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Thread started 06/04/19 7:47pm

poppys

Juvenile Curfew being enforced here



What do you guys think about this?

https://www.nola.com/news/2019/06/as-new-orleans-begins-youth-curfew-questions-about-effectiveness-persist.html

As New Orleans begins youth curfew, questions about effectiveness persist

Posted Jun 3, 2019

By Kevin Litten, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

New Orleans police will begin enforcing the city’s juvenile curfew law at 8 p.m. Monday (June 3) in the French Quarter and an hour later in the rest of the city. It will require youth to be off the streets until 6 a.m. Enforcement will begin at 11 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

Officials have defended the curfew as a way to make positive contact with juveniles who are roaming neighborhoods, connect them with city services and identify reasons why their parents would let them out late at night. In an interview after last week, Tenisha Stevens, Mayor LaToya Cantrell’s criminal justice commissioner, said the city decided to implement the curfew with an eye toward “saving our youth because not only do we know that kids are involved in criminal activity, but they’re also victims of crime as well.”...

...Austin, Texas, ended enforcement of its juvenile curfew in 2017 because it disproportionately targeted black and Hispanic youth. No one ever produced data to show it was effective, KUT-FM reported.

"It doesn’t keep our kids safe,” Ellen Stone, who researched the issue, told the Austin City Council at the time, according to KUT. “Instead it does just the opposite. The curfew unnecessarily pushes our kids into the justice system.”

A 2016 article in The Guardian also raised the problem of curfew laws increasing police interaction with youth that isn’t always positive. "It was really kind of scary to have them treat you like a hardened criminal,” a 19-year-old who was stopped for a curfew violation told the newspaper:

New Orleans officials said they are aware of the research questioning the effectiveness of curfew laws, but Stevens said officials concluded the enforcement is in the best interest of public safety...

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Reply #1 posted 06/04/19 8:51pm

PennyPurple

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We've had so many problems in our entertainment districts that they started this curfew. Kids would be in groups and go into these districts and ravage them. It has helped some, but of course it still happens.



Police would like to remind parents and children that the City’s summer curfew for unaccompanied youth goes into effect May 24.

The summer curfew is meant to promote a safe environment for all and focuses only on youth who are unaccompanied by a parent or responsible adult after evening hours. The curfews are as follows:


Entertainment Districts
Country Club Plaza, Westport, Jazz District, Zona Rosa, Downtown

17 years old or younger - 9 p.m.

Citywide

Ages 15 and younger – 10 p.m.

Ages 16-17 – 11 p.m.

If a child is found in violation of the curfew, they could be detained, and their parent or guardian – not the child – will be issued a citation with a court-recommended minimum fine of $125 and a maximum of $500. The curfew is in effect from Memorial Day weekend through the last Sunday in September.

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Reply #2 posted 06/05/19 4:31am

2elijah

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Honestly, I think it’s a good thing. It keeps them from being prey to bad elements within society. A curfew has been working in a town in New Jersey for a while, and they have a low crime rate. Also, there are also some towns that don’t allow parking in certain areas after 2am. I was told they do that to keep drug dealers from combing communities in wee hours of the morning. It actually works.

Just my opinion, but I feel that curfews help keep teens safe. Teens are restless and they get bored fast, and often times, there may not be enough recreational centers/programs to keep them off the street, with some ending up in trouble. I also think it makes parents take more responsibility of their kid’s whereabouts.
[Edited 6/5/19 4:33am]
The abortion ban issue...any relation to 2045 or pre-1848?
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Reply #3 posted 06/05/19 7:50am

2freaky4church
1

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More dumb digression from what is more important: income inequality. Housing justice.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #4 posted 06/05/19 8:32am

RodeoSchro

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I don't think curfews are a good idea on any public level.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's paladin
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Reply #5 posted 06/05/19 10:33am

PennyPurple

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I think it's a great idea, the kids can be out after curfew if they are driving to or from work, and from school events.


Gangs of kids would go into stores and bombard them and steal everything in sight. Then they would surround the customers cars and not let them leave, while they were beating the hell out of the cars.

Things got out of hand fast.



