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Thread started 07/31/19 6:35am

OldFriends4Sal
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Afghanistan 2019...

Africa, the Middle East are dealing with a conflict of 'modern' politics' and tribal affairs that continue and increase these senseless attacks

...32 people, mostly women and children, killed

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

Fifteen others were wounded, Mohibullah Mohib, a spokesman for the police chief in Farah province, told The Associated Press. Most of those wounded were in critical condition.

No one has claimed responsibility for attacking the bus, which was traveling on a highway between the cities of Herat and Kandahar, but Taliban fighters operate in the region and often use roadside bombs, the AP reported.

Wednesday's attack comes a day after a U.N. report was released documenting the nearly 4,000 Afghan civilian casualties in in the first half of 2019 -- 1,366 killed, 2,446 wounded.

The report concluded that most casualties -- about 52% -- continue to be caused by anti-government elements including the Taliban.

On-the-ground fighting remained the leading cause of casualties, at about one-third of the total, with improvised explosives, or IEDs, responsible for 28% and airstrikes contributing about 14%.

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Reply #1 posted 07/31/19 7:22am

poppys


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_in_Afghanistan_(2001–present)


War in Afghanistan (2001–present)

The War in Afghanistan (or the U.S. War in Afghanistan or the Afghanistan War), code named Operation Enduring Freedom (2001–14) and Operation Freedom's Sentinel (2015–present), followed the United States invasion of Afghanistan of 7 October 2001, when the U.S. and allies successfully drove out the Taliban from power in order to dismantle al-Qaeda and to deny it a safe base of operations in Afghanistan. Since the initial objectives were completed, a coalition of over 40 countries (including all NATO members) formed a security mission in the country.

The war has since mostly involved U.S. and allied Afghan government troops battling Taliban insurgents. The War in Afghanistan is the longest war in U.S. history, having overtaken the U.S. participation in the Vietnam War in 2010.

[Edited 7/31/19 7:38am]

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Reply #2 posted 07/31/19 7:51am

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Our war on terror sure went well. We suck.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #3 posted 07/31/19 4:08pm

IanRG

2freaky4church1 said:

Our war on terror sure went well. We suck.

.

Yes, we do, but the sucking goes back further than this. The current issue started with the closing of the border with the Soviet Union and its impact on nomadic farmers in the area.

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Reply #4 posted 07/31/19 4:30pm

poppys

IanRG said:

2freaky4church1 said:

Our war on terror sure went well. We suck.

.


Yes, we do, but the sucking goes back further than this. The current issue started with the closing of the border with the Soviet Union and its impact on nomadic farmers in the area.


nod I remember my father saying the Russians were complete idiots to take on the fierce Afghanis. He didn't live long enough to see the US do it too.


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Reply #5 posted 08/01/19 6:17am

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3 US Marines killed in roadside bomb attack in Afghanistan identified by officials

By

elizabeth mclaughlin

andluis martinez

Three U.S. Marines were killed by an improvised explosive device in northern Parwan province in Afghanistan on Monday, according to the U.S. military.Interested in Afghanistan?

Add Afghanistan as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Afghanistan news, video, and analysis from ABC News.Afghanistan

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On Tuesday evening, the Defense Department identified the three Marines as Cpl. Robert A. Hendriks, 25, of Locust Valley, New York; Sgt. Benjamin S. Hines, 31, of York, Pennsylvania; and Staff Sgt. Christopher K.A. Slutman, 43, of Newark, Delaware. They were all from the 25th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division, Marine Forces Reserve.

Three other Americans service members and an Afghan contractor were also wounded in the attack, which occurred near Bagram Air Base. The wounded were evacuated and receiving medical care.(MORE: Staff Sgt. Travis Atkins awarded Medal of Honor posthumously in White House ceremony)

Early reports on Monday from U.S. Forces Afghanistan incorrectly identified the contractor as an American who had also been killed, but an updated statement on Tuesday corrected that the contractor was actually an Afghan civilian who was alive and "treated along with other injured civilians."

"We feel and mourn the loss of these Americans with their families and loved ones. They volunteered to protect their country. We will continue our mission," said Gen. Scott Miller, Commanding General of Resolute Support and U.S. Forces Afghanistan.

