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Thread started 05/19/08 12:29pm

namepeace

An article -- Happy Birthday, Brother Shabazz f/k/a . . .

Rest in peace to our "black manhood," and our "black shining prince."

What does the legacy of El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, or Malcolm X, mean to you?

http://www.theroot.com/id/46565
[Edited 5/19/08 13:56pm]
Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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Reply #1 posted 05/19/08 12:39pm

shanti0608

AMY GOODMAN: We end today’s show with Malcolm X. He was born eighty-three years ago today on May 19th, 1925, assassinated February 21, 1965, as he spoke before a packed audience in Harlem’s Audubon Ballroom. He was just thirty-nine years old when he was gunned down. This is an excerpt of a speech Malcolm X gave at the Audubon Ballroom about half a year earlier. It’s called “By Any Means Necessary.”

MALCOLM X: One of the first things that the independent African nations did was to form an organization called the Organization of African Unity. […] The purpose of our […] Organization of Afro-American Unity, which has the same aim and objective to fight whoever gets in our way, to bring about the complete independence of people of African descent here in the Western hemisphere, and first here in the United States, and bring about the freedom of these people by any means necessary. That’s our motto. […]

The purpose of our organization is to start right here in Harlem, which has the largest concentration of people of African descent that exists anywhere on this earth. There are more Africans here in Harlem than exist in any city on the African continent, because that’s what you and I are: Africans. […]

[…] the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights are the principles in which we believe, and that these documents, if put into practice, represent the essence of mankind’s hopes and good intentions; desirous that all Afro-American people and organizations should henceforth unite so that the welfare and well-being of our people will be assured; we are resolved to reinforce the common bond of purpose between our people by submerging all of our differences and establishing nonsectarian, constructive programs for human rights; we hereby present this charter:

I. The Establishment.

The Organization of Afro-American Unity shall include all people of African descent in the Western hemisphere […] In essence what it is saying, instead of you and me running around here seeking allies in our struggle for freedom in the Irish neighborhood or the Jewish neighborhood or the Italian neighborhood, we need to seek some allies among people who look something like we do. And once we get their allies. It’s time now for you and me to stop running away from the wolf right into the arms of the fox, looking for some kind of help. That’s a drag.

II. Self-Defense.

Since self-preservation is the first law of nature, we assert the Afro-American’s right to self-defense.

The Constitution of the United States of America clearly affirms the right of every American citizen to bear arms. And as Americans, we will not give up a single right guaranteed under the Constitution. The history of unpunished violence against our people clearly indicates that we must be prepared to defend ourselves or we will continue to be a defenseless people at the mercy of a ruthless and violent racist mob.


AMY GOODMAN: Malcolm X, speaking just over [half] a year before he was assassinated. Malcolm X would have been eighty-three years old today.

http://www.democracynow.o...5_february
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Reply #2 posted 05/19/08 1:15pm

2elijah

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An era of African-Americans fighting for human rights and the right to be recognized as human beings, within a country where many did not want to embrace African-Americans as part of America or the human race, and many still don't today, even though their ancestors helped to build this country without compensation.

Do I feel much has changed since then? Yes, some, but we still have a long way to go. Unfortunately, much of those same racist attitudes that existed during the time of Malcolm X, still exists in America today.....same attitudes, just a different day.



Happy Birthday Brother Malcolm, may you remain "in spiritual peace."


Peace
[Edited 5/19/08 16:45pm]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
#PRESIDENT-ELECT JOE BIDEN & VICE PRESIDENT-ELECT KAMALA HARRIS!! 2021
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Reply #3 posted 05/19/08 1:24pm

theAudience

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The picture says it...



...If you can see it.



tA

peace Tribal Disorder

http://www.soundclick.com...dID=182431
"Ya see, we're not interested in what you know...but what you are willing to learn. C'mon y'all."
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Reply #4 posted 05/19/08 1:58pm

namepeace

theAudience said:

The picture says it...



...If you can see it.


I think I see what you're getting at.

And it's striking how FAMILIAR this sight is in our current environment.
Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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Reply #5 posted 05/19/08 2:10pm

theAudience

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namepeace said:

I think I see what you're getting at.

And it's striking how FAMILIAR this sight is in our current environment.

You're 20/20 all the way. wink


tA

peace Tribal Disorder

http://www.soundclick.com...dID=182431
"Ya see, we're not interested in what you know...but what you are willing to learn. C'mon y'all."
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Reply #6 posted 05/19/08 3:20pm

babynoz

theAudience said:

namepeace said:

I think I see what you're getting at.

And it's striking how FAMILIAR this sight is in our current environment.

You're 20/20 all the way. wink


tA

peace Tribal Disorder

http://www.soundclick.com...dID=182431



A welcome sight to behold indeed...full circle.
Prince, in you I found a kindred spirit...Rest In Paradise.
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Reply #7 posted 05/19/08 3:33pm

uPtoWnNY

For someone like me who grew up in NYC during the 60s & early 70s, Malcolm was one of my idols. He was simply, THE TRUTH, and he exposed the hypocrisy of the so-called "liberal" north. 'The Autobiography of Malcolm X' and 'Malcolm X Speaks!' should be in EVERY black family's home. I consider them my bibles.
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Reply #8 posted 05/19/08 4:46pm

2elijah

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namepeace said:

theAudience said:

The picture says it...



...If you can see it.


I think I see what you're getting at.

And it's striking how FAMILIAR this sight is in our current environment.



nod Absolutely.
[Edited 5/19/08 16:47pm]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
#PRESIDENT-ELECT JOE BIDEN & VICE PRESIDENT-ELECT KAMALA HARRIS!! 2021
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