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Reply #60 posted 05/24/17 6:38am

purplepoppy

jjhunsecker said:

I'll post this, from a much more brilliant mind than me, Brent Staples of the NY Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2...e&_r=0

Very interesting, unfortunately not surprising. Ties that bow properly.


Brand new boogie without the hero.
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Reply #61 posted 05/24/17 6:49am

Pokeno4Money

avatar

OnlyNDaUsa said:

2elijah said:

2freaky4church1 said: Well, glad they got rid of those shit statues. Those kinds of reminders of a horrific past, should not be glorified.

just remember if they ever start taking down things you might think have value that you can not really say much.


Oh, they'll still say much ... they'll still complain. Lot of hypocrisy.

For instance you've got some statues of really vile famous people all over the country, nobody says anything about it.

"Jussie Smollett wanted to become the Rosa Parks of Gay Black Men, but instead he became the Rosie Ruiz."

https://nypost.com/2019/0...a-is-long/
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Reply #62 posted 05/24/17 7:02am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

purplepoppy said:

jjhunsecker said:

I'll post this, from a much more brilliant mind than me, Brent Staples of the NY Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2...e&_r=0

Very interesting, unfortunately not surprising. Ties that bow properly.


Thanks, JJ

"Families are torn apart, men women and children are separated. Children come home from school to find their parents have gone missing." - Anne Frank
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Reply #63 posted 05/24/17 7:19am

purplepoppy

OnlyNDaUsa said:

purplepoppy said:

Ain't nobody taking a step back here - poor choice of words.

YES, the New Orleans City Council VOTED to remove the statues. In the first place, what part of 56% black population of NOLA did you not get from my other post? And the white people that live here are in the majority of wanting it down. Why would anybody want to live in such a magnificent city with the most prominent sculptures being Jefferson Davis, and Robert E Lee? People come from all over the world for the music, the food and the culture here - black and blended culture - not Civil War memorabilia.


As a visual artist and history buff I have followed this argument closely, including those who say the monuments should stay, to remember the brutal historical record. Many of those folks don't live in New Orleans. What people don't get is that you can't go to Jazz Fest without seeing Confederate Gen Beauregard on a horse, Lee Circle is a major city hub, the French Quarter a crown jewel. This shit matters right now. The city is reflecting what it wants to look like.

so you just assume most people in the city want them removed..got it

It was voted on 2 years ago - READ. Most people in the city DO want them removed. Who do you think lives here anyway? Our children deserve better.


Interesting that the last battle of the Civil War was fought in Texas, over a month AFTER Robert E Lee surrendered. Why don't you MYOB? You are a big supporter of "States Rights" (was and still is code for institutionalized racism). Now all of a sudden you want to weigh in on what we do in our city and state. Nobody's buying the slippery slope argument you are trying to sell either.

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Reply #64 posted 05/24/17 7:44am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

purplepoppy said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

so you just assume most people in the city want them removed..got it

It was voted on 2 years ago - READ. Most people in the city DO want them removed. Who do you think lives here anyway? Our children deserve better.

If you say so...


Interesting that the last battle of the Civil War was fought in Texas, over a month AFTER Robert E Lee surrendered.

wholly irrelevant and has nothing to do with this issue.


Why don't you MYOB? You are a big supporter of "States Rights"


Wait so now I am not allowed to state an opinion that this could lead to more removals of more icons? And how very friendly of you... how lady like... so charming.


(was and still is code for institutionalized racism).

I think it can be...sure. but most of the time it is not. Like State's Right to educate its kids they way it sees fit and the fed ought to stay out of it. Or smoking laws or highway speed limits or gun laws




Now all of a sudden you want to weigh in on what we do in our city and state.

Well I have the right you and you have the right to get all twisty over it and yaddy yadday yap yap yap... it is okay you cussed me out and are suggesting I should not speak on this issue.. i forgive you.


Nobody's buying the slippery slope argument you are trying to sell either.


ok and no one is obligated to... but i think someone will move to remove say "Malcolm x" from schools or streets or any monuments he is after all a convict. A felon if am not mistaken.

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #65 posted 05/24/17 7:49am

2elijah

avatar

purplepoppy said:



OnlyNDaUsa said:




purplepoppy said:


Ain't nobody taking a step back here - poor choice of words.

