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Thread started 05/23/08 6:46pm

RodeoSchro

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NYC, here I come! So, of course, I need your help

Hey. I'm taking the boy to New York over the July 4th weekend. Our plan is to watch some Yankees/Red Sox games and go to Cooperstown and check out the Hall of Fame.

So, here are some questions:

1. Is sitting in the bleachers at Yankee Stadium cool? I hope so, because tickets are freaking expensive! I don't think I can afford to blow the whole vacation budget on field box seats.

2. If you sit in the bleachers, is it assigned seats or general admission?

3. What should we do before the game? Is it worth it to get there early and hang out around the stadium, or has Wrigley Field spoiled me?

4. And where should we stay? Somewhere that's affordable and not that far from Yankee Stadium. Is there such a place?

5. Does it matter what airport we fly into? We're flying Southwest, and I have no idea yet where they fly.

6. What's the best way to get to/from the stadium? Taxi? Subway? Something else?

7. Who's going to buy us dinner?

8. The July 4th game is a 1:05 start. Where should we go after the game to watch fireworks?

9. What else is there to do in New York City besides watch baseball?

Thanks for your help.
































BTW, number 9 is a joke.
Second Funkiest White Man in America

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Reply #1 posted 05/23/08 6:52pm

MoniGram

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Oh Rodeo, don't tell me you are a Yankee fan disbelief


giggle
Proud Memaw to Seyhan Olivia Christine ,Zoey Cirilo Jaylee & Ellie Abigail Lillian mushy
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Reply #2 posted 05/23/08 7:09pm

Anxiety

i lived in new york for six years, but i've never been to a sporting event nor do i know the first thing about sports. so for the purposes of your questions, i might as well have spent a six year residency on tattooine. all i can tell you is watch some seinfeld episodes - they're always going to baseball games in NYC and getting into wacky situations.
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Reply #3 posted 05/23/08 7:10pm

JasmineFire

Anxiety said:

i lived in new york for six years, but i've never been to a sporting event nor do i know the first thing about sports. so for the purposes of your questions, i might as well have spent a six year residency on tattooine. all i can tell you is watch some seinfeld episodes - they're always going to baseball games in NYC and getting into wacky situations.

giggle

i never went to a sporting event in NYC either. shrug I did have a super hot boyfriend, though.
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Reply #4 posted 05/24/08 6:23am

RodeoSchro

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I will be on the lookout for George Costanza, thanks.

No, I'm not a Yankees fan but we will be wearing Yankees gear at Yankee Stadium. And if we get up to Boston, we'll be wearing Red Sox gear at Fenway.

When in Rome...
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Reply #5 posted 05/24/08 8:34am

MoniGram

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RodeoSchro said:

I will be on the lookout for George Costanza, thanks.

No, I'm not a Yankees fan but we will be wearing Yankees gear at Yankee Stadium. And if we get up to Boston, we'll be wearing Red Sox gear at Fenway.

When in Rome...



I would love to see the Bosox at Fenway...but I will have to wait to see my boys when they come to play the Rangers...drive down and make a weekend of it. biggrin
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Reply #6 posted 05/24/08 10:11am

DevotedPuppy

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I've only been to one Yankees game and I don't really recall that much about it, but for what it's worth, here are my thoughts:

RodeoSchro said:

Hey. I'm taking the boy to New York over the July 4th weekend. Our plan is to watch some Yankees/Red Sox games and go to Cooperstown and check out the Hall of Fame.

So, here are some questions:

1. Is sitting in the bleachers at Yankee Stadium cool? I hope so, because tickets are freaking expensive! I don't think I can afford to blow the whole vacation budget on field box seats. No clue. Sorry. shrug

2. If you sit in the bleachers, is it assigned seats or general admission? No clue. Sorry. shrug

3. What should we do before the game? Is it worth it to get there early and hang out around the stadium, or has Wrigley Field spoiled me? Um, I don't think it's a Wrigley Field kinda thing. (I used to live 3 blocks from Wrigley Field--hated it!). Yankee Stadium is in the Bronx, and I don't think it's in a hip neighborhood. But I do know you can definitely take the subway there.

