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Thread started 02/08/10 8:12am

Purple123

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Boycotting-Question for the African Americans

I have a question that a close friend and I have been discussing for about two weeks now. We all know that we African Americans don't own anything in our communities but Barbar shops and salons mostly, and that's it. Now...he wants it to be like or somewhat like Black Wallstreet or The Reconstruction Era. He thinks that one of the first things we should do as African Americans to start this is to boycott all Asian or non African American cleaners to get them to close, then buy them ourselves.

My question is would you as an African American participate in this boycott? If so, why?

and if not, why? And do you have a better idea of getting our communities back and be black own and operated with the money staying and circulating in our neighborhoods like the Jews, Latinos, Italians, Asians etc.

Talk to me people.
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Reply #1 posted 02/08/10 8:18am

Graycap23

Seems 2 be the wrong way 2 go about.
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Reply #2 posted 02/08/10 8:45am

2elijah

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Interesting topic Purple123.

Here's my personal view: I understand your friend's desire to have more black businesses within black communities, but many communities are now multiracial. I have African, Asian, Russian, Italian, East Indian, and Hispanic business owners in my community. Unfortunately, there are not any African-American/Black American business owners there. If we do what your friend requests, then our businesses can be boycotted as well. What if that business owner only gets black customers, and depend solely on them to keep his business flowing, and then there comes a time, when business is slow, and he/she loses out, because the money flow is limited only to products that service the black community, so this financially limits the growth of one's business, to only cater to a specific segment of the population.

Black Wall Street worked well because that was during segregated times, and blacks weren't allowed to go into non-white businesses, so many black business owners had a much, larger chance of making a good profit from their own, since that segment of the population depended on them solely for their goods and services. Today, we have more of a multicultural society, regardless of this nation's problem with race issues. If you limit yourself financially to a specific population as a business owner, then you limit your financial growth as far as your business is concerned. It took years for many business owners to learn this, because they allowed racist attitudes to get in their way.

Now if you have a business where you know a certain demographic uses a product that is in constant demand, then that may be a different story. Many Asians who own beauty supply places have obviously done their homework, learned a lot about various parts of black culture, and know what products are in demand within portions of that demographic. Many Asian grocery/fruit market owners, are also knowledgeable when it comes to the Caribbean culture and specific foods, fruit/vegetables that are used within that culture.
[Edited 2/8/10 8:59am]
Rest in Power Elijah Cummings. Thank you for your fight for human rights/justice. Your legacy will never die in vain.
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Reply #3 posted 02/08/10 9:27am

SUPRMAN

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Purple123 said:

I have a question that a close friend and I have been discussing for about two weeks now. We all know that we African Americans don't own anything in our communities but Barbar shops and salons mostly, and that's it. Now...he wants it to be like or somewhat like Black Wallstreet or The Reconstruction Era. He thinks that one of the first things we should do as African Americans to start this is to boycott all Asian or non African American cleaners to get them to close, then buy them ourselves.

My question is would you as an African American participate in this boycott? If so, why?

and if not, why? And do you have a better idea of getting our communities back and be black own and operated with the money staying and circulating in our neighborhoods like the Jews, Latinos, Italians, Asians etc.

Talk to me people.


Participate in a boycott of local businesses? I don't see it as being practical.
Where would boycotting patrons go for similar services? Are alternatives available at reasonable cost of money and time?

A better idea is to simply open a competing business. The problem would be getting members of the community to consistently support it to make it viable.
I don't want you to think like me. I just want you to think.
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Reply #4 posted 02/08/10 9:28am

SUPRMAN

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2elijah said:

Interesting topic Purple123.

Here's my personal view: I understand your friend's desire to have more black businesses within black communities, but many communities are now multiracial. I have African, Asian, Russian, Italian, East Indian, and Hispanic business owners in my community. Unfortunately, there are not any African-American/Black American business owners there. If we do what your friend requests, then our businesses can be boycotted as well. What if that business owner only gets black customers, and depend solely on them to keep his business flowing, and then there comes a time, when business is slow, and he/she loses out, because the money flow is limited only to products that service the black community, so this financially limits the growth of one's business, to only cater to a specific segment of the population.

Black Wall Street worked well because that was during segregated times, and blacks weren't allowed to go into non-white businesses, so many black business owners had a much, larger chance of making a good profit from their own, since that segment of the population depended on them solely for their goods and services. Today, we have more of a multicultural society, regardless of this nation's problem with race issues. If you limit yourself financially to a specific population as a business owner, then you limit your financial growth as far as your business is concerned. It took years for many business owners to learn this, because they allowed racist attitudes to get in their way.

