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Thread started 07/18/19 9:23pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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CNN 2020 Democratic Debate July 30-31

A good mix of the front runners spread a cross both nights.

https://m.huffpost.com/us...dffcde4b0a

Time: 8 to 10 p.m. ET
Location: Fox Theatre in Detroit, Michigan
.

How to watch the second 2020 Democratic debate

TV broadcast: CNN
Free online stream: CNN.com, CNN apps, or on fuboTV – start a free trial
Additional coverage: Watch CBSN for live coverage of the debates before, during and after
.
Night 1:
Montana Gov. Steve Bullock

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg

Former Rep. John Delaney (Md.)

Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.)

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (Texas)

Rep. Tim Ryan (Ohio)

Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.)

Author Marianne Williamson


Night 2:
Sen. Michael Bennet (Colo.)

Former Vice President and former Sen. Joe Biden (Del.)

Sen. Cory Booker (N.J.)

Former Housing Secretary and former San Antonio, Texas, Mayor Julián Castro

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (Hawaii)

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (N.Y.)

Sen. Kamala Harris (Calif.)

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee

Entrepreneur Andrew Yang
[Edited 7/30/19 7:49am]
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Reply #1 posted 07/19/19 4:34am

poppys

[Folks, please stay on topic. Do not derail this thread snip - luv4u]

lurking



giphy.gif

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Reply #2 posted 07/24/19 7:06pm

Ugot2shakesumt
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Thank you luv4u

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Reply #3 posted 07/26/19 4:43am

PennyPurple

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Mayor Pete came out with a great plan, sounds good to me anyways. Hopefully this will bring his numbers up a bit.

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Reply #4 posted 07/30/19 8:04am

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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It's going to be interesting tonight. Will the democrats continue to shoot themselves in the foot?. It was bizarre how all they had to do was sit still and let let the craziness of the Trump administration do all the talking. All they had to do was shut up and look sane. But a lot of these so-called progressives had to open their mouths and make the democrats look just as bonkers.

.

i don't want to see anyone make any wild promises or accusations, just keep cool, make the case for sanity and differentiate from the GOP by simply being diplomatic.

.

And crazy Marrianne Williamson and Yang need to go as soon as possible

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Reply #5 posted 07/30/19 3:42pm

RodeoSchro

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Here is a great article from the guy who played unrepentant serial adulterer Donald J. Trump in Hillary Clinton's practice debates. I think if I was on the stage tonight, I'd lob some of these bombs at unrepentant serial adulterer Donald J. Trump and see how hard they land:

https://www.politico.com/...ton-227487

Before any of them takes the debate stage on Tuesday and Wednesday, the 2020 Democratic candidates will already have put in dozens of hours each preparing. But here’s what they need to understand: Nothing they do to prepare for the primary debates will feel remotely similar to when the nominee faces Donald Trump in a debate.

My perspective on this is unique: I was assigned the role of playing Trump during Hillary Clinton’s general election debate prep in 2016. His stand-in. Her sparring partner. The ball machine. Over 17 years of working for her, I’ve argued with and annoyed Hillary plenty. But this time, I was supposed to. And without question, she did the debates right. They were her most successful three days between the high of accepting the nomination and the low of Election Day.

Keep reading, this gets really good!

.

[Edited 7/30/19 16:53pm]

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's Palladin
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Reply #6 posted 07/30/19 3:51pm

2freaky4church
1

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Bernie is about to surprise.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #7 posted 07/30/19 4:05pm

YESWECAN

Ugot2shakesumthin said:

It's going to be interesting tonight. Will the democrats continue to shoot themselves in the foot?. It was bizarre how all they had to do was sit still and let let the craziness of the Trump administration do all the talking. All they had to do was shut up and look sane. But a lot of these so-called progressives had to open their mouths and make the democrats look just as bonkers.

.

i don't want to see anyone make any wild promises or accusations, just keep cool, make the case for sanity and differentiate from the GOP by simply being diplomatic.

.

