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Thread started 04/20/15 12:50pm

2freaky4church
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Death Case of Freddie Gray by the Baltimore Police

This young black man's spine is severed by Police and he later dies. The mayor was on Morning Joe spinning like a top. She is a black democrat by the way.

Her problem with body cameras? Too expensive. grrr. She hasn't even talked to the family. These Obama Dems make me sick.

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All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #1 posted 04/20/15 12:52pm

2freaky4church
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All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #2 posted 04/20/15 3:51pm

2elijah

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Saw that on the news. Terrible that he ended up with a severed spine, when he was taken out of the van. He was refused medical assistance, when he asked for an inhaler, and they dragged him to a vehicle, because he couldn't walk from the injuries, the cops obviously gave him while he was in the van. He later went into a coma and died. Damn shame. Glad the cops got suspended, now they need to be in prison.

These are the reasons people should not be silenced to speak out against these kind of vicious cops.
falloff
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Reply #3 posted 04/21/15 5:55pm

Astasheiks

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2elijah said:

Saw that on the news. Terrible that he ended up with a severed spine, when he was taken out of the van. He was refused medical assistance, when he asked for an inhaler, and they dragged him to a vehicle, because he couldn't walk from the injuries, the cops obviously gave him while he was in the van. He later went into a coma and died. Damn shame. Glad the cops got suspended, now they need to be in prison. These are the reasons people should not be silenced to speak out against these kind of vicious cops.

In the video, it shows he can't walk to the van and is being dragged to the van. All this before he was ever in the van. Unbelieveable! It has been 10 days and they (the police) haven't even talked. eek mad

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Reply #4 posted 04/21/15 5:57pm

Astasheiks

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Now they are marching in Baltimore approximate 2000 over some more bs. Lawd Jesus! disbelief

[Edited 4/21/15 17:59pm]

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Reply #5 posted 04/21/15 8:11pm

2elijah

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Astasheiks said:



2elijah said:


Saw that on the news. Terrible that he ended up with a severed spine, when he was taken out of the van. He was refused medical assistance, when he asked for an inhaler, and they dragged him to a vehicle, because he couldn't walk from the injuries, the cops obviously gave him while he was in the van. He later went into a coma and died. Damn shame. Glad the cops got suspended, now they need to be in prison. These are the reasons people should not be silenced to speak out against these kind of vicious cops.


In the video, it shows he can't walk to the van and is being dragged to the van. All this before he was ever in the van. Unbelieveable! It has been 10 days and they (the police) haven't even talked. eek mad


This thread will probably be moved to the sticky thread, but I heard it is procedure that the cops not to be interviewed for a certain number of days after this type of incident before writing a report. I believe the mayor said she has been working with others to try and get that changed, so that cops are required to write a report right after these types of incidents.

Suppose to be more vids, according to the news, possibly showing his first encounter with cops. Tbe cops made about 3 stops before getting him medical attention. The Mayor is trying to find out how he got injured, when the cops dragged him to the van, and the vid shows him yelling in pain at the same time and not able to walk. Witness who filmed part of it, said the cops were beating on him before the witness started filming. His vocal cords were damaged as well as his spine. What did those cops do to that guy that led him going into a coma and dying? So sad. Also Mayor said she is not sure if the cops had the right to arrest him, for thecclaim he had a knife, but it seems it was a small knife that wasn't illegal to carry in Baltimore, which would not be a cause for arrest. Lot of unanswered questions. Too many cops going way too far in their use of excessive force.
[Edited 4/21/15 20:20pm]
falloff
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Reply #6 posted 04/22/15 9:43am

free2bfreeda

Death of Freddie Gray after Police Arrest

: http://news.yahoo.com/pho...33232.html

Protesters stand outside the Baltimore Police Department's Western District police station at the end of a march for Freddie Gray, Tuesday, April 21, 2015, in Baltimore. Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a police van. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Baltimore police vowed on Monday to make a full and swift probe of the death of a black suspect who suffered spinal injuries after white officers arrested him, the latest incident to raise questions about the treatment of minorities by U.S. police.