Now if you have a business where you know a certain demographic uses a product that is in constant demand, then that may be a different story. Many Asians who own beauty supply places have obviously done their homework, learned a lot about various parts of black culture, and know what products are in demand within portions of that demographic. Many Asian grocery/fruit market owners, are also knowledgeable when it comes to the Caribbean culture and specific foods, fruit/vegetables that are used within that culture.
[Edited 2/8/10 8:59am]


I agree.
I don't want you to think like me. I just want you to think.
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Reply #5 posted 02/09/10 10:17am

Purple123

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2elijah said:

Interesting topic Purple123.

Here's my personal view: I understand your friend's desire to have more black businesses within black communities, but many communities are now multiracial. I have African, Asian, Russian, Italian, East Indian, and Hispanic business owners in my community. Unfortunately, there are not any African-American/Black American business owners there. If we do what your friend requests, then our businesses can be boycotted as well. What if that business owner only gets black customers, and depend solely on them to keep his business flowing, and then there comes a time, when business is slow, and he/she loses out, because the money flow is limited only to products that service the black community, so this financially limits the growth of one's business, to only cater to a specific segment of the population.

Black Wall Street worked well because that was during segregated times, and blacks weren't allowed to go into non-white businesses, so many black business owners had a much, larger chance of making a good profit from their own, since that segment of the population depended on them solely for their goods and services. Today, we have more of a multicultural society, regardless of this nation's problem with race issues. If you limit yourself financially to a specific population as a business owner, then you limit your financial growth as far as your business is concerned. It took years for many business owners to learn this, because they allowed racist attitudes to get in their way.

Now if you have a business where you know a certain demographic uses a product that is in constant demand, then that may be a different story. Many Asians who own beauty supply places have obviously done their homework, learned a lot about various parts of black culture, and know what products are in demand within portions of that demographic. Many Asian grocery/fruit market owners, are also knowledgeable when it comes to the Caribbean culture and specific foods, fruit/vegetables that are used within that culture.
[Edited 2/8/10 8:59am]


I so agree with you on this. I'm going to let him read your post, because as you said, more and more communities are becoming mutltiracial and THAT's the big point. There are still communities though that are a big majority of black people in them and the businesses are own by other minorities, but the thing is, is getting black people to patroize them and keep them a float.

Great point though
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Reply #6 posted 02/09/10 10:25am

2elijah

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Purple123 said:

2elijah said:

Interesting topic Purple123.

Here's my personal view: I understand your friend's desire to have more black businesses within black communities, but many communities are now multiracial. I have African, Asian, Russian, Italian, East Indian, and Hispanic business owners in my community. Unfortunately, there are not any African-American/Black American business owners there. If we do what your friend requests, then our businesses can be boycotted as well. What if that business owner only gets black customers, and depend solely on them to keep his business flowing, and then there comes a time, when business is slow, and he/she loses out, because the money flow is limited only to products that service the black community, so this financially limits the growth of one's business, to only cater to a specific segment of the population.

Black Wall Street worked well because that was during segregated times, and blacks weren't allowed to go into non-white businesses, so many black business owners had a much, larger chance of making a good profit from their own, since that segment of the population depended on them solely for their goods and services. Today, we have more of a multicultural society, regardless of this nation's problem with race issues. If you limit yourself financially to a specific population as a business owner, then you limit your financial growth as far as your business is concerned. It took years for many business owners to learn this, because they allowed racist attitudes to get in their way.

Now if you have a business where you know a certain demographic uses a product that is in constant demand, then that may be a different story. Many Asians who own beauty supply places have obviously done their homework, learned a lot about various parts of black culture, and know what products are in demand within portions of that demographic. Many Asian grocery/fruit market owners, are also knowledgeable when it comes to the Caribbean culture and specific foods, fruit/vegetables that are used within that culture.
[Edited 2/8/10 8:59am]


I so agree with you on this. I'm going to let him read your post, because as you said, more and more communities are becoming mutltiracial and THAT's the big point. There are still communities though that are a big majority of black people in them and the businesses are own by other minorities, but the thing is, is getting black people to patroize them and keep them a float.

Great point though


Thanks. I think with communities that are predominantly black, and want to own usinesses there, and for some reason or another are denied bank loans and other resources to start a business, this is when they need to get their local politicians involved, to find a way to make it happen. Get residents in the community together to see what can be done to attract black business owners in there, and how to obtain resources, if they don't have enough of their own to start one. They need to research if any possible, black business owners tried to open a business there, and how many were denied the resources to build a business in their community. Because nothing can stop a person from owning their own business but money right? But the problem is how to get the resources to jumpstart/fund your business. To get started, all you need is an idea, a dream.. then try to find a way to make it happen financially to build and profit from it.

