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Reply #330 posted 05/31/19 5:31pm

poppys

DiminutiveRocker said:

poppys said:


Yes. I am not arguing that. I am acknowledging both sides of the leaking argument.

If journalists can be charged for leaking, (whether you think he is one or not, the 17 new charges are leveled at journalists), we will lose a freedom of the press (1st amendment) right. It will set a legal precedent.

If journalists were charged during Vietnam, we may not have found out about the My Lai Massacre or Cambodia as well as other atrocities.

What Assange did personally (like Sweden) is a separate issue.

I was not challenging your argument - it was just a comment on what Snowden - also in exile due to his whistle blowing - said.


Yes, it's been mentioned a few times in this thread. Almost timed out - guess we may need a new one.

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Reply #331 posted 06/02/19 1:10am

Lovejunky

avatar

U.N. Special Rapporteur Calls for Julian Assange to Be Freed, Citing

“Psychological Torture”

The United Nations special rapporteur on torture is warning that WikiLeaks

founder Julian Assange is suffering from the effects of “psychological torture”

due to his ongoing detention and threats of possible extradition to the United States.

The U.N. expert, Nils Melzer, also warned that Assange would likely face

a “politicized show trial” if he were to be extradited to the United States.

Melzer writes, “In 20 years of work with victims of war, violence and political persecution,

I have never seen a group of democratic states ganging up to deliberately isolate,

demonize and abuse a single individual for such a long time.”

Julian Assange is currently serving a 50-week sentence for skipping bail in 2012

at London’s Belmarsh Prison,

after he was forcibly removed from the Ecuadorean Embassy by Bri

Assange with 17 counts of violating the Espionage Act for his role in publishing

U.S. classified military and diplomatic documents exposing

U.S. war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Assange, who had already been charged on one count of hacking a government computer,

now faces up to 170 additional years in prison under the new charges

—10 years for each count of violating the Espionage Act.

Assange was due to appear by video link before a magistrates’ court on

Thursday but failed to appear,

reportedly due to health problems.

more HERE

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
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Reply #332 posted 06/02/19 1:30am

Lovejunky

avatar

Assange has been denied

computer access,

books or visitors.

His only "entertainment is in the form of letters.

If you wish to make contact

Julian Assange

(DOB 03/07/1971)

Prisoner Number A93779AY

HMP Belmarsh

Western Way

LONDON

SE28

OEB

UK

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
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Reply #333 posted 06/03/19 1:56pm

PennyPurple

avatar

poppys said:

Here's something I found.

https://www.thedailybeast...-in-london

Why Ecuador Finally Got Sick of Julian Assange and Ended His Refuge at the Embassy in London

...His dramatic expulsion from the embassy follows a year of ratcheting tension between Assange and his Ecuadorian hosts, culminating in WikiLeaks publicizing a leak of hundreds of thousands of hacked emails mysteriously stolen from the inboxes of Ecuador’s president and first lady.

It was this last move that finally set Ecuador’s government firmly against Assange, who was by then already being treated less like a political refugee than an inmate—albeit one who was free to leave at any time...

Well he wasn't acting as a journalist when he hacked into those emails.


I still don't believe that he was acting as a journalist when he hacked into the US Government computers either. He was acting as a hacker.

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Reply #334 posted 06/03/19 2:45pm

poppys

PennyPurple said:

poppys said:

Here's something I found.

https://www.thedailybeast...-in-london

Why Ecuador Finally Got Sick of Julian Assange and Ended His Refuge at the Embassy in London

...His dramatic expulsion from the embassy follows a year of ratcheting tension between Assange and his Ecuadorian hosts, culminating in WikiLeaks publicizing a leak of hundreds of thousands of hacked emails mysteriously stolen from the inboxes of Ecuador’s president and first lady.

It was this last move that finally set Ecuador’s government firmly against Assange, who was by then already being treated less like a political refugee than an inmate—albeit one who was free to leave at any time...

Well he wasn't acting as a journalist when he hacked into those emails.


I still don't believe that he was acting as a journalist when he hacked into the US Government computers either. He was acting as a hacker.