YES, the New Orleans City Council VOTED to remove the statues. In the first place, what part of 56% black population of NOLA did you not get from my other post? And the white people that live here are in the majority of wanting it down. Why would anybody want to live in such a magnificent city with the most prominent sculptures being Jefferson Davis, and Robert E Lee? People come from all over the world for the music, the food and the culture here - black and blended culture - not Civil War memorabilia.


As a visual artist and history buff I have followed this argument closely, including those who say the monuments should stay, to remember the brutal historical record. Many of those folks don't live in New Orleans. What people don't get is that you can't go to Jazz Fest without seeing Confederate Gen Beauregard on a horse, Lee Circle is a major city hub, the French Quarter a crown jewel. This shit matters right now. The city is reflecting what it wants to look like.





so you just assume most people in the city want them removed..got it



It was voted on 2 years ago - READ. Most people in the city DO want them removed. Who do you think lives here anyway? Our children deserve better.


Interesting that the last battle of the Civil War was fought in Texas, over a month AFTER Robert E Lee surrendered. Why don't you MYOB? You are a big supporter of "States Rights" (was and still is code for institutionalized racism). Now all of a sudden you want to weigh in on what we do in our city and state. Nobody's buying the slippery slope argument you are trying to sell either.


clapping And so transparent.
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Reply #66 posted 05/24/17 8:03am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

2elijah said:


clapping And so transparent.

first JJ and now you and I think purplepoppy may have too... use code words to call me a racist... be an adult say it... it sad how so many can not accept a different opinion and have to name call. but i guess i forgive you...

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #67 posted 05/24/17 8:04am

purplepoppy

2elijah said:

http://nypost.com/2017/05...ally-gone/ NEWS In New Orleans, Confederate monuments are finally gone By Associated Press May 20, 2017 | 9:35am The AP NEW ORLEANS — They were among the city’s oldest landmarks, as cemented to the landscape of New Orleans as the Superdome and St. Louis Cathedral: a stone obelisk heralding white supremacy and three statues of Confederate stalwarts. But after decades standing sentinel over this Southern city, the Confederate monuments are gone, amid a controversy that at times hearkened back to the divisiveness of the Civil War they commemorated. The last of the monuments — a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee facing defiantly north with his arms crossed — was lifted by a crane from its pedestal late Friday. As air was seen between Lee’s statue and the pedestal below it, a cheer went out from the crowd who recorded the history with their phones and shook hands with each other in congratulations. Many in the crowd had waited since morning. “I never thought I would see this day!” shouted Melanie Morel-Ensminger with joy. “But look! It’s happening.” Lee’s was the last of four monuments to Confederate-era figures to be removed under a 2015 City Council vote on a proposal by Mayor Mitch Landrieu. It caps a nearly two-year-long process that has been railed against by those who feel the monuments are a part of Southern heritage and honor the dead. But removal of the monuments has drawn praise from those who saw them as brutal reminders of slavery and symbols of the historic oppression of black people. Landrieu called for the monuments’ removal in the lingering emotional aftermath of the 2015 massacre of nine black parishioners at a South Carolina church. The killer, Dylann Roof, was an avowed racist who brandished Confederate battle flags in photos, recharging the debate over whether Confederate emblems represent racism or an honorable heritage. While Roof’s actions spurred a debate in many parts of the South about whether it was appropriate to fly the Confederate battle emblem — and many places have taken it down — the reaction in New Orleans seemed to go even further, knocking away at even weightier, heavier parts of history. Landrieu drew blistering criticism from monument supporters and even some political allies. But in explaining his reasoning, the mayor has repeatedly said they do not represent the diversity and future of New Orleans. “These statues are not just stone and metal. They are not just innocent remembrances of a benign history. These monuments celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy; ignoring the death, ignoring the enslavement, ignoring the terror that it actually stood for,” he said Friday. "After the Civil War, these statues were a part of that terrorism, as much as burning a cross on someone’s lawn. They were erected purposefully to send a strong message to all who walked in their shadows about who was still in charge in this city,” he added. Of the four monuments, Lee’s was easily the most prominent: The bronze statue alone is close to 20 feet (6 meters) tall. It’s a bronze sculpture of Lee looking toward the northern horizon from atop a roughly 60-foot-tall column. wires and New Orleans’ famous streetcar lines. The atmosphere Friday was almost festive as dozens of people, some with lawn chairs, came out to see what many called history in the making.

highfive Thank you for posting the story 2elijah. Appreciated. Great video online of Lee being lifted off his pedestal.