I have to say there is a predominately black area in Queens, NY where there are a strip of many private, black business owners--from restaurants, dance schools (ballet/modern dance), daycare businesses, barber shops, beauty supply shops, supermarket, party planning/goods/services, martial arts studio, night club owners, etc. It is mixture of blacks from the south and various parts of the Carribean and they are part of a merchants' association. This is the type of thing you won't see in the media unfortunately, informing people that black businesses do exist in black, middle-class areas throughout the U.S.
[Edited 2/9/10 10:52am]
Rest in Power Elijah Cummings. Thank you for your fight for human rights/justice. Your legacy will never die in vain.
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Reply #7 posted 02/09/10 10:41am

Mach

Interesting topic ... hmmm
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Reply #8 posted 02/12/10 8:57am

paisleypark4

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Purple123 said:

I have a question that a close friend and I have been discussing for about two weeks now. We all know that we African Americans don't own anything in our communities but Barbar shops and salons mostly, and that's it. Now...he wants it to be like or somewhat like Black Wallstreet or The Reconstruction Era. He thinks that one of the first things we should do as African Americans to start this is to boycott all Asian or non African American cleaners to get them to close, then buy them ourselves.

My question is would you as an African American participate in this boycott? If so, why?

and if not, why? And do you have a better idea of getting our communities back and be black own and operated with the money staying and circulating in our neighborhoods like the Jews, Latinos, Italians, Asians etc.

Talk to me people.



This MAY have worked back in the 60's 70's and even 80's, however in 2010 this whole "black community" thing is kind of selfish in my opinion being a African American. These days right now you have to do it for yourself.

Now I understand that yes there are still cultural communites everywhere, and I do have to say that in most African American popularized areas, Asian and Middle Eastern businesses are the majority of ownership in said areas. Sad but true. However they cannot just CLOSE DOWN a business. They worked to gain that business, maybe your friend should too. It's not their fault they have customers keep buying their stuff. Don't FORCE them to close down, if you really want a business to close, stop going there. However if they have done nothing but serve the community with a little cultural flavor (and everyone loves Asian food, it's so much fun) they should indeed return a bit to the community they live in.

I also understand that African Americans are high in denial (and lots of other born Americans) for ownwerships of business...and that's a whole other thread right there. I have NEVER seen a African American buffet in my life....
Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #9 posted 02/12/10 9:51am

OnlyNDaUsa

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I would say that is racism. But legal. I support people opening a small business and even being selective of who they go to. But there is an uneasy issue with basing that decision on the race of the owner.
No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #10 posted 02/12/10 10:28am

Mstrustme

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Boycotting is probably not the way to go but absolutely something at some point has gotta' give

Its such a shame that most minorities can keep the dollars flowing in their community time and time over and yet the black dollar barely passes through one hand before it leaves the community

I remember a story a year ago about a black couple in Atlanta who were going out of their way to support black businesses

A Black Wallstreet is very unlikely but the reemergence of black banks would be nice
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Reply #11 posted 02/12/10 10:36am

OnlyNDaUsa

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Mstrustme said:

Boycotting is probably not the way to go but absolutely something at some point has gotta' give

Its such a shame that most minorities can keep the dollars flowing in their community time and time over and yet the black dollar barely passes through one hand before it leaves the community

I remember a story a year ago about a black couple in Atlanta who were going out of their way to support black businesses

A Black Wallstreet is very unlikely but the reemergence of black banks would be nice



I think there is a fine balance between seeking out a Black business as opposed to NOT going to a non-black.
No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #12 posted 02/12/10 10:43am

Mstrustme

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2elijah said:

Interesting topic Purple123.

Here's my personal view: I understand your friend's desire to have more black businesses within black communities, but many communities are now multiracial. I have African, Asian, Russian, Italian, East Indian, and Hispanic business owners in my community. Unfortunately, there are not any African-American/Black American business owners there. If we do what your friend requests, then our businesses can be boycotted as well. What if that business owner only gets black customers, and depend solely on them to keep his business flowing, and then there comes a time, when business is slow, and he/she loses out, because the money flow is limited only to products that service the black community, so this financially limits the growth of one's business, to only cater to a specific segment of the population.

Black Wall Street worked well because that was during segregated times, and blacks weren't allowed to go into non-white businesses, so many black business owners had a much, larger chance of making a good profit from their own, since that segment of the population depended on them solely for their goods and services. Today, we have more of a multicultural society, regardless of this nation's problem with race issues. If you limit yourself financially to a specific population as a business owner, then you limit your financial growth as far as your business is concerned. It took years for many business owners to learn this, because they allowed racist attitudes to get in their way.