Freddie Gray, 27, of Baltimore, was arrested on April 12 and died on Sunday from a spinal injury after slipping into a coma, officials said. His death has sparked outrage and protests in the largely black Maryland city of about 625,000 people.

Deputy Police Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said officers had arrested Gray without using force after he fled when they approached him. They put him into a police van to take him to a station, he told a news conference.

"I know that when Mr. Gray was placed inside that van, he was able to talk, upset, and when Mr. Gray was taken out of that van, he could not talk and he could not breathe," Rodriguez said.

Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said a wide-ranging and transparent department investigation would be concluded by the end of next week and the results forwarded to state prosecutors. After that, the probe will undergo an independent review, he said. (Reuters)

i hope adding to this thread is okay.

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #7 posted 04/22/15 5:27pm

2elijah

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free2bfreeda said:




Death of Freddie Gray after Police Arrest



: http://news.yahoo.com/pho...33232.html



Protesters stand outside the Baltimore Police Department's Western District police station at the end of a march for Freddie Gray, Tuesday, April 21, 2015, in Baltimore. Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a police van. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)








Baltimore police vowed on Monday to make a full and swift probe of the death of a black suspect who suffered spinal injuries after white officers arrested him, the latest incident to raise questions about the treatment of minorities by U.S. police.


Freddie Gray, 27, of Baltimore, was arrested on April 12 and died on Sunday from a spinal injury after slipping into a coma, officials said. His death has sparked outrage and protests in the largely black Maryland city of about 625,000 people.


Deputy Police Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said officers had arrested Gray without using force after he fled when they approached him. They put him into a police van to take him to a station, he told a news conference.


"I know that when Mr. Gray was placed inside that van, he was able to talk, upset, and when Mr. Gray was taken out of that van, he could not talk and he could not breathe," Rodriguez said.


Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said a wide-ranging and transparent department investigation would be concluded by the end of next week and the results forwarded to state prosecutors. After that, the probe will undergo an independent review, he said. (Reuters)





i hope adding to this thread is okay.







The whole situation in this incident is terrible, and what's worse is that these 6 cops will continue lying about how this young man got his spine severed and his vocal cords destroyed. I can't imagine what kind of animals would do this. This is why pressure against police abuse has to continue. This type of behavior from cops is unacceptable. They are suppose to protect and serve, not be beat or shoot unarmed, non-threatening to their death.

Now the lawyers for these police are trying to twist how Gray received the injuries, and denying how he received his injuries. It is almost like they are trying to blame the victim for how he received the injuries. Unbelievable. disbelief CNN keeps getting the same, bald-headed l, NY retired officer for every recent police incident, and he is always trying to twist his theory of the incidents to the police favor. Not surprised.
falloff
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Reply #8 posted 04/22/15 9:37pm

V10LETBLUES

Cops have been allowed to be thugs in minority communities because of a superiority complex that has gone unchalleged because minority voices are easier to ignore. Imagine how when people with money get in the crosshairs lawyers are deployed and change happens. Case in point when lawyers themselves were ticketed via red-light cameras. Oh man did they challenge and change laws in municipalities across the nation change.

...well at least in more prosperous communities. We see time and again the poor taken advantage of because of a fainter financial/political voice.
[Edited 4/22/15 21:52pm]
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Reply #9 posted 04/23/15 3:41am

2elijah

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V10LETBLUES said:

Cops have been allowed to be thugs in minority communities because of a superiority complex that has gone unchalleged because minority voices are easier to ignore. Imagine how when people with money get in the crosshairs lawyers are deployed and change happens. Case in point when lawyers themselves were ticketed via red-light cameras. Oh man did they challenge and change laws in municipalities across the nation change.

...well at least in more prosperous communities. We see time and again the poor taken advantage of because of a fainter financial/political voice.
[Edited 4/22/15 21:52pm]

The reality of cops who abuse their authority and many who bring their, ingrained stereotyped views about the value of many non-white citizens to the job, are being is finally being exposed. If superiors of police officers allow it, then the problem is at the top as well.
hing major was done to break down the blue wall of silence that seems to protect abusive cops from being accountable for their abusive actions.