And crazy Marrianne Williamson and Yang need to go as soon as possible

I felt the same way watching the first round. I won't vote for any of these moonbats, but I thought the Castro guy did ok.

disclaimer - I did not watch every minute biggrin

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Reply #8 posted 07/30/19 4:24pm

Missmusicluver
72

I watched to first set of debates back in June and thought Julian Castro did very well, but am a little surprised his numbers didn't go up any. Hope Beto does better, and I like Elizabeth and Kamala too. I know it is still early but at this point I am leaning towards Biden though. I really don't want them to start attacking each other but get their points across respectfully and bring to forefront about election security vulnerability and how dangerous it is. This needs to be a big issue going into the fall and next year.

Love is God, God is love, girls and boys love God above.
RIP Sweet Prince
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Reply #9 posted 07/30/19 5:10pm

PennyPurple

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The Tim guy, couldn't even put his hand over his heart. He needs to GTFOH

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Reply #10 posted 07/30/19 5:16pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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Let's hope CNN does a better job than the msnbc ones in June. Those were a mess in moderation.

so far, it looks better. The candidates have been given time to make their opening statements un rushed.

[Edited 7/30/19 17:19pm]

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Reply #11 posted 07/30/19 5:27pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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I have to admit I really like Bernie. And he sure does know how to make a compelling argument.

.

Warren is coming off more commanding than last debate so far.

.

[Edited 7/30/19 17:33pm]

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Reply #12 posted 07/30/19 6:21pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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Warren has a great sound bite that's going to go viral responding to John Delaney about what we can do and why anyone would run for President on what we cannot do.

"I don't understand why anybody goes to all the trouble of running for President of the United States just to talk about what we really can't do and shouldn't fight for."

.

shes doing good.

.

John is doing good too taking up the pragmatic point of view, but that must have stung. Warren didn't bat and eye when she shut him down.

.

Edit.

its already gone viral with a nice animated gif too. lol

Delaney is done

lol

[Edited 7/30/19 18:34pm]

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Reply #13 posted 07/30/19 6:52pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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Sofar Warren is doing best in my opinion. She really stepped it up. I had already written her off after her last debate. Shows you can come back and show the doubters wrong.

I still think

Marrianne Williamson is done.
Tim Ryan is done.

[Edited 7/30/19 19:04pm]

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Reply #14 posted 07/30/19 7:31pm

PennyPurple

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Ugot2shakesumthin said:

Sofar Warren is doing best in my opinion. She really stepped it up. I had already written her off after her last debate. Shows you can come back and show the doubters wrong.

I still think

Marrianne Williamson is done.
Tim Ryan is done.

[Edited 7/30/19 19:04pm]

Agree, Marianne and Tim Ryan should be done.

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Reply #15 posted 07/30/19 7:48pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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Gotta give Sanders props for a closing statement that included a plug for his website on national TV for donations to his campaign. lol


surprised no one else did the same.

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Reply #16 posted 07/30/19 7:50pm

PennyPurple

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Amy needs to start wearing Purple. Get those Minnesota voters to vote for her.

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Reply #17 posted 07/30/19 7:53pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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Props to Warren! I am not convinced she is the best candidate...yet. But she certainly showed everyone up tonight. It was her night.

[Edited 7/30/19 19:54pm]

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Reply #18 posted 07/30/19 8:06pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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I am glad there were pragmatic candidates airing their concerns about the far left sloganeering. All the candidates need to hear it. This is a coddled affair with friendly candidates. They need to hear what the not-so-friendly opposition is going to be gunning them with. They need to be prepared. Warren did good shutting Delaney down on that argument, but it's important that they don't drink the Kool-Aid without pushback.

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Reply #19 posted 07/31/19 5:20am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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moderator

Liberals Warren and Sanders unite against moderates: 6 takeaways from night one of the Democratic debateBy Melanie Mason, Los Angeles Times

8 hrs ago

From left, Democratic presidential candidates Marianne Williamson, Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio), Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke, former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper, and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock during the Democratic Presidential Debate at the Fox Theatre in Detroit on Tuesday, July 30, 2019. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/TNS) **FOR USE WITH THIS STORY ONLY**

Elizabeth Warren gave Bernie Sanders a side hug and an enthusiastic "good to see you!" at the start of Tuesday's Democratic debate.

And for more than 2 1/2 hours, the nonaggression pact between the progressive standard bearers held steady.