Now if you have a business where you know a certain demographic uses a product that is in constant demand, then that may be a different story. Many Asians who own beauty supply places have obviously done their homework, learned a lot about various parts of black culture, and know what products are in demand within portions of that demographic. Many Asian grocery/fruit market owners, are also knowledgeable when it comes to the Caribbean culture and specific foods, fruit/vegetables that are used within that culture.


Question, do most black people live in multiracial communities? If they do I digress, if they don't...

How exactly would a black business owner in a black community be "limiting himself"? Notice how the OP mentioned cleaners which leads me to believe that his friends are talking mostly about small busines. If we're talking corporations then I understand what you're saying about not limiting yourself but if we're talking about your standard Mom & Pop shop I don't really see it

In regards to black businesses being boycotted in return, there are probably very few non-black minority neighborhoods that would let black businesses into their neighborhoods the same we let them in so we wouldn't be missing out on much in that sense
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Reply #13 posted 02/12/10 10:51am

HatrinaHaterwi
tz

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My dry cleaners is actually owned by African Americans, so I can't support that idea but I wouldn't even if that weren't the case because I personally think there is room for everybody to play. However, I do agree that it is time that African Americans stop getting shut out of the game. Tell your friend if he wants to promote a boycott, how about we start with the banks that won't give loans to small business owners and people that want to be small business owners, of which the majority of those declined are African Americans?

Let's put that money into local banks and credit unions that will use our money to help the people in our communities!!!
.
[Edited 2/12/10 11:03am]
Here's what bothers ME:

Prince died of an overdose of the drug Fentanyl. Of which, it is very highly fucking likely that he never even knew he'd taken.
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Reply #14 posted 02/12/10 11:19am

paisleypark4

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HatrinaHaterwitz said:

My dry cleaners is actually owned by African Americans, so I can't support that idea but I wouldn't even if that weren't the case because I personally think there is room for everybody to play. However, I do agree that it is time that African Americans stop getting shut out of the game. Tell your friend if he wants to promote a boycott, how about we start with the banks that won't give loans to small business owners and people that want to be small business owners, of which the majority of those declined are African Americans?

Let's put that money into local banks and credit unions that will use our money to help the people in our communities!!!
.
[Edited 2/12/10 11:03am]



I loved when US Bank used to have us volunteer to pain houses in the summertime for people who really needed work. That is one business that actually does do something within the community even if it was a corporate slumbag to its employees. M&I Bank also, however we are not in the middle of a neighborhood so we don't have that much access to people's homes, however we have given to charities like the Salvation Army and even volunteered to help mothers who have to work and take their kids to a play center.

I do agree with you and I believe that is a big way to develop a little in the communities. Doing volunteer work will get your name out there, and banks will learn to trust you even if you have good or bad credit, banks will try to help you if you indeed have some type of value to the community.
Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #15 posted 02/12/10 1:34pm

2elijah

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Mstrustme said:

2elijah said:

Interesting topic Purple123.

Here's my personal view: I understand your friend's desire to have more black businesses within black communities, but many communities are now multiracial. I have African, Asian, Russian, Italian, East Indian, and Hispanic business owners in my community. Unfortunately, there are not any African-American/Black American business owners there. If we do what your friend requests, then our businesses can be boycotted as well. What if that business owner only gets black customers, and depend solely on them to keep his business flowing, and then there comes a time, when business is slow, and he/she loses out, because the money flow is limited only to products that service the black community, so this financially limits the growth of one's business, to only cater to a specific segment of the population.

Black Wall Street worked well because that was during segregated times, and blacks weren't allowed to go into non-white businesses, so many black business owners had a much, larger chance of making a good profit from their own, since that segment of the population depended on them solely for their goods and services. Today, we have more of a multicultural society, regardless of this nation's problem with race issues. If you limit yourself financially to a specific population as a business owner, then you limit your financial growth as far as your business is concerned. It took years for many business owners to learn this, because they allowed racist attitudes to get in their way.

Now if you have a business where you know a certain demographic uses a product that is in constant demand, then that may be a different story. Many Asians who own beauty supply places have obviously done their homework, learned a lot about various parts of black culture, and know what products are in demand within portions of that demographic. Many Asian grocery/fruit market owners, are also knowledgeable when it comes to the Caribbean culture and specific foods, fruit/vegetables that are used within that culture.


Question, do most black people live in multiracial communities? If they do I digress, if they don't...