These situations of abuse like in Ferguson, NYC and many other cities and states have been brewing for a long time. Now it has and is reaching its boiling point.
[Edited 4/23/15 4:39am]
falloff
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Reply #10 posted 04/23/15 6:09am

free2bfreeda

Baltimore police officer who chased Freddie Gray had pattern of violence – court filings

Brian Rice, lieutenant suspended in police-van death that sparked federal inquiry, was ordered to stay away from man who had ‘fear of imminent harm or death’

: http://www.theguardian.co...rt-filings

The Baltimore police supervisor suspended over the death of Freddie Gray was accused of threatening to kill a man as part of an alleged “pattern of intimidation and violence” that led to a temporary restraining order.

Lieutenant Brian Rice was ordered to stay away from the man after a series of alleged confrontations, including one armed standoff that led to a 911 call and officers from two police departments spending 90 minutes defusing the situation, according to court filings.

“I am seeking protection immediately,” the man wrote to a court in Carroll County, Maryland, in January 2013. He alleged Rice’s behaviour had caused him “to have constant fear for my personal safety” and a “fear of imminent harm or death from Brian Rice”.

The Guardian is aware of the man’s identity but is not naming him due to the nature of the allegations. He declined to comment during a telephone conversation with the Guardian. Rice and the Baltimore police department did not respond to emails requesting comment.

The emergency protective order was granted. According to a separate filing, Rice had firearms confiscated. In addition to his police-issued Glock pistol, he was said to own a personal Glock handgun, long guns and a cross-bow. The protective order was then lifted after a week when a judge ruled there was no basis in Maryland law for it to continue.

Rice, 41, was one of six officers suspended pending a criminal inquiry into the death of Gray, who died after his neck was “80% severed” by the breaking of three vertebrae, according to his family’s attorney, who said Gray’s voice box was almost crushed.

>

read more at link: http://www.theguardian.co...rt-filings

also: http://www.theguardian.co...c-violence

Baltimore officer suspended in Freddie Gray case accused of domestic violence


Lieutenant Brian Rice faced Maryland civil actions in 2008 and 2013

Officer led initial chase of man who died with broken neck after arrest

excerpt:

Lieutenant Brian Rice faced actions in Maryland’s civil courts over alleged domestic violence in 2008 and 2013, according to public filings. In both cases, requests for protective orders were denied by the judge. For a week in 2013, Rice was also ordered not to abuse, contact, nor go to the home or workplace of a second person who took him to court.

Rice, 41, was one of six officers suspended over Gray’s death on Sunday. Gray, who was 25, was arrested a week earlier after being chased when he made eye contact with Rice and ran away, according to police chiefs. Gray’s neck was left “80% severed” by the breaking of three vertebrae and his voice box was almost crushed, according to his family’s attorney.

According to the court filings, a judge in Baltimore county denied the first accuser’s request for a protective order against Rice in April 2008, ruling there was “no statutory basis” for it. A clerk in Carroll County said the accuser’s request for an emergency protective order there in January 2013 was denied by the court.

iincidents like this continue to happen. it's almost like an overview of a type of scenario where a bullies target those who they feel they can get away with beating up and causing permanent injuries.

why is this happening? what is the agenda? is this a case of scapegoating?

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #11 posted 04/23/15 6:38am

V10LETBLUES

2elijah said:

V10LETBLUES said:

Cops have been allowed to be thugs in minority communities because of a superiority complex that has gone unchalleged because minority voices are easier to ignore. Imagine how when people with money get in the crosshairs lawyers are deployed and change happens. Case in point when lawyers themselves were ticketed via red-light cameras. Oh man did they challenge and change laws in municipalities across the nation change.