In a congressional hearing on Tuesday, Navy Secretary Richard Spencer confirmed that the three dead American service members were Marines.The Kentland Volunteer Fire Department identified one of those Marines Monday as Staff Sgt. Christopher Slutman, who served in their department as well as the New York City Fire Department for 19 years.

"Through this trying time, we will remember Chris for the father, husband, brother, son, and friend that he was, the moral character he displayed daily, and the courage and conviction to serve his fellow Americans, both at home and abroad," the department wrote in a Facebook post."We ask for your thoughts and prayers for his firehouse brothers, his fellow Marines, his friends – but most of all, his family," the post read.

Prior to Monday's attack, there had been a total of four American troops killed in Afghanistan in 2019: Sgt. Cameron Meddock, Staff Sgt. Joshua Z. Beale, Spc. Joseph P. Collette, and Sgt. 1st Class Will D. Lindsay.There are 14,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan, many of whom train, advise and assist Afghan forces in their fight against the Taliban.

In February, acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said he had not received orders from President Donald Trump to reduce the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan by half, but U.S. military planners had been tasked with a possible troop reduction after internal discussions began late last year, according to U.S. officials.

U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Amb. Zalmay Khalilzad has led direct talks with the Taliban which resulted last month on an agreement "in draft" related to American troop withdrawal and the Taliban's commitment to deny safe haven to terror groups. However, no final decisions have been made.

Afghan security forces gather at the site of Monday's suicide attack that killed three american service members near the Bagram Air Base, north of Kabul, Afghanistan, April 9, 2019.

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/american-service-members-contractor-killed-attack-afghanistan/story?id=62251531

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Reply #6 posted 08/01/19 7:56am

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Robert Fisk says we should leave the entire Middle East.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #7 posted 08/01/19 4:41pm

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U.S. preparing to withdraw thousands of troops from Afghanistan in initial deal with Taliban

Dan Lamothe, John Hudson, Pamela Constable
The Trump administration is preparing to withdraw thousands of troops from Afghanistan in exchange for concessions from the Taliban, including a cease-fire and a renunciation of al-Qaeda, as part of an initial deal to end the nearly 18-year-old war, U.S. officials say.

a group of people standing in a military uniform: Soldiers carry the casket of Spec. Michael Nance at Dover Air Force Base on July 31 in Delaware. Nance and Pfc. Brandon Kreischer were killed on July 29 in Afghanistan’s Uruzgan province.

The agreement, which would require the Taliban to begin negotiating a larger peace deal directly with the Afghan government, could cut the number of American troops in the country from roughly 14,000 to between 8,000 and 9,000, the officials said. That number would be nearly the same as when Donald Trump took office.

The plan has taken shape after months of negotiations between the Taliban and Zalmay Khalilzad, an Afghan-born American diplomat who was appointed by the Trump administration last year to jump-start talks. Officials said an agreement could be finalized ahead of the Afghan presidential election in September, though they cautioned that Taliban leaders could delay and that significant challenges remain.

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The proposal is likely to be viewed skeptically by some U.S. and Afghan officials who question the Taliban’s honesty and wonder how the United States can verify whether Taliban leaders are following through. But if approved, it would be one of the most significant steps toward ending the war, a goal that increasingly has bipartisan support.

“I would say that they are 80 or 90 percent of the way there,” said one official, who like others spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss details of the emerging deal. “But there is still a long way to go on that last 10 or 20 percent.”

A Taliban spokesman, Zabiullah Mujahid, declined to comment about the likelihood of an initial agreement. In a brief telephone interview Thursday, he said he did not know when talks would resume.

“We are hopeful,” he said. “Things look promising that there will be a breakthrough. We hope there won’t be any obstacle, but it also depends on the seriousness of the Americans.”

Khalilzad said in a tweet Wednesday that he plans to resume his next round of talks with the Taliban in Qatar soon and that if the group does its part, an agreement will be finalized.

Additional cuts to U.S. forces would be negotiated as part of discussions involving the Taliban and the Afghan government, U.S. officials said.

Army Gen. Austin “Scott” Miller, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, is open to the proposal, two defense officials said, because he believes it would protect U.S. interests by maintaining a counterterrorism force that can strike the Islamic State and al-Qaeda. Miller, who took command in Kabul last September, previously has said that political negotiations are “absolutely” a key to ending the war.