Warren and Sanders stood at the center of the debate stage in Detroit, and were united in fending off attacks by their moderate challengers, who strove to distinguish themselves as more pragmatic and more electable than the lefty pair.

The other candidates appearing on stage Tuesday were Montana Gov. Steve Bullock; South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg; former Maryland Rep. John Delaney; former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper; Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar; former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan and spiritual self-help author Marianne Williamson.A guide to the 24 Democratic contenders who want to face Trump

The rest of the field will convene on Wednesday for night two of the debate, which will feature a hotly anticipated rematch between former Vice President Joe Biden and California Sen. Kamala Harris, who clashed in the previous debate over school busing.

Here's what stood out as the big takeaways from the crowded 10-candidate face-off:

———

MORAL SIGNALING THROUGH HEALTH CARE: Democrats dug in on a meaty debate on health care policy, which may have left viewers' heads spinning on the distinctions between a sweeping Medicare for All, a smaller-scale public option and many variations in between. It was a lengthy back-and-forth, with debate moderators goading candidates to weigh in on their rivals' stances.

But along with laying out policy details, candidates framed their health care stances in moral terms, trying to cast their approach as more empathic and righteous than their rivals.

For Sanders and Warren, only a government-run health care overhaul is sufficient to fix the current system.

"This isn't funny!" exclaimed Warren, quieting the audience's titters as she challenged CNN anchor Jake Tapper for interrupting her.

"The basic profit model of an insurance company is taking as much money as you can in premiums and pay out as little as possible in health care coverage," she added. "That is not working for Americans."

But moderates said a more incremental approach — one that is more likely to pass Congress — is more humane in confronting urgent need.

Klobuchar defended her preference for a public option to compete with private health insurance plans.

"That is the easiest way to move forward quickly," she said.

———

GOOD NEWS/BAD NEWS FOR DELANEY: The former Maryland congressman was the first prominent Democrat to jump into the 2020 fray but has had a hard time winning attention from his better-known rivals. On Tuesday, he got a substantial amount of screen time, a boon to a candidate desperate for exposure.

But Delaney, a centrist, will perhaps be best known for setting up strong zingers for his more progressive colleagues.

Going toe-to-toe with his rivals on health care, he mocked them for not understanding the business of health care.

"It's not a business!" Sanders swiftly replied, a quick jab to underscore his position that health care should be a right, not a product.

Later, when debating on the best way to beat Donald Trump, Delaney again argued for a more moderate appeal to voters.

That gave Warren an opening to make her central campaign pitch that she'd be a scrappy force for systemic change.

"I don't understand why anybody goes to all the trouble of running for president of the United States to talk about what we really can't do and shouldn't fight for," Warren said, winning applause from the crowd.

———

WARREN'S WINNING ONE-LINERS: Warren's high school debating experience served her well Tuesday night. The Massachusetts senator turned around a number of polished one-liners that helped her reframe debate questions on her terms.

On health care, for example, she shut down more moderate rivals who warned Medicare for All would result in people losing their insurance.

"We are the Democrats," she said firmly. "We are not about trying to take away from health care from anyone ... We should stop using Republican talking points in order to talk with each other about how to provide that health care."

And when asked later about racial strife in the country — potentially dicey territory on a night where no candidates of color were on stage — Warren won cheers for her blunt assessment pronouncement: "We need to call out white supremacy for what it is — domestic terrorism."

———

SOUPED-UP SANDERS: Sanders made little impression in the Democratic debates last month, but on Tuesday night, the Vermont senator showed much more spark. While largely sticking to his long-held campaign message, Sanders was peppier and quick with the zingers.

The more animated Sanders got attention from his fellow candidates, who noted his forceful delivery.

"You don't have to yell," said Ryan.

"Throw your hands up!" former Hickenlooper said teasingly in a back-and-forth. When Sanders complied, Hickenlooper waved his limbs too, giving the proceedings an uncommonly calisthenic flair. "Whoa-ho, I can do it!"

———

GETTING ALONG ON GUNS: CNN's moderators were able to get the Democrats squabbling on health care, climate change and trade. But on guns, there was little disagreement to be found.