4. And where should we stay? Somewhere that's affordable and not that far from Yankee Stadium. Is there such a place? I definitely wouldn't stay by the stadium, because other than being close to the stadium, you're probably not going to be doing much else in that neighborhood. I think it would be better to stay in Manhattan, close to a subway line so that you can easily get to wherever. Affordable and New York don't go together so well, especially during holiday weekends. I have culled quite a list of hotels for when people ask so I am happy to orgnote those to you. They range in price, niceness, and neighborhood. I think you'll want to get your hotel lined up asap---they will only get more expensive and harder to find the longer you wait, especially b/c 4 of July + Yankees/Red Sox = madness!

5. Does it matter what airport we fly into? We're flying Southwest, and I have no idea yet where they fly. I would try to fly into LaGuardia. It is closer to Manhattan and the cab fare will be less.

6. What's the best way to get to/from the stadium? Taxi? Subway? Something else? Subway. I think you take the 4 train.


7. Who's going to buy us dinner? zipped I work for a non-profit, and am probably resigning within the next 3 weeks.

8. The July 4th game is a 1:05 start. Where should we go after the game to watch fireworks? shrug Anywhere along the East River. I think they have designated spots, but like anything it will be crowded and I bet there will be people camped out all day long to get the "front row". Last year I went to a friends house in Brooklyn that overlooked the harbor.

9. What else is there to do in New York City besides watch baseball? Museums! yay! Go to the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a beer and great view of Central Park and Manhattan.

Thanks for your help.


I have to run some errands, but I'll try to orgnote you the hotel info by tomorrow. Feel free to orgnote me with questions.
"Your presence and dry wit are appealing in a mysterious way."
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Reply #7 posted 05/24/08 9:01pm

lovemachine

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The problem with the bleacher seats is that you are only allowed access to the bleacher area and cannot tour other parts of the ballpark including the monuments.

They are also alcohol free if that matters to you.
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Reply #8 posted 05/26/08 7:21am

RodeoSchro

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lovemachine said:

The problem with the bleacher seats is that you are only allowed access to the bleacher area and cannot tour other parts of the ballpark including the monuments.

They are also alcohol free if that matters to you.


Good info, thanks. I like the "no alcohol" part because of my son, but we'd sure like to see other parts of the Stadium. Can you go to Monument Park during the game, or is that something you have to see on an off-day?
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Reply #9 posted 05/26/08 7:57am

lovemachine

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RodeoSchro said:

lovemachine said:

The problem with the bleacher seats is that you are only allowed access to the bleacher area and cannot tour other parts of the ballpark including the monuments.

They are also alcohol free if that matters to you.


Good info, thanks. I like the "no alcohol" part because of my son, but we'd sure like to see other parts of the Stadium. Can you go to Monument Park during the game, or is that something you have to see on an off-day?


The monuments are open gameday from the time the gates open until like 30 or 40 minutes before gametime.
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Reply #10 posted 05/26/08 8:15am

Mach

I know #9 is a joke

If it wasn't ...

St Patrick's Cathedral is a must thumbs up!

http://www.fordham.edu/ha...tpat1.html
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Reply #11 posted 05/26/08 1:38pm

RodeoSchro

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lovemachine said:

RodeoSchro said:



Good info, thanks. I like the "no alcohol" part because of my son, but we'd sure like to see other parts of the Stadium. Can you go to Monument Park during the game, or is that something you have to see on an off-day?


The monuments are open gameday from the time the gates open until like 30 or 40 minutes before gametime.


Great, thanks! I was afraid it was only a part you could see on an off-day!
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Reply #12 posted 05/26/08 6:33pm

JerseyKRS

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you can see Monument park before the game. It is open from the time the gate opens to about an hour before the game begins. It is essential to see this. The tours of the stadium are sold out, however, they release 20 or so tix before the tour, so you can take your chances with that. Bleachers are a GREAT place to see the game. No designated seats there. However, you can't go around the stadium, and that is a BUMMER. I would suggest for your one and only trip to the stadium, get some regular tickets. Easiest way to get to the stadium is the subway. Take the 4, B or D train to the 161st St. Yankee stadium exit and you are there.