...well at least in more prosperous communities. We see time and again the poor taken advantage of because of a fainter financial/political voice.
[Edited 4/22/15 21:52pm]

The reality of cops who abuse their authority and many who bring their, ingrained stereotyped views about the value of many non-white citizens to the job, are being is finally being exposed. If superiors of police officers allow it, then the problem is at the top as well.
hing major was done to break down the blue wall of silence that seems to protect abusive cops from being accountable for their abusive actions.

These situations of abuse like in Ferguson, NYC and many other cities and states have been brewing for a long time. Now it has and is reaching its boiling point.
[Edited 4/23/15 4:39am]


I agree with what you said, except I have always felt Ferguson was not a good example and is now being used by right wing media as an example of the lack of validity of the argument.
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Reply #12 posted 04/23/15 10:28am

2elijah

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V10LETBLUES said:

2elijah said:


The reality of cops who abuse their authority and many who bring their, ingrained stereotyped views about the value of many non-white citizens to the job, are being is finally being exposed. If superiors of police officers allow it, then the problem is at the top as well.
hing major was done to break down the blue wall of silence that seems to protect abusive cops from being accountable for their abusive actions.

These situations of abuse like in Ferguson, NYC and many other cities and states have been brewing for a long time. Now it has and is reaching its boiling point.
[Edited 4/23/15 4:39am]


I agree with what you said, except I have always felt Ferguson was not a good example and is now being used by right wing media as an example of the lack of validity of the argument.

Most of those right wingers have no clue of these experiences, which is why they obsess on any negative info they can find on Ferguson. How they feel isn't stopping the ongoing abuse by bad cops.

Over the past few weeks, a few more have been killed at the hands of some officers, and right wingers are surely not happy that many in the public have finally opened their eyes, and expressing their disgust towards these abuses. Ferguson was the boiling point and has awakened many in other cities to finally demand answers to this country's extensive history of police abuse. Something has to change. Too much abuse going on against many citizens and remaining silent about it won't bring changes.
[Edited 4/23/15 10:32am]
falloff
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Reply #13 posted 04/23/15 11:11am

V10LETBLUES

2elijah said:

V10LETBLUES said:
I agree with what you said, except I have always felt Ferguson was not a good example and is now being used by right wing media as an example of the lack of validity of the argument.
Most of those right wingers have no clue of these experiences, which is why they obsess on any negative info they can find on Ferguson. How they feel isn't stopping the ongoing abuse by bad cops. Over the past few weeks, a few more have been killed at the hands of some officers, and right wingers are surely not happy that many in the public have finally opened their eyes, and expressing their disgust towards these abuses. Ferguson was the boiling point and has awakened many in other cities to finally demand answers to this country's extensive history of police abuse. Something has to change. Too much abuse going on against many citizens and remaining silent about it won't bring changes. [Edited 4/23/15 10:32am]

Yes I agree about the boiling point, and it's been a long time coming. Ferguson did light a fire and finally shed a lot more attention to this epidemic of police thuggery under color of the law. In that regard Ferguson was unequivocally important. I have long been a proponent of cameras on cops, and on public streets. Cameras put the uncertainty, such as giving officers the benefit of the doubt under questionable circumstance, to obvious such as seeing with your own eyes a cop shooting a man 8 times in the back as he was fleeing.

While I do not completely agree that Brown was cold blooded murder, it did finally put the issue on everyone's front and center shinning like a spotlight in people's eyes where it belongs. News media has had a long sad history of only caring, and finding newsworthy and actionable when it is well-off white people who suffer, and turning a blind eye on everyone else. So, sadly, Ferguson was an important moment under incredibly bad circumstances.

[Edited 4/23/15 11:13am]

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Reply #14 posted 04/23/15 11:38am

2elijah

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V10LETBLUES said:



2elijah said:


V10LETBLUES said:
I agree with what you said, except I have always felt Ferguson was not a good example and is now being used by right wing media as an example of the lack of validity of the argument.