Agree he went too far. I posted as such in this thread. I think he's an ass and needs to answer to the rape charges in Sweden.

BUT - the argument is beyond Assange now - it's more than a personal view of what he did.

They are using him via these 17 NEW charges to shut down the 1st amendment for ANY journalist, and that's f'ed up for freedom of speech for ALL of us. Consider how Trump and his admin try to shut down dissenting voices.

That is why it's the 1st amendment, we didn't have a voice in our own government. Now they are trying to take that away from everyone, not just Assange. It will set legal precedent whether he's really a 'journalist' or not, they could care less.

[Edited 6/3/19 14:54pm]

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Reply #335 posted 06/03/19 3:17pm

IanRG

The Swedish court has ruled that they will seek extradition at this time but this may not the end of it. Part of the reason was that with Assange in prison, he is not a current flight risk.

.

On the US front: being charged is different to being foung guilty. It is only if his publishing activities are ruled to illegal that it is a threat to freedoms of the press. If he is found guilty of hacking or assisting others to hack, that is nothing new.

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Reply #336 posted 06/03/19 3:42pm

poppys

IanRG said:

The Swedish court has ruled that they will seek extradition at this time but this may not the end of it. Part of the reason was that with Assange in prison, he is not a current flight risk.

.

On the US front: being charged is different to being foung guilty. It is only if his publishing activities are ruled to illegal that it is a threat to freedoms of the press. If he is found guilty of hacking or assisting others to hack, that is nothing new.


That is nice to know Ian. Could be a positive that all is in limbo.

I'm seeing mainstream industry hacks on morning televison news worried about this, so it must be rippling through the news as entertainment haze. Probably a good thing for them to be worried about something beyond their bonuses.

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Reply #337 posted 06/04/19 7:34am

maplenpg

avatar

Lovejunky said:

Assange has been denied

computer access,

books or visitors.

His only "entertainment is in the form of letters.

If you wish to make contact

Julian Assange

(DOB 03/07/1971)

Prisoner Number A93779AY

HMP Belmarsh

Western Way

LONDON

SE28

OEB

UK

Whilst I can't, nor would I, try and stop anyone writing. Please can I just make people reading this aware of a few things:

Computer access is denied to all prisoners in high-security establishments, with few exceptions -therefore to not have access to computers is not unusual. Books are slightly more complex and I don't know about Belmarsh specifically, but there is a big problem in UK prisons with the drug, Spice. Books are/were regularly used as a method of getting the drug inside the prison, therefore most prisons have imposed strict regulations on books coming into prison. He should be allowed access to books from the library, but given that he has been moved to healthcare, this could be a reason he doesn't get access. Visitors are very complex in high-security prisons, but he should be allowed legal visitors as a minimum. He should at some point be allowed other visitors.

Any letters received have to go through security. This involves a person from the prison physically reading the letter before it is approved/rejected. Many high-security establishments only allow copies of the letter with edited parts blacked out (not on original paper to prevent Spice coming in). Depending on his health, and how many letters he is receiving, healthcare may decide to restrict his access to some for his own welfare. If he is segregated from other prisoners then Lovejunky is right in saying that letters may be his only form of entertainment (though I find it difficult to believe he hasn't got access to a TV).

I'm not saying the restrictions imposed on him are right, but I hope it's put people a little more in the picture that he won't be being singled out (and if he is, there is usually a reason for it).

If love is the answer, what was the question? - Carter USM.
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Reply #338 posted 06/04/19 7:38am

poppys

Thanks for the great info, maplenpg.

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Reply #339 posted 06/04/19 7:40am

maplenpg

avatar

thumbs up!

If love is the answer, what was the question? - Carter USM.
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Reply #340 posted 06/04/19 4:30pm

Lovejunky

avatar

maplenpg said:

Lovejunky said:

Assange has been denied

computer access,

books or visitors.

His only "entertainment is in the form of letters.