Brand new boogie without the hero.
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Reply #68 posted 05/24/17 8:06am

purplepoppy

OnlyNDaUsa said:

2elijah said:


clapping And so transparent.

first JJ and now you and I think purplepoppy may have too... use code words to call me a racist... be an adult say it... it sad how so many can not accept a different opinion and have to name call. but i guess i forgive you...


Guess you forgot I have called you a racist before. If the shoe fits...

Brand new boogie without the hero.
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Reply #69 posted 05/24/17 8:08am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

purplepoppy said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

first JJ and now you and I think purplepoppy may have too... use code words to call me a racist... be an adult say it... it sad how so many can not accept a different opinion and have to name call. but i guess i forgive you...


Guess you forgot I have called you a racist before. If the shoe fits...

it doesn't and you are not being friendly I have not one racist thought and I have not said anything at all even close to that. but if you see it then maybe you need to reflect and ask yourself if you hold any race-based bigotry?

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #70 posted 05/24/17 8:11am

jjhunsecker

avatar

OnlyNDaUsa said:

2elijah said:


clapping And so transparent.

first JJ and now you and I think purplepoppy may have too... use code words to call me a racist... be an adult say it... it sad how so many can not accept a different opinion and have to name call. but i guess i forgive you...

If I was going to call you a racist, I wouldn't fuck around, I would just SAY IT.

I DID ask why you seem to be so invested in this issue, and seem deaf to the opinions of those opposed to those statues (for example, saying that this is not comparable to Nazi imagery and monuments)

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Reply #71 posted 05/24/17 8:13am

jjhunsecker

avatar

Gen Rommel of Germany during WWII was considered a brilliant general, a great tactitian. Patton considered him a worth adversary. Should Germany allow a statue of him to stand in the middle of Berlin or Frankfurt , or anywhere ?

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Reply #72 posted 05/24/17 8:15am

13cjk13

Pokeno4Money said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

just remember if they ever start taking down things you might think have value that you can not really say much.


Oh, they'll still say much ... they'll still complain. Lot of hypocrisy.

For instance you've got some statues of really vile famous people all over the country, nobody says anything about it.

"While there are many stories centering around Cobb's alleged racial intolerance during his playing years, there are scant documented incidents of racially motivated acts." Pay attention.

"If we had had confidence the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so."
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Reply #73 posted 05/24/17 8:16am

purplepoppy

OnlyNDaUsa said:

purplepoppy said:


Guess you forgot I have called you a racist before. If the shoe fits...

it doesn't and you are not being friendly I have not one racist thought and I have not said anything at all even close to that. but if you see it then maybe you need to reflect and ask yourself if you hold any race-based bigotry?

And it was regarding what you said about people in NOLA after Katrina, something I will never forget. We don't need your likes in Louisiana or New Orleans.

Brand new boogie without the hero.
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Reply #74 posted 05/24/17 8:17am

jjhunsecker

avatar

2elijah said:

http://nypost.com/2017/05...ally-gone/ NEWS In New Orleans, Confederate monuments are finally gone By Associated Press May 20, 2017 | 9:35am The AP NEW ORLEANS — They were among the city’s oldest landmarks, as cemented to the landscape of New Orleans as the Superdome and St. Louis Cathedral: a stone obelisk heralding white supremacy and three statues of Confederate stalwarts. But after decades standing sentinel over this Southern city, the Confederate monuments are gone, amid a controversy that at times hearkened back to the divisiveness of the Civil War they commemorated. The last of the monuments — a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee facing defiantly north with his arms crossed — was lifted by a crane from its pedestal late Friday. As air was seen between Lee’s statue and the pedestal below it, a cheer went out from the crowd who recorded the history with their phones and shook hands with each other in congratulations. Many in the crowd had waited since morning. “I never thought I would see this day!” shouted Melanie Morel-Ensminger with joy. “But look! It’s happening.” Lee’s was the last of four monuments to Confederate-era figures to be removed under a 2015 City Council vote on a proposal by Mayor Mitch Landrieu. It caps a nearly two-year-long process that has been railed against by those who feel the monuments are a part of Southern heritage and honor the dead. But removal of the monuments has drawn praise from those who saw them as brutal reminders of slavery and symbols of the historic oppression of black people. Landrieu called for the monuments’ removal in the lingering emotional aftermath of the 2015 massacre of nine black parishioners at a South Carolina church. The killer, Dylann Roof, was an avowed racist who brandished Confederate battle flags in photos, recharging the debate over whether Confederate emblems represent racism or an honorable heritage. While Roof’s actions spurred a debate in many parts of the South about whether it was appropriate to fly the Confederate battle emblem — and many places have taken it down — the reaction in New Orleans seemed to go even further, knocking away at even weightier, heavier parts of history. Landrieu drew blistering criticism from monument supporters and even some political allies. But in explaining his reasoning, the mayor has repeatedly said they do not represent the diversity and future of New Orleans. “These statues are not just stone and metal. They are not just innocent remembrances of a benign history. These monuments celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy; ignoring the death, ignoring the enslavement, ignoring the terror that it actually stood for,” he said Friday. "After the Civil War, these statues were a part of that terrorism, as much as burning a cross on someone’s lawn. They were erected purposefully to send a strong message to all who walked in their shadows about who was still in charge in this city,” he added. Of the four monuments, Lee’s was easily the most prominent: The bronze statue alone is close to 20 feet (6 meters) tall. It’s a bronze sculpture of Lee looking toward the northern horizon from atop a roughly 60-foot-tall column. wires and New Orleans’ famous streetcar lines. The atmosphere Friday was almost festive as dozens of people, some with lawn chairs, came out to see what many called history in the making. [Edited 5/24/17 4:52am] [Edited 5/24/17 7:04am]

Thanks 2E. Very good article.

My view is not to destroy these statues. Instead , put them in a museum , where one can see them in their proper historical context. The same way the Holocaust Museum displays Nazi artifacts

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Reply #75 posted 05/24/17 8:18am

jjhunsecker

avatar

purplepoppy said:

jjhunsecker said:

I'll post this, from a much more brilliant mind than me, Brent Staples of the NY Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2...e&_r=0

Very interesting, unfortunately not surprising. Ties that bow properly.


You're welcome. I had to post it as a link because it wouldn't allow me to cut and paste it .

Staples is a brilliant guy, one of the main editors of the NY Times

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Reply #76 posted 05/24/17 8:20am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

purplepoppy said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

it doesn't and you are not being friendly I have not one racist thought and I have not said anything at all even close to that. but if you see it then maybe you need to reflect and ask yourself if you hold any race-based bigotry?

And it was regarding what you said about people in NOLA after Katrina, something I will never forget. We don't need your likes in Louisiana or New Orleans.

you mean when I said it was 50% black and 50% white? (well within like 2 people). That is true and was based on records released publicly. Also, half the homes flooded were in predominantly *that means MOSTLY* white areas and about 50% were in predominantly black areas. Which means what? That is was basically about what one would expect given the population. That is unless you hung a political agenda on the event.

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #77 posted 05/24/17 8:28am

purplepoppy

OnlyNDaUsa said:

purplepoppy said:

And it was regarding what you said about people in NOLA after Katrina, something I will never forget. We don't need your likes in Louisiana or New Orleans.

you mean when I said it was 50% black and 50% white? (well within like 2 people). That is true and was based on records released publicly. Also, half the homes flooded were in predominantly *that means MOSTLY* white areas and about 50% were in predominantly black areas. Which means what? That is was basically about what one would expect given the population. That is unless you hung a political agenda on the event.

The City of New Orleans is predominantly African-American. Read the census. Just start with that FACT. You have no idea about our neighborhoods and what's what here either.

Brand new boogie without the hero.
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Reply #78 posted 05/24/17 9:21am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

purplepoppy said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

you mean when I said it was 50% black and 50% white? (well within like 2 people). That is true and was based on records released publicly. Also, half the homes flooded were in predominantly *that means MOSTLY* white areas and about 50% were in predominantly black areas. Which means what? That is was basically about what one would expect given the population. That is unless you hung a political agenda on the event.

The City of New Orleans is predominantly African-American. Read the census. Just start with that FACT. You have no idea about our neighborhoods and what's what here either.

so then white deaths and the flooding of white homes was actually OVER represented in the flooding?