The candidates were united in lamenting the scourge of gun violence and blasting the influence of the National Rifle Association. They were quick to emphasize how gun deaths personally affected them — Hickenlooper recalled visiting the Aurora, Colo., movie theater that was the site of a 2012 massacre; Bullock spoke of the shooting death of his 11-year-old nephew.

It's a striking illustration of how quickly the politics of gun control have shifted in recent years. No longer are Democratic candidates fearful of appearing too liberal on guns; if anything, it was candidates who had taken more conservative positions in the past, such as Sanders who voted against a 1993 background check bill, who were on the defensive.

———

OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND: Biden has consistently been the front-runner in Democratic polls. You wouldn't know it from Tuesday night's debate, when his name never came up.

Harris released her version of Medicare-for-All earlier this week, setting off a round of sniping between her, Biden and Sanders. It didn't merit a mention in Tuesday night's lengthy health care debate.

The 10 Democrats on stage Tuesday night trained their focus on each other — or President Donald Trump. But the other half of the field, who will be on stage Wednesday night, was largely invisible.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #20 posted 07/31/19 5:57am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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5 fights at the Democratic debateBenjy Sarlin

7 hrs ago

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

Ten of the Democratic presidential candidates gathered in Detroit on Tuesday for the second debate, clashing on topics like health care, immigration and climate change. Here are some of the key areas that sparked the biggest disagreements.

1. HEALTH CARE

The health care debate within the debate centered on whether to pursue a single-payer Medicare For All system favored by Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., or an alternative that preserves competing private plans.

The more moderate candidates made the case that Americans wanted to have a choice of private insurance, with some like Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, and former Rep. John Delaney mentioning unions that had negotiated specific plans.

"We should deal with the tragedy of the uninsured and give everyone health care as a right but why do we got to be the party of taking something away from people?" Delaney asked.

Sanders and Warren argued that the private insurance industry added overhead costs and paperwork without providing benefits in return. "We've tried this experiment with the insurance companies and what they have done is suck billions of dollars out of the system," Warren said.

Former Rep. Beto O'Rourke positioned himself as a middle path, saying his plan to auto-enroll the uninsured in a Medicare plan while also preserving employer insurance would guarantee universal coverage. South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg suggested his version of a public option would "become Medicare for All without us having to kick anybody off their insurance" because the public would prefer it to "corporate options."

The candidates also split over how they would finance their plans. O'Rourke said "the middle class will not pay more in taxes." Warren would not make the same commitment, instead promising their "total costs will go down." Buttiigeig said the debate was misleading and that paying taxes or premiums was "a distinction without a difference."

2. IMMIGRATION

Similar to the first Democratic debate last month, the disagreement on immigration centered on a proposal put forward by former HUD Secretary Julian Castro that would make illegally crossing the border a civil rather than criminal offense.

Warren argued it would remove a legal basis for President Donald Trump to prosecute parents of children crossing the border and consequently separate families. "We need to continue to have border security and we can do that, but what we can't do is not live our values," she said.

Others, like Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, argued that the law, which has been on the books since 1929, was not the core issue. "The challenge isn't that it's a criminal offense to cross the border, the challenge is that Donald Trump is president and using this to rip families apart," he said.

O'Rourke said he would break from Trump on how to handle immigration, but added, "I expect that people who come here follow our laws and we reserve the right to criminally prosecute them if they do not."

Sanders, who has said he would apply his health care plan to undocumented immigrants, defended himself from criticism by Bullock and Ryan that it would create an incentive for further illegal immigration. He said he would ""ave strong border protections," but added that he considered health care "a human right that applies to all people in this country."

3. CLIMATE CHANGE

The candidates agreed that they needed significant government action to confront climate change, but differed over the particulars of the Green New Deal, a resolution put forward by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., calling for a rapid shift to renewable energy.

Delaney, whose own climate plan centers on a carbon tax, complained that the Green New Deal "ties its progress to other things that are completely unrelated" like a call for guaranteed jobs. Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper raised the issue as well, saying it would be "a disaster at the ballot box."

In practice, candidates supporting the Green New Deal have released plans focused more narrowly on climate issues. This prompted Warren, who touted a $2 trillion plan to build up the renewable energy industry, to accuse her rivals of manufacturing a divide that doesn't exist.