If you wish to make contact

Julian Assange

(DOB 03/07/1971)

Prisoner Number A93779AY

HMP Belmarsh

Western Way

LONDON

SE28

OEB

UK

Whilst I can't, nor would I, try and stop anyone writing. Please can I just make people reading this aware of a few things:

Computer access is denied to all prisoners in high-security establishments, with few exceptions -therefore to not have access to computers is not unusual. Books are slightly more complex and I don't know about Belmarsh specifically, but there is a big problem in UK prisons with the drug, Spice. Books are/were regularly used as a method of getting the drug inside the prison, therefore most prisons have imposed strict regulations on books coming into prison. He should be allowed access to books from the library, but given that he has been moved to healthcare, this could be a reason he doesn't get access. Visitors are very complex in high-security prisons, but he should be allowed legal visitors as a minimum. He should at some point be allowed other visitors.

Any letters received have to go through security. This involves a person from the prison physically reading the letter before it is approved/rejected. Many high-security establishments only allow copies of the letter with edited parts blacked out (not on original paper to prevent Spice coming in). Depending on his health, and how many letters he is receiving, healthcare may decide to restrict his access to some for his own welfare. If he is segregated from other prisoners then Lovejunky is right in saying that letters may be his only form of entertainment (though I find it difficult to believe he hasn't got access to a TV).

I'm not saying the restrictions imposed on him are right, but I hope it's put people a little more in the picture that he won't be being singled out (and if he is, there is usually a reason for it).

Thanks for the info Maplenpg

Not sure why he isn NOT allowed visitors,

Assange’s letter to Gordon Dimmack

I have been isolated from all ability to prepare to defend myself,

no laptop, no internet, no computer, no library so far,

but even if I do get access it will be just for half an hour

with everyone else once a week.

Just two visits a month and it takes weeks to get someone

on the call list and the Catch-22 in getting their details

to be security screened.

Then all calls except lawyer are recorded and are a maximum 10 minutes and

in a limited 30 minutes each day in which all prisoners compete for the phone.

And credit?

Just a few pounds a week and no one can call in.

A superpower that has been preparing for 9 years with

hundreds of people and untold millions spent on the case.

I am defenceless and am counting on you and others of good character to save my life

I am unbroken albeit literally surrounded by murderers.

But the days when I could read and speak and organise to defend myself,

my ideals and my people are over until I am free.

Everyone else must take my place.

The US government or rather those regrettable elements in

it that hate truth liberty and justice want to cheat their way

into my extradition and death rather than letting the public

hear the truth for which I have won the highest awards

in journalism and have been nominated seven times for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Truth ultimately is all we have.


“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
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Reply #341 posted 06/04/19 4:46pm

Lovejunky

avatar

“In 20 years of work with victims of war, violence and political persecution

I have never seen a group of democratic States ganging up to

deliberately isolate, demonise and abuse a single individual

for such a long time and

with so little regard for human dignity and the rule of law

~The collective persecution of Julian Assange must end here and now~!”

Nils Melzer

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
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Reply #342 posted 06/04/19 5:23pm

PennyPurple

avatar

He would probably still be in the Embassy if he hadn't have hacked into his host's emails. He has nobody to blame but himself.


Why does he think he should get special treatment in jail? How dare he blame the US for his troubles. He's the one who hacked into OUR government computers. Hell, Chelsea Manning spent time in jail, why does he think he doesn't have to?


I have no sympathy for him. He was acting as a hacker not as a journalist. Big difference.

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Reply #343 posted 06/04/19 10:17pm

maplenpg

avatar

Lovejunky said:



maplenpg said:




Lovejunky said:


Assange has been denied


computer access,


books or visitors.


His only "entertainment is in the form of letters.



If you wish to make contact



Julian Assange


(DOB 03/07/1971)


Prisoner Number A93779AY


HMP Belmarsh


Western Way


LONDON


SE28


OEB


UK



Whilst I can't, nor would I, try and stop anyone writing. Please can I just make people reading this aware of a few things:

Computer access is denied to all prisoners in high-security establishments, with few exceptions -therefore to not have access to computers is not unusual. Books are slightly more complex and I don't know about Belmarsh specifically, but there is a big problem in UK prisons with the drug, Spice. Books are/were regularly used as a method of getting the drug inside the prison, therefore most prisons have imposed strict regulations on books coming into prison. He should be allowed access to books from the library, but given that he has been moved to healthcare, this could be a reason he doesn't get access. Visitors are very complex in high-security prisons, but he should be allowed legal visitors as a minimum. He should at some point be allowed other visitors.