How exactly would a black business owner in a black community be "limiting himself"? Notice how the OP mentioned cleaners which leads me to believe that his friends are talking mostly about small busines. If we're talking corporations then I understand what you're saying about not limiting yourself but if we're talking about your standard Mom & Pop shop I don't really see it

In regards to black businesses being boycotted in return, there are probably very few non-black minority neighborhoods that would let black businesses into their neighborhoods the same we let them in so we wouldn't be missing out on much in that sense



I believe you read my post the wrong way, as my points were quite clear.
I was talking about any business owner limiting himself financially, if they are only expecting support from one particular group to make a profit. I live in a multiracial community. Africans have opened businesses there and are still there. From beauty salons and discount stores, and people within the community support these shops. We also have a Jamaican bakery and restaurant. There is a large population of Blacks, Latinos, Russians, Asians and East Indian that live within the community. On the other hand, in my post that you read, I mentioned that there are black communities that support the black businesses that are within black communities, but also get support from those who are passing through the community, that's what I meant when I mentioned not limiting themselves.

However, I do understand that there is a problem with many "Black Americans" those born within the states, getting loans to finance their businesses in non-black or many multiracial communties. All this mentioned in my post.

I am all for contacting elected officials about this problem, which is what people need to start doing to help them bring this situation to the community's attention and organize community meetings to deal with this situation. You can also get merchants currently in the community, to stand with the residents, on this issue.
[Edited 2/12/10 13:52pm]
Rest in Power Elijah Cummings. Thank you for your fight for human rights/justice. Your legacy will never die in vain.
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Reply #16 posted 02/12/10 3:16pm

Mstrustme

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2elijah said:

I believe you read my post the wrong way, as my points were quite clear.
I was talking about any business owner limiting himself financially, if they are only expecting support from one particular group to make a profit. I live in a multiracial community. Africans have opened businesses there and are still there. From beauty salons and discount stores, and people within the community support these shops. We also have a Jamaican bakery and restaurant. There is a large population of Blacks, Latinos, Russians, Asians and East Indian that live within the community. On the other hand, in my post that you read, I mentioned that there are black communities that support the black businesses that are within black communities, but also get support from those who are passing through the community, that's what I meant when I mentioned not limiting themselves.

However, I do understand that there is a problem with many "Black Americans" those born within the states, getting loans to finance their businesses in non-black or many multiracial communties. All this mentioned in my post.

I am all for contacting elected officials about this problem, which is what people need to start doing to help them bring this situation to the community's attention and organize community meetings to deal with this situation. You can also get merchants currently in the community, to stand with the residents, on this issue.


- Those were two seperate posts and I responded to your first one though I read the second one as well

I understand what you're saying but (lol) if a black entrepreneur is in a black neighborhood than who his core customers are is obvious; "outsiders" passing by would be some extra but ultimately most of his $$ is going to come from people w/in the community otherwise he wouldn't have set up shop there. In which case the only way he would be limiting himself would be if turned down non-black customers/passer-bys which is not something a rational business owner would do so while I understand your "limiting yourself" comment I don't think it truly applies in this scenario

About the last bolded part, I wasn't referring to business loans pe se but more of the consumers in the community being reluctant to spend money on black businesses that are in their non-black community
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Reply #17 posted 02/12/10 4:17pm

SUPRMAN

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2elijah said:

Mstrustme said:



Question, do most black people live in multiracial communities? If they do I digress, if they don't...

How exactly would a black business owner in a black community be "limiting himself"? Notice how the OP mentioned cleaners which leads me to believe that his friends are talking mostly about small busines. If we're talking corporations then I understand what you're saying about not limiting yourself but if we're talking about your standard Mom & Pop shop I don't really see it

In regards to black businesses being boycotted in return, there are probably very few non-black minority neighborhoods that would let black businesses into their neighborhoods the same we let them in so we wouldn't be missing out on much in that sense



I believe you read my post the wrong way, as my points were quite clear.
I was talking about any business owner limiting himself financially, if they are only expecting support from one particular group to make a profit. I live in a multiracial community. Africans have opened businesses there and are still there. From beauty salons and discount stores, and people within the community support these shops. We also have a Jamaican bakery and restaurant. There is a large population of Blacks, Latinos, Russians, Asians and East Indian that live within the community. On the other hand, in my post that you read, I mentioned that there are black communities that support the black businesses that are within black communities, but also get support from those who are passing through the community, that's what I meant when I mentioned not limiting themselves.

However, I do understand that there is a problem with many "Black Americans" those born within the states, getting loans to finance their businesses in non-black or many multiracial communties. All this mentioned in my post.

I am all for contacting elected officials about this problem, which is what people need to start doing to help them bring this situation to the community's attention and organize community meetings to deal with this situation. You can also get merchants currently in the community, to stand with the residents, on this issue.