Most of those right wingers have no clue of these experiences, which is why they obsess on any negative info they can find on Ferguson. How they feel isn't stopping the ongoing abuse by bad cops. Over the past few weeks, a few more have been killed at the hands of some officers, and right wingers are surely not happy that many in the public have finally opened their eyes, and expressing their disgust towards these abuses. Ferguson was the boiling point and has awakened many in other cities to finally demand answers to this country's extensive history of police abuse. Something has to change. Too much abuse going on against many citizens and remaining silent about it won't bring changes. [Edited 4/23/15 10:32am]


Yes I agree about the boiling point, and it's been a long time coming. Ferguson did light a fire and finally shed a lot more attention to this epidemic of police thuggery under color of the law. In that regard Ferguson was unequivocally important. I have long been a proponent of cameras on cops, and on public streets. Cameras put the uncertainty, such as giving officers the benefit of the doubt under questionable circumstance, to obvious such as seeing with your own eyes a cop shooting a man 8 times in the back as he was fleeing.

While I do not completely agree that Brown was cold blooded murder, it did finally put the issue on everyone's front and center shinning like a spotlight in people's eyes where it belongs. News media has had a long sad history of only caring, and finding newsworthy and actionable when it is well-off white people who suffer, and turning a blind eye on everyone else. So, sadly, Ferguson was an important moment under incredibly bad circumstances.


[Edited 4/23/15 11:13am]



For a long time body cameras have been needed. Also, for years many Black communities tried hard to bring the police abuse issue to the forefront, but it did not receive the national attention needed, for change and improvement, and for a long time, many have said one day it will reach a boiling point, because too many of these incidents have gone ignored.

No one wants riots of any source and this younger generation is not from the civil rights era. They are experiencing their own era of 'right-now'. In this era of phone cameras it is helping to capture many of these incidents, although it does not guarantee at a trial, contents caught on camera will lead to a fair trial.
[Edited 4/23/15 11:42am]
falloff
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Reply #15 posted 04/23/15 12:06pm

V10LETBLUES

...and having said all that, let's not fool ourselves into thinking that police brutality is in and of itself the problem for certain communities void of extenuating circumstances. Some are truly violent places that need soul searching by the community itself, and a hard look in the mirror as to what are the ingridients that make up this boiling stew.

[Edited 4/23/15 12:21pm]

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Reply #16 posted 04/23/15 12:36pm

3rdeyedude

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V10LETBLUES said:

...and having said all that, let's not fool ourselves into thinking that police brutality is in and of itself the problem for certain communities void of extenuating circumstances. Some are truly violent places that need soul searching by the community itself, and a hard look in the mirror as to what are the ingridients that make up this boiling stew.

[Edited 4/23/15 12:21pm]

exactly......and nobody wants to look at the ingredients, especially the ones who live in those communities where shit like this happens........check out the video below:

http://www.baltimoresun.c...story.html

doesn't look like the cops did anything wrong............DOES IT??

[Edited 4/23/15 12:37pm]

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Reply #17 posted 04/23/15 12:44pm

2freaky4church
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A reporter from there was on tv today and said the real problem was get tough laws that were passed, like pissing in public or open containers, jay walking, graffiti, jay walking. Police shootings of blacks went up since then. What get tough means is protect the upper class areas so they can feel extra safe that a dangerous negro will not kill their vaunted white kiddies.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #18 posted 04/23/15 12:45pm

2freaky4church
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A cop told her that they rarely arrested people. Now it is a daily service.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #19 posted 04/23/15 2:40pm

2elijah

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V10LETBLUES said:

...and having said all that, let's not fool ourselves into thinking that police brutality is in and of itself the problem for certain communities void of extenuating circumstances. Some are truly violent places that need soul searching by the community itself, and a hard look in the mirror as to what are the ingridients that make up this boiling stew.

[Edited 4/23/15 12:21pm]


Lol....Having said that, most persons of color that commit crimes in said communities are arrested and pay for their crimes. How many cops serve time for harming or killing unarmed Blacks who were no threat to them, and those cops who lie about incidents with citizens and not held accountable?

Or..what about the many cops who plant evidence on innocent Blacks they profile just to meet their monthly quotas, and hoping they get promotions from some of these illegal tactics and don't give a damn whose lives they ruin, just like what happened to the Central Park Five.