“Neither side will win it militarily, and if neither side will win it militarily you have to move . . . towards a political settlement here,” he said in an interview with ABC News in February.

A spokesman for Miller, Army Col. Sonny Leggett, declined to comment.

U.S. officials acknowledged there are legitimate concerns that the Taliban might not break with al-Qaeda, as Washington has demanded, or stand up to the Islamic State. Still, officials may be content with a partial troop withdrawal that opens the door to additional negotiations and keeps the counterterrorism mission alive as the status quo becomes politically untenable.

The Taliban has refused to talk with the Afghan government, which it calls a puppet regime, until it reaches a deal with the United States on its troops.

A Pentagon spokesman, Cmdr. Sean Robertson, said the Defense Department has not been ordered to withdraw forces from Afghanistan — a point that other officials describing the potential deal also stressed. Robertson declined to discuss what a partial troop withdrawal could include, saying the department does not comment on military planning.

“Our strategy in Afghanistan is conditions-based,” Robertson said. “Our troops will remain in Afghanistan at appropriate levels so long as their presence is required to safeguard U.S. interests.”

Afghan government officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the discussions, said they expected that an initial U.S. deal with the Taliban would include some U.S. troop reductions but did not know what numbers or timetable might be proposed.

The officials said they were pleased to hear that a U.S. proposal would require the Taliban to meet with them. But some expressed concerns that a partial pullout would embolden the Taliban.

“The Americans call this a peace negotiation, but the Taliban definitely perceive it as a withdrawal negotiation,” one Afghan official said.

A State Department official rejected that view, saying the United States is pursuing “peace” not “withdrawal.”

In recent weeks, U.S. visitors to Afghanistan have included Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Marine Gen. Kenneth F. McKenzie, the chief of U.S. Central Command; and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

The task of explaining the negotiations in Afghanistan to the American public has fallen to Pompeo. On Monday, when asked whether he expected a reduction in U.S. forces before the 2020 election, he said, “That’s my directive.” The following day, he clarified his remarks, saying that “there is no deadline” for the mission there and accusing the news media of misinterpreting his words.

The president wants to draw down forces “just as quickly as we can get there, consistent with his other mission set, which is to ensure that we have an adequate risk reduction plan for making sure that there is not terror that’s conducted from Afghanistan,” Pompeo told reporters aboard his plane en route to Thailand.

Trump said this week that he did not know whether all troops will come home from the war before the U.S. election. “We hope in the coming days that we will be able to urge the Taliban to talk,” he said.

Cutting the troop level to 9,000 would require commanders in the field to make some tough decisions on which bases to close and which missions to curtail, and on whether to scale back advising Afghan troops.

One person with familiarity with Miller’s thinking said the general is sure to want to keep open Bagram air base, from which the United States launches counterterrorism strikes in Afghanistan's eastern mountains. The military also is likely to maintain a significant presence in Kabul, where there are numerous bases, and some troops at Kandahar Airfield, the largest U.S. base in the south.

Meanwhile, U.S. officials say that German troops are likely to keep a presence in northern Afghanistan and that Italian troops will remain in the west.

But some Afghan officials fear that a preliminary deal outlining a U.S. withdrawal could weaken their negotiating position during intra-Afghan talks and eventually leave them alone to fight the battle-hardened Taliban.

One of the concerns is that gains made since the fall of the Taliban could be erased if the group, which seeks to reestablish an Islamic emirate, becomes part of a power-sharing government. Women’s rights groups are especially concerned, given the Taliban’s restrictions on women and opposition to educating girls. But the State Department says it has secured agreement with the Afghan government on “next steps on the Afghan peace process.”

In the absence of formal talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban, the militant Islamist group has been willing to meet with a delegation of Afghan leaders in Qatar in recent weeks, with the understanding that the Afghans are not acting in an official government capacity. Though the Taliban officials were reportedly welcoming, progress was not made on preserving fundamental freedoms, according to media reports citing peop...o attended the meetings.

The State Department declined to comment on the details of the drawdown agreement, but an official said that “any future reductions or withdrawal of forces will be conditions-based.”

