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Thread started 08/11/19 7:29pm

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Hong Kong Protests

What Travelers Need to Know About the Hong Kong Protests

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/what-travelers-need-to-know-about-the-hong-kong-protests/ar-AAD4l9n?ocid=spartanntp

Over the past two months, protesters have filled Hong Kong’s streets, blocking roads and demonstrating against Hong Kong’s top official, chief executive Carrie Lam, who attempted to pass an extradition bill in June that many say would weaken the protections around those who live in the semi-autonomous territory.

Organizers say an unverified estimated 2 million people demonstrated peacefully on Sunday, June 16, according to the New York Times, following a smaller protest on Wednesday, June 12, that turned violent. (Hong Kong has a population of slightly more than 7 million.) Since June 9, Hong Kong police say they have arrested 589 people during the protests that have occurred on consecutive weekends over the past two months. Police have used rubber bullets and fired tear gas to control protesters.

“There have been some skirmishes with police—with most here considering the police to be overly aggressive,” says Kate Appleton, a former AFAR staffer based in Hong Kong. “It has been remarkable how peaceful and orderly the protests have been. There are reports of protesters picking up trash and clearing the way for ambulances.”

Here’s what travelers need to know about visiting Hong Kong right now.

Which areas have been affected?

The protests have occurred primarily in Admiralty, the Central Government Complex of Hong Kong, and SAR Tamar Park—much of Hong Kong’s downtown core.

The June 16 march began in Victoria Park and headed west along Hennessy Road through the Wan Chai neighborhood to end up in Admiralty by the Legislative Council, says Appleton. (A map of June 16’s route appears here.)

On Friday, August 9, thousands of protesters began a demonstration at Hong Kong’s international airport. So far, the protest there has remained peaceful and has not disrupted any flights or tourist arrivals in the city.

What should I know if I’m traveling to Hong Kong?

As of August 8, 2019, the State Department upped its travel advisory for those visiting Hong Kong to a Level 2, which suggests travelers “exercise increased caution in Hong Kong due to civil unrest.” The State Department has not released any more alerts for upcoming protests, which are typically announced one day before they happen, but it suggests travelers “keep a low profile,” “avoid the areas of the demonstrations,” “exercise caution if unexpectedly in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests,” and “monitor local media for updates.”

Given the size of the demonstrations, large parts of the city can become inaccessible, and public transport can be impacted. Appleton says in June, the Admiralty MTR station was closed for less than 24 hours but has since reopened; in general, she notes it’s still easy to move about the city via car and public transportation.

Travelers should monitor the situation via social media and news. Some of the best local outlets are:

For additional assistance, contact the U.S. Consulate General Ho...amp; Macau by telephone using the following numbers: 852-2841-2211 or 852-2523-9011 (after hours). It can also be reached by email, at acshk@state.gov.

Are any attractions or hotels affected?

Appleton says Hong Kong is still safe for travelers, and “as of now, they can expect to move about the city and experience things normally.”

Some 100 art institutions also went on strike on June 12, closing their doors in solidarity with the protesters. They’ve since reopened, but if you’re traveling to Hong Kong while more demonstrations are planned, be sure to check the website of any attraction you’d like to visit.

On June 12, the Peninsula Hong Kong released a statement, saying:

“The Peninsula Hong Kong is operating as normal. While local residents and international visitors can continue to travel around Hong Kong as usual, guests are advised to check with the Concierge before venturing out to Hong Kong Island.

“The Hong Kong International Airport is open and operating as normal. However, guests with flights are advised to allocate extra time prior to their scheduled flight departure time and to check the flight status prior to travelling. Additionally, guests are recommended to check with their respective embassy for travel advisories.

“The Peninsula Hotels takes the safety of its guests and staff extremely seriously. As such, we will continue to closely monitor the situation, and will advise guests of any change in the situation or security-related measures that should prove necessary.”

Other popular hotels in Hong Kong, including the St. Regis, Four Seasons, and the Island Shangri-La, have not been affected.

What caused the protests?

The extradition bill, which has been delayed indefinitely as of Saturday, June 15, is the root cause. Since February, Lam has pushed for the passage of the bill, which she says is necessary to a murder case: In 2018, Poon Hiu-wing and her boyfriend, Chan Tong-kai, went on a trip to Taiwan. Only Chan returned; he later told police he had strangled Poon.

Yet under Hong Kong law, Chan can only face charges related to where the death occurred, in Taiwan. Because Hong Kong does not share an extradition agreement with Taiwan, Chan remains in Hong Kong. Because of this, Lam has been an advocate for entering an extradition agreement with Taiwan as well as China.