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #79 posted 05/24/17 9:33am

purplepoppy

OnlyNDaUsa said:

purplepoppy said:

The City of New Orleans is predominantly African-American. Read the census. Just start with that FACT. You have no idea about our neighborhoods and what's what here either.

so then white deaths and the flooding of white homes was actually OVER represented in the flooding?

There is no way I'm falling into that trap. My opinion about you is formed by your own words and "logic". I have a very good memory.

This thread is about the MONUMENTS COMIN DOWN!!!!! 2017 flag

Brand new boogie without the hero.
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Reply #80 posted 05/24/17 9:42am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

purplepoppy said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

so then white deaths and the flooding of white homes was actually OVER represented in the flooding?

There is no way I'm falling into that trap. My opinion about you is formed by your own words and "logic". I have a very good memory.

This thread is about the MONUMENTS COMIN DOWN!!!!! 2017 flag

so you admit that you do not know the figures of deaths by race... it is okay.

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #81 posted 05/24/17 11:32am

2elijah

avatar

jjhunsecker said:



2elijah said:


http://nypost.com/2017/05...ally-gone/ NEWS In New Orleans, Confederate monuments are finally gone By Associated Press May 20, 2017 | 9:35am The AP NEW ORLEANS — They were among the city’s oldest landmarks, as cemented to the landscape of New Orleans as the Superdome and St. Louis Cathedral: a stone obelisk heralding white supremacy and three statues of Confederate stalwarts. But after decades standing sentinel over this Southern city, the Confederate monuments are gone, amid a controversy that at times hearkened back to the divisiveness of the Civil War they commemorated. The last of the monuments — a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee facing defiantly north with his arms crossed — was lifted by a crane from its pedestal late Friday. As air was seen between Lee’s statue and the pedestal below it, a cheer went out from the crowd who recorded the history with their phones and shook hands with each other in congratulations. Many in the crowd had waited since morning. “I never thought I would see this day!” shouted Melanie Morel-Ensminger with joy. “But look! It’s happening.” Lee’s was the last of four monuments to Confederate-era figures to be removed under a 2015 City Council vote on a proposal by Mayor Mitch Landrieu. It caps a nearly two-year-long process that has been railed against by those who feel the monuments are a part of Southern heritage and honor the dead. But removal of the monuments has drawn praise from those who saw them as brutal reminders of slavery and symbols of the historic oppression of black people. Landrieu called for the monuments’ removal in the lingering emotional aftermath of the 2015 massacre of nine black parishioners at a South Carolina church. The killer, Dylann Roof, was an avowed racist who brandished Confederate battle flags in photos, recharging the debate over whether Confederate emblems represent racism or an honorable heritage. While Roof’s actions spurred a debate in many parts of the South about whether it was appropriate to fly the Confederate battle emblem — and many places have taken it down — the reaction in New Orleans seemed to go even further, knocking away at even weightier, heavier parts of history. Landrieu drew blistering criticism from monument supporters and even some political allies. But in explaining his reasoning, the mayor has repeatedly said they do not represent the diversity and future of New Orleans. “These statues are not just stone and metal. They are not just innocent remembrances of a benign history. These monuments celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy; ignoring the death, ignoring the enslavement, ignoring the terror that it uthat terrorism, as much as burning a cross on someone’s lawn. They were erected purposefully to send a strong message to all who walked in their shadows about who was still in charge in this city,” he added. Of the four monuments, Lee’s was easily the most prominent: The bronze statue alone is close to 20 feet (6 meters) tall. It’s a bronze sculpture of Lee looking toward the northern horizon from atop a roughly 60-foot-tall column. wires and New Orleans’ famous streetcar lines. The atmosphere Friday was almost festive as dozens of people, some with lawn chairs, came out to see what many called history in the making. [Edited 5/24/17 4:52am] [Edited 5/24/17 7:04am]


Thanks 2E. Very good article.



My view is not to destroy these statues. Instead , put them in a museum , where one can see them in their proper historical context. The same way the Holocaust Museum displays Nazi artifacts



I agree. They should be kept in a museum. I mean just imagine someone putting up a statue of a man holding a Swastika, in a Jewish community.
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Reply #82 posted 05/24/17 11:34am

jjhunsecker

avatar

2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said:

Thanks 2E. Very good article.