Any letters received have to go through security. This involves a person from the prison physically reading the letter before it is approved/rejected. Many high-security establishments only allow copies of the letter with edited parts blacked out (not on original paper to prevent Spice coming in). Depending on his health, and how many letters he is receiving, healthcare may decide to restrict his access to some for his own welfare. If he is segregated from other prisoners then Lovejunky is right in saying that letters may be his only form of entertainment (though I find it difficult to believe he hasn't got access to a TV).



I'm not saying the restrictions imposed on him are right, but I hope it's put people a little more in the picture that he won't be being singled out (and if he is, there is usually a reason for it).



Thanks for the info Maplenpg


Not sure why he isn NOT allowed visitors,


Assange’s letter to Gordon Dimmack




I have been isolated from all ability to prepare to defend myself,


no laptop, no internet, no computer, no library so far,


but even if I do get access it will be just for half an hour


with everyone else once a week.


Just two visits a month and it takes weeks to get someone


on the call list and the Catch-22 in getting their details


to be security screened.


Then all calls except lawyer are recorded and are a maximum 10 minutes and


in a limited 30 minutes each day in which all prisoners compete for the phone.


And credit?


Just a few pounds a week and no one can call in.


A superpower that has been preparing for 9 years with


hundreds of people and untold millions spent on the case.


I am defenceless and am counting on you and others of good character to save my life


I am unbroken albeit literally surrounded by murderers.


But the days when I could read and speak and organise to defend myself,


my ideals and my people are over until I am free.


Everyone else must take my place.


The US government or rather those regrettable elements in


it that hate truth liberty and justice want to cheat their way


into my extradition and death rather than letting the public


hear the truth for which I have won the highest awards


in journalism and have been nominated seven times for the Nobel Peace Prize.



Truth ultimately is all we have.







Ahhh, thanks for this. Makes more sense now. Bottom line, he's getting what all other prisoners get. He's on what they call basic as you have to earn an enhanced status by staying out of trouble, working etc... from this he isn't saying he's not allowed visitors, just that he's frustrated with the regime. Two visits a month is normal. In fact, he's gone down a little in my estimation whining about these things. High-security prison is no walk in the park, despite what the papers say. It's in his best interests to get on with people, keep his head down, get a job if possible and let the legal cogs turn.
If love is the answer, what was the question? - Carter USM.
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Reply #344 posted 06/04/19 10:30pm

poppys

into my extradition and death...

The death part is not true.

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Reply #345 posted 06/04/19 10:59pm

IanRG

maplenpg said:

Lovejunky said:

Ahhh, thanks for this. Makes more sense now. Bottom line, he's getting what all other prisoners get. He's on what they call basic as you have to earn an enhanced status by staying out of trouble, working etc... from this he isn't saying he's not allowed visitors, just that he's frustrated with the regime. Two visits a month is normal. In fact, he's gone down a little in my estimation whining about these things. High-security prison is no walk in the park, despite what the papers say. It's in his best interests to get on with people, keep his head down, get a job if possible and let the legal cogs turn.

.

In addition to this being no different from normal treatment, his boasts about getting awards and being nominated for Nobel Peace Prizes is not helping. There are hundreds of nominees each year. Given Assange's misrepresentations about the Russian sourced documents, the Kremlin has been one of the organisations that encouraged nominations for Assange.

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Reply #346 posted 06/05/19 2:38am

Lovejunky

avatar

poppys said:

into my extradition and death...

The death part is not true.

170 years in Prison is comparable to death..NO ?

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
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Reply #347 posted 06/05/19 5:31am

IanRG

Lovejunky said:

poppys said:

into my extradition and death...

The death part is not true.

170 years in Prison is comparable to death..NO ?

.

No. Life is not death.

.

And this is just the maximum possible sentence for charges that he has not been found guilty.

.

You already posted an article from another person charged with a more than a life time maximum sentences who served no time at all.

.