Since the protests began in June, they have also started to include calls for broader democratic reforms in Hong Kong, as well as the resignation of Lam and investigations into alleged police abuse of force.

What do protesters say?

Protesters have said this extradition agreement would expose them to China’s legal system. A former British colony, Hong Kong today is a special administrative region of China that has control over its politics, laws, and economy and operates under the “one country, two systems” principle. Many critics of the extradition bill, like Claudia Mo, an opposition lawmaker, say it’s nothing more than an opportunity for Lam to push a broader agenda of incorporating Hong Kong into China (Lam was selected by China to lead the territory).

“I think the whole thing is a political maneuver more than anything else,” said Mo, according to the New York Times. “Ever since the handover, it’s been stipulated in the law that we do not hand over fugitives to mainland China. Now they are taking advantage of this particular Taiwan case and pretend it is for compassion and humanity.”

Mo has said the protests will continue until Lam steps down.

The Associated Press contributed reporting. This article originally appeared online on June 18, 2019; it was updated on August 9, 2019, to include current information.

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Reply #1 posted 08/11/19 7:32pm

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Hong Kong airport occupied by hundreds of protesters as demonstrations enter 10th weekend

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/hong-kong-airport-occupied-by-hundreds-of-protesters-as-demonstrations-enter-10th-weekend/ar-AAFz5Xd?ocid=spartanntp

a large crowd of people: Protesters rally against a controversial extradition bill at Hong Kongs international airport on August 9, 2019. - Hundreds of pro-democracy activists, some wearing face masks and helmets, staged a sit-in at Hong Kong's airport on August 9 hoping to win support from international visitors for their movement. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images)

Hundreds of pro-democracy activists have begun what is intended to be a three-day occupation of Hong Kong's international airport, part of a series of demonstrations marking the 10th straight weekend of protests across the Asian financial hub.

Chanting "Hong Kong people, add oil," and carrying signs such as "all you can eat tear gas available in 13 districts," protesters gathered from midday Friday in the arrivals hall of the airport's main terminal.

The move is the latest challenge to the government's apparent strategy of waiting out the ongoing political crisis and comes just days after a citywide strike shut down...avel chaos. The crowd at the airport, which appeared to number in the high hundreds, included many older Hong Kongers, in contrast to the young people who have been at the forefront of recent street battles with police.

Protesters held signs in English and Chinese and had printed leaflets in multiple different languages explaining the causes and demands of the demonstrations for arriving tourists.

Hong Kong's airport is one of the busiest in the world, handling 1,100 passenger and cargo flights daily, with services between the city and about 200 international destinations.

In a statement, the city's Airport Authority said that additional security would be deployed on site Friday to assist passengers and airport staff. In order to minimize disruption to flights, only departing passengers with valid tickets or boarding passes and travel documents would be allowed to enter to the check-in aisles at Terminal 1, said the statement.

China bans Cathay Pacific staff involved in protests

On Thursday China issued a ban on staff from Cathay Pacific who have participated and supported in the Hong Kong protests, according to a statement published on China's Civil Aviation Administration's website.

It said that from midnight on Saturday, Hong Kong's flagship airline "must stop all those who have participated in and those who support the illegal demonstrations, protests and violent attacks, as well as those who have had radical behaviors, from executing all flights to and from the mainland."

New rules will also be implemented from Sunday that require the airline to "submit the ID information of all crew members flying to the mainland and flying over the mainland air space to the relevant mainland authorities for approval."

"Cathay flights will not be accepted without getting the approval," the statement added.

In response, Cathay told CNN in a statement that it was treating China's directive "seriously" and was studying it very carefully.

"The safety of our passengers is always the top priority of Cathay Pacific. There is zero tolerance to any inappropriate and unprofessional behavior that may affect aviation safety. We deal with these incidents very seriously," the airline's statement added.

US issues travel warning

On Thursday, the United States became the latest country to issue a travel warning for Hong Kong, urging travelers to exercise increased caution over the protests.

"Most have been peaceful, but some have turned confrontational or resulted in violent clashes," the advisory said. "These demonstrations, which can take place with little or no notice, are likely to continue."

Similar warnings have been issued by other countries including Australia, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Japan and Singapore. Although the warnings recommend travelers exercise a high degree of caution, countries are not yet advising visitors to avoid Hong Kong altogether.

"Hong Kong remains a welcoming city for tourists and travelers from around the world," a Hong Kong government spokesman said in a statement. "The impact of these illegal confrontations is confined to a limited area near the procession routes, and is not widespread."

