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Thread started 07/31/19 3:08pm

OldFriends4Sal
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Sign of the times: China vs Islam and Christianity

This is a very controversial topic, that I suspect more people around the world are on the fence about than might admit in fear of being accused of islamaphobia or xenophobia

...capital orders Arabic, Muslim symbols taken down

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/sign-of-the-times-chinas-capital-orders-arabic-muslim-symbols-taken-down/ar-AAF6Sdy?ocid=spartanntp

BEIJING (Reuters) - Authorities in the Chinese capital have ordered halal restaurants and food stalls to remove Arabic script and symbols associated with Islam from their signs, part of an expanding national effort to "Sinicize" its Muslim population.

Employees at 11 restaurants and shops in Beijing selling halal products and visited by Reuters in recent days said officials had told them to remove images associated with Islam, such as the crescent moon and the word "halal" written in Arabic, from signs.

Government workers from various offices told one manager of a Beijing noodle shop to cover up the "halal" in Arabic on his shop's sign, and then watched him do it.

"They said this is foreign culture and you should use more Chinese culture," said the manager, who, like all restaurant owners and employees who spoke to Reuters, declined to give his name due to the sensitivity of the issue.

The campaign against Arabic script and Islamic images marks a new phase of a drive that has gained momentum since 2016, aimed at ensuring religions conform with mainstream Chinese culture.

The campaign has included the removal of Middle Eastern-style domes on many mosques around the country in favor of Chinese-style pagodas.

China, home to 20 million Muslims, officially guarantees freedom of religion, but the government has campaigned to bring the faithful into line with Communist Party ideology.

It's not just Muslims who have come under scrutiny. Authorities have shut down many underground Christian churches, and torn down crosses of some churches deemed illegal by the government.

But Muslims have come in for particular attention since a riot in 2009 between mostly Muslim Uighur people and majority Han Chinese in the far western region of Xinjiang, home to the Uighur minority.

Spasms of ethnic violence followed, and some Uighurs, chafing at government controls, carried out knife and crude bomb attacks in public areas and against the police and other authorities.

In response, China launched what it described as a crackdown on terrorism in Xinjiang.

Now, it is facing intense criticism from Western nations and rights groups over its policies, in particular mass detentions and surveillance of Uighurs and other Muslims there.

The government says its actions in Xinjiang are necessary to stamp out religious extremism. Officials have warned about creeping Islamisation, and have extended tighter controls over other Muslim minorities.

AAF6Nso.img?h=416&w=799&m=6&q=60&u=t&o=f&l=f&x=1984&y=702

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Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #1 posted 07/31/19 4:18pm

IanRG

OldFriends4Sale said:

This is a very controversial topic, that I suspect more people around the world are on the fence about than might admit in fear of being accused of islamaphobia or xenophobia

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/sign-of-the-times-chinas-capital-orders-arabic-muslim-symbols-taken-down/ar-AAF6Sdy?ocid=spartanntp

BEIJING (Reuters) - Authorities in the Chinese capital have ordered halal restaurants and food stalls to remove Arabic script and symbols associated with Islam from their signs, part of an expanding national effort to "Sinicize" its Muslim population.

Employees at 11 restaurants and shops in Beijing selling halal products and visited by Reuters in recent days said officials had told them to remove images associated with Islam, such as the crescent moon and the word "halal" written in Arabic, from signs.

Government workers from various offices told one manager of a Beijing noodle shop to cover up the "halal" in Arabic on his shop's sign, and then watched him do it.

"They said this is foreign culture and you should use more Chinese culture," said the manager, who, like all restaurant owners and employees who spoke to Reuters, declined to give his name due to the sensitivity of the issue.

The campaign against Arabic script and Islamic images marks a new phase of a drive that has gained momentum since 2016, aimed at ensuring religions conform with mainstream Chinese culture.

The campaign has included the removal of Middle Eastern-style domes on many mosques around the country in favor of Chinese-style pagodas.

China, home to 20 million Muslims, officially guarantees freedom of religion, but the government has campaigned to bring the faithful into line with Communist Party ideology.

It's not just Muslims who have come under scrutiny. Authorities have shut down many underground Christian churches, and torn down crosses of some churches deemed illegal by the government.

But Muslims have come in for particular attention since a riot in 2009 between mostly Muslim Uighur people and majority Han Chinese in the far western region of Xinjiang, home to the Uighur minority.

Spasms of ethnic violence followed, and some Uighurs, chafing at government controls, carried out knife and crude bomb attacks in public areas and against the police and other authorities.

