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Reply #30 posted 09/02/21 2:51am

DaveT

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Empress said:

DaveT said:

Speaking of King, I'm continuing reading through his entire bibliography in order of release. I'm on The Stand at the moment (I'm reading the re-released unabridged version). Even though its meant to be his best I wasn't looking forward to it, knowing a little bit about it from snippets of the nineties TV movie they did.

I'm about 600 pages in and I've enjoyed it much more than I thought I would. I did enjoy the first half more than the second so far though ... the stuff discussing the collapse of society was more interesting that the setting up of the new society in Boulder has been so far. I'm hoping it picks up again in the final quarter.

So excited about all the classics ahead I've yet to read!

I envy you that you are reading King for the first time. The Stand is an absolute epic book and I loved it! Sure, like any book of its magnitude, there are some slow spots, but on the whole, it's a masterpiece IMHO. Enjoy all that's ahead of you.


King has always been my favourite writer, but I must confess that it was as much to do with the film adaptations of his books as anything else.

I was starting to feel like a bit of a fraud claiming King to be my fave when I'd only read his short story collections and novellas, but not most of his full length novels. Loving what I've read so far though and The Stand has definitely picked up now I'm 150 pages from the end.

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Reply #31 posted 09/02/21 6:23pm

TrivialPursuit

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I still haven't read The Dark Tower series. There's just so much of it. I think it's alluded to in Insomnia.

I know, I know. I should. But I haven't. Yet. Maybe I'll make that my 2022 thing - just read the whole set of books. I haven't watched the movie (or two?) made from the books because they were panned by everyone, and I didn't want them to taint my view of the books.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
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Reply #32 posted 09/03/21 5:24am

Empress

TrivialPursuit said:

I still haven't read The Dark Tower series. There's just so much of it. I think it's alluded to in Insomnia.

I know, I know. I should. But I haven't. Yet. Maybe I'll make that my 2022 thing - just read the whole set of books. I haven't watched the movie (or two?) made from the books because they were panned by everyone, and I didn't want them to taint my view of the books.

Don't bother with the movies, read the books. The movies were sub-par. Maybe read 2 or 3 then read something completely different and go back and read the rest. They are quite the adventure!

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Reply #33 posted 09/03/21 12:28pm

EmmaMcG

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TrivialPursuit said:

I still haven't read The Dark Tower series. There's just so much of it. I think it's alluded to in Insomnia.

I know, I know. I should. But I haven't. Yet. Maybe I'll make that my 2022 thing - just read the whole set of books. I haven't watched the movie (or two?) made from the books because they were panned by everyone, and I didn't want them to taint my view of the books.



The movie has very little to do with the actual books so don't let that put you off. The first book, The Gunslinger, is really short so you could read that in a day or two and decide if it's your kind of thing.
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Reply #34 posted 09/04/21 9:59am

corntea

Just finished the original trilogy of Mistborn and have just started The Alloy of Law.
The first three were as good as everyone who recommended them to me claimed, especially the first one. If you’re thinking about reading them, do it!

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Reply #35 posted 09/04/21 2:43pm

PurpleJedi

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I've been trying to read this thing for about 6 months now.

Somehow I don't have "alone time" to do reading much anymore.

By St. Boogar and all the saints at the backside door of Purgatory!
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Reply #36 posted 09/08/21 12:10am

Phase3

This thread
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Reply #37 posted 09/10/21 12:17pm

Cloudbuster

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Reply #38 posted 09/10/21 3:23pm

TrivialPursuit

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Empress said:

I really enjoyed Killers of the Flower Moon. I hope they do it justice with the movie. There are so many stories we didn't learn about in school, but as long as we can read, we can learn about them. I loved Billy Summers, but I usually enjoy all of King's books. Can't really think of one that I didn't like.


I'm now into Billy Summers. He's at his new home, and just learned about some gay guy that works for the collection agency, and he's written the first few pages of his "book," about his abuse (step?) father who murdered his sister. That's as far as I've gotten.

I'm glad I got through American Pastoral. Roth has a particular way of writing. A lot of inner dialogue here and there, that sorta meshes with the narrator. But really well done. The Plot Against America was just as good (if not a little better). I like how he addresses politics. It's not the typical way one may expect.

I love the jabs at pumpkin in Billy Summers.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
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Reply #39 posted 09/11/21 12:33pm

Empress

TrivialPursuit said:



Empress said:


I really enjoyed Killers of the Flower Moon. I hope they do it justice with the movie. There are so many stories we didn't learn about in school, but as long as we can read, we can learn about them. I loved Billy Summers, but I usually enjoy all of King's books. Can't really think of one that I didn't like.