"This could revitalize huge cities across this country and no one wants to talk about it," Warren said. "What you want to do instead is find the Republican talking point...say we don't really have to do anything."

Candidates named a variety of possible approaches, each with different emphases. Ryan focused on agricultural sustainability and creating incentives for companies to develop and deploy new technology. Sanders stressed taking on fossil fuel companies. Bullock criticized Democrats for not reassuring "folks who have spent their whole life powering our country" in the energy industry that they'd be taken care of in the transition.

4. STUDENT DEBT, FREE COLLEGE

The candidates split over proposals by Sanders and Warren to offer tuition-free public college to all Americans and to cancel existing student debt.

Senator Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., said she would make it easier to refinance student debt and expand loan forgiveness programs, but "my problem with some of these plans is they literally would pay for wealthy kids, for Wall Street kids to go to college" rather than focus their benefits on lower incomes.

Buttigieg said Warren's student debt proposal, a one-time cancellation of up to $50,000 of debt for Americans making under $250,000, would leave subsequent students "wondering why they weren't lucky enough" to qualify for the same thing.

O'Rourke said he favored making only two-year associate degrees free, including aid for room and board, while expanding loan forgiveness programs for teachers.

Perhaps the most spirited defense of free college and student debt cancellation came from self-help author Marianne Williamson, who argued it would free up consumer spending. "The best thing you can do to stimulate this economy is get rid of this debt," she said. Warren, for her part, argued her plan would help close the racial wealth gap.

5. SLAVERY REPARATIONS

Williamson drew applause with an impassioned call for reparations, referring to a "$200 to $500 billion payment of a debt that is owed" from the government's failure to provide 40 acres and a mule to freed slaves and protect their rights over the next century.

Sanders, who has opposed the concept of cash reparations, said he supported researching the broader issue. But rather than Williamson's targeted approach, he name-checked a race-neutral "10-20-30" bill by Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C., that would dedicate at least 10 percent of federal spending to areas where 20 percent of the population has been impoverished for over 30 years.

He also mentioned his "Thurgood Marshall plan" to encourage school districts to desegregate and boost education funding in poor areas.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #21 posted 07/31/19 7:52am

2freaky4church
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Bernie was a beast. He even called out the media. Huffpost bashed them for using GOP talking points.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #22 posted 07/31/19 8:34am

DiminutiveRock
er

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PennyPurple said:

Amy needs to start wearing Purple. Get those Minnesota voters to vote for her.



lol

"Families are torn apart, men women and children are separated. Children come home from school to find their parents have gone missing." - Anne Frank
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Reply #23 posted 07/31/19 10:00am

RodeoSchro

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I am completely on the Marianne Williamson train, and you should be, too.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's Palladin
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Reply #24 posted 07/31/19 10:13am

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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RodeoSchro said:

I am completely on the Marianne Williamson train, and you should be, too.


oh my god.

Well the dem party is a pack of stray cats. Herding cats is difficult. But that's one weird cat.

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Reply #25 posted 07/31/19 10:16am

XxAxX

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sanders and warren 2020?

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Reply #26 posted 07/31/19 12:20pm

DiminutiveRock
er

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XxAxX said:

sanders and warren 2020?


Warren and Mayor Pete woot!

"Families are torn apart, men women and children are separated. Children come home from school to find their parents have gone missing." - Anne Frank
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Reply #27 posted 07/31/19 12:38pm

2freaky4church
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Ugot2shake is a huge Delaney fan.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #28 posted 07/31/19 1:04pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

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2freaky4church1 said:

Ugot2shake is a huge Delaney fan.



Lol, noooo thank you. But I get where he is coming from.
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Reply #29 posted 07/31/19 1:40pm

RodeoSchro

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Ugot2shakesumthin said:



RodeoSchro said:


I am completely on the Marianne Williamson train, and you should be, too.




oh my god.


Well the dem party is a pack of stray cats. Herding cats is difficult. But that's one weird cat.



She makes sense. I need to learn more about her economics.

She isn’t going to get the nom. But I think the longer she’s in, the better.


.
[Edited 7/31/19 13:41pm]
Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's Palladin
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