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Reply #6 posted 06/05/19 10:45am

poppys

PennyPurple said:

I think it's a great idea, the kids can be out after curfew if they are driving to or from work, and from school events.


Gangs of kids would go into stores and bombard them and steal everything in sight. Then they would surround the customers cars and not let them leave, while they were beating the hell out of the cars.

Things got out of hand fast.




That's a good point, I wonder if they are making exceptions for that here. Is this the first summer they are trying it there?

The quarter has had quite a few shootings recently (not juveniles - just "juvenile" adults), mostly related to domestic violence, so I think they're worried about things getting even worse this summer.

They'll be taken to Covenant House here to wait for a parent or guardian, but if no one comes, they will go to juvey hall.

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Reply #7 posted 06/05/19 11:04am

OnlyNDaUsa

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They are a good thing. I know when I was 14 or 15 and I was out after 10 or 11...I was up to no good. Got caught and the cop let me have it.

What they do is give the cops an excuse to approach and talk to kids out late and if a kid is out there and doesn't want to be... they have an out.


The silly part is that it targets "black and Hispanic youth." What? So who ever said that (Without ANY backup) is suggesting that it is those kids who are out in violation of the ordinance. (what is that called? When you assume someone is more likely to do something bad based on their race or ethnicity?)

Being a die-hard civil rights champion,
Being a die-hard libertarian,
Sometimes I have to defend
that which I find distasteful.
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Reply #8 posted 06/05/19 11:58am

2freaky4church
1

avatar

Don't be caught out late Only. Don't want u to get in trouble.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #9 posted 06/05/19 12:22pm

2elijah

avatar

poppys said:



What do you guys think about this?

https://www.nola.com/news/2019/06/as-new-orleans-begins-youth-curfew-questions-about-effectiveness-persist.html


As New Orleans begins youth curfew, questions about effectiveness persist



Posted Jun 3, 2019





By Kevin Litten, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune





New Orleans police will begin enforcing the city’s juvenile curfew law at 8 p.m. Monday (June 3) in the French Quarter and an hour later in the rest of the city. It will require youth to be off the streets until 6 a.m. Enforcement will begin at 11 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.


Officials have defended the curfew as a way to make positive contact with juveniles who are roaming neighborhoods, connect them with city services and identify reasons why their parents would let them out late at night. In an interview after last week, Tenisha Stevens, Mayor LaToya Cantrell’s criminal justice commissioner, said the city decided to implement the curfew with an eye toward “saving our youth because not only do we know that kids are involved in criminal activity, but they’re also victims of crime as well.”...


...Austin, Texas, ended enforcement of its juvenile curfew in 2017 because it disproportionately targeted black and Hispanic youth. No one ever produced data to show it was effective, KUT-FM reported.


"It doesn’t keep our kids safe,” Ellen Stone, who researched the issue, told the Austin City Council at the time, according to KUT. “Instead it does just the opposite. The curfew unnecessarily pushes our kids into the justice system.”


A 2016 article in The Guardian also raised the problem of curfew laws increasing police interaction with youth that isn’t always positive. "It was really kind of scary to have them treat you like a hardened criminal,” a 19-year-old who was stopped for a curfew violation told the newspaper:



New Orleans officials said they are aware of the research questioning the effectiveness of curfew laws, but Stevens said officials concluded the enforcement is in the best interest of public safety...







@ bolded part. It is true though, that some rogue cops would get carried away , and abuse their authority when approaching teens who may miss the curfew. Apparently this is always a possibility, especially if there are a high number of valid complaints about it. That’s when I could see the curfew becoming a problem. Not every police or sheriff departments have a precinct full of good law enforcement officers. There’s always a possibility of bad eggs in the bunch, which make it bad for the good cops.
[Edited 6/5/19 12:22pm]
The abortion ban issue...any relation to 2045 or pre-1848?
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Reply #10 posted 06/05/19 5:05pm

SuperFurryAnim
al

avatar

They start with this and freedom of speech then move on to cigarettes and alcohol then take the guns. Think about it.
What are you outraged about today? CNN has not told you yet?
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Reply #11 posted 06/05/19 5:07pm

SuperFurryAnim
al

avatar

RodeoSchro said:

I don't think curfews are a good idea on any public level.