Many naysayers tend to live in a cloud of delusion, and don't want to hear the ugly truths citizens expose of these police abuses. Who said citizens from communities of color are against real criminals being arrested for crimes? The problem is the use of excessive force by police, where it is not necessary, is where part of the problem lies, and unecessary arrests for situations that don't warrant an arrest, which has occasionally resulted in some citizen's death, such as Freddie Grey and Mr. Scott. Freddie Grey should not have ended up with a severed spine and voice box. That type of abuse is not acceptable.

Grey was in the police care and they should have given him medical help before putting him in the van. I guarantee they are going to pull the lie that it was a rough ride in the van, that caused Grey's injuries just to release those cops from any wrongdoing. It will be the usual tactic to not hold cops accountable for Grey's injuries and death.

Using the Black crime statistics to justify and support these types of unfair, inhumane encounters by police, is s cop-out to not face the real issue and to not hold cops accountable for their actions. Just the usual form of denial, and it is always the ones that get angry because these truths are exposed. Wearing a badge does not give any police officer a right to abuse their authority. Those days are over and I am glad citizens from many racial groups are not standing for it anymore, and forcing change to get the bad cops off the streets.

At the end of the day, let the naysayers with their bruised egos keep using the same old excuse to deflect from the real issue, because they bring absolutely 'nothing' to the table towards change.
[Edited 4/23/15 16:48pm]
falloff
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Reply #20 posted 04/23/15 2:49pm

luvsexy4all

how long before a race riot in USA???

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Reply #21 posted 04/23/15 4:14pm

2elijah

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luvsexy4all said:

how long before a race riot in USA???


That won't happen. Race issues will continue, but no race war.

US police depts and their mayors and governors, need to work together to make changes in police tactics, reduce excessive force, and work with many communities to repair and create, better relationships between police and the communities they oversee. Killing citizens that pose no threat is not the answer and police departments will have to change their tactics. I am glad protesters are exposing these abuses by cops.
[Edited 4/24/15 3:46am]
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Reply #22 posted 04/24/15 6:49am

free2bfreeda

now this wookie fodder that's coming from the police union spokesperson: eek

Union lawyer: Freddie Gray wasn't wearing seat belt in police van

: http://www.cbsnews.com/ne...-continue/

excerpt:

ttorney Michael Davey, a police union lawyer who represents at least one of the officers under investigation, said Thursday that although Gray was handcuffed and put in leg restraints, he was not wearing a sea...he station.

Unbelted detainees have been paralyzed and even killed by rough rides in what used to be called "paddy wagons." It even has a name: "nickel rides," referring to cheap amusement park thrills.

Police brutality against prisoners being transported was addressed just six months ago in a plan released by Baltimore officials to reduce this misconduct. Department rules updated nine days before Gray's arrest clearly state that all detainees shall be strapped in by seat belts or "other authorized restraining devices" for their own safety after arrest.

"Policy is policy, practice is something else," particularly if a prisoner is combative, Davey told The Associated Press. "It is not always possible or safe for officers to enter the rear of those transport vans that are very small, and this one was very small."

Assistant Police Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said Gray was secured by "leg irons" after he became agitated during the trip, but the department hasn't said whether he was buckled in with a seat belt.

why would the officer's choose to put mr gray's legs in restraints when it is apparent that he no longer could walk is amazing to me. more than that why did they not make sure he was seatbelted.

if the police knew there was a chance of further injury to mr gray by the lack of a seat belt, why would the proceed to transport him.

mr gray was jostled around in the back of the van which added to his already injured body (alone) without anyone to watch over him.

the cops were in violoation of a newly implemented rule to "all detainees shall be strapped in by seatbelts or other authorized restrain devices."

shoot rolleyes the only difference in today's cops and the keystone cops is a lot of uncomedic brutality and overkill that seems to be happening to mostly black men.

many look for justice but in the effort/attempt see no peace or accountability from today's cops.