Multiple additional protests are planned for this weekend, including in the northern New Territories town of Tai Po and in Sham Shui Po, in Kowloon, where police fired tear gas in clashes with protesters earlier this week. As of Friday afternoon, police had refused to issue letters of no objection for the planned protests on Saturday and Sunday respectively, meaning they could be deemed illegal assemblies. Protesters are appealing those decisions.

Growing frustration

Both the Hong Kong government and protesters are engaged in an apparent war of attrition, with neither side willing to budge as protests became increasingly violent and the mood in the city turns darker.

Some people have reacted negatively as protests have spilled over from traditional demonstration targets in the city's central business district to more residential areas. Clashes have taken place between alleged triad gang members and mostly young protesters in some areas, and police tear gas fired to clear occupied roads has seeped into nearby apartments, putting vulnerable bystanders at risk.

Smaller scale demonstrations in support of the Hong Kong government and police have also been held, with another planned for this weekend.

Speaking this week, one of China's top officials responsible for Hong Kong appeared to seek to capitalize on the growing divides and frustrations within the city, dividing the protest movement into two groups.

"At the front are a small number of violent radicals; in the middle are some kind-hearted citizens who have been misguided and coerced to join," said Yang Guang, spokesman for the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office.

Speaking to reporters, Yang emphasized the economic and societal damage caused to Hong Kong by the protests and urged citizens to "stand firm and guard our beautiful homeland."

"Let's do as a loving mother does to take the inexplicably angry child home," he said, adding that the protests had gone way beyond the freedom of assembly and expression that Hong Kong is permitted.

Waiting game

During the 2014 Umbrella Movement, when tens of thousands of pro-democracy protesters occupied parts of the city for several months, the local government and police took a hands off approach, watching as the mood in some areas turned against the movement as it became increasingly disruptive to local businesses and general life.

That appears to be the current strategy as well, combined with hardline policing of any violent protests, and increased arrests of alleged ringleaders. Almost 600 people have been arrested so far, police said this week, for a range of offenses including "taking part in a riot," unlawful assembly, assaulting police officers, resisting arrest and possession of offensive weapons.

Speaking to CNN this week, a senior Hong Kong government official suggested the intention was to wait the protests out, saying that numbers and enthusiasm were shrinking as the demonstrations became increasingly disruptive.

The official said there was no chance of the government responding to protesters' demands, including a full withdrawal of a now-suspended extradition law which kicked off the current crisis and the resignation of Chief Executive Carrie Lam.

On whether China's military would be deployed to Hong Kong to deal with the protests, the official said that there was no intention by the local or Chinese government to do so at this time.

"We know the consequences," the official said, adding that Hong Kong police were capable of dealing with the increasing violent protests. However, he added that some protesters were risking such a reaction with provocative actions targeting China's offices in the city and the national flag.

"This is very dangerous," the official said.

Earlier this week, Yang, the Chinese official, said protesters should not "mistake our restraint for weakness."

"We would like to make it clear to the very small group of unscrupulous and violent criminals and the dirty forces behind them -- those who play with fire will perish by it," Yang said.

a man standing in front of a large crowd of people: Protesters rally against a controversial extradition bill at Hong Kongs international airport on August 9, 2019.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #2 posted 08/11/19 11:08pm

IanRG

It is, unfortunately, hard to see a way for this to not end badly

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Reply #3 posted 08/12/19 6:35pm

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Hong Kong Cancels All Remaining Monday Flights as Protesters Swarm Airport

Venus Feng and Sheryl Tian Tong Lee

(Bloomberg) — Hong Kong airport authorities canceled remaining flights on Monday after protesters swarmed the main terminal building for a fourth day, the biggest disruption yet to the city’s economy since demonstrations began in early June.

Thousands of black-clad protesters on Monday packed the arrival area, where they had gathered for a three-day sit-in that was originally planned to end last night. The protests, initially sparked by opposition to a bill that would allow extraditions to mainland China, have become increasingly violent in recent weeks, with demonstrators targeting public transportation in a bid to pressure the government.

It was unclear how many flights were impacted, according to Doris Lai, a spokesperson for the Hong Kong Airport Authority. The airport said in an earlier statement that it was aiming to restore operations as soon as possible after canceling all flights for the rest of the day, except those already in the air.

Shares of Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., Hong Kong’s main airline, tumbled to a 10-year low after the news. The government planned a press briefing for 5:15 p.m. local time. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index came off its session high and contracts for all three main U.S. equity indexes erased earlier gains.

