independent and unofficial
Prince fan community
Welcome! Sign up or enter username and password to remember me
Forum jump
Forums > General Discussion > The Official Org 2023 Book Reading Thread™
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Page 1 of 2 12>
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Author

Tweet     Share

Message
Thread started 01/03/23 12:51pm

TrivialPursuit

avatar

The Official Org 2023 Book Reading Thread™

What are you hoping to read in 2023? Anything you're looking forward to reading?

And what did you read in 2022? What did you enjoy, and would recommend?

This is what I read in 2022 (ebook and audiobook):

This Much Is True - Miriam Margolyes

Stephen King - Hearts In Atlantis

Stephen King - The Gungslinger (The Dark Tower I)

Stephen King - The Drawing of the Three (The Dark Tower II)

Stephen King - Waste Lands (The Dark Tower III)

Stephen King - Wizard and Glass (The Dark Tower IV)

Stephen King - The Wind Through The Keyhole (The Dark Tower 4.5)

Stephen King - Wolves of the Calla (The Dark Tower V)

Stephen King - Song of Susannah (The Dark Tower VI)

Stephen King - The Dark Tower (The Dark Tower VII)

Stephen King - The Little Sisters of Eluria (The Dark Tower 0.5)

Stephen King - The Talisman

Matthew Perry - Friends, Lovers, and the Big Terrible Thing


I plan to continue my King journey and cover some of the Dark Tower-related books.

I'm also planning to read The Help by Kathryn Stockett. I also have some stuff by José Saramago that I will try to incorporate.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #1 posted 01/03/23 3:58pm

ShellyMcG

I've just finished The Gunslinger, my first step into the world of Stephen King's epic Dark Tower series. Not at all what I was expecting but I thoroughly enjoyed it nevertheless. And I can't wait to see where the story goes next. Having said that, I'm not sure if I should jump straight into the next book or maybe I should break it up and read something else in between.

As for books I read in 2022, there was so many that I couldn't list them all without leaving a few out. So I'll just talk about the ones I'd actively recommend instead;

Zorro: The Curse Of Capistrano - The very first book about Zorro (I think) who was one if the very first modern-style superheroes. An excellent read, even if my copy had a few spelling errors.

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood - A novel of the movie written by Tarantino himself. Think of it as a "directors cut", the book features a lot of stuff that was seemingly cut from the movie and perhaps because of these extra scenes, the story flows that bit better as we get a fuller appreciation for the characters, particularly Brad Pitt's character and Sharon Tate.

City Primeval - I was practically forced into reading this at gunpoint but it ended up being my favourite book of 2022. Elmore Leonard's story about a psycho killer being hunted by a cop is being turned into a TV show this year, which bizarrely, is being made into a sequel to the TV show Justified, another Elmore Leonard piece. I haven't read much Elmore Leonard but this and Rum Punch (the book Tarantino made into Jackie Brown) have convinced me to delve deeper.

Alien - A novelization of the movie based on a first draft screenplay. It's pretty clear that the author didn't know what the actual alien was going to look like in the finished product but I kind of preferred this take on it. It's almost like an alternate version of the movie which I think any fan would get a kick out of.

Sherlock Holmes and The Christmas Demon - Written by James Lovegrove, this is the first non-Arthur Conan Doyle "Holmes" story I've read and I have to say, he absolutely nails the tone here. Holmes and Watson are exactly as they should be. I could almost picture Basil Rathbone delivering Holmes' lines. The central mystery is a corker too and will leave you guessing right up to the big reveal. A great Christmas read.


Turning back to 2023, I intend to read the rest of The Dark Tower series and maybe invest in some more of James Lovegrove's Sherlock Holmes books. I've also been flirting with the idea of getting into the Star Wars books but I have no idea where to start. Ideally, I'd prefer to just stick to what's considered canon and avoid the confusion of the "Legends" stuff. But even so, there's so many it's impossible to find a good starting place.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #2 posted 01/03/23 6:15pm

TrivialPursuit

avatar

I'd say read the first three Dark Towers back to back. Wizard and Glass is about 95% flashback, slower paced, and a love story. It's a good place to pause if you want to. Be sure to throw in The Wind Through The Keyhole before Wolves of the Calla. It was written after the first 7 books were done, but fits between 4 and 5 in the timeline. Sort of a story within a story within a story. But useful to the narrative overall.