[Edited 2/12/10 13:52pm]


I don't see how elected officials can correct the problem. They can't mandate that local businesses have a certain racial make-up.
They also should not be attempting to steer loans and favors to certain members of the community even if their heart is in the right place.
I don't want you to think like me. I just want you to think.
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Reply #18 posted 02/12/10 4:20pm

SUPRMAN

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Mstrustme said:

2elijah said:

Interesting topic Purple123.

Here's my personal view: I understand your friend's desire to have more black businesses within black communities, but many communities are now multiracial. I have African, Asian, Russian, Italian, East Indian, and Hispanic business owners in my community. Unfortunately, there are not any African-American/Black American business owners there. If we do what your friend requests, then our businesses can be boycotted as well. What if that business owner only gets black customers, and depend solely on them to keep his business flowing, and then there comes a time, when business is slow, and he/she loses out, because the money flow is limited only to products that service the black community, so this financially limits the growth of one's business, to only cater to a specific segment of the population.

Black Wall Street worked well because that was during segregated times, and blacks weren't allowed to go into non-white businesses, so many black business owners had a much, larger chance of making a good profit from their own, since that segment of the population depended on them solely for their goods and services. Today, we have more of a multicultural society, regardless of this nation's problem with race issues. If you limit yourself financially to a specific population as a business owner, then you limit your financial growth as far as your business is concerned. It took years for many business owners to learn this, because they allowed racist attitudes to get in their way.

Now if you have a business where you know a certain demographic uses a product that is in constant demand, then that may be a different story. Many Asians who own beauty supply places have obviously done their homework, learned a lot about various parts of black culture, and know what products are in demand within portions of that demographic. Many Asian grocery/fruit market owners, are also knowledgeable when it comes to the Caribbean culture and specific foods, fruit/vegetables that are used within that culture.


Question, do most black people live in multiracial communities? If they do I digress, if they don't...

How exactly would a black business owner in a black community be "limiting himself"? Notice how the OP mentioned cleaners which leads me to believe that his friends are talking mostly about small busines. If we're talking corporations then I understand what you're saying about not limiting yourself but if we're talking about your standard Mom & Pop shop I don't really see it

In regards to black businesses being boycotted in return,

How do we "let them in?"
Aren't they free to open that business anywhere zoning permits?
How would others keep out a Black business and "not let them in?"
I don't want you to think like me. I just want you to think.
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Reply #19 posted 02/12/10 4:52pm

Mstrustme

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SUPRMAN said:


How do we "let them in?"
Aren't they free to open that business anywhere zoning permits?
How would others keep out a Black business and "not let them in?"


Lol not the best choice of words

By that I mean where they choose to spend their $$$. Of course you come into their neighborhoods but if they don't support you what happens?
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Reply #20 posted 02/12/10 5:15pm

Vendetta1

Considering black people charge more in their stores (in the stores I've visited) than non-blacks do, I would not take part in any boycott.
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Reply #21 posted 02/12/10 5:30pm

ehuffnsd

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i've been involved in a very effective boycott in San Diego for the past two years, got the company to change it's mind and donate money to the cause however the boycott contiunes because enough hasn't been done.
You CANNOT use the name of God, or religion, to justify acts of violence, to hurt, to hate, to discriminate- Madonna
authentic power is service- Pope Francis
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Reply #22 posted 02/12/10 5:33pm

Efan

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ehuffnsd said:

i've been involved in a very effective boycott in San Diego for the past two years, got the company to change it's mind and donate money to the cause however the boycott contiunes because enough hasn't been done.


Which company is that? (If you don't mind sharing.)
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Reply #23 posted 02/12/10 7:42pm

RenHoek

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moderator

You wanna boycott something, go big or go home!!!

WalMart

go after them for knocking prices so low that everybody wants to shop there in order to "save" while in the background WalMart kills US manufacturing jobs & the very small business that I/we/you are trying to start, thumbs it's corporate nose at Employment regulations and reaps tremendous profits. All that AND they are one of the biggest boosters to the Chinese economy.

you wanna boycott? Go after them!!

woot!

.
[Edited 2/12/10 19:43pm]
A working class Hero is something to be ~ Lennon
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Reply #24 posted 02/12/10 8:33pm

SUPRMAN

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HatrinaHaterwitz said:

My dry cleaners is actually owned by African Americans, so I can't support that idea but I wouldn't even if that weren't the case because I personally think there is room for everybody to play. However, I do agree that it is time that African Americans stop getting shut out of the game. Tell your friend if he wants to promote a boycott, how about we start with the banks that won't give loans to small business owners and people that want to be small business owners, of which the majority of those declined are African Americans?