State Department officials say a breakthrough hinges on an agreement on four issues: counterterrorism assurances, troop withdrawal, intra-Afghan dialogue and a comprehensive cease-fire. In March, Khalilzad said that he reached agreement on a draft containing the first two points but that a final deal would not conclude “until everything is agreed.”

Khalilzad spent the past 10 days in Kabul for consultations with Afghans in what he described to one reporter as his “most productive visit” there since becoming special envoy. Next he will travel to Pakistan and then Qatar to continue talks with the Taliban, a State Department official said.

In an another indication that a force-reduction deal may soon be reached, the Afghan government named a 15-member team Wednesday to negotiate directly with the Taliban. Meetings with the Taliban and the Afghan government would proceed after the U.S. and Taliban officials reach their preliminary deal.

The discussions continue even as violence across the country remains pervasive, with the Taliban controlling more territory than at any point since 2001.

On Sunday, Afghan vice-presidential candidate Amrullah Saleh was targeted in an attack in Kabul that left at least 20 people dead. He has long been an adversary of the Taliban.

On Monday, two U.S. soldiers — Spec. Michael Nance, 24, and Pfc. Brandon Kreischer, 20 — were killed in Uruzgan province in what officials have described as an “insider” attack by an Afghan soldier. Fourteen U.S. troops have died this year from injuries sustained in the conflict.

Last year was the deadliest year for civilians during the entirety of the Afghan conflict, with 3,804 civilian deaths and 7,000 wounded, according to the United Nations.

Nearly 2,400 American troops have died in the country since the war began in 2001 and more than 20,000 have been wounded, according to the Pentagon.

dan.lamothe@washpost.com

john.hudson@washpost.com

pamela.constable@washpost.com

Constable reported from Kabul. Sayed Salahuddin in Kabul and Missy Ryan in Washington contributed to this report.

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Reply #8 posted 08/04/19 8:35pm

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Afghan TV Bus Bombed In Kabul, Killing Two

https://www.rferl.org/a/afghan-tv-bus-bombed-in-kabul-killing-two/30091889.html

KABUL -- Two people were killed and at least three others wounded in a blast targeting media workers in Kabul, Afghan officials say.

Interior Ministry spokesman Nasrat Rahimi said that a magnetic explosive device attached to a bus carrying employees of the Afghan television station Khurshid TV blew up during the evening rush hour on August 4.

The bus driver and a pedestrian were killed, Rahimi said, while two Khurshid TV employees and a second passerby were wounded in the blast.

Samiullah Aminy, the news director with Khurshid TV, confirmed that a cameraman and an audio presenter were wounded.

No one claimed responsibility for the attack.

The Taliban and Islamic State militant groups are active in the Afghan capital. They have both attacked reporters in the past over what the militants view as biased or negative coverage.

In June, the Taliban warned it would target Afghan media organizations if they did continued broadcasting anti-Taliban announcements paid for by the government.

"We don't broadcast anti-Taliban advertisements but it is clear that freedom of expression is under constant threat in Afghanistan," Aminy said.

President Ashraf Ghani condemned the attack, writing in a tweet: "Deliberately targeting media and civilians is a war crime and those responsible will be held accountable."

Afghanistan was the deadliest country in the world to be a journalist in 2018, with at least 13 deaths.

Violence in Afghanistan has spiked in recent weeks as both Afghan forces and Taliban militants attempt to increase their leverage in ongoing peace talks.

U.S. and Taliban negotiators began an eighth round of peace talks in Qatar on August 3.

More than 1,500 civilians were killed or wounded in Afghanistan's conflict last month -- the highest figure since May 2017, according to the United Nations United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA).

UNAMA says that 1,366 civilians were killed during the first six months of this year, a 21-percent decrease on the same period last year.

With reporting by AP, Reuters, and AFP

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Reply #9 posted 08/07/19 3:38pm

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We owe them so.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #10 posted 08/17/19 6:56am

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Trump and senior aides discuss withdrawal from Afghanistan as talks with Taliban advance

U.S. negotiators have made significant advances in recent talks with the Taliban, and the two sides are close to announcing an agreement on an initial U.S. troop withdrawal, along with plans to start direct discussions between the militants and the Afghan government, according to American and foreign officials.