I'm now into Billy Summers. He's at his new home, and just learned about some gay guy that works for the collection agency, and he's written the first few pages of his "book," about his abuse (step?) father who murdered his sister. That's as far as I've gotten.

I'm glad I got through American Pastoral. Roth has a particular way of writing. A lot of inner dialogue here and there, that sorta meshes with the narrator. But really well done. The Plot Against America was just as good (if not a little better). I like how he addresses politics. It's not the typical way one may expect.

I love the jabs at pumpkin in Billy Summers.



There's a lot more to come with Billy Summers. I was surprised by what happens after he completes his "job". Let me know what you think when you're finished. Have you read Portnoy's Complaint by Roth? I read it 25 years ago, it was very good and made me laugh.
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Reply #40 posted 09/11/21 4:39pm

TrivialPursuit

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Empress said:

TrivialPursuit said:


I'm now into Billy Summers. He's at his new home, and just learned about some gay guy that works for the collection agency, and he's written the first few pages of his "book," about his abuse (step?) father who murdered his sister. That's as far as I've gotten.

I'm glad I got through American Pastoral. Roth has a particular way of writing. A lot of inner dialogue here and there, that sorta meshes with the narrator. But really well done. The Plot Against America was just as good (if not a little better). I like how he addresses politics. It's not the typical way one may expect.

I love the jabs at pumpkin in Billy Summers.

There's a lot more to come with Billy Summers. I was surprised by what happens after he completes his "job". Let me know what you think when you're finished. Have you read Portnoy's Complaint by Roth? I read it 25 years ago, it was very good and made me laugh.


The only two Roth novels I've read are those I mentioned. Just sorta came across them when I found The Plot Against America. The mini-series was really good, for that one.

One book I love and wish they'd do something with is my aforementioned Richard Bach's Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah. It's a very short read, and would make a great movie.

"eye don’t really care so much what people say about me because it is a reflection of who they r."
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Reply #41 posted 09/13/21 5:45pm

MarkThrust

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I've been reading a lot of short stories, or writers known for them. I never gave them a chance! I think I got on this path with a Gore essay on Italo Calvino, and I loved reading the novel The Baron in the Trees - when I bought another book of his & it turned out to be (due to my not paying attention) a collection of short stories, Difficult Loves, that I enjoyed a lot. So I've been reading Cheever, Carver, Chekhov, and have O'Conner lined up. I also tried Barthe, but it was a little too 'out there' for me, which usually means I'll try to read it again.

.

After all that, I would recommend Baron in the Trees, and if you avoided short stories like me: get over it and read Chekhov.

.

I have been, and will be, reading a lot of Dawn Powell. Being from the rural Midwest and landing in Greeenwich village in the 40's, she creates character contrasts that feel relevant today. I think A Time to Be Born is her most popular book, but I was amazed I couldn't find her at any of my local bookstores. At. All. My Home Is Far Away is also recommended.

.

I re-read the Kapesh books by Philip Roth - The Dying Animal and The Professor of Desire. I felt they deserved a re-read before going to the used bookstore for credit. I don't know if I would recommend them - they're a little dark, and exhibit why David Foster Wallace classified Roth as one of the 'Great Male Narcissists'.

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Reply #42 posted 09/15/21 4:17am

fortuneandsere
ndipity

Empress said:

I've been reading King since I was a teenager and I'm 58 now. I've read everything and although some of his work has been long and drawn out, I've enjoyed every book or short story. I've always enjoyed long, overblown books and for me, the longer, the better. For example, I loved every book in the Dark Tower series. I remember waiting anxiously for the next release. I know some people didn't love that series because it was so over the top and long, but those characters have stayed with me. When I go to the bookstore to buy Kings latest, I'm always hoping for a huge book that I can barely carry around - LOL. The only book I've re-read is IT as it's probably my favourite of his. I dread the day King is no longer here to write as he's been a constant in my life for decades. Fortunately, I have every book and I hope to re-read them when I retire and have more free time. Having said all of this, I'm not a huge fan of the movie adaptations. Some have been very good like The Shining, Misery and Shawshank Redemption, but I'd much rather read the book. [Edited 8/30/21 5:27am]


Personally I don't understand people who prefer reading a book to a movie adaptation. And I say that as both a playwright and novelist myself. I'm guessing you're not a sports fan either, because there's too much immediacy.


The hypocrisy of the far-left is something else.

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence - this is where all religions fall down.
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Reply #43 posted 09/15/21 7:30am

2freaky4church
1

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NeoConned Again. about the evils of the Iraq war, good timing.