Let's put that money into local banks and credit unions that will use our money to help the people in our communities!!!
.
[Edited 2/12/10 11:03am]

clapping
There it is!
[Edited 2/12/10 23:20pm]
I don't want you to think like me. I just want you to think.
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Reply #25 posted 02/12/10 8:47pm

SUPRMAN

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Mstrustme said:

SUPRMAN said:


How do we "let them in?"
Aren't they free to open that business anywhere zoning permits?
How would others keep out a Black business and "not let them in?"


Lol not the best choice of words

By that I mean where they choose to spend their $$$. Of course you come into their neighborhoods but if they don't support you what happens?

Convenience, service and price, I would think trump race for the vast majority of people. But people are free to vote with their feet and their dollars. But as a business person, part of the challenge is knowing your market, generating awareness in your target market and finally generating repeat sales by meeting your customers needs better than the competition.
I don't want you to think like me. I just want you to think.
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Reply #26 posted 02/12/10 8:54pm

Mstrustme

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SUPRMAN said:


Convenience, service and price, I would think trump race for the vast majority of people. But people are free to vote with their feet and their dollars. But as a business person, part of the challenge is knowing your market, generating awareness in your target market and finally generating repeat sales by meeting your customers needs better than the competition.


One would hope

Absolutely on everything else
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Reply #27 posted 02/12/10 10:31pm

RenHoek

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SUPRMAN said:

Mstrustme said:



Lol not the best choice of words

By that I mean where they choose to spend their $$$. Of course you come into their neighborhoods but if they don't support you what happens?

Convenience, service and price, I would think trump race for the vast majority of people. But people are free to vote with their feet and their dollars. But as a business person, part of the challenge is knowing your market, generating awareness in your target market and finally generating repeat sales by meeting your customers needs better than the competition.


SUPRMAN knockin'em outta the park again and again!!!

clapping
A working class Hero is something to be ~ Lennon
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Reply #28 posted 02/13/10 5:51am

2elijah

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Mstrustme said:

2elijah said:

I believe you read my post the wrong way, as my points were quite clear.
I was talking about any business owner limiting himself financially, if they are only expecting support from one particular group to make a profit. I live in a multiracial community. Africans have opened businesses there and are still there. From beauty salons and discount stores, and people within the community support these shops. We also have a Jamaican bakery and restaurant. There is a large population of Blacks, Latinos, Russians, Asians and East Indian that live within the community. On the other hand, in my post that you read, I mentioned that there are black communities that support the black businesses that are within black communities, but also get support from those who are passing through the community, that's what I meant when I mentioned not limiting themselves.

However, I do understand that there is a problem with many "Black Americans" those born within the states, getting loans to finance their businesses in non-black or many multiracial communties. All this mentioned in my post.

I am all for contacting elected officials about this problem, which is what people need to start doing to help them bring this situation to the community's attention and organize community meetings to deal with this situation. You can also get merchants currently in the community, to stand with the residents, on this issue.


- Those were two seperate posts and I responded to your first one though I read the second one as well

I understand what you're saying but (lol) if a black entrepreneur is in a black neighborhood than who his core customers are is obvious; "outsiders" passing by would be some extra but ultimately most of his $$ is going to come from people w/in the community otherwise he wouldn't have set up shop there. In which case the only way he would be limiting himself would be if turned down non-black customers/passer-bys which is not something a rational business owner would do so while I understand your "limiting yourself" comment I don't think it truly applies in this scenario

About the last bolded part, I wasn't referring to business loans pe se but more of the consumers in the community being reluctant to spend money on black businesses that are in their non-black community



If Black business owners set up businesses in black communities it is obvious they are there to gain money from the community they opened their business in. Unfortunately, you can't force people to shop in a store, because it is black owned, but more or less, do they have the products you are willing to spend your money on? I guess it all depends on the type of business. More than likely the community will support them anyway. I grew up in an area, where we had a black family that owned a grocery store for years, and you can bet the community supported them, and they basically knew everyone in the community. It was an area where to get to a major supermarket, you had to walk far, because our community was mostly residential, so this grocery store was convenient to the residents, and this was in the early 70s, and they lasted for quite a while in the community, until they decided to move down south, and the store was turned into a community organization center, where local residents and elected officials met to discuss social, community concerns within the community, and that center is still there. There was also a black-owned barbershop, and the barber was a female. Her business stayed there for over 25 years. The community is predominantly Black, pretty much middle-class homeowners, and the neighbors still look out for one another.

However, I do understand though, what you mean when you mention, black-owned businesses in multiracial communities. However, black businesses in multiracial communities like where I live, are doing well, and have been around for a number of years. It also depends on what type of business, i.e. barbershops/hair salons, and how skilled the barbers/hairdressers are to deal with various hair textures, that will attract a variety of customers, even if their original purpose is to to attract black customers.