The Little Sisters is a prequel story with Roland, and could be read at any time. It's very short so you could throw that anywhere into your schedule. Keep the rest as I listed them, though. (I didn't know about Little Sisters until I was in book 5 or 6, so I just waited).

If you read the first three, that really establishes the journey, some particulars, and the main players (who show up in the next book). t.

However I still say this - and it's not a spoiler - the climax for The Waste Lands is in the beginning of Wizard and Glass. So read into book IV to get resolution for The Waste Lands. Then when the flashback starts, that's your pause, if you want one. Wizard and Glass is Roland telling a story from his childhood, once the events of The Waste Lands get resolved. I don't know why he separated them that way, but now you know.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #3 posted 01/04/23 5:29am

ShellyMcG

TrivialPursuit said:

I'd say read the first three Dark Towers back to back. Wizard and Glass is about 95% flashback, slower paced, and a love story. It's a good place to pause if you want to. Be sure to throw in The Wind Through The Keyhole before Wolves of the Calla. It was written after the first 7 books were done, but fits between 4 and 5 in the timeline. Sort of a story within a story within a story. But useful to the narrative overall.

The Little Sisters is a prequel story with Roland, and could be read at any time. It's very short so you could throw that anywhere into your schedule. Keep the rest as I listed them, though. (I didn't know about Little Sisters until I was in book 5 or 6, so I just waited).

If you read the first three, that really establishes the journey, some particulars, and the main players (who show up in the next book). t.

However I still say this - and it's not a spoiler - the climax for The Waste Lands is in the beginning of Wizard and Glass. So read into book IV to get resolution for The Waste Lands. Then when the flashback starts, that's your pause, if you want one. Wizard and Glass is Roland telling a story from his childhood, once the events of The Waste Lands get resolved. I don't know why he separated them that way, but now you know.



I've ordered another few Sherlock Holmes books but they won't be here until next week so I reckon I'll just continue on with The Dark Tower for now. The Gunslinger was relatively short but just looking at some of the later books, they can be pretty big. Wizard & Glass in particular seems like a bit of an ordeal, given your review of it.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #4 posted 01/04/23 10:54am

S2DG

avatar

Mostly have a lot of non-fiction on the agenda.

It's been a while but Shelly's mention of Elmore Leonard reminds me I need to bring some fiction back into the mix. I love Elmore Leonard's work.



In addition to that, 2023 will have a few bios, self-help books and books on design/photography/music. Since I've got them on my devices, I'm reading a lot more than I used to.





[Edited 1/4/23 10:55am]

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #5 posted 01/04/23 12:35pm

onlyforaminute

avatar

Professional Troublemaker: The Fear-Fighter Manuel by Luvvie Ajayi Jones

Rameses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra by Anne & Chris Rice

Why Am I So Anxious? by Tracey Marks

What The Dog Saw by Malcolm Gladewell

Life of Pi by Yann Martel
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #6 posted 01/04/23 1:06pm

TrivialPursuit

avatar

S2DG said:

Mostly have a lot of non-fiction on the agenda.

It's been a while but Shelly's mention of Elmore Leonard reminds me I need to bring some fiction back into the mix. I love Elmore Leonard's work.



In addition to that, 2023 will have a few bios, self-help books and books on design/photography/music. Since I've got them on my devices, I'm reading a lot more than I used to.


I got through all those Dark Tower books by employing audiobooks, a medium I never thought I'd enjoy. But when I'm up late and working on something (like hand sewing, etc), it's a great time to concentrate on the audio and get some work done.

I'll often stop the audio book, get ready for bed and pick up on my Nook where the audio left off.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #7 posted 01/05/23 9:07am

S2DG

avatar

TrivialPursuit said:

S2DG said:

Mostly have a lot of non-fiction on the agenda.