Who are the parents? Who is parenting? Kids should be home at a reasonable time per the parentals watch. Not big brother watching over you.
What are you outraged about today? CNN has not told you yet?
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Reply #12 posted 06/05/19 7:09pm

poppys

2elijah said:

poppys said:



What do you guys think about this?

https://www.nola.com/news/2019/06/as-new-orleans-begins-youth-curfew-questions-about-effectiveness-persist.html

As New Orleans begins youth curfew, questions about effectiveness persist

Posted Jun 3, 2019

By Kevin Litten, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

New Orleans police will begin enforcing the city’s juvenile curfew law at 8 p.m. Monday (June 3) in the French Quarter and an hour later in the rest of the city. It will require youth to be off the streets until 6 a.m. Enforcement will begin at 11 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

Officials have defended the curfew as a way to make positive contact with juveniles who are roaming neighborhoods, connect them with city services and identify reasons why their parents would let them out late at night. In an interview after last week, Tenisha Stevens, Mayor LaToya Cantrell’s criminal justice commissioner, said the city decided to implement the curfew with an eye toward “saving our youth because not only do we know that kids are involved in criminal activity, but they’re also victims of crime as well.”...

...Austin, Texas, ended enforcement of its juvenile curfew in 2017 because it disproportionately targeted black and Hispanic youth. No one ever produced data to show it was effective, KUT-FM reported.

"It doesn’t keep our kids safe,” Ellen Stone, who researched the issue, told the Austin City Council at the time, according to KUT. “Instead it does just the opposite. The curfew unnecessarily pushes our kids into the justice system.”

A 2016 article in The Guardian also raised the problem of curfew laws increasing police interaction with youth that isn’t always positive. "It was really kind of scary to have them treat you like a hardened criminal,” a 19-year-old who was stopped for a curfew violation told the newspaper:

New Orleans officials said they are aware of the research questioning the effectiveness of curfew laws, but Stevens said officials concluded the enforcement is in the best interest of public safety...


@ bolded part. It is true though, that some rogue cops would get carried away , and abuse their authority when approaching teens who may miss the curfew. Apparently this is always a possibility, especially if there are a high number of valid complaints about it. That’s when I could see the curfew becoming a problem. Not every police or sheriff departments have a precinct full of good law enforcement officers. There’s always a possibility of bad eggs in the bunch, which make it bad for the good cops.


When I first heard it, I thought no, it's taking away their freedom, especially 8pm in the quarter. Then, after thinking about it, maybe it's not a bad idea. Adults run amok in the quarter after the dinner hours, go-cups of alcohol are legal. It's mostly tourists anyway, for the most part the locals down there are working.

If it keeps younger kids off the streets, and they still have weekends, maybe it's worth a try. It will target the parents that aren't keeping track of their children. They say they are not going to get too harsh about it, just a deterrent, so we'll see what really happens.

That's why I started the thread to see what others here think.

[Edited 6/6/19 8:46am]

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Reply #13 posted 06/05/19 7:15pm

SuperFurryAnim
al

avatar

You probably put on your seatbelt. I'm a MAGA rebel without a cause.
What are you outraged about today? CNN has not told you yet?
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Reply #14 posted 06/05/19 8:49pm

PennyPurple

avatar

SuperFurryAnimal said:

You probably put on your seatbelt. I'm a MAGA rebel without a cause.

lol Oh you are such a rebel. wink

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Reply #15 posted 06/06/19 4:41am

SuperFurryAnim
al

avatar

Something big is being planned for NYC, July or August. They taken out the ice cream supply and curfews are being tested. In test cities.

What are you outraged about today? CNN has not told you yet?
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Reply #16 posted 06/06/19 4:54am

2elijah

avatar

poppys said:



2elijah said:


poppys said:



What do you guys think about this?

https://www.nola.com/news/2019/06/as-new-orleans-begins-youth-curfew-questions-about-effectiveness-persist.html


As New Orleans begins youth curfew, questions about effectiveness persist


Posted Jun 3, 2019

By Kevin Litten, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune




New Orleans police will begin enforcing the city’s juvenile curfew law at 8 p.m. Monday (June 3) in the French Quarter and an hour later in the rest of the city. It will require youth to be off the streets until 6 a.m. Enforcement will begin at 11 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.