Enjoy it!!


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Reply #13 posted 05/26/08 6:38pm

Wonderwall

I have Yankee season tickets and am actually born and raised in Chicago...South Side tho...so I really shouldn't even be helping you since you are a Cub fan (GO WHITE SOX!) wink, but here you go...

Neighourhood around Yankee Stadium SUCKS and is NOTHING like Wrigleyville (even Bridgeport where the W Sox play is better). Nothing to see or do around the stadium and you are going to want to leave as soon as the game is over. There are a couple of bars we go to before the game (the Dugout or Stanleys) but since your son is with I say high tail it outta there and head South after the game. Stay at a hotel in Midtown or even downtown and take the #4 train to the game. Hotel rates are not bad in Midtown...more than Michigan Ave hotels...but not by much. But there is so much to see and do that its worth the extra $$ to stay in a good place in a good spot.

A very cool neighbourhood to check out esp for out of towners is the Seaport area. Its way downtown, not far from World Trade Center...We go to this one place in this area called Nelson Blue...its a New Zealand bar and grill. Very good food and beautiful views of the Brooklyn Bridge...its literally underneath it. We've been going after the game and keep going back because of the great food, relaxed atomsphere, AND because not a lot people know about it so it has yet to get over-crowded. Plus prices are reasonable for New York. I have been taking Chicago friends there who say nasty things about NYC and they always leave impressed of the Nelson Blue AND Seaport. Nelson Blue has a website so check it out if you want.

Another cool spot to check out is Top of the Rock. A cool observation deck on top of 30 Rockefeller Center. Not near as touristy as Empire State Building and the views are spectacular.

DO NOT take a cab...rates are ridiculous. Use the subway as much as possible. I actually think NYC subways are better and cleaner than the El/CTA in Chicago.

The airport question? Personally I like JFK better...its more like O'Hare. Where LaGuardia is more like Midway if not a little worse. Being a Chicagoan I think you know what I mean.

Hope this helps!!
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Reply #14 posted 05/26/08 7:20pm

DevotedPuppy

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JerseyKRS said:

you can see Monument park before the game. It is open from the time the gate opens to about an hour before the game begins. It is essential to see this. The tours of the stadium are sold out, however, they release 20 or so tix before the tour, so you can take your chances with that. Bleachers are a GREAT place to see the game. No designated seats there. However, you can't go around the stadium, and that is a BUMMER. I would suggest for your one and only trip to the stadium, get some regular tickets. Easiest way to get to the stadium is the subway. Take the 4, B or D train to the 161st St. Yankee stadium exit and you are there.

Enjoy it!!



I'm pretty sure the B train doesn't run on weekends though...(my closest stop is a B/C stop). Not sure about the D.
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Reply #15 posted 05/26/08 7:33pm

xplnyrslf

The Metropolitan Museum on Central Park.

The Carnegie Deli.

Get a current New Yorker mag and see what exhibits are there, and activities.
Don't miss out on great opportunities. smile
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Reply #16 posted 05/26/08 8:27pm

RodeoSchro

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LOL. First of all - I'm from Houston! Born and raised. I do consider Wrigley Field the Mecca of Baseball, but I live in Houston. FWIW, I despise the Cubs on general principle, and despise/envy (sorry) the White Sox, since they beat us in the World Series!

But your advice is GREATLY appreciated. And if you aren't using your tickets Friday or Saturday, I'd be happy to buy them from you!

Wonderwall said:

I have Yankee season tickets and am actually born and raised in Chicago...South Side tho...so I really shouldn't even be helping you since you are a Cub fan (GO WHITE SOX!) wink, but here you go...

Neighourhood around Yankee Stadium SUCKS and is NOTHING like Wrigleyville (even Bridgeport where the W Sox play is better). Nothing to see or do around the stadium and you are going to want to leave as soon as the game is over. There are a couple of bars we go to before the game (the Dugout or Stanleys) but since your son is with I say high tail it outta there and head South after the game. Stay at a hotel in Midtown or even downtown and take the #4 train to the game. Hotel rates are not bad in Midtown...more than Michigan Ave hotels...but not by much. But there is so much to see and do that its worth the extra $$ to stay in a good place in a good spot.