President Trump met Friday with Cabinet officials and other senior national security advisers for a briefing by Zalmay Khalilzad, the chief U.S. envoy to the talks. Attendees at the meeting, held at Trump’s New Jersey golf resort, included Vice President Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Joseph F. Dunford Jr., CIA Director Gina Haspel and White House national security adviser John Bolton.

An initial withdrawal under the proposed deal would include roughly 5,000 of the 14,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan. In exchange, the Taliban would agree to renounce al-Qaeda and to bar it from activities such as fundraising, recruiting, training and operational planning in areas under Taliban control.

A statement after the meeting offered no details, with Hogan Gidley, the principal deputy White House press secretary, saying only that “discussions centered around our ongoing negotiations and eventual peace and reconciliation agreement with the Taliban and the government of Afghanistan.”

“The meeting went very well,” Gidley said.

In an evening tweet, Trump called the meeting “very good” and wrote, “Many on the opposite side of this 19 year war, and us, are looking to make a deal - if possible!”

Earlier, a White House official cautioned that it might not immediately result in a decision or an announcement.

In addition to the withdrawal, the agreement is expected to include a statement of Taliban willingness to sit down with representatives of Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s government to develop a political framework for peace, something that has long been a sticking point in the U.S.-Taliban talks.

Last week, as technical experts wound up the latest round of U.S.-Taliban meetings in Doha, Qatar, Khalilzad traveled to Germany, which is in charge of shepherding the inter-Afghan negotiations, and to Oslo, where those discussions are likely to be held.

Throughout the U.S.-Taliban talks, critics in Kabul and Washington have questioned U.S. willingness to bypass the Afghan government in its eagerness to meet Trump’s insistence on withdrawal.

The Taliban has not publicly expressed any change in its refusal to negotiate with Ghani. But U.S. officials have said throughout the months of negotiations that any phased withdrawal agreement would be explicitly linked to the start of inter-Afghan talks.

Once the agreement is announced, U.S. officials expect the two Afghan sides to move directly into talks. The pact is also expected to reference a cease-fire as part of the initial round of those negotiations, although it is unlikely to immediately halt the fighting, according to the officials, who spoke about the status of the closed-door negotiations on the condition of anonymity.

It is expected that the Afghan talks would develop a road map for Taliban inclusion in government and would address matters such as the role of women in Afghanistan and other social issues.

Assuming the talks continue as outlined, discussions between the Afghan sides would also consider the extent to which the U.S. military could maintain a residual counterterrorism presence in Afghanistan, something that many in the administration and Congress think is imperative.

Following the initial U.S. withdrawal, however, the bulk of American troops would leave within about 18 months. Germany and Italy, which have sizable numbers of troops in Afghanistan under NATO auspices, would expect to time their own withdrawals to the U.S. departure, officials said.

After numerous reports of military progress or imminent peace throughout the 18-year war, all sides have cautioned that hopes of announcing a deal before the end of August could fall apart or be delayed. Khalilzad, who arrived in Washington late Monday, expects to return to Doha, where his Taliban counterparts will report on their own leadership consultations.

U.S. officials are hoping that the Afghan parties, once they have agreed to meet, will jointly call for a delay in Afghanistan’s presidential election, scheduled for Sept. 28.

In public statements, Ghani — running for a new term — has rejected any delay, and last week he said the vote was “vital” to the nation. His chief challenger, former national security adviser Hanif Atmar, has dropped out of the race. Others among the 16 candidates challenging Ghani have said the election must be delayed whether or not a viable agreement is announced.

Some in Congress are also expected to object to the deal, questioning whether the Taliban, whose military position and control of territory is better than it has been since the start of the war in 2001, can be trusted to break relations with al-Qaeda. There are also concerns that dissent within Taliban ranks over any deal will prompt some fighters to join a growing Islamic State presence in Afghanistan.

Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.), responding to initial reports of a deal, said in a statement that “to trust the Taliban to control al-Qaeda” and other militant groups in Afghanistan “as a replacement for a U.S. counterterrorism force would be a bigger mistake than Obama’s Iranian nuclear deal.”

.....