I would however, like to see more beauty/hair products owned by African-Americans since, the majority of the customers in those type stores are mainly owned by Asians, who sell a plethora of black hair/beauty products.

As far as elected officials, yes they can get involved if they have the nerve to come into your community and ask for your vote around election time. They can get together with community organizations within the community, and arrange meetings with banks in those communities, to discuss giving small business loans to African-Americans. You have to remember, that they come into the community trying to attract customers to bank with them, so they should also reach out to members of the community seeking loans for small businesses, and those who decide to bank with them. Like others mentioned, they could boycott banks throughout specific communities/or meet with bank reps and demand that more small business loans are offered to qualified African-Americans or African-Americans will not bank with those particular banks.

Also, Carter Federal Savings Bank is Black-owned, last I heard, and have helped many African-Americans open businesses, like restaurants, grocery stores, dance studios, etc.

My community over the years, has invited and continue to invite, elected officials, law enforcement officials, college representatives, health educators, etc., to speak to members of the community, where residents discussed their concerns and other interests, and it has been very helpful. (i.e. we've had Hillary visit a few times when she was a NY Senator). But getting back to small business owners, the only threat they faces in my community, are three major malls, less than 8 blocks away, with a 4th mall about to open in March. Not to mention about a 20 to 30 block stretch of other small businesses, along the major boulevard of those malls as well. Most of the small businesses on my block, and around the corner, have managed to stay in business for a while, despite all the surrounding malls and stretch of other small businesses, not from them. Like I mentioned earlier, we have a business owned by Jamaicans and Africans and 3 are Black-American business owners.
[Edited 2/13/10 6:07am]
Rest in Power Elijah Cummings. Thank you for your fight for human rights/justice. Your legacy will never die in vain.
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Reply #29 posted 02/13/10 11:21am

Mstrustme

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2elijah said:

If Black business owners set up businesses in black communities it is obvious they are there to gain money from the community they opened their business in. Unfortunately, you can't force people to shop in a store, because it is black owned, but more or less, do they have the products you are willing to spend your money on? I guess it all depends on the type of business. More than likely the community will support them anyway. I grew up in an area, where we had a black family that owned a grocery store for years, and you can bet the community supported them, and they basically knew everyone in the community. It was an area where to get to a major supermarket, you had to walk far, because our community was mostly residential, so this grocery store was convenient to the residents, and this was in the early 70s, and they lasted for quite a while in the community, until they decided to move down south, and the store was turned into a community organization center, where local residents and elected officials met to discuss social, community concerns within the community, and that center is still there. There was also a black-owned barbershop, and the barber was a female. Her business stayed there for over 25 years. The community is predominantly Black, pretty much middle-class homeowners, and the neighbors still look out for one another.

However, I do understand though, what you mean when you mention, black-owned businesses in multiracial communities. However, black businesses in multiracial communities like where I live, are doing well, and have been around for a number of years. It also depends on what type of business, i.e. barbershops/hair salons, and how skilled the barbers/hairdressers are to deal with various hair textures, that will attract a variety of customers, even if their original purpose is to to attract black customers.

I would however, like to see more beauty/hair products owned by African-Americans since, the majority of the customers in those type stores are mainly owned by Asians, who sell a plethora of black hair/beauty products.

As far as elected officials, yes they can get involved if they have the nerve to come into your community and ask for your vote around election time. They can get together with community organizations within the community, and arrange meetings with banks in those communities, to discuss giving small business loans to African-Americans. You have to remember, that they come into the community trying to attract customers to bank with them, so they should also reach out to members of the community seeking loans for small businesses, and those who decide to bank with them. Like others mentioned, they could boycott banks throughout specific communities/or meet with bank reps and demand that more small business loans are offered to qualified African-Americans or African-Americans will not bank with those particular banks.

Also, Carter Federal Savings Bank is Black-owned, last I heard, and have helped many African-Americans open businesses, like restaurants, grocery stores, dance studios, etc.

My community over the years, has invited and continue to invite, elected officials, law enforcement officials, college representatives, health educators, etc., to speak to members of the community, where residents discussed their concerns and other interests, and it has been very helpful. (i.e. we've had Hillary visit a few times when she was a NY Senator). But getting back to small business owners, the only threat they faces in my community, are three major malls, less than 8 blocks away, with a 4th mall about to open in March. Not to mention about a 20 to 30 block stretch of other small businesses, along the major boulevard of those malls as well. Most of the small businesses on my block, and around the corner, have managed to stay in business for a while, despite all the surrounding malls and stretch of other small businesses, not from them. Like I mentioned earlier, we have a business owned by Jamaicans and Africans and 3 are Black-American business owners.


We're on the same page for the most part. Only thing is you're talking about multiracial communities and I'm not but I catch your drift
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