Officials have defended the curfew as a way to make positive contact with juveniles who are roaming neighborhoods, connect them with city services and identify reasons why their parents would let them out late at night. In an interview after last week, Tenisha Stevens, Mayor LaToya Cantrell’s criminal justice commissioner, said the city decided to implement the curfew with an eye toward “saving our youth because not only do we know that kids are involved in criminal activity, but they’re also victims of crime as well.”...


...Austin, Texas, ended enforcement of its juvenile curfew in 2017 because it disproportionately targeted black and Hispanic youth. No one ever produced data to show it was effective, KUT-FM reported.


"It doesn’t keep our kids safe,” Ellen Stone, who researched the issue, told the Austin City Council at the time, according to KUT. “Instead it does just the opposite. The curfew unnecessarily pushes our kids into the justice system.”


A 2016 article in The Guardian also raised the problem of curfew laws increasing police interaction with youth that isn’t always positive. "It was really kind of scary to have them treat you like a hardened criminal,” a 19-year-old who was stopped for a curfew violation told the newspaper:


New Orleans officials said they are aware of the research questioning the effectiveness of curfew laws, but Stevens said officials concluded the enforcement is in the best interest of public safety...







@ bolded part. It is true though, that some rogue cops would get carried away , and abuse their authority when approaching teens who may miss the curfew. Apparently this is always a possibility, especially if there are a high number of valid complaints about it. That’s when I could see the curfew becoming a problem. Not every police or sheriff departments have a precinct full of good law enforcement officers. There’s always a possibility of bad eggs in the bunch, which make it bad for the good cops.



When I first heard it, I thought no, it's taking away their freedom, especially 8pm in the quarter. Then, after thinking about it, maybe it's not a bad idea. Adults run amok in the quarter after the dinner hours, go-cups of alcohol are legal on Bourbon St. It's mostly tourists anyway, for the most part the locals down there are working.

If it keeps younger kids off the streets, and they still have weekends, maybe it's worth a try. It will target the parents that aren't keeping track of their children. They say they are not going to get too harsh about it, just a deterrent, so we'll see what really happens.

That's why I started the thread to see what others here think.

[Edited 6/5/19 19:39pm]


I guess it depends on how well they train their officers to approach the situation.
The abortion ban issue...any relation to 2045 or pre-1848?
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Reply #17 posted 06/06/19 6:11am

benni

avatar

I've never been a fan of instituting curfews. It sounds too much like a police state to me and not all kids out that late at night are out to cause trouble.

When I worked at a home for adolescents, back in the mid to late '90s, one of the girls that was placed in the home was from St. Louis. The courts had removed her from her home because the cops were constantly finding her out late at night (she was maybe 12 or 13) and the courts decided there was no supervision at the home. She finally opened up to me (as her caseworker) and said the reason she was always out so late (most of the time by herself) was because she was waiting on her abuser (mom's boyfriend) to either pass out drunk or to go to sleep, so she could sneak back in and not be bothered by him. She had no where else to go, no other family that she knew of, so she'd go to the library until it closed, then she'd walk in the park or go to stores that are open all night and wouldn't go home until about 1:00 AM. So she felt like she got in trouble, was "punished" for trying to protect herself.

Not everyone has an ideal home life. Kids that are out that late do have parents that probably just don't care what they do. Or they are parents drinking, drugging, or whatever. Forcing them to be home early puts those kids more at risk.

Then you also have the homeless kids. Where do they go?

And like someone posted, some cops will push it too far, especially cops that have those racist attitudes. Who will be targeted more for harrassment? Who will they escalate the problem on? It's not going to be affluent white kids. They'll get the kid glove treatment.

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Reply #18 posted 06/06/19 6:28am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

All kids are not up to no good when out late... sure... but enough are. And the ones that may not be out for no good may end up meeing some who are.