Manning was charged in two sets and faced a maximum sentence of life plus 52 years including a capital charge for which the prosecution said they would not seek the death penalty. She was only sentenced to 35 years and this was commuted to much less than this.

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Reply #348 posted 06/05/19 8:19pm

Lovejunky

avatar

IanRG said:

Lovejunky said:

170 years in Prison is comparable to death..NO ?

.

No. Life is not death.

Literally TRUE...

but subjectively ?????

Some people would rather be dead that spend the rest of their lives in Prison..

.

And this is just the maximum possible sentence for charges that he has not been found guilty.

Not yet...but you can be sure he will be found guilty of some of them

.

You already posted an article from another person charged with a more than a life time maximum sentences who served no time at all.

Yes..I did...and I posted that as a comparison and for posterity..ELLSBERG served no time,despite 11 Charges of Espionage....DO you really think that ASSANGE wont either ?

.

Manning was charged in two sets and faced a maximum sentence of life plus 52 years including a capital charge for which the prosecution said they would not seek the death penalty. She was only sentenced to 35 years and this was commuted to much less than this.

Yes...

ONLY 35 years commuted to ONLY 7...

and now she is once again detained,

and paying ONLY $1000 a day for the privledge....

The difference between You and I Ian,

You seem to accept all Governmental Laws,

I dont...

In these instances the LAWS Broken,

were LAWS that were set in place specifically

to allow the Government to be ABOVE the LAW...

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
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Reply #349 posted 06/05/19 9:46pm

IanRG

Lovejunky said:

IanRG said:

.

No. Life is not death.

Literally TRUE...

but subjectively ?????

Some people would rather be dead that spend the rest of their lives in Prison..

.

And this is just the maximum possible sentence for charges that he has not been found guilty.

Not yet...but you can be sure he will be found guilty of some of them

.

You already posted an article from another person charged with a more than a life time maximum sentences who served no time at all.

Yes..I did...and I posted that as a comparison and for posterity..ELLSBERG served no time,despite 11 Charges of Espionage....DO you really think that ASSANGE wont either ?

.

Manning was charged in two sets and faced a maximum sentence of life plus 52 years including a capital charge for which the prosecution said they would not seek the death penalty. She was only sentenced to 35 years and this was commuted to much less than this.

Yes...

ONLY 35 years commuted to ONLY 7...

and now she is once again detained,

and paying ONLY $1000 a day for the privledge....

The difference between You and I Ian,

You seem to accept all Governmental Laws,

I dont...

In these instances the LAWS Broken,

were LAWS that were set in place specifically

to allow the Government to be ABOVE the LAW...

.

Subjectively people in prison are alive. Remember, this is a person who hid out for 7 years in a self imposed prison, so I doubt he is adverse to confinement.

.

If he is found guilty of some of the charges then he will not be sentenced to a maximum of 170 years, then will he? If he is sentenced he may not be charged with the maximum sentence for each charge, Manning was not. If he is erroneously found guilty then he has the same paths Manning had - he can appeal or seek a pardon.

.

I don't know whether or which charges Assange may be found guilty of and neither do you. A clear difference between Ellsberg and Assange is Assange has been hiding out to avoid the law and Ellsberg and his supporters used the law to defend himself. Assange has spent the last 7 years angering the UK courts, the Swedish prosecutors and the US courts by his obstruction. This is why he got the near maximum for breaking bail in the UK. Do you think his obstruction will endear him to the US courts?

.

Life plus 52 years down to 35 and commuted to 7 is a very significant reduction. She is only back in trouble because she is now breaking a different set of laws. A pardon does not absolve you of needing to follow any law in the future. As this is contempt of court, all she has to do is follow the law and she will save $1000 a day. That she is now obstructing the case around Assange, she is angering the court and making it more likely that courts will seek to assert their legal powers. What you have is the two people involved with the charges obstructing the investigation and legal processes. This is not a good idea.

.