IMO there are good police men/women. then there are badly wired robo cop wanna be's who only purpose seems to be to kill and destroy.

but once again, the cops involved in this death-incident will most likely walk. i agree with 2elijah. seems they are trying to kill hope with guns, bullets, crooked judicial systems and canines.




“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #23 posted 04/24/15 7:40am

2elijah

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free2bfreeda said:

now this wookie fodder that's coming from the police union spokesperson: eek




Union lawyer: Freddie Gray wasn't wearing seat belt in police van



: http://www.cbsnews.com/ne...-continue/



excerpt:



ttorney Michael Davey, a police union lawyer who represents at least one of the officers under investigation, said Thursday that although Gray was handcuffed and put in leg restraints, he was not wearing a sea...he station.


Unbelted detainees have been paralyzed and even killed by rough rides in what used to be called "paddy wagons." It even has a name: "nickel rides," referring to cheap amusement park thrills.


Police brutality against prisoners being transported was addressed just six months ago in a plan released by Baltimore officials to reduce this misconduct. Department rules updated nine days before Gray's arrest clearly state that all detainees shall be strapped in by seat belts or "other authorized restraining devices" for their own safety after arrest.


"Policy is policy, practice is something else," particularly if a prisoner is combative, Davey told The Associated Press. "It is not always possible or safe for officers to enter the rear of those transport vans that are very small, and this one was very small."


Assistant Police Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said Gray was secured by "leg irons" after he became agitated during the trip, but the department hasn't said whether he was buckled in with a seat belt.



why would the officer's choose to put mr gray's legs in restraints when it is apparent that he no longer could walk is amazing to me. more than that why did they not make sure he was seatbelted.


if the police knew there was a chance of further injury to mr gray by the lack of a seat belt, why would the proceed to transport him.


mr gray was jostled around in the back of the van which added to his already injured body (alone) without anyone to watch over him.


the cops were in violoation of a newly implemented rule to "all detainees shall be strapped in by seatbelts or other authorized restrain devices."



shoot rolleyes the only difference in today's cops and the keystone cops is a lot of uncomedic brutality and overkill that seems to be happening to mostly black men.



many look for justice but in the effort/attempt see no peace or accountability from today's cops.


IMO there are good police men/women. then there are badly wired robo cop wanna be's who only purpose seems to be to kill and destroy.



but once again, the cops involved in this death-incident will most likely walk. i agree with 2elijah. seems they are trying to kill hope with guns, bullets, crooked judicial systems and canines.










Now you know they are going to use the 'no seat belt' excuse to say that is how he got those injuries to free those cops if any responsibility of contributing to his death. Oh and that pic depicts the lonnng history of police abuse against Blacks. Guess the bad cops are trying to keep that history alive,and some of their supporters seem to love it. So sad.
[Edited 4/24/15 7:45am]
falloff
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Reply #24 posted 04/24/15 11:38am

V10LETBLUES

Well hopefully we can have most police officers equipped with cameras soon, and along with citizens commisions and start prosecuting them. I have always felt that commiting crimes under cover of the law, or under political/public privilage should be punished more harshly. Once we as a community can oversee the officers behaivior and incarcerations of officers start happening we will see them cool it. Hey if they are going to get tough on your own citizens and throw the book (or guns firing) at them for minor infractions, we should see the same for public officials.

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Reply #25 posted 04/25/15 12:44pm

2freaky4church
1

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Their police union said protests are a lynch mob. They are peaceful, better organized than Ferguson.

I am really proud of these folks so far.

Rakia Boyd is another issue. The cops shoot her, they get off.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #26 posted 04/25/15 7:17pm

3rdeyedude

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not sure what news you have been watching but the Orioles/Red Sox fans were told to remain in the stadium after the game due to safety issues related to the protests..........also the mayor is "dissapointed" with today's outcome

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Reply #27 posted 04/25/15 8:43pm

jjhunsecker

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2elijah said:

V10LETBLUES said:

...and having said all that, let's not fool ourselves into thinking that police brutality is in and of itself the problem for certain communities void of extenuating circumstances. Some are truly violent places that need soul searching by the community itself, and a hard look in the mirror as to what are the ingridients that make up this boiling stew.