It's been a while but Shelly's mention of Elmore Leonard reminds me I need to bring some fiction back into the mix. I love Elmore Leonard's work.



In addition to that, 2023 will have a few bios, self-help books and books on design/photography/music. Since I've got them on my devices, I'm reading a lot more than I used to.


I got through all those Dark Tower books by employing audiobooks, a medium I never thought I'd enjoy. But when I'm up late and working on something (like hand sewing, etc), it's a great time to concentrate on the audio and get some work done.

I'll often stop the audio book, get ready for bed and pick up on my Nook where the audio left off.



I've tried audio books a couple of times and couldn't do it. Not sure if it was the voice or someone talking for an extended period of time but it wasn't working for me.

Maybe I'll try it again, it could have been a time and place thing. I'd love to get a few more books in this year.

Thanks for the reminder!

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #8 posted 01/05/23 12:52pm

ShellyMcG

On the subject of audiobooks, I've never listened to one but I imagine they'd come in handy on my morning commute. Sometimes I try to read on the bus but I find it hard to concentrate on what I'm reading with all the noise. My only concern would be the voice of whoever is reading it. Do they have an accent, do they pronounce certain words or names weird, is it a male or female voice etc.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #9 posted 01/05/23 1:05pm

ShellyMcG

I was all set to move straight on to the next Dark Tower but my cousin has given me a lend of his copy of Heat 2. He hasn't actually read it himself yet and he'll obviously be taking it with him when he goes home so I have until the 16th to get through it before I have to return it.

For those who don't know, Heat 2 is a follow up to the movie Heat, starring Al Pacino and Robert De Niro, and is written by Michael Mann, who made the movie. As far as I know, the book is set directly after the movie's ending where (SPOILERS FOR A 30 YEAR OLD MOVIE) Al Pacino kills De Niro and sees the Al Pacino character chasing down Val Kilmer's character, who got away in the movie. Heat is one of my favourite movies ever so I'm looking forward to this. It seems like a bit of a hefty book and I only have 10 days to get through it. Which sounds like a long time but I'm not a fast reader and I'm even slower when I only get to read a few pages per night.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #10 posted 01/05/23 1:28pm

TrivialPursuit

avatar

S2DG said:

I've tried audio books a couple of times and couldn't do it. Not sure if it was the voice or someone talking for an extended period of time but it wasn't working for me.

Maybe I'll try it again, it could have been a time and place thing. I'd love to get a few more books in this year.

Thanks for the reminder!


It definitely took me a bit to get into it. I found myself really having to concentrate on the audio. Which, really, sorta turned out to be a good thing. It's not like having music on in the background where it can just sink into the back of whatever you're doing. One really has to focus on the audio, which is nice actually. It helps me focus.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #11 posted 01/05/23 1:31pm

TrivialPursuit

avatar

ShellyMcG said:

My only concern would be the voice of whoever is reading it. Do they have an accent, do they pronounce certain words or names weird, is it a male or female voice etc.


There are a few popular narrators, and actually many film stars do audio book narrations. One guy, who is dead now, Frank Muller does a lot of King books. He has a particular style of voice, but it seems to work. Another guy, George Guidall has done subsequent King books and I enjoy his book.

It's each speakers own take on it. Some audio books are more dramatized with sounds, etc. But the King books I've listened to so far, are just straight up narration, and the people reading do voices - sort of. Maybe a change in tone or accent a bit, just so you know who they are.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #12 posted 01/06/23 7:50am

2freaky

I tend to do non fiction. 5 books currently.

I'll tell U what the Eye in the Pimp stand 4!
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #13 posted 01/06/23 9:49am

PJMcGee

avatar

Reading my first King in a while, Fairy Tale. I don't know if I'm just getting too old for this shit, but the fantastical elements are kind of goofy. As I recall, there were some out there parts in The Talisman, his most fantasy type book that I recall, but I loved it.