And to me it gives the police a reason to engage them in a less than voluntary manner. (I am not sure what the laws are or how they interact with city ordanances: I know for a fact were I live state law says you only have to ID yourself once you are under arrest... (Being detained is not arrest) UNLESS you are in control of a motor vehicle...)

Even if it is "Hey what's up? You know there is a curfew...?" and just see how they react and maybe give one or more the chance to say "yeah can you call my parents?" (Patents MUST have an understaning for things like this: even if they snuck out... that a call or text or code or whatever... and they can work out penalties later)

Being a die-hard civil rights champion,
Being a die-hard libertarian,
Sometimes I have to defend
that which I find distasteful.
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Reply #19 posted 06/06/19 6:48am

poppys

2elijah said:

poppys said:


When I first heard it, I thought no, it's taking away their freedom, especially 8pm in the quarter. Then, after thinking about it, maybe it's not a bad idea. Adults run amok in the quarter after the dinner hours, go-cups of alcohol are legal on Bourbon St. It's mostly tourists anyway, for the most part the locals down there are working.

If it keeps younger kids off the streets, and they still have weekends, maybe it's worth a try. It will target the parents that aren't keeping track of their children. They say they are not going to get too harsh about it, just a deterrent, so we'll see what really happens.

That's why I started the thread to see what others here think.


I guess it depends on how well they train their officers to approach the situation.

Yes, we can pretty much guess how that is goiing to go. Some LE will play nice, some will be complete assholes.

There is a historical aspect to kids getting bands together and playing music in the French Quarter.

Congo Square is an African-American landmark because the enslaved were always allowed to play drums and gather on Sundays, so the music has never stopped there since the very beginning of the drums being brought here from Africa, (alongside Native Americans, some also enslaved, with their own drum and musical culture). Unlike other places where music was not permitted and outlawed.

Huge tradition of music and musical families here, think Wynton Marsalis, John Batiste, Trombone Shorty. Playing in the Quarter for kids here is like playing in the NY subways, way to hone your chops.

But of course the tourist industry that fuels the quarter, wants to control it somehow, Tourists love the street music, but not the crime. So there is a huge push/pull with all of that. Visiting adults do go nuts there, get really stupid drunk and endanger others or get in trouble themselves. Similar to the cruise ship mentality in the Caribbean. So the tourist industry is trying to keep them safe while they get their $$ for the unique "local flavor".

[Edited 6/6/19 8:29am]

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Reply #20 posted 06/06/19 6:56am

poppys

benni said:

I've never been a fan of instituting curfews. It sounds too much like a police state to me and not all kids out that late at night are out to cause trouble.

When I worked at a home for adolescents, back in the mid to late '90s, one of the girls that was placed in the home was from St. Louis. The courts had removed her from her home because the cops were constantly finding her out late at night (she was maybe 12 or 13) and the courts decided there was no supervision at the home. She finally opened up to me (as her caseworker) and said the reason she was always out so late (most of the time by herself) was because she was waiting on her abuser (mom's boyfriend) to either pass out drunk or to go to sleep, so she could sneak back in and not be bothered by him. She had no where else to go, no other family that she knew of, so she'd go to the library until it closed, then she'd walk in the park or go to stores that are open all night and wouldn't go home until about 1:00 AM. So she felt like she got in trouble, was "punished" for trying to protect herself.

Not everyone has an ideal home life. Kids that are out that late do have parents that probably just don't care what they do. Or they are parents drinking, drugging, or whatever. Forcing them to be home early puts those kids more at risk.

Then you also have the homeless kids. Where do they go?

And like someone posted, some cops will push it too far, especially cops that have those racist attitudes. Who will be targeted more for harrassment? Who will they escalate the problem on? It's not going to be affluent white kids. They'll get the kid glove treatment.


Those are some great points Benni. There all all kinds of reasons kids would not be at home, many of them heartbreaking. And the curfew net system probably has little interest in all that. But the world is pretty scary for kids out on the street these days too. More violence against kids that ever, sigh.

The homeless kids aspect is a really good point. We have SO MANY homeless here, the biggest camps are right downtown beneath the underpass.