A very cool neighbourhood to check out esp for out of towners is the Seaport area. Its way downtown, not far from World Trade Center...We go to this one place in this area called Nelson Blue...its a New Zealand bar and grill. Very good food and beautiful views of the Brooklyn Bridge...its literally underneath it. We've been going after the game and keep going back because of the great food, relaxed atomsphere, AND because not a lot people know about it so it has yet to get over-crowded. Plus prices are reasonable for New York. I have been taking Chicago friends there who say nasty things about NYC and they always leave impressed of the Nelson Blue AND Seaport. Nelson Blue has a website so check it out if you want.

Another cool spot to check out is Top of the Rock. A cool observation deck on top of 30 Rockefeller Center. Not near as touristy as Empire State Building and the views are spectacular.

DO NOT take a cab...rates are ridiculous. Use the subway as much as possible. I actually think NYC subways are better and cleaner than the El/CTA in Chicago.

The airport question? Personally I like JFK better...its more like O'Hare. Where LaGuardia is more like Midway if not a little worse. Being a Chicagoan I think you know what I mean.

Hope this helps!!
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Reply #17 posted 05/26/08 8:28pm

RodeoSchro

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JerseyKRS said:

you can see Monument park before the game. It is open from the time the gate opens to about an hour before the game begins. It is essential to see this. The tours of the stadium are sold out, however, they release 20 or so tix before the tour, so you can take your chances with that. Bleachers are a GREAT place to see the game. No designated seats there. However, you can't go around the stadium, and that is a BUMMER. I would suggest for your one and only trip to the stadium, get some regular tickets. Easiest way to get to the stadium is the subway. Take the 4, B or D train to the 161st St. Yankee stadium exit and you are there.

Enjoy it!!


Great advice. Thank you very much!
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Reply #18 posted 05/26/08 8:34pm

shausler

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Reply #19 posted 05/26/08 10:04pm

purplecam

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RodeoSchro said:

Hey. I'm taking the boy to New York over the July 4th weekend. Our plan is to watch some Yankees/Red Sox games and go to Cooperstown and check out the Hall of Fame.

So, here are some questions:

1. Is sitting in the bleachers at Yankee Stadium cool? I hope so, because tickets are freaking expensive! I don't think I can afford to blow the whole vacation budget on field box seats.

2. If you sit in the bleachers, is it assigned seats or general admission?

3. What should we do before the game? Is it worth it to get there early and hang out around the stadium, or has Wrigley Field spoiled me?

4. And where should we stay? Somewhere that's affordable and not that far from Yankee Stadium. Is there such a place?

5. Does it matter what airport we fly into? We're flying Southwest, and I have no idea yet where they fly.

6. What's the best way to get to/from the stadium? Taxi? Subway? Something else?

7. Who's going to buy us dinner?

8. The July 4th game is a 1:05 start. Where should we go after the game to watch fireworks?

9. What else is there to do in New York City besides watch baseball?

Thanks for your help.
































BTW, number 9 is a joke.

1. I never sat at the bleachers but whatever you do, bring sunscreen.

2. I believe that the Bleachers are first come first serve. I could be wrong but I think that's what it is.

3. I always went straight to my seat before the game. It's so crowded just getting to and in the stadium.

4. Stay somewhere affordable and nearby the subway

5. It doesn't matter what airline you fly into but I don't know of any airport that Southwest flies into here in NYC or even Newark. If they fly around here, let a brother know! lol

6. The best way to get the the stadium is the Subway, hands down. If you take a cab, you might pay a big bill cause traffic around the stadium is BAD. The lines to take are the 4, B and D to 161st - Yankee Stadium. The 4 goes down the east side and is an express in Manhattan and the B and D goes down 6th Avenue in Manhattan. The 4 Train is the line that goes outside by the stadium and you'll get a quick glimpse inside the stadium from the train. If you take the B/D to the game on July 4th, you will have to take the D train. The B only goes to the Bronx during rush hour.