There was more to Talisman tho. More characters, richer worlds. Fairy is pretty simple. One main character, with other characters not being around for long.

So it's a bit of a slog. Usually with King I have to finish it quickly, sometimes very quickly. I think he called that the Gotta. Fairy hasn't gotta'd me.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #14 posted 01/06/23 11:33am

S2DG

avatar

TrivialPursuit said:

S2DG said:

I've tried audio books a couple of times and couldn't do it. Not sure if it was the voice or someone talking for an extended period of time but it wasn't working for me.

Maybe I'll try it again, it could have been a time and place thing. I'd love to get a few more books in this year.

Thanks for the reminder!


It definitely took me a bit to get into it. I found myself really having to concentrate on the audio. Which, really, sorta turned out to be a good thing. It's not like having music on in the background where it can just sink into the back of whatever you're doing. One really has to focus on the audio, which is nice actually. It helps me focus.



I think you hit the nail on the head here. I think that's where the irritation comes in because I'm treating it like a background element without keeping focus.

Great perspective to go into this when I make another attempt.

Thanks again TrivialPursuit, I appreciate your insight here. thumbs up!

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #15 posted 01/12/23 5:31am

ShellyMcG

TrivialPursuit said:



ShellyMcG said:


My only concern would be the voice of whoever is reading it. Do they have an accent, do they pronounce certain words or names weird, is it a male or female voice etc.


There are a few popular narrators, and actually many film stars do audio book narrations. One guy, who is dead now, Frank Muller does a lot of King books. He has a particular style of voice, but it seems to work. Another guy, George Guidall has done subsequent King books and I enjoy his book.

It's each speakers own take on it. Some audio books are more dramatized with sounds, etc. But the King books I've listened to so far, are just straight up narration, and the people reading do voices - sort of. Maybe a change in tone or accent a bit, just so you know who they are.



Thanks for the info. I think I'll get an Audible trial from Amazon and give it a go on my way to work. See how it goes.

The voice of the narrator would be a deal breaker for me. Like, for example, the Cormac McCarthy book "No Country For Old Men" would be perfect if the audiobook was done by Tommy Lee Jones or someone similar. But there's no way I could listen to it if the narrator was, say, English or something. It just wouldn't feel right. I wonder, though, are there different versions of audiobooks with different narrators?
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #16 posted 01/13/23 11:41am

S2DG

avatar

ShellyMcG said:

TrivialPursuit said:


There are a few popular narrators, and actually many film stars do audio book narrations. One guy, who is dead now, Frank Muller does a lot of King books. He has a particular style of voice, but it seems to work. Another guy, George Guidall has done subsequent King books and I enjoy his book.

It's each speakers own take on it. Some audio books are more dramatized with sounds, etc. But the King books I've listened to so far, are just straight up narration, and the people reading do voices - sort of. Maybe a change in tone or accent a bit, just so you know who they are.

Thanks for the info. I think I'll get an Audible trial from Amazon and give it a go on my way to work. See how it goes. The voice of the narrator would be a deal breaker for me. Like, for example, the Cormac McCarthy book "No Country For Old Men" would be perfect if the audiobook was done by Tommy Lee Jones or someone similar. But there's no way I could listen to it if the narrator was, say, English or something. It just wouldn't feel right. I wonder, though, are there different versions of audiobooks with different narrators?


Didn't think about the narrators voice, that can be a major deal-breaker if it's annoying. hmmm

I wanted to jump into audio books but it looks like this is the main option, right? I see Apple has their version of audio books but the selection choices aren't there.

Trivial, where do you get your audio books and do you buy them like or music or just rent them?

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #17 posted 01/13/23 2:22pm

TrivialPursuit

avatar

S2DG said:

Didn't think about the narrators voice, that can be a major deal-breaker if it's annoying. hmmm

I wanted to jump into audio books but it looks like this is the main option, right? I see Apple has their version of audio books but the selection choices aren't there.

Trivial, where do you get your audio books and do you buy them like or music or just rent them?


Torrents.