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Reply #21 posted 06/06/19 6:57am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

2elijah said:


I guess it depends on how well they train their officers to approach the situation.

but that goes for any cop (Or anyone who believes that the are an authority) in any situation. Keep in mind how one responds can make all the difference as to how it goes. (1) do not lie (2) do not resist* (3) do not flee

My best advice is know the law where you live. Is it a stop and ID Police State? Or is is more reasonable state? Also worth knowing are any local ordinances that add to state law.


But just know a cop can come up to you or anyone and attempt to engage you... whether or not they can compel an ID or not (and YouTube is not a good place to get information as to the law)


* Police really need to be better trained on what is or what is not resisting. Being handcuffed is often times not comfortable... so a natural reaction is to try to adjust position... that is often seen as resisting... cops could do much better.

Being a die-hard civil rights champion,
Being a die-hard libertarian,
Sometimes I have to defend
that which I find distasteful.
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Reply #22 posted 06/06/19 7:24am

SuperFurryAnim
al

avatar

OnlyNDaUsa said:

2elijah said:


I guess it depends on how well they train their officers to approach the situation.

but that goes for any cop (Or anyone who believes that the are an authority) in any situation. Keep in mind how one responds can make all the difference as to how it goes. (1) do not lie (2) do not resist* (3) do not flee

My best advice is know the law where you live. Is it a stop and ID Police State? Or is is more reasonable state? Also worth knowing are any local ordinances that add to state law.


But just know a cop can come up to you or anyone and attempt to engage you... whether or not they can compel an ID or not (and YouTube is not a good place to get information as to the law)


* Police really need to be better trained on what is or what is not resisting. Being handcuffed is often times not comfortable... so a natural reaction is to try to adjust position... that is often seen as resisting... cops could do much better.

When in NOLA when you walk in French Quarters near the street with all the music. Always kids on heroin hangout there few blocks from Frenchman st. You see also that is the problem. You'll get robbed there if you walk at night. If some kid does something stupid and gets shot it is not because he was not following orders it is because of race. That is evident in the thread. Why they can't just go and clean up very apparent druggies hanging out is beyond me? You see this gives them reason to do just so. I do feel bad for kids that play music at night. I see that too when I walk late at night around the FQ.

What are you outraged about today? CNN has not told you yet?
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Reply #23 posted 06/06/19 7:26am

RodeoSchro

avatar

SuperFurryAnimal said:

Something big is being planned for NYC, July or August. They taken out the ice cream supply and curfews are being tested. In test cities.



I couldn't agree more. That fat fuck Alex Jones and his chickenshit friends warned us about the UN takeover of Chicago last summer, and now all the Chicago Cubs fans are wearing blue hats. Can't be a coincidence.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's paladin
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Reply #24 posted 06/06/19 8:03am

2freaky4church
1

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Give them something to do.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #25 posted 06/06/19 8:09am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

2freaky4church1 said:

Give them something to do.

do you really think that is even a consideration?

Being a die-hard civil rights champion,
Being a die-hard libertarian,
Sometimes I have to defend
that which I find distasteful.
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Reply #26 posted 06/06/19 8:38am

poppys

SuperFurryAnimal said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

but that goes for any cop (Or anyone who believes that the are an authority) in any situation. Keep in mind how one responds can make all the difference as to how it goes. (1) do not lie (2) do not resist* (3) do not flee

My best advice is know the law where you live. Is it a stop and ID Police State? Or is is more reasonable state? Also worth knowing are any local ordinances that add to state law.


But just know a cop can come up to you or anyone and attempt to engage you... whether or not they can compel an ID or not (and YouTube is not a good place to get information as to the law)


* Police really need to be better trained on what is or what is not resisting. Being handcuffed is often times not comfortable... so a natural reaction is to try to adjust position... that is often seen as resisting... cops could do much better.

When in NOLA when you walk in French Quarters near the street with all the music. Always kids on heroin hangout there few blocks from Frenchman st. You see also that is the problem. You'll get robbed there if you walk at night. If some kid does something stupid and gets shot it is not because he was not following orders it is because of race. That is evident in the thread. Why they can't just go and clean up very apparent druggies hanging out is beyond me? You see this gives them reason to do just so. I do feel bad for kids that play music at night. I see that too when I walk late at night around the FQ.