Has writers from the right, left, military, former insiders, experts, some nuts lol

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #44 posted 09/16/21 4:02pm

EmmaMcG

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fortuneandserendipity said:



Empress said:


I've been reading King since I was a teenager and I'm 58 now. I've read everything and although some of his work has been long and drawn out, I've enjoyed every book or short story. I've always enjoyed long, overblown books and for me, the longer, the better. For example, I loved every book in the Dark Tower series. I remember waiting anxiously for the next release. I know some people didn't love that series because it was so over the top and long, but those characters have stayed with me. When I go to the bookstore to buy Kings latest, I'm always hoping for a huge book that I can barely carry around - LOL. The only book I've re-read is IT as it's probably my favourite of his. I dread the day King is no longer here to write as he's been a constant in my life for decades. Fortunately, I have every book and I hope to re-read them when I retire and have more free time. Having said all of this, I'm not a huge fan of the movie adaptations. Some have been very good like The Shining, Misery and Shawshank Redemption, but I'd much rather read the book. [Edited 8/30/21 5:27am]


Personally I don't understand people who prefer reading a book to a movie adaptation. And I say that as both a playwright and novelist myself. I'm guessing you're not a sports fan either, because there's too much immediacy.




Immediacy has nothing to do with it. Some people prefer novels to movies because even in the best adaptations you never really get the full story. Novels will generally go into a lot more detail regarding character's thoughts, motivations, etc. You understand them more from reading the book than you do if you just watch the movie. Also, in most adaptations, the movie tends to leave out a few scenes altogether. Some scenes are left out to help with a movie's pacing or just to keep it to a respectable running time. Not something you need to worry about with a novel.

Another thing is that when you read a book, you kind of picture that character in your head. Your imagination brings to life what he looks like, how he talks. But then the movie comes out and suddenly there's some actor playing the part completely different to how you've pictured it. It feels off. It doesn't work as well as it did before when you were reading it.
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Reply #45 posted 09/17/21 1:00am

JorisE73

EmmaMcG said:

fortuneandserendipity said:


Personally I don't understand people who prefer reading a book to a movie adaptation. And I say that as both a playwright and novelist myself. I'm guessing you're not a sports fan either, because there's too much immediacy.


Immediacy has nothing to do with it. Some people prefer novels to movies because even in the best adaptations you never really get the full story. Novels will generally go into a lot more detail regarding character's thoughts, motivations, etc. You understand them more from reading the book than you do if you just watch the movie. Also, in most adaptations, the movie tends to leave out a few scenes altogether. Some scenes are left out to help with a movie's pacing or just to keep it to a respectable running time. Not something you need to worry about with a novel. Another thing is that when you read a book, you kind of picture that character in your head. Your imagination brings to life what he looks like, how he talks. But then the movie comes out and suddenly there's some actor playing the part completely different to how you've pictured it. It feels off. It doesn't work as well as it did before when you were reading it.


yeahthat

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Reply #46 posted 09/17/21 3:42am

fortuneandsere
ndipity

EmmaMcG said:

fortuneandserendipity said:


Personally I don't understand people who prefer reading a book to a movie adaptation. And I say that as both a playwright and novelist myself. I'm guessing you're not a sports fan either, because there's too much immediacy.


Immediacy has nothing to do with it. Some people prefer novels to movies because even in the best adaptations you never really get the full story. Novels will generally go into a lot more detail regarding character's thoughts, motivations, etc. You understand them more from reading the book than you do if you just watch the movie. Also, in most adaptations, the movie tends to leave out a few scenes altogether. Some scenes are left out to help with a movie's pacing or just to keep it to a respectable running time. Not something you need to worry about with a novel. Another thing is that when you read a book, you kind of picture that character in your head. Your imagination brings to life what he looks like, how he talks. But then the movie comes out and suddenly there's some actor playing the part completely different to how you've pictured it. It feels off. It doesn't work as well as it did before when you were reading it.


I guess what I'm saying is, in books you get details like what the characters are wearing described in great detail, or how the leaves are rustling in the wind sometimes taking up an entire paragraph, or how the main character is holding the cutlery.
All of this can be depicted in a movie, but instead hitting you in the solar plexus because in film all these things can occur simultaneously.

You're right that books include in greater detail the character's thoughts, motivations. And I'm someone who generally prefers films the more psychological they are. But conversely, it can become too mired in its own psychological contraptions.
Take The Shining for instance. In the novel, Jack's character degenerating into madness appears to happen concurrent to his descent into alcoholism. But for me, that can't possibly work well within the context of a haunted house movie, which is what The Shining essentially is. It takes away the spookiness.
On the other hand, the climax with the topiary animals that come to life at the end of the Shining, thankfully doesn't happen in the movie. Instead we get Jack chasing his kid through the maze. Which for me works better because Jack is already far gone. And he's a caretaker, not a gardener. The house alone should be haunted.
When a movie goes too far with an over the top scene, the thought springing to mind is, if aliens came down to earth in the next scene you wouldn't question it! As books often contain additional subplots or one-off scenes, there's always a greater chance of an apparent superficial, random event or consequence occurring. Which in film, would be called a plot device.