China stepped up its rhetoric on Monday, saying protesters have committed serious crimes and showed signs of “terrorism.” Hong Kong has come to a “critical juncture” and all people who care about its future should say no to violence, Yang Guang, a spokesman for its Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, told reporters on Monday as protesters gathered at the airport.

“All those who care about Hong Kong’s future should come out and stand against all criminal acts and perpetrators of violence,” Yang told reporters.

pic.twitter.com/ASW4GaBAYE

— Bloomberg TicToc (@tictoc) August 12, 2019

The protests have evolved into the biggest challenge to Chinese control since the U.K. relinquished its former colony in 1997. The social unrest has hurt the economy and impacted daily life in one of the world’s most densely crowded cities, raising concern that Beijing will use force to restore order.

Stoking those fears, the Communist Party-backed Global Times reported on Monday that the Chinese People’s Armed Police have been assembling across the border in Shenzhen ahead of “apparent large-scale exercises.”

a steam train on a track with smoke coming out of it: Riot police deploy tear gas during a protest in Wan Chai on Aug. 11.© Bloomberg

Riot police deploy tear gas during a protest in Wan Chai on Aug. 11.

Tang Ping-keung, deputy commissioner of police, said it was too early to say whether force would be used to clear the airport. “It will be up to commander to decide” whether to use tear gas, he told reporters.

Authorities had deployed more aggressive tactics during the weekend protests, with riot police videotaped beating demonstrators in subway stations and officers going undercover to infiltrate the group and make arrests. The violent scenes emerged as protesters used flash mobs across the city, surrounding police stations, disrupting traffic, and hurling projectiles including bricks and petrol bombs. One officer was taken to the hospital after suffering burns in the upmarket shopping district of Tsim Sha Tsui. Mob violence broke out elsewhere.

Police responded with tear gas and rubber bullets at various locations – including inside a metro station for the first time. Dramatic videos showed riot police firing weapons at close range and beating some protesters, many of whom wore yellow hard hats and gas masks. Some 13 protesters were injured, including two in serious condition, RTHK reported, citing hospital authorities.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/hong-kong-cancels-all-remaining-monday-flights-as-protesters-swarm-airport/ar-AAFGQls?ocid=spartanntp

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A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

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Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
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Reply #4 posted 08/12/19 6:41pm

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https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/hong-kong-cancels-all-remaining-monday-flights-as-protesters-swarm-airport/ar-AAFGQls?ocid=spartanntp

Slide 1 of 71: An anti-extradition bill protester holds a tear gas canister during a demonstration in Sham Shui Po neighbourhood in Hong Kong, China, August 11, 2019. REUTERS/Issei Kato

Slide 15 of 71: Riot police run to disperse anti-extradition bill protesters during a protest at Sham Shui Po in Hong Kong, China, August 11, 2019. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

Slide 19 of 71: A riot police raises a warning flag as they try to disperse anti-extradition bill protesters by tear gas at Sham Shui Po in Hong Kong, China August 11, 2019. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

Slide 20 of 71: Police arrest a man during protests in Tsim Sha Tsui in Hong Kong on August 11, 2019, in the latest opposition to a planned extradition law that was quickly evolved into a wider movement for democratic reforms. - Thousands of pro-democracy protesters hit the streets of Hong Kong for a tenth weekend in-a-row on August 11, again defying police who fired volleys of tear gas at several locations. (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images)

Slide 21 of 71: Riot policemen search a protester's bag during the anti-extradition bill protest in Hong Kong, Sunday, Aug. 11, 2019. Police fired tear gas late Sunday afternoon to try to disperse a demonstration in Hong Kong as protesters took over streets in two parts of the Asian financial capital. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

Slide 24 of 71: People read messages left by Pro-Democracy protesters against the controversial extradition bill at Hong Kong's international airport on August 11, 2019. - Empty hotel rooms, struggling shops and even disruption at Disneyland: months of protests in Hong Kong have taken a major toll on the city's economy, with no end in sight. (Photo by Manan VATSYAYANA / AFP)        (Photo credit should read MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Slide 26 of 71: Protesters hold posters depicting protesters, medical worker and people help an injured protester bearing the words "Together" as they take part in the anti-extradition bill protest march at Shum Shui in Hong Kong, Sunday, Aug. 11, 2019. Separate protests were being held in two parts of Hong Kong on Sunday in a continuing series of demonstrations that have generally started peacefully but often ended in violent clashes with police. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

Slide 39 of 71: A riot police officer gestures during a demonstration held by anti-extradition bill protesters in Tai Wai in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 10.