In response, China launched what it described as a crackdown on terrorism in Xinjiang.

Now, it is facing intense criticism from Western nations and rights groups over its policies, in particular mass detentions and surveillance of Uighurs and other Muslims there.

The government says its actions in Xinjiang are necessary to stamp out religious extremism. Officials have warned about creeping Islamisation, and have extended tighter controls over other Muslim minorities.

AAF6Nso.img?h=416&w=799&m=6&q=60&u=t&o=f&l=f&x=1984&y=702

.

As an Australian with strong connections to Malaysia and Myanmar, I often see that the Western, and primarily Anglophone nations, focus on racism as being a primarily by "whites" is wrong. Racism is everywhere. Even if you restrict the definition to just the actions of the dominant racial/ethnic group in the country (which I don't), there are events like this by so many different races/ethnic groups.

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Reply #2 posted 07/31/19 4:24pm

poppys

And this suprises anyone???

China will win the battle for world domination - no doubt about it. They've been refining their tactics for thousands of years. I'm starting to think the US won't even make 300.

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Reply #3 posted 07/31/19 4:44pm

CherryMoon57

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They're doing the same with Christianity:

In China, they’re closing churches, jailing pastors – and even rewriting scripture

[...] Early Rain is the latest victim of what Chinese Christians and rights activists say is the worst crackdown on religion since the country’s Cultural Revolution, when Mao Zedong’s government vowed to eradicate religion.

Researchers say the current drive, fuelled by government unease over the growing number of Christians and their potential links to the west, is aimed not so much at destroying Christianity but bringing it to heel.

“The government has orchestrated a campaign to ‘sinicise’ Christianity, to turn Christianity into a fully domesticated religion that would do the bidding of the party,” said Lian Xi, a professor at Duke University in North Carolina, who focuses on Christianity in modern China.


Over the past year, local governments have shut hundreds of unofficial congregations or “house churches” that operate outside the government-approved church network, including Early Rain. A statement signed by 500 house church leaders in November says authorities have removed crosses from buildings, forced churches to hang the Chinese flag and sing patriotic songs, and barred minors from attending. [...]

More: https://www.theguardian.c...tion-bible

Open your heart open your mind
A train is leaving all day
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Reply #4 posted 07/31/19 5:13pm

IanRG

CherryMoon57 said:

They're doing the same with Christianity:

In China, they’re closing churches, jailing pastors – and even rewriting scripture

[...] Early Rain is the latest victim of what Chinese Christians and rights activists say is the worst crackdown on religion since the country’s Cultural Revolution, when Mao Zedong’s government vowed to eradicate religion.

Researchers say the current drive, fuelled by government unease over the growing number of Christians and their potential links to the west, is aimed not so much at destroying Christianity but bringing it to heel.

“The government has orchestrated a campaign to ‘sinicise’ Christianity, to turn Christianity into a fully domesticated religion that would do the bidding of the party,” said Lian Xi, a professor at Duke University in North Carolina, who focuses on Christianity in modern China.


Over the past year, local governments have shut hundreds of unofficial congregations or “house churches” that operate outside the government-approved church network, including Early Rain. A statement signed by 500 house church leaders in November says authorities have removed crosses from buildings, forced churches to hang the Chinese flag and sing patriotic songs, and barred minors from attending. [...]

More: https://www.theguardian.c...tion-bible

.

And Buddhism. They are demanding the right to appoint the next Dalia Lama.

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Reply #5 posted 07/31/19 7:29pm

poppys

No religion really has a foothold since the Cultural Revolution/aftermath. Communist China history is fascinating, and brutal. People just disappear there - never to be seen again. They do NOT support free speech or freedom of religion. Or art or journalism for that matter.

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Reply #6 posted 08/01/19 1:32am

CherryMoon57

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Judging by what they are doing in Africa, we have reasons to worry.

'China is in Africa now not to advance Maoism, but to control its resources, people, and potential. From building railways in Kenya and roads in rural Ethiopia to running mines in the Congo, China has drastically changed the African economic landscape in the twentieth century. [...]

China’s activities in the African continent have yet to receive the attention they deserve in the West. China’s behavior in Africa is important for three major reasons. First, China is the source of significant investment capital twinned with a prodigious ability to create infrastructure, both of which are needed by many African states. Second, China’s behavior in Africa provides the rest of the world with insight into how it will behave towards other states, particularly the states of the Global South, as it becomes equal in power with the United States. Third, what China is doing in Africa does not augur well for the rest of the world. China’s activities and behavior in Africa may only be described as neo-colonial and exploitative of African peoples and the environment.'

