-Elevens and McDonald’s outlets will stay open, no matter the chaos, that the former is relied on as a dispensary of umbrellas (surprisingly good at repelling tear gas canisters), while vouchers to the latter are often distributed at marches to feed and hydrate weary protesters.

AAGnnCH.img?h=351&w=624&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

For many of the hundreds of thousands of residents who have joined the protests, demonstrating is a weekend activity. Come Monday, everyone goes back to work.

“Our lives are actually still very normal on weekdays,” said Karen Lau, 22, a university student. “Just last Friday, I went to do my nails with my close friend and then we had Japanese food. It sounds funny, because the very next day we were facing tear gas and risking our lives in Kwun Tong. I think this is what’s unique about our protest this time. We are all ordinary people living our ordinary little lives.”

Hong Kongers may be willing to rock the boat, but for now, they are unwilling to capsize it. Beijing also seems unwilling to push the envelope too far, advancing a policy of stalemate rather than risk a bloody crackdown.

Even the local government seems torn between describing the protests as a growing menace and a contained exercise. Soon after the State Department issued a warning to American travelers visiting Hong Kong, officials here said the city remained a welcoming place for visitors and had a long tradition of peaceful protests.

“The impact of these illegal confrontations is confined to a limited area near the procession routes, and is not widespread,” the government said in a statement.

Despite Beijing’s claim that the protesters are attempting to foment a ...revolution,” similar to those that upended governments in the Middle East and Eastern Europe, there are, as of now, no signs of the political instability or breakdown in civil society that were hallmarks of those events.

None of which is to say that the protests have been small or unsuccessful. Nor is it to say they have not taken a toll on the economy, or descended into violence.

Shops may be open for business, but those catering to foreign tourists and mainland Chinese visitors have been particularly pinched. Luxury brands, hotels and airlines have seen, or expect to see, a decline in business. Visitors are expected to put off traveling to the city because of the protests, which the authorities have characterized as “riots.” Even Trevor Noah, the host of “The Daily Show,” cited the protests when he canceled a comedy show here this month.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/in-hong-kong-life-goes-on-despite-the-whiff-of-tear-gas/ar-AAGomtw?ocid=spartanntp

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Reply #36 posted 09/09/19 5:36am

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Hong Kong school students form human chain after weekend of protests

By Joe Brock and Jessie Pang

Calif. boat fire: Owners blame insurers for suit to cap payout

HONG KONG, Sept 9 (Reuters) - Hundreds of secondary school students, many wearing masks with their uniforms, formed human chains in districts across Hong Kong on Monday in support of anti-government protesters after another weekend of clashes in the Chinese-ruled city.

© Anthony Kwan/Getty Images HONG KONG, CHINA - SEPTEMBER 9 : Students hold hands as they take part in a join school human chain event on September 9, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Pro-democracy protesters have continued demonstrations across Hong Kong despite the withdrawal of a controversial extradition bill as demonstrators call for the city's Chief Executive Carrie Lam to immediately meet the rest of their demands, including an independent inquiry into police brutality, the retraction of the word Riot to describe the rallies, and the right for Hong Kong people to vote for their own leaders.



Metro stations which had closed on Sunday amid sometimes violent confrontations reopened, although the mood in the Asian financial hub remained tense.

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The Hong Kong government warned foreign lawmakers not to interfere in the internal affairs of the former British colony after thousands of protesters called on U.S. President Donald Trump to "liberate" the city.

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Chinese state media on Monday said Hong Kong was an inseparable part of China and any form of secessionism "will be crushed."

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The China Daily newspaper said Sunday's rally was proof foreign forces were behind the protests and warned demonstrators should "stop trying the patience of the central government."

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Three months of protests over a now withdrawn extradition bill have evolved into a broader backlash against the government. Many activists are angry over Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam's refusal to grant an independent inquiry into accusations of police brutality during demonstrations.

The protesters' other demands include the retraction of the word "riot" to describe demonstrations, the release of all those arrested and the right for Hong Kong people to choose their own leaders.

Joshua Wong, one of the leaders of the pro-democracy "Umbrella" movement five years ago, was due to appear in court on Monday for breaching bail conditions following his arrest in August when he was charged with inciting and participating in an unauthorized assembly.
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Hong Kong returned to China in 1997 under a "one country, two systems" formula that guarantees freedoms not enjoyed on the mainland. Many Hong Kong residents fear Beijing is eroding that autonomy.

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China denies the accusation of meddling and says Hong Kong is an internal affair. It has denounced the protests, accusing the United States and Britain of fomenting unrest, and warned of the damage to the economy.

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"The United States continues to monitor events in Hong Kong," said a senior U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity.