Slide 42 of 71: Bystanders watch protesters building a barricade on a road from inside a shopping mall in Tai Wai in the New Territories of Hong Kong on Aug. 10.

Slide 50 of 71: Protesters hold banners as they demonstrate at the airport In Hong Kong on Friday, Aug. 9, 2019. Pro-democracy protesters held a demonstration at Hong Kong's airport Friday even as the city sought to reassure visitors to the city after several countries issued travel safety warnings related to the increasing levels of violence surrounding the two-month-old protest movement. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

Cathay Pacific has come under fire after some of its employees joined the demonstrations. A Chinese state-run company told employees not to fly Cathay Pacific on business or personal trips, according to people familiar with the matter.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam has refused to yield to a series of demands, including that she withdraw the bill and step down from her position. Authorities in Beijing remain supportive of her government, which has warned of an economic crisis if the demonstrations drag on.

The protesters are resorting to flash mobs and violence as their numbers diminish, according to Steve Vickers, chief executive officer of risk consultancy Steve Vickers and Associates and a former head of the Royal Hong Kong Police Criminal Intelligence Bureau.

“The government’s policy of sitting on their hands and hiding behind the police is actually working,” Vickers told Bloomberg Television on Monday. “The numbers are declining, the level of violence is increasing. As violence increases, the more middle class people and ordinary people of Hong Kong will turn against this movement.”

China in recent weeks has toughened its stance toward the movement and doubled down on its support for the police. The Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, its top agency overseeing the former British colony’s affairs, has held unprecedented briefings condemning violent protesters and called on the people of Hong Kong to oppose them. An overseas edition of the Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily said last month that police should take stern action to restore order.

Hong Kong called former deputy police commissioner Lau Yip-shing out of retirement last week to handle major upcoming public events including celebrations marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China in October. Lau had overseen the government’s crackdown on protesters during the 2014 pro-democracy Occupy movement.

Authorities had denied permits over the weekend for protests in all but Victoria Park, but demonstrators took to the streets anyway. Police made more arrests on Sunday after detaining 16 people on Saturday, with local media reporting that officers may be dressing as protesters and infiltrating their ranks to help with detentions.

China’s civil aviation authority had earlier told Cathay Pacific to ban all employees who supported or joined the recent protests from flying to the mainland, one of the strongest signs yet that Beijing is losing its patience with the demonstrations.

Cathay suspended a pilot from flying who had been detained while participating in a protest, the airline said in a statement. It also fired two workers for “misconduct.” They allegedly leaked information about the travel arrangements of a Hong Kong police soccer team, the South China Morning Post reported.

“As always our actions and responsibilities are focused on the safety and security of our operations,” the airline said.

This weekend’s protests come days after a general strike that disrupted the financial hub’s morning rush hour, leaving traffic jammed, subway lines suspended and dozens of flights canceled. Those demonstrations also ended in tear gas and dispersal operations.

“It’s affected business tremendously -- all businesses basically,” Allan Zeman, chairman of Hong Kong’s Lan Kwai Fong Group, which operates restaurants and bars in the city, told Bloomberg Television. “We have to stop the violence. That’s the most important thing. Then we can talk.”

(Updates throughout.)

--With assistance from Fion Li, Will Davies and Justin Chin.

To contact the reporters on this story: Venus Feng in Hong Kong at vfeng7@bloomberg.net;Sheryl Tian Tong Lee in Hong Kong at slee1905@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Karen Leigh

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

Slide 7 of 71: REFILE - CORRECTING GRAMMAR Anti-extradition bill protesters cover their eyes with gauze during a mass demonstration after a woman was shot in the eye during a protest at Hong Kong International Airport, in Hong Kong, China August 12, 2019.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
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Reply #5 posted 08/13/19 10:17am

onlyforaminute

This is a tough one. If im reading this right, mofo kills another citizen in another country, but based on laws can only be convicted in the country he committed the crime in. Morally reprehensible yet if Hong Kong allows China an inch they damned sure are going to take a mile finding all kinds of loopholes to make their agreement useless in the long run. I wonder if Taiwan can get a back dated extradition agreement at this point with Hongkong. Problem solved?
Year of Return 2019
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Reply #6 posted 08/13/19 4:18pm

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Trump admin quiet on Moscow protests while defending Hong Kong's demonstrations

AACMZgS.img?h=416&w=799&m=6&q=60&u=t&o=f&l=f

Police advance towards protesters during a rally against a controversial extradition law proposal outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong, June 12, 2019.