More: https://nationalinterest....time-70526

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A train is leaving all day
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Reply #7 posted 08/01/19 1:37am

CherryMoon57

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How China is slowly expanding its power in Africa, one TV set at a time


'[...] In 2015, Xi announced the 10,000 Villages Project, a lofty plan to take digital television to impoverished parts of Africa, such as the village where Nganga lives. Previously, television access in many parts of the continent was a privilege of the elite, and those who were connected relied on old-fashioned, snowy analog reception.

Xi's dream was to upgrade huge swathes of Africa to modern, digital satellite TV networks, that could broadcast a constellation of channels over long distances — so long, in fact, that a TV channel from Beijing could be beamed to African homes.

This was more than just a philanthropic gesture.It was a stroke of soft-power genius that would raise China's profile among Africans, while giving Beijing a tighter grip on the continent's communications infrastructure and control over how it is portrayed there in the media. And it would boost the fortunes and power of one important Chinese company that otherwise keeps a low profile.

StarTimes has been the Chinese government's primary contractor to carry out the 10,000 Villages Project, paving the way for the Beijing-based firm — not any of its American or European media competitors — to dominate the African market of 1.2 billion people. A spokesperson for StarTimes said it was "important" for Beijing to work with "an experienced and cost-conscious enterprise for the assignment."

Today, the company beams Chinese TV shows into the homes of 10 million subscribers in 30 African countries, pushes China's state-owned propaganda news network into households over Western news networks, and controls television networks to such an extent in Zambia and Kenya there have been fears the company could black out TVs in those countries, if it wanted to.[...]'


https://edition.cnn.com/2...index.html

Open your heart open your mind
A train is leaving all day
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Reply #8 posted 08/01/19 7:12am

OldFriends4Sal
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CherryMoon57 said:

Judging by what they are doing in Africa, we have reasons to worry.

'China is in Africa now not to advance Maoism, but to control its resources, people, and potential. From building railways in Kenya and roads in rural Ethiopia to running mines in the Congo, China has drastically changed the African economic landscape in the twentieth century. [...]

China’s activities in the African continent have yet to receive the attention they deserve in the West. China’s behavior in Africa is important for three major reasons. First, China is the source of significant investment capital twinned with a prodigious ability to create infrastructure, both of which are needed by many African states. Second, China’s behavior in Africa provides the rest of the world with insight into how it will behave towards other states, particularly the states of the Global South, as it becomes equal in power with the United States. Third, what China is doing in Africa does not augur well for the rest of the world. China’s activities and behavior in Africa may only be described as neo-colonial and exploitative of African peoples and the environment.'

More: https://nationalinterest....time-70526

Prior to this I was reading a lot about Chinese men marrying African women in large numbers

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #9 posted 08/01/19 8:03am

2freaky4church
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China has gone nuts. Sam Harris and his ilk are very quiet.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #10 posted 08/01/19 8:04am

2freaky4church
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Iran did this under the Shah.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #11 posted 08/01/19 8:07am

CherryMoon57

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OldFriends4Sale said:

CherryMoon57 said:

Judging by what they are doing in Africa, we have reasons to worry.

'China is in Africa now not to advance Maoism, but to control its resources, people, and potential. From building railways in Kenya and roads in rural Ethiopia to running mines in the Congo, China has drastically changed the African economic landscape in the twentieth century. [...]

China’s activities in the African continent have yet to receive the attention they deserve in the West. China’s behavior in Africa is important for three major reasons. First, China is the source of significant investment capital twinned with a prodigious ability to create infrastructure, both of which are needed by many African states. Second, China’s behavior in Africa provides the rest of the world with insight into how it will behave towards other states, particularly the states of the Global South, as it becomes equal in power with the United States. Third, what China is doing in Africa does not augur well for the rest of the world. China’s activities and behavior in Africa may only be described as neo-colonial and exploitative of African peoples and the environment.'

More: https://nationalinterest....time-70526

Prior to this I was reading a lot about Chinese men marrying African women in large numbers


Looks like this is not going down too well in Uganda, especially when done illegally: https://qz.com/africa/857...eir-women/



[Edited 8/1/19 8:26am]

Open your heart open your mind
A train is leaving all day
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Reply #12 posted 08/10/19 7:10am

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In China, Where ‘Education’ Is Indoctrination and ‘Students’ Are Muslim Detainees

Chris Buckley and Steven Lee Myers

HOTAN, China — The muscular young Uighur man sat uncomfortably, glancing occasionally at three Chinese officials in the room, as he described his state-mandated salvation in a re-education camp.