"The freedoms of expression and assembly are core values that we share with the people of Hong Kong, and those freedoms must be vigorously protected. As the President has said: 'they're looking for democracy and I think most people want democracy'."
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http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

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Reply #37 posted 09/10/19 6:25am

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The extradition bill HAS NOT BEEN WITHDRAWN. Despite the media glaze, what Carrie Lam said was that she would begin the process to withdraw it.

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Reply #38 posted 09/10/19 12:34pm

poppys

Hong Kong (CNN)Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam has warned the United States and other countries against interfering in the city's domestic affairs, two days after thousands of protesters gathered outside the US consulate to ask President Donald Trump to "liberate" the city.

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Reply #39 posted 09/10/19 4:05pm

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Oddly Protests are like antifa.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #40 posted 09/14/19 5:57pm

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Hong Kong police break up scattered clashes between rival protesters

By Clare Jim and Poppy McPherson

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Baton-wielding Hong Kong police moved in to break up scuffles on Saturday between pro-China protesters and those denouncing perceived Chinese meddling in the Asian financial hub, the latest in months of sometimes violent clashes.

The pro-China demonstrators chanted "Support the police" and "China, add oil" at a shopping mall, adapting a line used by anti-Hong Kong government protesters and loosely meaning: "China, keep your strength up".

"Hong Kong is China," one woman shouted at passersby who shouted obscenities in return in an angry pushing and pulling standoff, marked more by the shouting than violence.

The clashes in the Kowloon Bay area of the Hong Kong "special administrative zone" of China spilled out onto the streets, with each confrontation captured by dozens of media and onlookers on their smart phones. Police detained several people.

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But the unrest was minor compared with previous weeks when anti-government protesters have attacked the legislature and Liaison Office, the symbol of Chinese rule, trashed metro stations and set street fires. Police have responded with tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannon.

Protesters complaining about perceived Chinese interference in the former British colony came out in their hundreds across the territory on Friday, singing and chanting on the Mid-Autumn Festival.

They have also gathered in malls, with occasional scuffles with flag-carrying China supporters, often denouncing police for perceived brutality.

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On Saturday, anti-government protesters also gathered in the northwestern New Territories district of Tin Shui Wai, with a brief standoff with police. There were scattered scuffles between rival protesters elsewhere, including in the Fortress Hill area of Hong Kong island.

"We need to keep coming out to tell the government to respond to our five demands, otherwise it will think we accept the withdrawal (of an extradition bill)," said protester Mandy, 26, in Tin Shui Wai, where crowds, a few waving the U.S. Stars and Stripes, shouted: "Liberate Hong Kong."

The spark for the anti-government protests was the now-withdrawn bill and concerns that Beijing is eroding civil liberties, but many young protesters are also angry about sky-high living costs and a lack of job prospects.

Their four other demands are: retraction of the word "riot" to describe rallies, release of all detained demonstrators, an independent inquiry into perceived police brutality and the right for Hong Kong people to choose their own leaders.

The extradition bill would have allowed people to be sent to mainland China for trial in Communist Party-controlled courts, despite Hong Kong having its own much-cherished legal system.

Hong Kong returned to China in 1997 under a "one country, two systems" formula that guarantees freedoms not enjoyed on the mainland.

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A police officer looks on as he blocks the road as anti-government protesters gather in Tin Shui Wai in Hong Kong

a person wearing a helmet: Police officers block the road as anti-government protesters gather in Tin Shui Wai in Hong Kong

a group of people playing instruments and performing on a stage: A protester is detained by the police officers at Amoy Plaza shopping mall in Kowloon Bay, Hong Kong

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: A protester is detained by the police officers at Amoy Plaza shopping mall in Kowloon Bay, Hong Kong

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Reply #41 posted 09/14/19 5:59pm

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a group of stuffed animals: Pro-China demonstrators hold Chinese national flags at Amoy Plaza shopping mall in Kowloon Bay, Hong Kong

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Reply #42 posted 09/16/19 5:18am

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100 days in: How Hong Kongers sustain protests with creativity

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[url]http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/100-days-in-how-hong-kongers-sustain-protests-with-creativity/ar-AAHlxkX?ocid=ientp#image=AAHlxkX_1|7[iurl]

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With Hong Kong shaken by 100 days of huge pro-democracy protests, activists have adopted a host of creative ways to fuel their movement away from the barricades.

From laser pen light shows, to flashmob singalongs and human chains, we look at some of the inventive methods embraced by a movement that shows no signs of abating.

- Flashmob singalongs -

Music has long played a prominent role in Hong Kong's years of democracy rallies.

The tune that received the most traction early on in this summer's protests was the catchy Christian hymn "Sing Hallelujah to the Lord" as well as "Do you hear the people sing?" from the musical "Les Miserables".