As far as voices, the Frank guy I mentioned (who has since passed away after a terrible car accident affected his brain and motor skills for his remaining few years) really had a certain way of reading The Talisman. He said that narrating SK books was his favorite, and he really puts a lot into them. But that one tested me. He's better on Black House (the sequel). The other guy's voice, George Guidall, is super nice, and he did the latter half of The Dark Tower series.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #18 posted 01/15/23 10:13am

S2DG

avatar

TrivialPursuit said:

S2DG said:

Didn't think about the narrators voice, that can be a major deal-breaker if it's annoying. hmmm

I wanted to jump into audio books but it looks like this is the main option, right? I see Apple has their version of audio books but the selection choices aren't there.

Trivial, where do you get your audio books and do you buy them like or music or just rent them?


Torrents.

As far as voices, the Frank guy I mentioned (who has since passed away after a terrible car accident affected his brain and motor skills for his remaining few years) really had a certain way of reading The Talisman. He said that narrating SK books was his favorite, and he really puts a lot into them. But that one tested me. He's better on Black House (the sequel). The other guy's voice, George Guidall, is super nice, and he did the latter half of The Dark Tower series.



Gotcha!

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #19 posted 01/17/23 10:13am

onlyforaminute

avatar

I've got an interactive book on audible I'm trying to figure out. Meaning I have the patience of a knat and I should have paid more attention to what I ordered. I checked my "library" I have a ton of books I need to revisit. I hadn't realized I really use this thing that much.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #20 posted 01/17/23 6:15pm

onlyforaminute

avatar

Looks like I'm going to be reading The Three-Body Problem series by Cixin Liu next.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #21 posted 01/18/23 10:32am

ShellyMcG

onlyforaminute said:

Looks like I'm going to be reading The Three-Body Problem series by Cixin Liu next.


I hope you enjoy it. I've only read the first one but I really liked it.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #22 posted 01/18/23 11:53am

S2DG

avatar

Not that anyone cares but I've taken Triv's suggestion and started an audiobook.

It turns out to be a perfect distraction when I'm walking every other day for a few miles. Took a second to get used to the guy reading it but because I love the book (THE STAND) so I'm all in.

Feel like a dumbass for not doing this sooner... err

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #23 posted 01/19/23 6:13am

onlyforaminute

avatar

ShellyMcG said:

onlyforaminute said:

Looks like I'm going to be reading The Three-Body Problem series by Cixin Liu next.


I hope you enjoy it. I've only read the first one but I really liked it.

Ive only just heard about it. It sounded lik a worthwhile read right up my alley. I also see Netflix is coming out with a series of it. Don't know when. But so far after 9 chapters it's been interesting.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #24 posted 01/19/23 10:58am

ShellyMcG

onlyforaminute said:

ShellyMcG said:



I hope you enjoy it. I've only read the first one but I really liked it.

Ive only just heard about it. It sounded lik a worthwhile read right up my alley. I also see Netflix is coming out with a series of it. Don't know when. But so far after 9 chapters it's been interesting.


I didn't know there was a series of it coming. I must get back to the books at some point before the show comes out.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #25 posted 01/19/23 4:40pm

TrivialPursuit

avatar

I finished Black House by King and Straub, the sequel to The Talisman. It was long, but the pace kept the action going. While the book could end Jack Sawyer's story as a duo, there is certainly room for a third book. Straub and King started it, but Straub died in 2021. I hope King finishes it.

I may take a break from fiction, and dig into Prince Harry's Spare. Because why not.

By the way, if anyone is on Goodreads, you can add me.

[Edited 1/19/23 16:50pm]

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #26 posted 01/20/23 6:09pm

onlyforaminute

avatar

ShellyMcG said:

onlyforaminute said:


Ive only just heard about it. It sounded lik a worthwhile read right up my alley. I also see Netflix is coming out with a series of it. Don't know when. But so far after 9 chapters it's been interesting.


I didn't know there was a series of it coming. I must get back to the books at some point before the show comes out.