The man, Abduweili Kebayir, 25, explained how watching Islamic videos on his phone landed him in one of China’s notorious indoctrination camps for Muslims for eight months — and how he emerged in January as a reformed man.

“Now I know the error of my ways,” he said, as his wife and daughter shuffled nervously around the living room. The room, like the rest of the eerily sparse house where officials who arranged the meeting said he lived, seemed almost staged, decorated with a family portrait, a potted plastic plant and a wall clock that had stopped.

His words at times sounded as rigidly scripted as the government’s propaganda. “Now I know what is right and wrong, and what is legal and illegal,” he said.

In late July, the government said most detainees had been released from the indoctrination camps built to eliminate what it described as the threat of Islamic radicalism and antigovernment sentiment among the overwhelmingly Muslim population of Uighurs in the Xinjiang region in China’s northwest.

But reporters from The New York Times found, over seven days of traveling through the region, that the vast network of detention camps erected by the government of China’s authoritarian leader, Xi Jinping, continues to operate, and even expand.

These camps, large and small, remain swaddled in heavy security and secrecy, despite the Chinese government’s new pledge of transparency. There are five major ones around Hotan, a city in southern Xinjiang, including the one where Mr. Kebayir said he was detained. Recent satellite images showed that a new detention facility has risen in the desert across the road from his former camp, surrounded by high walls and telltale watchtowers.

Efforts by Times reporters to approach the camps, factories and other religious sites were repeatedly blocked by plainclothes security officials — often giving outlandish explanations. Men claiming to be construction workers pulled power cables across the road near the camp where Mr. Kebayir was held and said the scene was too dangerous for anyone to pass. (When the reporters were later some distance away, the road promptly reopened.)

Since last year, evidence has also pointed to a system of forced labor linked to the camps. Factories being built nearby provide a place to transfer detainees whom officials consider sufficiently “reformed,” like Mr. Kebayir now, while keeping them under government supervision. Critics say this is simply another form of subjugation.

“I always thought the government was backing itself into a corner with its policies in Xinjiang,” said Sean R. Roberts, a professor at George Washington University who studies the region. “I can’t imagine that the process of backing out of it is going to be very quick at all.”

The Communist government’s narrative of redemption through state-enforced “re-education,” despite its dystopian echoes, remains the justification for the camps.

The camps have already swallowed up one million Muslims or more, by most estimates, wrenching them from their families and homes and subjecting them to what activists, relatives of detainees and former detainees describe as stressful, even debilitat...ctrination. Detainees, they say, are forced to denounce their religious beliefs and embrace the ideology of the Communist Party.

The establishment of the detention and re-education system — which Secretary of State Mike Pompeo recently called “the stain of the century” — has generated the harshest criticism of China’s record on human rights since the bloody Tiananmen crackdown in 1989.

The government seems more eager to quell international outrage over the camps than to begin to wind down the far-flung system it has built over the past two years. It remains unapologetically proud of the centers, which were established in a region that experienced a string of deadly attacks up until 2016, especially targeting ethnic Chinese and government buildings.

The chairman of the Xinjiang regional government, Shohrat Zakir, declared that the re-education system was accomplishing its goal of eliminating radicalism and separatism.

Whether the government succeeds in stamping out the threat of terrorism remains to be seen. The authorities in Xinjiang have taken some steps to relax the suffocating surveillance and travel restrictions on Uighurs and others in the region.

Security in major cities ...n Xinjiang has visibly eased somewhat, including in Hotan, Yarkand and Kashgar, all centers of Uighur traditions and resistance to Chinese dominance. There are fewer checkpoints now, though residents have to pass through scanners with facial-recognition software when they move between cities.

Mr. Zakir, the regional chairman, welcomed visitors to the region to see the changes for themselves, but it is clear the authorities are not yet prepared to allow unfettered access.

Local officials instead offered to organize visits and interviews that, in some cases, did more to raise questions than to dispel them.

Mr. Kebayir’s village, a farming settlement reclaimed out of the desert after 2014 and called Harmony New Village, also has a smaller re-education center that continues to hold more than 300 local Uighurs, ages 24 to 41, according to Wuergulia Ashim, an official there.

The center offered a model of how the Chinese government describes the indoctrination camps — a kind of boarding school and training center that turns local residents into loyal citizens. Former detainees have disputed this description of these centers, saying that life inside the camps is far harsher and that inmates included professionals and officials who were not in need of job training.