For more than a month now, thousands of protesters have taken to the streets of two major cities to demand democratic reforms and been met by strong crackdowns by their government. But only one of those movements is getting vocal support from the U.S.

In Hong Kong, demonstrations shut down much of the territory, including the airport, for the 10th weekend in a row. What initially began as outrage over legislation that would allow extraditions from Hong Kong to mainland China have burned on -- even after authorities said they would not pursue the bill -- and protesters are now demanding that the bill be formally withdrawn, an investigation be launched into police brutality against demonstrators and they want broader democratic reforms.

Moscow has now seen four weekends with protesters filling the streets to demand that opposition candidates be included on the ballot for city elections in September. As those protests have grown and hundreds have been taken into custody, protesters are now also calling for their release.

In both cities, authorities have responded with fierce crackdowns that have, at times, included the use of brute force.

Hundreds of people have been detained by law enforcement in Moscow each weekend. On Aug. 10, more than 350 people were arrested for participating in unsanctioned protests in Moscow and other cities, according to independent rights watchdog OVD-Info, which reported that more than 1,000 people were detained during Aug. 3 protests and approximately 1,400 people on July 27.

Opposition leaders have also been targeted, with one of Russian President Vladimir Putin's top opponents, Alexey Navalny, and his doctor accusing the government o...soning him. Lyubov Sobol, who was one of the independent candidates barred from the ballot, live-streamed video as police entered her home and arrested her this past weekend.

On Sunday, there was a dramatic escalation of violence in Hong Kong too, with riot police firing tear gas in subway stations and bean bag rounds at close range. Demonstrators wore eye patches on Monday in symbolic solidarity with a woman who was reportedly hit in the eye on Sunday with a bean bag round and allegedly sustained permanent vision loss.

Since the movement's peaceful beginnings in early June, the demonstrations have, at times, turned violent and confrontational in response to police attempts to disperse crowds. Protesters have also been assaulted by pro-Beijing vigilantes that may have ties to organized crime. In the chaos, Hong Kong authorities have tried to paint protesters as violent Western-backed riots....(the rest posting in the Russia thread)

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/trump-admin-quiet-on-moscow-protests-while-defending-hong-kongs-demonstrations/ar-AAFI9QJ?ocid=spartanntp

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A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #7 posted 08/14/19 6:55am

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Trump Says China Moving Troops to Its Border With Hong KongJustin Blum

17 hrs ago

(Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump said reports from U.S. intelligence agencies show the Chinese government is moving troops to its border with Hong Kong.

"Everyone should be calm and safe!" Trump said in a tweet on Tuesday, without providing details about when he received the information.

Trump's tweet came amid increasing tensions in Hong Kong between the government and protesters. Activists clashed with police outside Hong Kong's airport after a standoff over a man protesters beat alleging he was an undercover cop from the mainland.

A U.S. State Department official urged China to respect the agreements it made when taking control of Hong Kong from the U.K. and allow the city to "exercise a high degree of autonomy."

The airport suspended check-ins for departing flights -- its second straight day of major service disruptions -- as embattled local leader Carrie Lam warned that the city risked sliding into an "abyss."

What began as a largely leaderless effort to block legislation allowing extraditions to the mainland has expanded into a list of demands including investigations into police tactics and a direct vote to replace Lam. She has resisted calls to resign.

Over the past week, signs had appeared that China was stepping up preparations to mobilize mainland forces to quell the weeks-long uprising in Hong Kong.

State-run media posted videos this week of the People's Armed Police, a paramilitary force specializing in riot control, assembling across the border in Shenzhen. A Chinese official with the agency overseeing the city used "terrorism" to describe the protests, invoking a term used to justify sending in forces to repress minority Muslims in the far west region of Xinjiang.

Earlier Tuesday, Trump told reporters in New Jersey: "It's a very tricky situation. I think it'll work out and I hope it works out for liberty. I hope it works out for everybody, including China."

Trump earlier this month referred to the protests in Hong Kong as "riots," adopting the language used by Beijing and suggesting the U.S. would stay out of an issue that was "between Hong Kong and China."

(Updates with State Department official in fourth paragraph.)

To contact the reporter on this story: Justin Blum in Washington at jblum4@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Alex Wayne at awayne3@bloomberg.net, Justin Blum, Joshua Gallu

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
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Reply #8 posted 08/14/19 8:15am

OldFriends4Sal
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WOW, ok uh hmmmm, but it's expected, I thought it would be worse, compared to some similar protesting demonstrations of China's past

Flights restart at Hong Kong airport as protesters apologize

By VINCENT THIAN and YANAN WANG, Associated Press

HONG KONG (AP) — Flights resumed at Hong Kong's airport Wednesday after two days of disruptions marked by outbursts of violence that highlight the hardening positions of pro-democracy protesters and the authorities in the semi-autonomous Chinese city.