You are making assumptions that are inconsistent with what I have said: I said that if he found guilty of pubishing then this is BAD and restriction on necessary freedoms of the press and it should be fought against. This cannot be seen as me just accepting all laws. I also said above that generally what is whistleblown are far more serious crimes than what was done to whistleblow, so the crimes exposed should be treated as far more important than the crimes (if any) to expose these. There needs to be whistleblower protection - but this does not mean that what it appears that Assange may have done in conscripting, encouraging and assisting Manning to do break into systems she did not have access to should be above the law any more than the government should be above the law.

.

As a fellow Australian, where is your outrage over the treatment of Richard Boyle and the Australian Federal Police raids on News Corp and ABC - a government funded public broadcaster, no less?

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Reply #350 posted 06/05/19 11:00pm

Lovejunky

avatar

IanRG said:

Lovejunky said:

The difference between You and I Ian,

You seem to accept all Governmental Laws,

I dont...

In these instances the LAWS Broken,

were LAWS that were set in place specifically

to allow the Government to be ABOVE the LAW...

.

Subjectively people in prison are alive. Remember, this is a person who hid out for 7 years in a self imposed prison, so I doubt he is adverse to confinement.

.

If he is found guilty of some of the charges then he will not be sentenced to a maximum of 170 years, then will he? If he is sentenced he may not be charged with the maximum sentence for each charge, Manning was not. If he is erroneously found guilty then he has the same paths Manning had - he can appeal or seek a pardon.

.

I don't know whether or which charges Assange may be found guilty of and neither do you. A clear difference between Ellsberg and Assange is Assange has been hiding out to avoid the law and Ellsberg and his supporters used the law to defend himself. Assange has spent the last 7 years angering the UK courts, the Swedish prosecutors and the US courts by his obstruction. This is why he got the near maximum for breaking bail in the UK. Do you think his obstruction will endear him to the US courts?

.

Life plus 52 years down to 35 and commuted to 7 is a very significant reduction. She is only back in trouble because she is now breaking a different set of laws. A pardon does not absolve you of needing to follow any law in the future. As this is contempt of court, all she has to do is follow the law and she will save $1000 a day. That she is now obstructing the case around Assange, she is angering the court and making it more likely that courts will seek to assert their legal powers. What you have is the two people involved with the charges obstructing the investigation and legal processes. This is not a good idea.

.

You are making assumptions that are inconsistent with what I have said: I said that if he found guilty of pubishing then this is BAD and restriction on necessary freedoms of the press and it should be fought against. This cannot be seen as me just accepting all laws. I also said above that generally what is whistleblown are far more serious crimes than what was done to whistleblow, so the crimes exposed should be treated as far more important than the crimes (if any) to expose these. There needs to be whistleblower protection - but this does not mean that what it appears that Assange may have done in conscripting, encouraging and assisting Manning to do break into systems she did not have access to should be above the law any more than the government should be above the law.

.

As a fellow Australian, where is your outrage over the treatment of Richard Boyle and the Australian Federal Police raids on News Corp and ABC - a government funded public broadcaster, no less?

wrong thread

and as for the rest of it,

I dont have the energy to debate you..

Im not here to change your mind or opinion..

simply giving mine...

If you dont agree I dont care...

“LOVE IS THE MASTERPLAN”
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Reply #351 posted 06/06/19 1:27am

IanRG

Lovejunky said:

IanRG said:

.

Subjectively people in prison are alive. Remember, this is a person who hid out for 7 years in a self imposed prison, so I doubt he is adverse to confinement.

.

If he is found guilty of some of the charges then he will not be sentenced to a maximum of 170 years, then will he? If he is sentenced he may not be charged with the maximum sentence for each charge, Manning was not. If he is erroneously found guilty then he has the same paths Manning had - he can appeal or seek a pardon.

.

I don't know whether or which charges Assange may be found guilty of and neither do you. A clear difference between Ellsberg and Assange is Assange has been hiding out to avoid the law and Ellsberg and his supporters used the law to defend himself. Assange has spent the last 7 years angering the UK courts, the Swedish prosecutors and the US courts by his obstruction. This is why he got the near maximum for breaking bail in the UK. Do you think his obstruction will endear him to the US courts?

.