Books probably also play better in the mind of someone able to visualize well. When I visualize I picture people's faces easier than anything else, and even then it tends to be snapshots rather than rolling scenes, and stuff based on what I've already seen. Not conception.
If someone reading a book is able to visualize to a degree everything playing out as if in a film, then I totally get why to then watch a movie adaptation would be jarring.

But then you have to ask the question, if they watch the movie first and then read the book, would their opinion be any different?


The hypocrisy of the far-left is something else.

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence - this is where all religions fall down.
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Reply #47 posted 09/17/21 6:14am

Empress

fortuneandserendipity said:



Empress said:


I've been reading King since I was a teenager and I'm 58 now. I've read everything and although some of his work has been long and drawn out, I've enjoyed every book or short story. I've always enjoyed long, overblown books and for me, the longer, the better. For example, I loved every book in the Dark Tower series. I remember waiting anxiously for the next release. I know some people didn't love that series because it was so over the top and long, but those characters have stayed with me. When I go to the bookstore to buy Kings latest, I'm always hoping for a huge book that I can barely carry around - LOL. The only book I've re-read is IT as it's probably my favourite of his. I dread the day King is no longer here to write as he's been a constant in my life for decades. Fortunately, I have every book and I hope to re-read them when I retire and have more free time. Having said all of this, I'm not a huge fan of the movie adaptations. Some have been very good like The Shining, Misery and Shawshank Redemption, but I'd much rather read the book. [Edited 8/30/21 5:27am]


Personally I don't understand people who prefer reading a book to a movie adaptation. And I say that as both a playwright and novelist myself. I'm guessing you're not a sports fan either, because there's too much immediacy.




You would be guessing wrong. I'm a huge sports fan. I love the NBA, MLB, tennis and golf and I really enjoying watching the Olympics. My husband and I watch every Raptors game and have been watching these sports for over 40 years. Reading a book has always been way more fulfilling for me than watching the movie or tv show version of any book. In fact, most I don't watch as I prefer to read the book.
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Reply #48 posted 09/17/21 6:15am

Empress

EmmaMcG said:

fortuneandserendipity said:



Empress said:


I've been reading King since I was a teenager and I'm 58 now. I've read everything and although some of his work has been long and drawn out, I've enjoyed every book or short story. I've always enjoyed long, overblown books and for me, the longer, the better. For example, I loved every book in the Dark Tower series. I remember waiting anxiously for the next release. I know some people didn't love that series because it was so over the top and long, but those characters have stayed with me. When I go to the bookstore to buy Kings latest, I'm always hoping for a huge book that I can barely carry around - LOL. The only book I've re-read is IT as it's probably my favourite of his. I dread the day King is no longer here to write as he's been a constant in my life for decades. Fortunately, I have every book and I hope to re-read them when I retire and have more free time. Having said all of this, I'm not a huge fan of the movie adaptations. Some have been very good like The Shining, Misery and Shawshank Redemption, but I'd much rather read the book. [Edited 8/30/21 5:27am]


Personally I don't understand people who prefer reading a book to a movie adaptation. And I say that as both a playwright and novelist myself. I'm guessing you're not a sports fan either, because there's too much immediacy.




Immediacy has nothing to do with it. Some people prefer novels to movies because even in the best adaptations you never really get the full story. Novels will generally go into a lot more detail regarding character's thoughts, motivations, etc. You understand them more from reading the book than you do if you just watch the movie. Also, in most adaptations, the movie tends to leave out a few scenes altogether. Some scenes are left out to help with a movie's pacing or just to keep it to a respectable running time. Not something you need to worry about with a novel.

Another thing is that when you read a book, you kind of picture that character in your head. Your imagination brings to life what he looks like, how he talks. But then the movie comes out and suddenly there's some actor playing the part completely different to how you've pictured it. It feels off. It doesn't work as well as it did before when you were reading it.


Well put EmmaG. I completely agree.
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Reply #49 posted 09/17/21 6:35am

fortuneandsere
ndipity

Empress said:

fortuneandserendipity said:


Personally I don't understand people who prefer reading a book to a movie adaptation. And I say that as both a playwright and novelist myself. I'm guessing you're not a sports fan either, because there's too much immediacy.