But in the last fortnight a new anthem has been embraced with gusto.

"Glory to Hong Kong" was written by an anonymous composer and has gone viral, its defiant lyrics repeatedly belted out at protests, nightly flashmob concerts in city malls and even football matches.- Laser shows -

Laser pointers were initially used by frontline protesters to indicate police positions, distract officers and stop people from taking photos or videos.

But they were adopted en masse after a student leader with 10 laser pens in his bag was arrested for possession of an offensive weapon.

Since then demonstrators have held "lightshows" outside of police stations and at most public gatherings, lending the protests a somewhat surreal disco-vibe once the sun sets.

AAHmKJr.img?h=582&w=1119&m=6&q=60&u=t&o=f&l=f

- Human chains -

Human chains were first adopted in late August on the 30th anniversary of the Baltic Way, when more than a million people linked arms in huge anti-Soviet Union demonstrations.

The symbol caught on. Tens of thousands have taken part in human chains across the city in recent weeks, some formed on top of famous hills such as the Peak and Lion Rock. Secondary school students have also formed them each morning before classes.

- Crowd-funding -

Several online crowd-funding campaigns have been hugely successful.

Two campaigns raised over HK$21 million ($2.7 million) to place adverts in major international newspapers.

"By placing ads internationally, we can break through the filter of the media and show the world the truth underneath the government propaganda," a campaign co-organiser, who gave his name as Taylor, told AFP.

Other campaigns have raised money to build a four-metre-tall statue called "Lady Liberty Hong Kong" and to provide defence funds for the some 1,400 people arrested.

- Lennon Walls -

Plastered in colourful sticky-notes, posters and slogans, "Lennon Walls" have sprung up in more than a hundred locations across the city, often in pedestrian tunnels or near subway stations.

The first Hong Kong wall appeared during huge pro-democracy protests in 2014 and was a local take on a public graffiti wall in Prague that appeared after the 1980 murder of John Lennon.

When crowds of government supporters tore down a Lennon Wall outside the city's parliament early on in this summer's protests, democracy activists simply created new ones in their local neighbourhoods. Walls are still being torn down by opponents but they reappear within hours.

- 10pm chanting -

Hong Kongers have taken to shouting protest slogans from their apartments each night at 10pm, inspired by cacerolazos, a form of protest that emerged in authoritarian Chile during the 1970s and has since been adopted by multiple dissent movements.

In a city renowned for the highest concentration of skyscrapers in the world, the chanting is particularly effective, with popular slogans such as "Liberate Hong Kong, revolution now" and "No rioters, only tyranny" bouncing off buildings and echoing through neighbourhoods.

- Mooncakes -

Traditionally given during the mid-autumn festival, these dense pastries have been given a protest makeover. One bakery has sold tens of thousands of cakes which sport popular protest slogans on their crusts.

- Protest art -

Painting, calligraphy, comic strips, sculptures -- Hong Kongers have been working around the clock to provide an artistic backdrop to their protests.

Much of the art is distributed in a highly modern fashion -- shared on online forums or pinged to people's phones using Bluetooth and Airdrop.

It is not unusual for someone's phone to receive multiple digital flyers and posters each day, especially on the subway.

Soon the same artworks are printed and placed on the city's Lennon Walls, which have become a constantly evolving canvas of dissent.

- Flags -

Small groups of protesters have waved the flags of Britain, colonial era Hong Kong and the United States.

But by far the most common flag is the "wilted bauhinia" -- a twist on Hong Kong's official flag, a white bauhinia flower on a red backdrop.

The new flag has turned the backdrop black, to reflect the mood of the streets, and the bauhinia flower is wilted and blood-stained.

Australian-based Chinese dissident artist Badiucao, who draws daily cartoons for the protest movement, has also created a flag of rainbow-coloured squares, meant to symbolise the Lennon Walls.

Another popular emblem directed at Beijing is dubbed "Chinazi" -- a red flag with yellow stars in the shape of a swastika.

- 'Be water' -

Inventiveness has been a core principle of the protests themselves with the phrase "Be water" commonly chanted.

The slogan references a philosophy of unpredictability espoused by local kung fu legend Bruce Lee and encourages protesters to keep mobile in a bid to stretch police resources and avoid mass arrests.

Protesters have also found creative ways to hold rallies that are banned, portraying them instead as opportunities to go window shopping, hold picnics or gather for religious meetings.

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#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #43 posted 09/16/19 5:19am

OldFriends4Sal
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#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #44 posted 09/16/19 5:24am

OldFriends4Sal
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I so respect the 'style' at which the Chinese protest

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
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