Ms. Ashim said “more and more” of the detainees, whom she called students, were “graduating” from the center. They are confined from Monday morning to Saturday afternoon, when they are allowed to return home briefly.

“Society is increasingly stable, and fewer and fewer people are infected with extremist thought,” she added.

The impeccably neat, six-story building was built in 2017 and has a capacity of 447 people.

Detainees sleep six to room. There is a music room, an art room, a library with books mostly in Chinese, a room to learn how to give manicures and another to learn to cut hair.

There was also a psychological counseling room. “Have a heart-to-heart,” read a sign on the wall. “Your secrets are my responsibility.”

The walls of classrooms were decorated with Communist Party adages and displayed samples of exemplary class work. “I have achieved true happiness because I was born in a country that is prosperous, strong and democratic,” one essay read. “How happy we are!”

Even the carefully choreographed meeting with Mr. Kebayir, conducted over an impressive spread of glass dishes bearing bread, fruits and nuts, faltered under questioning.

A seemingly rehearsed monotone slipped when the conversation turned to details of Mr. Kebayir’s detention, and one official tried to cut him off. A question about how many detainees were housed with Mr. Kebayir, an official said angrily, was a leading one.

By his account, Mr. Kebayir was now earning a decent wage — 2,100 renminbi last month, about $300 — stitching soles onto leather shoes at one of the new factories. Before he entered the camp, he said, he struggled as a poorly educated farmer, growing corn and walnuts, for which Hotan is famous.

He paused awkwardly when pressed about details of his re-education. He said most of the others there were young men from the countryside, but he did not know any of them personally.

Much of the instruction involved agricultural techniques, he said, but he also learned Chinese, the tenets of the Communist Party and what he called “healthy life habits.” He credited the instructors with dispelling his budding extremist thinking.

“Before I couldn’t even write my own name in Chinese,” he said. “Now I can speak the national language, my thinking is clear, and I have job skills.”

He initially said that he had volunteered to “enroll” but later acknowledged that village officials had picked him because of antisocial behavior, like watching the Islamic-themed videos and spending time at home alone. The latter seemed to be contradicted by the fact that he was married and had a daughter, now 2.

“Young people can be extremely vulnerable to extremist ideas,” he said.

It was not even clear that the house where Mr. Kebayir was interviewed was actually his. The closet held nothing except for a few dresses, and the refrigerator was empty except for a plate of uncooked dough. There were no toys around for their toddler.

Only hours later, Mr. Kebayir and his wife and daughter were no longer at the house and could not be reached, not even through the officials who set up the interview. One of them said Mr. Kebayir had business to deal with and had turned off his phone.

Chris Buckley is a correspondent covering China, where he has lived for more than 20 years after growing up in Australia. Before joining The Times in 2012, he was a correspondent for Reuters. Steven Lee Myers is a veteran diplomatic and national security correspondent, now based in the Beijing bureau. He joined The New York Times in 1989, and has previously worked as a correspondent in Moscow, Baghdad and Washington.

Austin Ramzy contributed reporting from Hong Kong.

a little girl standing in front of a building: A statue in Hotan, China, of Mao shaking hands with a Uighur villager. Chinese detention camps have swallowed up a million Muslims or more, wrenching them from their families and homes.

A statue in Hotan, China, of Mao shaking hands with a Uighur villager. Chinese detention camps have swallowed up a million Muslims or more, wrenching them from their families and homes.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #13 posted 08/10/19 7:15am

OldFriends4Sal
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https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/in-china-where-education-is-indoctrination-and-students-are-muslim-detainees/ar-AAFALDc?ocid=spartanntp#image=AAFALDc_1|1

a man sitting in a living room: Abduweili Kebayir with his wife and daughter. “Now I know the error of my ways,” he said, as Chinese officials watched.

Abduweili Kebayir with his wife and daughter. “Now I know the error of my ways,” he said, as Chinese officials watched.

a man riding on the back of a truck: Uighur women in a settlement called Harmony New Village. A re-education center there still holds more than 300 local Uighurs.

Uighur women in a settlement called Harmony New Village. A re-education center there still holds more than 300 local Uighurs.

a large building: The entrance to the re-education camp at Harmony New Village.

The entrance to the re-education camp at Harmony New Village.

a room filled with furniture and a table: A counseling room at the camp in Harmony New Village. A sign there reads, “Your secrets are my responsibility.”