[Edited 4/23/15 12:21pm]

Lol....Having said that, most persons of color that commit crimes in said communities are arrested and pay for their crimes. How many cops serve time for harming or killing unarmed Blacks who were no threat to them, and those cops who lie about incidents with citizens and not held accountable? Or..what about the many cops who plant evidence on innocent Blacks they profile just to meet their monthly quotas, and hoping they get promotions from some of these illegal tactics and don't give a damn whose lives they ruin, just like what happened to the Central Park Five. Many naysayers tend to live in a cloud of delusion, and don't want to hear the ugly truths citizens expose of these police abuses. Who said citizens from communities of color are against real criminals being arrested for crimes? The problem is the use of excessive force by police, where it is not necessary, is where part of the problem lies, and unecessary arrests for situations that don't warrant an arrest, which has occasionally resulted in some citizen's death, such as Freddie Grey and Mr. Scott. Freddie Grey should not have ended up with a severed spine and voice box. That type of abuse is not acceptable. Grey was in the police care and they should have given him medical help before putting him in the van. I guarantee they are going to pull the lie that it was a rough ride in the van, that caused Grey's injuries just to release those cops from any wrongdoing. It will be the usual tactic to not hold cops accountable for Grey's injuries and death. Using the Black crime statistics to justify and support these types of unfair, inhumane encounters by police, is s cop-out to not face the real issue and to not hold cops accountable for their actions. Just the usual form of denial, and it is always the ones that get angry because these truths are exposed. Wearing a badge does not give any police officer a right to abuse their authority. Those days are over and I am glad citizens from many racial groups are not standing for it anymore, and forcing change to get the bad cops off the streets. At the end of the day, let the naysayers with their bruised egos keep using the same old excuse to deflect from the real issue, because they bring absolutely 'nothing' to the table towards change. [Edited 4/23/15 16:48pm]

Very true. One can discuss the disproportinate amount of crime committed by young Black men,and still not use that as an excuse for police abuse (as idiots like Guiliani has done). One does not justify the other

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Reply #28 posted 04/25/15 8:59pm

PurpleSkipper5
8

As a white guy, I feel for the mans family an friends for their loss and it's sad that we as a society still face problems like this..
But personally I don't believe in the violence that's breaking out. It's not gonna bring the man back and it's not truly gonna solve anything.. Change starts with US. Everybody.
RIP Freddie Gray
”The people that will end up defining ‘Hate Speech Laws’ are the very people you don’t want to define the Hate Speech Laws” — Jordan B Peterson
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Reply #29 posted 04/26/15 4:43am

2elijah

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PurpleSkipper58 said:

As a white guy, I feel for the mans family an friends for their loss and it's sad that we as a society still face problems like this..
But personally I don't believe in the violence that's breaking out. It's not gonna bring the man back and it's not truly gonna solve anything.. Change starts with US. Everybody.
RIP Freddie Gray

The thing is, you have outsiders interrupting many of the peaceful protesting that goes on these days. It happened in Ferguson, NYC, and many other cities. This overshadows the peaceful protesters' mission, and you have some people in the media and some citizens whose only focus is to center on anything negative from the protests, to feed what they hope happens, because they already hold a negative mindset and assumptions towards the community, before the protests begins.

I doubt most citizens who are are protesting want any violence to erupt from this. Sadly it is a shame that there are some who are infiltrating (like during occupy Wall Street) these protests, just to intentionally cast a bad light on the community seeking change and better police relations with the community. It is interesting though, how quickly many who look for the negativity in these protests, are so easily drawn to the hopes something negative like violence happens, because they are against the protesters demand for change. In any event, due to the outcry of the death of Freddie Grey, in the hands of police, Baltimore police and elected officials will be forced to make changes in their policing tactics. It is a shame someone has to die for change to happen. I pray for peace for Freddie's family in their grief.
[Edited 4/26/15 4:46am]
falloff
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