Do you walk around the Quarter in your MAGA hat? I doubt it.

The fact that you feel sorry for kids playing music shows you don't understand or like the music. Do you understand Louis Armstrong? He lived in a children's home and played on the streets. Almost all musicians here play on the streets for different occasions, regardless of fame or fortune. You don't understand the culture beyond a tourist lens is my guess.

Many of them are the age Prince was when he started - and beaucoup talented too. There is a huge push here by elders of all stripes to continue the musical traditions, especially post-Katrina. Including street/parade/second line traditions.

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Reply #27 posted 06/06/19 8:50am

OnlyNDaUsa

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poppys said:

SuperFurryAnimal said:

When in NOLA when you walk in French Quarters near the street with all the music. Always kids on heroin hangout there few blocks from Frenchman st. You see also that is the problem. You'll get robbed there if you walk at night. If some kid does something stupid and gets shot it is not because he was not following orders it is because of race. That is evident in the thread. Why they can't just go and clean up very apparent druggies hanging out is beyond me? You see this gives them reason to do just so. I do feel bad for kids that play music at night. I see that too when I walk late at night around the FQ.


Do you walk around the Quarter in your MAGA hat? I doubt it.

The fact that you feel sorry for kids playing music shows you don't understand or like the music. Do you understand Louis Armstrong? He lived in a children's home and played on the streets. Almost all musicians here play on the streets for different occasions, regardless of fame or fortune. You don't understand the culture beyond a tourist lens is my guess.

Many of them are the age Prince was when he started - and beaucoup talented too. There is a huge push here by elders of all stripes to continue the musical traditions, especially post-Katrina. Including street/parade/second line traditions.

You seemed to have not even read what he said. Nothing in that was against the musicians. More of the general conditions and crime in the area. To me he is saying it is a ashame that there is so much crime because it is not good for the street musicians.

Being a die-hard civil rights champion,
Being a die-hard libertarian,
Sometimes I have to defend
that which I find distasteful.
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Reply #28 posted 06/06/19 8:59am

SuperFurryAnim
al

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OnlyNDaUsa said:

poppys said:


Do you walk around the Quarter in your MAGA hat? I doubt it.

The fact that you feel sorry for kids playing music shows you don't understand or like the music. Do you understand Louis Armstrong? He lived in a children's home and played on the streets. Almost all musicians here play on the streets for different occasions, regardless of fame or fortune. You don't understand the culture beyond a tourist lens is my guess.

Many of them are the age Prince was when he started - and beaucoup talented too. There is a huge push here by elders of all stripes to continue the musical traditions, especially post-Katrina. Including street/parade/second line traditions.

You seemed to have not even read what he said. Nothing in that was against the musicians. More of the general conditions and crime in the area. To me he is saying it is a ashame that there is so much crime because it is not good for the street musicians.

I hang around Frenchman nonstop. Two blocks from there druggies all races. I see it can the cops? What can the cops do? Apparently nothing now. This gives the cops some authority do parent. They can go roundup the kiddies and the parents that aren't parents can pick them up at the pen and go on about how stupid they were targetted.

What are you outraged about today? CNN has not told you yet?
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Reply #29 posted 06/06/19 9:03am

poppys

SuperFurryAnimal said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

You seemed to have not even read what he said. Nothing in that was against the musicians. More of the general conditions and crime in the area. To me he is saying it is a ashame that there is so much crime because it is not good for the street musicians.


I hang around Frenchman nonstop.
Two blocks from there druggies all races. I see it can the cops? What can the cops do? Apparently nothing now. This gives the cops some authority do parent. They can go roundup the kiddies and the parents that aren't parents can pick them up at the pen and go on about how stupid they were targetted.


I hang around Frenchman nonstop. Right. In your MAGA hat? No you don't.

New Orleans is over 60% black, get real. You say you are too paranoid to leave your house. Which one is it?

Anyway, I was replying to 2elijah - who will actually understand what I am discussing without derailing my thread - with ice cream trucks et al...

[Edited 6/6/19 10:26am]

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