About three dozen protesters remained camped in the airport's arrivals area a day after a mass demonstration and frenzied mob violence forced more than 100 flight cancelations. Additional identification checks were in place, but check-in counters were open and flights appeared to be operating normally.

Protesters spread pamphlets and posters across the floor in a section of the terminal but were not impeding travelers. Online, they also circulated letters and promotional materials apologizing to travelers and the general public for inconveniences during the past five days of airport occupations.

"It is not our intention to cause delays to your travels and we do not want to cause inconvenience to you," said an emailed statement from a group of protesters. "We ask for your understanding and forgiveness as young people in Hong Kong continue to fight for freedom and democracy."The airport's management said it had obtained "an interim injunction to restrain persons from unlawfully and willfully obstructing or interfering" with airport operations. It said an area of the airport had been set aside for demonstrations, but no protests would be allowed outside the designated area.

The airport had closed check-in for remaining flights late Tuesday afternoon as protesters swarmed the terminal and blocked access to immigration for departing passengers. Those cancelations were in addition to 200 flights canceled on Monday.

Hong Kong police said they arrested five people during clashes with pro-democracy protesters at the airport Tuesday night.

Assistant Commissioner of Police Operations Mak Chin-ho said the men, aged between 17 and 28, were arrested for illegal assembly. Two were also charged with assaulting a police officer and possessing offensive weapons as riot police sought to clear the terminal.

More than 700 protesters have been arrested in total since early June, mostly men in their 20s and 30s, but also including women, teenagers and septuagenarians.

Mak gave no further details, but said additional suspects were expected to be arrested, including those who assaulted an officer after stripping him of his baton and pepper spray, prompting him to draw his gun to fend them off.

Hong Kong law permits life imprisonment for those who commit violent acts or acts that might interfere with flight safety at an airport.

More than 7 million travelers pass through Hong Kong's airport each year, making it "not an appropriate place of protest," Mak said.

"Hong Kong police have always facilitated peaceful and orderly protests over the years, but the extremely radical and violent acts have certainly crossed the line and are to be most severely condemned," he said. "The police pledge to all citizens of Hong Kong that we will take steps to bring all culprits to justice."

Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific said in a statement it had canceled 272 flights over the past two days, affecting more than 55,000 passengers, while 622 departures and arrivals went ahead.

The airport disruptions have escalated a summer of demonstrations aimed at what many Hong Kong residents see as an increasing erosion of the freedoms they were promised in 1997 when Communist Party-ruled mainland China took over what had been a British colony...

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

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Reply #9 posted 08/14/19 6:47pm

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Reply #10 posted 08/15/19 5:30am

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In 'clear warning', Chinese paramilitary forces exercise near Hong Kong

SHENZHEN, China/HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hundreds of members of China's People's Armed Police could be seen conducting exercises on Thursday at a sports stadium in Shenzhen, as the U.S. State Department expressed concern that they could be deployed across the border in Hong Kong to break up protests wracking the city.

But Western and Asian diplomats in Hong Kong said Beijing has little appetite for rolling the PAP or the People's Liberation Army onto Hong Kong's streets.

On Thursday men in fatigues could be seen in a stadium and shouts and whistles could be heard by a Reuters journalist. The stadium is next to a retail complex and shoppers were milling around the area, although the entrances to the stadium were closed.

Parking spaces at the stadium were filled with more than 100 dark-painted paramilitary vehicles, including troop trucks, armored personnel carriers, buses and jeeps. At least three were armored wheel-loaders, and two vehicles carried water cannons.

"This is the first time I've seen such a large-scale meeting," said Yang Ying, a receptionist at a wellness center inside the stadium's retail complex.

"There have been exercises in the past, but usually they involve traffic police," she added. "Our friends, social media all say it's because of Hong Kong."

Ten weeks of increasingly violent confrontations between police and protesters have plunged Hong Kong into its worst crisis since it reverted from British to Chinese rule in 1997.

The protests represent one of the biggest challenges for Chinese President Xi Jinping since he came to power in 2012.

On Wednesday the U.S. State Department said it was deeply concerned about reports that Chinese police forces were gathering near the border with Hong Kong and urged the city's government to respect freedom of speech.

Troops marched in and out of the Shenzhen stadium, some in fatigues, some in black T-shirts and camouflage trousers. The floor of an indoor area visible through an open gate was lined with mats and rucksacks.