Life plus 52 years down to 35 and commuted to 7 is a very significant reduction. She is only back in trouble because she is now breaking a different set of laws. A pardon does not absolve you of needing to follow any law in the future. As this is contempt of court, all she has to do is follow the law and she will save $1000 a day. That she is now obstructing the case around Assange, she is angering the court and making it more likely that courts will seek to assert their legal powers. What you have is the two people involved with the charges obstructing the investigation and legal processes. This is not a good idea.

.

You are making assumptions that are inconsistent with what I have said: I said that if he found guilty of pubishing then this is BAD and restriction on necessary freedoms of the press and it should be fought against. This cannot be seen as me just accepting all laws. I also said above that generally what is whistleblown are far more serious crimes than what was done to whistleblow, so the crimes exposed should be treated as far more important than the crimes (if any) to expose these. There needs to be whistleblower protection - but this does not mean that what it appears that Assange may have done in conscripting, encouraging and assisting Manning to do break into systems she did not have access to should be above the law any more than the government should be above the law.

.

As a fellow Australian, where is your outrage over the treatment of Richard Boyle and the Australian Federal Police raids on News Corp and ABC - a government funded public broadcaster, no less?

wrong thread

and as for the rest of it,

I dont have the energy to debate you..

Im not here to change your mind or opinion..

simply giving mine...

If you dont agree I dont care...

.

And I am just giving my opinion, also without any expectation of changing your mind.

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For others: Boyle is a whistleblower who is facing similar terms for being right about the Australian Taxation Office. The AFP raids are even closer to Assange/Manning - This is about reporting on potentially illegal acts and killings by Australian Special Forces in Afghanistan and about proposals to allow the Depts of Defence and Home Affairs to secretly electonically monitor citizens. Regardless of you assumptions about me, I oppose these.

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Reply #352 posted 06/06/19 2:35am

maplenpg

avatar

Lovejunky said:

poppys said:

into my extradition and death...

The death part is not true.

170 years in Prison is comparable to death..NO ?

Honestly, no. You can have a job, a roof over your head, three meals a day, and much more if you behave. However, I do understand Assange having (probably not unjust) fears that someone (US government) may try to kill him. I might have laughed at my own comment if these sort of assasinations hadn't taken place in the past few years (granted by Russian government). I think he's right to worry about what would happen to his life if he were extradited.

If love is the answer, what was the question? - Carter USM.
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Reply #353 posted 06/06/19 5:48am

poppys

maplenpg said:

Lovejunky said:

170 years in Prison is comparable to death..NO ?


Honestly, no. You can have a job, a roof over your head, three meals a day, and much more if you behave.

However, I do understand Assange having (probably not unjust) fears that someone (US government) may try to kill him.

I might have laughed at my own comment if these sort of assasinations hadn't taken place in the past few years (granted by Russian government).

I think he's right to worry about what would happen to his life if he were extradited.


He is not going to be killed by the US government. Are you saying Russia or the US are going to assassinate him?? Too much drama being tossed around here.

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Reply #354 posted 06/06/19 6:08am

maplenpg

avatar

poppys said:

maplenpg said:


Honestly, no. You can have a job, a roof over your head, three meals a day, and much more if you behave.

However, I do understand Assange having (probably not unjust) fears that someone (US government) may try to kill him.

I might have laughed at my own comment if these sort of assasinations hadn't taken place in the past few years (granted by Russian government).

I think he's right to worry about what would happen to his life if he were extradited.


He is not going to be killed by the US government. Are you saying Russia or the US are going to assassinate him?? Too much drama being tossed around here.

Not necessarily, but I do think that if an 'accident' were to happen after he was extradited , then I wouldn't be overly surprised. What I was tryng to say was that I think that's what he means by 'into my extradition and death...' - that's all. Maybe it is overdramatic, but it's what I think he means. Over here we've had the novichok deaths, Alexander Litvinenko's poisoning, and all sorts of conspiracies surrounding what happened to Princess Diana, so I'm just saying that if he thinks his death is possible after extradition, then I'd agree with him. I think he might be even more inclined to believe all this himself as he really doesn't seem the most mentally stable person in the world. Just my twocents

If love is the answer, what was the question? - Carter USM.
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