You would be guessing wrong. I'm a huge sports fan. I love the NBA, MLB, tennis and golf and I really enjoying watching the Olympics. My husband and I watch every Raptors game and have been watching these sports for over 40 years. Reading a book has always been way more fulfilling for me than watching the movie or tv show version of any book. In fact, most I don't watch as I prefer to read the book.

Way to confound me (and probably the rest of your critics), Empress. boxed

However, you also said you love golf. Now for me, that is analogous to reading a 1000+ page book over four days. Not to say all 1000+ page books will be boring. But ya know in most cases, probably. I conjecture, were you British, you might appreciate test match cricket. Which takes an extra day to complete than a 4 round tournament of golf. But eh, maybe I'm too ADD to appreciate these longer pursuits. And my need for immediacy gets in the way. wink



The hypocrisy of the far-left is something else.

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence - this is where all religions fall down.
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Reply #50 posted 09/17/21 7:33am

Empress

fortuneandserendipity said:



Empress said:


fortuneandserendipity said:



Personally I don't understand people who prefer reading a book to a movie adaptation. And I say that as both a playwright and novelist myself. I'm guessing you're not a sports fan either, because there's too much immediacy.




You would be guessing wrong. I'm a huge sports fan. I love the NBA, MLB, tennis and golf and I really enjoying watching the Olympics. My husband and I watch every Raptors game and have been watching these sports for over 40 years. Reading a book has always been way more fulfilling for me than watching the movie or tv show version of any book. In fact, most I don't watch as I prefer to read the book.

Way to confound me (and probably the rest of your critics), Empress. boxed

However, you also said you love golf. Now for me, that is analogous to reading a 1000+ page book over four days. Not to say all 1000+ page books will be boring. But ya know in most cases, probably. I conjecture, were you British, you might appreciate test match cricket. Which takes an extra day to complete than a 4 round tournament of golf. But eh, maybe I'm too ADD to appreciate these longer pursuits. And my need for immediacy gets in the way. wink





I don't require immediacy. A 1,000 page book is something I enjoy. I'm currently reading a book that's over 800 pages. I savour each page and how a long story unravels and evolves. I enjoy the journey and taking in all I can learn. One persons idea is of boring isn't always the same for the next person. I'm not looking for immediate gratification. As for cricket, I'm not a fan of the game, but I certainly appreciate what it takes to play and win.
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Reply #51 posted 09/17/21 8:55am

SantanaMaitrey
a

Interesting discussion about books and movies. It made me think: what do I prefer, the book or the movie and the answer was that I see them as two different things. Let's take one of the most famous books ever: Treasure Island. It has been adapted for film and tv countless times, my favourite Long John Silvers are Brian Blessed and Charlton Heston- because his version, a tv movie from 1989, stayed closest to the book. But when I read the book, I don't really think about the films or see those actors before me.
If you take any of this seriously, you're a bigger tool than I am.
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Reply #52 posted 09/17/21 9:35am

EmmaMcG

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Empress said:

fortuneandserendipity said:



Empress said:


fortuneandserendipity said:



Personally I don't understand people who prefer reading a book to a movie adaptation. And I say that as both a playwright and novelist myself. I'm guessing you're not a sports fan either, because there's too much immediacy.




You would be guessing wrong. I'm a huge sports fan. I love the NBA, MLB, tennis and golf and I really enjoying watching the Olympics. My husband and I watch every Raptors game and have been watching these sports for over 40 years. Reading a book has always been way more fulfilling for me than watching the movie or tv show version of any book. In fact, most I don't watch as I prefer to read the book.

Way to confound me (and probably the rest of your critics), Empress. boxed

However, you also said you love golf. Now for me, that is analogous to reading a 1000+ page book over four days. Not to say all 1000+ page books will be boring. But ya know in most cases, probably. I conjecture, were you British, you might appreciate test match cricket. Which takes an extra day to complete than a 4 round tournament of golf. But eh, maybe I'm too ADD to appreciate these longer pursuits. And my need for immediacy gets in the way. wink





I don't require immediacy. A 1,000 page book is something I enjoy. I'm currently reading a book that's over 800 pages. I savour each page and how a long story unravels and evolves. I enjoy the journey and taking in all I can learn. One persons idea is of boring isn't always the same for the next person. I'm not looking for immediate gratification. As for cricket, I'm not a fan of the game, but I certainly appreciate what it takes to play and win.


I definitely don't require immediacy. My husband can attest to that wink
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Reply #53 posted 09/19/21 4:17am

JDInteractive

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7 Habits of Highly Effective People-Steven Covey

There's Joy In Expatriation.
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