Still, diplomats in Hong Kong said they believe Chinese leadership is well aware that moving mainland forces into Hong Kong would shatter international faith in the "one country, two systems" model at the heart of Hong Kong's role as a global financial hub, and would swiftly lead to sanctions.

"We are seeing an escalation in the posturing that appears designed to send messages to both Hong Kong and the mainland ... but we are confident we are still in the realms of propaganda here," one senior Western envoy told Reuters, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media. "The trucks aren't about to roll at this point."

Alexander Neill, a Singapore-based security analyst at the International Institute of Strategic Studies, said it would take far more serious scenarios to spark such a move.

"I think we'd really need to see a total breakdown and a sense that China's national interests were at great risk and could not be protected by the Hong Kong government and its police," he said.

Worst-case scenarios, he said, could involve the assassination or kidnapping of Chinese officials in Hong Kong, the sacking and occupation of key offices there or the government's losing control of parts of the police force.

"We're a long way from anything like that yet, so I think what we are seeing is harder posturing that is part of a much broader propaganda effort underway on many fronts," he said.

The Shenzhen stadium sits across the water from Hong Kong's rural hinterland, near a bridge straddling the border.

People working around the stadium said the level of PAP activity was higher than they had ever seen, but not disruptive, as the troops usually kept to themselves.

The chief disruption was PAP vehicles occupying parking spaces, and people who worked in the area said they'd been told not to share pictures of vehicles.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

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Reply #11 posted 08/17/19 6:39am

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https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/hong-kong-protesters-kick-off-new-weekend-of-rallies/ar-AAFWcGR?ocid=spartanntp

.

Hong Kong protesters kick off new weekend of rallies

.

Hong Kong democracy activists kicked off a weekend of fresh protests on Saturday in a major test for the movement following criticism over an airport protest earlier this week -- and as concerns mount over Beijing's next move.

Ten weeks of demonstrations have plunged the international finance hub into crisis, with the communist-ruled mainland taking an increasingly hardline tone, including labelling the more violent protester actions "terrorist-like".

Activists are billing two planned rallies on Saturday and Sunday as a way to show Beijing and the city's unelected leaders that their movement still enjoys broad public support, despite increasingly violent tactics deployed by a minority of hardcore protesters that have cast a shadow.

On Tuesday, protesters blocked passengers from boarding flights at the city's airport and later assaulted two men they accused of being Chinese spies.

The images damaged a movement that until then had largely only targeted the police or government institutions, and prompted some soul-searching among protesters.

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Reply #12 posted 08/17/19 6:40am

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luv4u said:

https://www.reddit.com/r/HongKong/

Current stuff.

all of our servers are busy right now

please try again in a minute

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Reply #13 posted 08/17/19 4:17pm

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OldFriends4Sale said:

luv4u said:

https://www.reddit.com/r/HongKong/

Current stuff.

all of our servers are busy right now

please try again in a minute


Probably traffic made site crash lol. Try again, it's back up.

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Reply #14 posted 08/17/19 10:49pm

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Mulan star supports Hong Kong police:

Liu Yifei: Mulan boycott urged after star backs HK police

Disney's live-action remake of the animated film Mulan is facing calls for a boycott, after its star voiced support for Hong Kong's police force.

Read more: https://www.bbc.com/news/...-49373276


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Reply #15 posted 08/17/19 11:15pm

IanRG

sexton said:

Mulan star supports Hong Kong police:

Liu Yifei: Mulan boycott urged after star backs HK police

Disney's live-action remake of the animated film Mulan is facing calls for a boycott, after its star voiced support for Hong Kong's police force.

Read more: https://www.bbc.com/news/...-49373276


.

That is the complicating issue. In Australia we have had protest marches for both sides. Hong Kong's special status is under real threat. With Carrie Lam who came to power as the Beijing backed candidate, the pro China side is holding all the aces at the moment.

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Reply #16 posted 08/18/19 8:34am

poppys

PRC will never rest until they have full control of Hong Kong again - with no special status. And they're not waiting until 2047. They consider the 1997 treaty with Britain as having "no practical significance". British Colonialism was a long long loss of face in the first place.

As we were shown in the 1989 protests in Beijing, China is willing to massacre millions to achieve compliance from their people.

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Reply #17 posted 08/18/19 8:43am

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Good for them! They are fighting to end what people like AOC and Sanders and their ilk are trying to bring here...

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Reply #18 posted 08/19/19 8:00am

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Only, they are using violence? I thought you were against violent protests?

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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