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/trump-and-senior-aides-discuss-withdrawal-from-afghanistan-as-talks-with-taliban-advance/ar-AAFTACv?ocid=spartanntp

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Reply #11 posted 08/17/19 8:17am

poppys

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Reply #12 posted 08/18/19 11:27am

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IS claims deadly Kabul suicide attack

a view of a city: An explosion at a wedding in Kabul came just as the US and the Taliban are widely expected to sign off on a deal that would see American troops begin to depart AfghanistanAn Afghan man inspects a damaged wedding hall after a blast in Kabul, Afghanistan August 18, 2019.Afghan men investigate in a wedding hall after a deadly bomb blast in Kabul on August 18, 2019.

Joy and celebration turned into horror and carnage when an Islamic State suicide bomber targeted a packed Afghan wedding hall, killing at least 63 people in the deadliest attack to rock Kabul in months, officials and witnesses said Sunday.

The massive blast, which took place late Saturday in west Kabul, underscores both the inadequacy of Afghanistan's security forces and the scale of the problem they face as Washington and the Taliban finalise a deal to reduce the US military presence in Afghanistan and hopefully build a roadmap to a ceasefire.

The groom recalled greeting smiling guests in the afternoon, before seeing their bodies being carried out hours later.

The attack "changed my happiness to sorrow", the young man, who gave his name as Mirwais, told local TV station Tolo News.

"My family, my bride are in shock, they cannot even speak. My bride keeps fainting," he said.

ministry spokesman Nasrat Rahimi said a suicide bomber carried out the attack, with at least 63 people killed and 182 injured.

"Among the wounded are women and children," Rahimi said.

Afghan weddings are epic and vibrant affairs, with hundreds or often thousands of guests celebrating for hours inside industrial-scale wedding halls where men are usually segregated from women and children.

"The wedding guests were dancing and celebrating the party when the blast happened," recounted Munir Ahmad, 23, who was seriously injured and whose cousin was among the dead.

"Following the explosion, there was total chaos. Everyone was screaming and crying for their loved ones," he told AFP from his bed in a local hospital, where he was being treated for shrapnel wounds.

Images from inside the hall showed blood-stained bodies on the ground along with pieces of flesh and torn clothes, hats, sandals and bottles of mineral water. The huge blast ripped parts of the ceiling off.

The wedding was largely a gathering of Shia Muslims, who frequently are targeted in Sunni-majority Afghanistan, particularly by IS.

The Sunni extremist group's Afghan affiliate claimed responsibility for the blast, saying the bomber targeted the wedding because it was Shia.

Wedding guest Hameed Quresh told AFP the young bride and groom were saying their vows when the bomb went off.

"We fainted following the blast, and we don't know who brought us to the hospital," sobbed Quresh, who lost one brother and was himself wounded.

Another guest told Tolo that about 1,200 people had been invited. With low security, weddings are seen as easy targets.

The attack sent a wave of grief through a city grimly accustomed to atrocities and garnered broad condemnation.

President Ashraf Ghani called it "barbaric", while Afghanistan's chief executive Abdullah Abdullah described it as a "crime against humanity".

As a sign of mourning, Ghani postponed celebrations which were scheduled for Monday to mark 100 years of Afghan independence from Britain.

While the police and army claim they prevent most bombings from ever happening, insurgents pull off horrific attacks with chilling regularity.

On July 28, at least 20 people were killed when attackers targeted Ghani's running mate Amrullah Saleh during presidential election campaigning.

The issue also goes to the heart of a prospective deal between the US and the Islamist extremist Taliban that would see Washington begin to withdraw its approximately 14,000 s

oldiers from Afghanistan.

Several US sources suggested in recent days that an agreement could be imminent, but some points remain to be resolved.

US peace envoy Zalmay Khalilzad, who condemned the "heinous attack" on the wedding party, could return to the region in the coming days to continue or even finalise the negotiations.

"We must accelerate the Afghan Peace Process including intra-Afghan negotiations. Success here will put Afghans in a much stronger position to defeat ISIS," he tweeted.

The deal relies on Taliban guarantees they will stop jihadist groups such as Al-Qaeda and IS from using Afghanistan as a safe haven.

Saturday's attack suggests any such promise would be tough to keep.

The "Taliban cannot absolve themselves of blame, for they provide platform for terrorists," Ghani said.

Few believe such a deal will bring quick peace and Afghans fear the Taliban could return, eroding hard-won rights for women and leading to a spiralling civil war.