The Chinese series is on utube as well as another app that has it dubbed, it's one of those 30 episode series, but I haven't checked it out. Wanna read the series first since I already have an overview of what it's about.
I'm almost done with the 1st book. Have the 2nd book at hand. I'm really enjoying it. I realize it's setup for some pretty indepth concepts. I'm ready for them. All I can say right now is I'm obviously not an intellectual because that game would have been thrown out a window the 2 or 3rd time I played it.


TrivialPursuit said:

I finished Black House by King and Straub, the sequel to The Talisman. It was long, but the pace kept the action going. While the book could end Jack Sawyer's story as a duo, there is certainly room for a third book. Straub and King started it, but Straub died in 2021. I hope King finishes it.


I read The Talisman a very long time ago and it stuck with me for so long. Loved it. I did start Black House but I failed to complete it. I will revisit it one day.
SK has so many novels.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #27 posted 01/21/23 5:39am

TrivialPursuit

avatar

onlyforaminute said:

ShellyMcG said:
I read The Talisman a very long time ago and it stuck with me for so long. Loved it. I did start Black House but I failed to complete it. I will revisit it one day. SK has so many novels.


Once, SK and George RR Martin had a talk at a university. GRRM said, "How do you write so many damn books?"

SK made a good point, which - I wish I had the discipline to do myself as a writer - was to work on 4-6 pages a day. Get them really good, work them and rework them. Doesn't seem like much, but you do an average of 5 really good pages a day, and your book is 500 pages, that's just over 3 months than you have what is probably more than just a rough draft.

Some people tell you to not edit as you go, but I find myself doing that time to time. And I think if it's part of one's creative process, then do it. It can be a distraction to going further, so a writer has to check themselves.

I meant to mention earlier that Black House sideways mentions people from Hearts in Atlantis and Insomnia. The latter I find constantly amusing because SK said that book and Rose Madder were books where he was "trying too hard." Yet it was Insomnia where we first see the Crimson King make an appearance. One needs a case of insomnia to get through that behemoth book. Took me two months to read that (before my audio book days).

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #28 posted 01/23/23 6:55pm

onlyforaminute

avatar

TrivialPursuit said:



onlyforaminute said:


ShellyMcG said:
I read The Talisman a very long time ago and it stuck with me for so long. Loved it. I did start Black House but I failed to complete it. I will revisit it one day. SK has so many novels.




Once, SK and George RR Martin had a talk at a university. GRRM said, "How do you write so many damn books?"

SK made a good point, which - I wish I had the discipline to do myself as a writer - was to work on 4-6 pages a day. Get them really good, work them and rework them. Doesn't seem like much, but you do an average of 5 really good pages a day, and your book is 500 pages, that's just over 3 months than you have what is probably more than just a rough draft.

Some people tell you to not edit as you go, but I find myself doing that time to time. And I think if it's part of one's creative process, then do it. It can be a distraction to going further, so a writer has to check themselves.

I meant to mention earlier that Black House sideways mentions people from Hearts in Atlantis and Insomnia. The latter I find constantly amusing because SK said that book and Rose Madder were books where he was "trying too hard." Yet it was Insomnia where we first see the Crimson King make an appearance. One needs a case of insomnia to get through that behemoth book. Took me two months to read that (before my audio book days).



Well we know that's not GRRM's formula. Still waiting. But yeah it takes a lot of discipline to write.
The rate of my reading is nowhere where it used to be. Never was a speed reader, finishing books in a couple of hours but I was very consistent. Usually had 3 books going at a time and got thru them all in 2-3 week. I'd like to get back to that.
Time keeps on slipping into the future...


This moment is all there is...
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #29 posted 01/24/23 7:00am

TrivialPursuit

avatar

onlyforaminute said:

Usually had 3 books going at a time and got thru them all in 2-3 week. I'd like to get back to that.


I think it was 2019 that I was doing that. I had a fiction and a non-fiction. I'd read one every other night when I went to bed. I think I read 21 books that year, which is a lot for me. I'm not a fast reader, either.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Page 1 of 2 12>
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > General Discussion > The Official Org 2023 Book Reading Thread™