A counseling room at the camp in Harmony New Village. A sign there reads, “Your secrets are my responsibility.”

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #14 posted 08/13/19 10:08am

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China removes Christian references from 'Robinson Crusoe' and other children's classics

Leah MarieAnn Klett Sat 10 Aug 2019 10:53 BST

In efforts to bring Christianity further under government control, authorities in China have erased the words "Bible", "God" and "Christ" from classic children's stories, including Robinson Crusoe.

China's Ministry of Education recently introduced a new school textbook to help fifth-grade students "understand other cultures," according to Asia News. Included in the textbook are four popular stories by foreign writers, including Robinson Crusoe, The Little Match Girl, and Vanka.However, each story is censored to remove any religious reference.

In Daniel Defoe's 18th century classic novel, castaway Robinson Crusoe discovers three Bibles inside a shipwreck, which he then uses as his moral compass while stranded on the island. However, the Chinese version eliminates the word "Bible," instead noting that Crusoe happened upon "a few books."

The original The Little Match Girl, written by Danish author Hans Christian Anderson, includes the line, "when a star falls, a soul goes to be with God." The redacted Chinese version, however, reads, "when a star falls, a person leaves this world."

Anton Chekhov's story Vanka includes a passage where a prayer is said inside a church, during which the word "Christ" is mentioned several times. In the Chinese version, that section is left out and every mention of the word Christ has been erased.

Asia News notes that the censorship of Christian religious elements isn't isolated to elementary schools. Several college professors also condemn classics containing religious words and confiscate them. Among these are The Count of Montecristo by A. Dumas, Resurrection by Lev Tolstoy, and Notre-Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo.

In 2018, China's ruling Communist Party implemented rules on religious practice and announced a five-year plan to make Christianity more compatible with socialism. Efforts to make the faith more "Chinese" reportedly included a rewrite of the New Testament using Buddhist scripture and Confucian teachings to establish a "correct understanding" of the text.

"There are outlines that the new Bible should not look westernized and [should look] Chinese and reflect Chinese ethics of Confucianism and socialism," Bob Fu, founder of ChinaAid, previously told The Christian Post...

https://www.christiantoda...133005.htm

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #15 posted 08/13/19 10:09am

OldFriends4Sal
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CherryMoon57 said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Prior to this I was reading a lot about Chinese men marrying African women in large numbers


Looks like this is not going down too well in Uganda, especially when done illegally: https://qz.com/africa/857...eir-women/



[Edited 8/1/19 8:26am]

Yes, China is moving in on African right now...

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #16 posted 08/24/19 6:21pm

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Religious groups have been swept up in a broader tightening of CCP control over civil society.
Freedom House

Religion in China

As religious observance in China grows, the Chinese Communist Party continues to toughen oversight, increase religious persecution, and attempt to coopt state-sanctioned religious organizations.

Last updated October 11, 2018

https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/religion-china

Introduction

Religious observance in China is on the rise. Amid China’s economic boom and rapid modernization, experts point to the emergence of a spiritual vacuum as a trigger for the growing number of religious believers, particularly adherents of Christianity and traditional Chinese religious groups. While China’s constitution allows religious belief, adherents across all religious organizations, from state-sanctioned to underground and banned groups, face intensifying persecution and repression.

Freedom and Regulation

Article 36 of the Chinese constitution says that citizens “enjoy freedom of religious belief.” It bans discrimination based on religion and forbids state organs, public organizations, or individuals from compelling citizens to believe in—or not believe in—any particular faith. The State Council, the government’s administrative authority, passed new regulations on religious affairs, which took effect in February 2018, to allow state-registered religious organizations to possess property, publish literature, train and approve clergy, and collect donations. Yet alongside these rights come heightened government controls. The revised rules include restrictions on religious schooling and the times and locations of religious celebrations, as well as monitoring of online religious activity and reporting donations that exceed 100,000 yuan (around $15,900).

Human Rights Watch’s China director, Sophie Richardson, says that while religious belief in China is protected by the constitution, the measures “do not guarantee [PDF] the right to practice or worship.” Religious practices are limited to “normal religious activities,” though “normal” is left undefined and can be broadly interpreted. The state recognizes five religions: Buddhism, Catholicism, Daoism, Islam, and Protestantism. The practice of any other faith is formally prohibited, although often tolerated, especially in the case of traditional Chinese beliefs. Religious organizations must register with one of five state-sanctioned patriotic religious associations, which are supervised by the State Administration for Religious Affairs (SARA).

https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/religion-china

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