In the northern province of Balkh, a roadside bomb killed 11 members of the same family, officials said, blaming the Taliban.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
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Reply #13 posted 08/19/19 5:24pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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it is not easy to beat an enemy like this... no regard for life or how they operate with no rules no limts no regulations... as our troops are locked into ridiculous ROEs and rules the enemy will never follow.

Some troop kills a man with a WMD and one of the dead guy's buddies say "it was not an WMD it was a koran" and the troop has to prove it?

If "Assault" rifles are banned... COPS first! If they want to TRY to take them from the PEOPLE they should set the example!
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Reply #14 posted 08/20/19 8:50am

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We are the enemy.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #15 posted 08/22/19 4:12pm

PennyPurple

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Afghanistan is a war zone, what do you expect?

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Reply #16 posted 08/22/19 6:40pm

poppys

The reason why we can't "win" in Afghanistan is the same reason the UK and the USSR didn't "win". Ditto the Taliban.

You can't successfully take and hold one side of the mountains - and then try to take and hold the other side. Not to mention the Afghans are fierce stubborn fighters who are fucking sick of people taking over their country.

Read the rich history of the place and try not to weep over what it has become due to constant "intervention".

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Reply #17 posted 08/23/19 8:34pm

OldFriends4Sal
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US, Taliban due to resume peace push at Doha talks

The US and the Taliban said they would return to talks in Qatar on Friday aimed at bringing a close to Afghanistan's 18-year conflict.

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid told a media WhatsApp group that day two of the ninth round of negotiations in Doha would "restart after evening prayers and will continue till late evening".

A source close to the US negotiating team confirmed to AFP that "talks will resume this afternoon".

The US, which invaded Afghanistan and toppled the Taliban in 2001, wants to withdraw thousands of troops but only in return for the insurgent group renouncing Al-Qaeda and curbing attacks.

Washington is hoping to strike an agreement with the Taliban by September 1 -- ahead of Afghan polls due the same month, and US presidential polls due in 2020.

Taliban lead negotiator Abbas Stanikzai told AFP Thursday that talks had been "going well".

The talks are expected to focus on establishing a timeline for the US withdrawal of its more than 13,000 troops.

"We've been there for 18 years, it's ridiculous," US President Donald Trump told reporters Tuesday.

"We are negotiating with the government and we are negotiating with the Taliban," he added.

"We have good talks going and we will see what happens."

But thorny issues remain unresolved, including power-sharing with the Taliban, the role of regional powers including Pakistan and India, and the fate of Afghanistan's incumbent administration.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/us-taliban-due-to-resume-peace-push-at-doha-talks/ar-AAGeD6V?ocid=spartanntp

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Reply #18 posted 09/05/19 11:56pm

JorisE73

2freaky4church1 said:

Robert Fisk says we should leave the entire Middle East.


Typical. Make a mess and then split. Teh US should stay there and clean up the mess they made.

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Reply #19 posted 09/06/19 4:54am

PennyPurple

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JorisE73 said:

2freaky4church1 said:

Robert Fisk says we should leave the entire Middle East.


Typical. Make a mess and then split. Teh US should stay there and clean up the mess they made.

After 18 years, it's a mess that we can't fix and we shouldn't have tried to begin with. There will always be war in the Middle East whether we are there or not.

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Reply #20 posted 09/06/19 6:00am

JorisE73

PennyPurple said:

JorisE73 said:


Typical. Make a mess and then split. Teh US should stay there and clean up the mess they made.

After 18 years, it's a mess that we can't fix and we shouldn't have tried to begin with. There will always be war in the Middle East whether we are there or not.


That's a lazy and frankly douchy cop out.
The US is part of the problem there and a big part of the mess there was made by the US, so they should clean it up and not run like some douchbag, bratty loser.

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Reply #21 posted 09/06/19 3:24pm

PennyPurple

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JorisE73 said:

PennyPurple said:

After 18 years, it's a mess that we can't fix and we shouldn't have tried to begin with. There will always be war in the Middle East whether we are there or not.


That's a lazy and frankly douchy cop out.
The US is part of the problem there and a big part of the mess there was made by the US, so they should clean it up and not run like some douchbag, bratty loser.