My view is not to destroy these statues. Instead , put them in a museum , where one can see them in their proper historical context. The same way the Holocaust Museum displays Nazi artifacts

I agree. They should be kept in a museum. I mean just imagine someone putting up a statue of a man holding a Swastika, in a Jewish community.

And as my Jewish brothers say "NEVER FORGET !"

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Reply #83 posted 05/24/17 11:40am

2elijah

avatar

OnlyNDaUsa said:



2elijah said:



clapping And so transparent.




first JJ and now you and I think purplepoppy may have too... use code words to call me a racist... be an adult say it... it sad how so many can not accept a different opinion and have to name call. but i guess i forgive you...


No one called you racist. So stop the false accusations. This thread is not about you. Now how about staying on topic? The thread is about certain statues being removed in NOLA.
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Reply #84 posted 05/24/17 11:41am

2elijah

avatar

jjhunsecker said:



2elijah said:


jjhunsecker said:



Thanks 2E. Very good article.



My view is not to destroy these statues. Instead , put them in a museum , where one can see them in their proper historical context. The same way the Holocaust Museum displays Nazi artifacts



I agree. They should be kept in a museum. I mean just imagine someone putting up a statue of a man holding a Swastika, in a Jewish community.


And as my Jewish brothers say "NEVER FORGET !"


Exactly!
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Reply #85 posted 05/24/17 11:41am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

2elijah said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

first JJ and now you and I think purplepoppy may have too... use code words to call me a racist... be an adult say it... it sad how so many can not accept a different opinion and have to name call. but i guess i forgive you...

No one called you racist. So stop the false accusations. This thread is not about you. Now how about staying on topic? The thread is about certain statues being removed in NOLA.

if you say so... i will believe you.

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #86 posted 05/25/17 9:15am

purplepoppy

Let's have revolving statues of musicians from NOLA. So many to choose from:

Mahalia Jackson, Louis Armstrong (FYI - He did not like being called "Louie"), Pete Fountain, Frankie Ford, Allen Toussaint, Ellis, Branford, Wynton, Delfayo and Jason Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr, Irma Thomas, Jon Batiste, Trombone Shorty (Troy Andrews), Ludacris, Big Freedia. Yeah! - lets put Lil Wayne on a 60ft pedestal.

Brand new boogie without the hero.
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Reply #87 posted 05/25/17 9:33am

OnlyNDaUsa

avatar

purplepoppy said:

Let's have revolving statues of musicians from NOLA. So many to choose from:

Mahalia Jackson, Louis Armstrong (FYI - He did not like being called "Louie"), Pete Fountain, Frankie Ford, Allen Toussaint, Ellis, Branford, Wynton, Delfayo and Jason Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr, Irma Thomas, Jon Batiste, Trombone Shorty (Troy Andrews), Ludacris, Big Freedia. Yeah! - lets put Lil Wayne on a 60ft pedestal.

as long as none of them has never used any racial slurs and has never been convicted of any crimes...

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #88 posted 05/25/17 9:33am

2elijah

avatar

purplepoppy said:

Let's have revolving statues of musicians from NOLA. So many to choose from:

Mahalia Jackson, Louis Armstrong (FYI - He did not like being called "Louie"), Pete Fountain, Frankie Ford, Allen Toussaint, Ellis, Branford, Wynton, Delfayo and Jason Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr, Irma Thomas, Jon Batiste, Trombone Shorty (Troy Andrews), Ludacris, Big Freedia. Yeah! - lets put Lil Wayne on a 60ft pedestal.


That's a great idea. I love various types of New Orleans music.
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Reply #89 posted 05/25/17 9:39am

Dasein

OnlyNDaUsa said:

purplepoppy said:

Let's have revolving statues of musicians from NOLA. So many to choose from:

Mahalia Jackson, Louis Armstrong (FYI - He did not like being called "Louie"), Pete Fountain, Frankie Ford, Allen Toussaint, Ellis, Branford, Wynton, Delfayo and Jason Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr, Irma Thomas, Jon Batiste, Trombone Shorty (Troy Andrews), Ludacris, Big Freedia. Yeah! - lets put Lil Wayne on a 60ft pedestal.

as long as none of them has never used any racial slurs and has never been convicted of any crimes...


If that's the case, we ought to remove all memorials of white men who owned slaves and/or intentionally
caused war resulting in genocide.




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