What do you think we've been trying to do for 18 years? It hasn't worked. We've tried to train their troops, we've given them weapons, we help them at every turn, and IN turn the ones that we've given weapons to, and trained have turned against us and kill us. The middle east is so destabilized with the warring factions, and we will never be able to control that, we were never able to control and never will be.


What has your country done to help?

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Reply #22 posted 09/07/19 9:05am

Cloudbuster

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It's been worth it for the opium. stoned

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Reply #23 posted 09/08/19 7:59pm

OldFriends4Sal
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Afghans welcome Trump’s cancellation of Taliban peace talks

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/afghans-welcome-trump-s-cancellation-of-taliban-peace-talks/ar-AAGYXAj?ocid=spartanntp

KABUL —Afghan officials, analysts and citizens on Sunday cautiously welcomed President Trump’s announcement that he was calling off the troubled U.S.-Taliban peace talks aimed at ending the 18-year conflict.

After weeks of mounting uncertainty and suspicion here, with insurgent violence raging across the country even as a bilateral deal neared, Trump’s stunning tweets late Saturday seemed to burst the pent-up tension across Afghan society and offer a moment of relief — even as they created new fears over what would come next.

The Taliban, for its part, waited all day before issuing a coolly worded statement saying it had been ready to sign a peace agreement with the United States, but Trump’s impatience had sabotaged the process and the insurgents would now continue their “jihad” against foreign “occupation.”

The days before Trump’s bombshell were filled with conflicting signals from Taliban and U.S. leaders. While U.S. negotiators said a deal was imminent, Taliban attacks intensified...

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #24 posted 09/08/19 11:50pm

JorisE73

PennyPurple said:

JorisE73 said:


That's a lazy and frankly douchy cop out.
The US is part of the problem there and a big part of the mess there was made by the US, so they should clean it up and not run like some douchbag, bratty loser.

What do you think we've been trying to do for 18 years? It hasn't worked. We've tried to train their troops, we've given them weapons, we help them at every turn, and IN turn the ones that we've given weapons to, and trained have turned against us and kill us. The middle east is so destabilized with the warring factions, and we will never be able to control that, we were never able to control and never will be.


What has your country done to help?


lol The Netherlands are actually succesfully rebuilding the mess the US made since 2002 and will stay there for the time being. The sad thing is is that the Dutch troops are dependant on US support.

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Reply #25 posted 09/09/19 4:43am

PennyPurple

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JorisE73 said:

PennyPurple said:

What do you think we've been trying to do for 18 years? It hasn't worked. We've tried to train their troops, we've given them weapons, we help them at every turn, and IN turn the ones that we've given weapons to, and trained have turned against us and kill us. The middle east is so destabilized with the warring factions, and we will never be able to control that, we were never able to control and never will be.


What has your country done to help?


lol The Netherlands are actually succesfully rebuilding the mess the US made since 2002 and will stay there for the time being. The sad thing is is that the Dutch troops are dependant on US support.

I think just about everybody is dependant on the US's support.

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Reply #26 posted 09/09/19 6:10am

OldFriends4Sal
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PennyPurple said:

JorisE73 said:


lol The Netherlands are actually succesfully rebuilding the mess the US made since 2002 and will stay there for the time being. The sad thing is is that the Dutch troops are dependant on US support.

I think just about everybody is dependant on the US's support.

That is something president Obama expressed, that people want the US to risk the lives of our people, even though the problems affect everyone

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #27 posted 09/11/19 6:06am

JorisE73

PennyPurple said:

JorisE73 said:


lol The Netherlands are actually succesfully rebuilding the mess the US made since 2002 and will stay there for the time being. The sad thing is is that the Dutch troops are dependant on US support.

I think just about everybody is dependant on the US's support.


Well, most countries will take more chances with a bully in there corner.

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Reply #28 posted 09/12/19 2:57pm

jaawwnn

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OldFriends4Sale said:



PennyPurple said:




JorisE73 said:




lol The Netherlands are actually succesfully rebuilding the mess the US made since 2002 and will stay there for the time being. The sad thing is is that the Dutch troops are dependant on US support.



I think just about everybody is dependant on the US's support.




That is something president Obama expressed, that people want the US to risk the lives of our people, even though the problems affect everyone


At face value this is either the most naive take in existence or just more pro empire rhetoric.
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Reply #29 posted 09/12/19 3:44pm

PennyPurple

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