7. I don't know what to tell ya. lol

8 For fieworks, you can try and go to the east side of Manhattan over on the FDR Drive which is normally closed for the fireworks and try to see them from 42nd St all the way down. You'll be by the 4 train, which is a fast line, and you'll get down there quick anywhere between 42nd St and Bowling Green by South Ferry - Battery Park, another great place to see fireworks.

One thing to do while you are in the area is to check out the new Yankee Stadium. It's really cool to see the progress of the new place. You can even see the inside of the new stadium from the 4 Train but to do that, you'd have to go past 161st St to see it. After the game. you might want to go up one stop to 167st St anyways because of how crowded the 161st St station will get. Whatever you do, have a great time here in this city and let us know how you and your son enjoyed it!
I'm not a fan of "old Prince". I'm not a fan of "new Prince". I'm just a fan of Prince. Simple as that
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Reply #20 posted 05/27/08 9:17am

Twiki

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Wonderwall said:

I have Yankee season tickets and am actually born and raised in Chicago...South Side tho...so I really shouldn't even be helping you since you are a Cub fan (GO WHITE SOX!) wink, but here you go...

Neighourhood around Yankee Stadium SUCKS and is NOTHING like Wrigleyville (even Bridgeport where the W Sox play is better). Nothing to see or do around the stadium and you are going to want to leave as soon as the game is over. There are a couple of bars we go to before the game (the Dugout or Stanleys) but since your son is with I say high tail it outta there and head South after the game. Stay at a hotel in Midtown or even downtown and take the #4 train to the game. Hotel rates are not bad in Midtown...more than Michigan Ave hotels...but not by much. But there is so much to see and do that its worth the extra $$ to stay in a good place in a good spot.

A very cool neighbourhood to check out esp for out of towners is the Seaport area. Its way downtown, not far from World Trade Center...We go to this one place in this area called Nelson Blue...its a New Zealand bar and grill. Very good food and beautiful views of the Brooklyn Bridge...its literally underneath it. We've been going after the game and keep going back because of the great food, relaxed atomsphere, AND because not a lot people know about it so it has yet to get over-crowded. Plus prices are reasonable for New York. I have been taking Chicago friends there who say nasty things about NYC and they always leave impressed of the Nelson Blue AND Seaport. Nelson Blue has a website so check it out if you want.

Another cool spot to check out is Top of the Rock. A cool observation deck on top of 30 Rockefeller Center. Not near as touristy as Empire State Building and the views are spectacular.

DO NOT take a cab...rates are ridiculous. Use the subway as much as possible. I actually think NYC subways are better and cleaner than the El/CTA in Chicago.

The airport question? Personally I like JFK better...its more like O'Hare. Where LaGuardia is more like Midway if not a little worse. Being a Chicagoan I think you know what I mean.

Hope this helps!!


I agree with most everything you said here except the airport thing. LaGuardia is closer to Manhattan and about a quarter of the size of JFK. I always have much better luck there in terms of on-time arrivals and departures. Plus, you can take the bus into Manhattan for $2 and transfer to the subway for free. At JFK, you have to pay a $60 cab fare ($45 plus tolls plus tip) to get into Manhattan or else you have to take an incredibly confusing and long train ride.
[Edited 5/27/08 9:17am]
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Reply #21 posted 05/27/08 9:29am

purplecam

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Another thing to add is that if you can avoid it, DON'T BRING BAGS WITH YOU. The guards at the turnstiles going into the stadium won't let you bring them inside and you'll have to run all the way across the street under the subway to go to a bowling alley and have your bag(s) checked there. They'll give your a number so that it'll be easy to get your bag back after the game. So if you must bring bags with you, find the bowling alley across the street and have them checked in first.
I'm not a fan of "old Prince". I'm not a fan of "new Prince". I'm just a fan of Prince. Simple as that
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Reply #22 posted 05/27/08 9:55am

Red

SIGHTS & FREE THINGS TO DO:


THE ROOSEVELT ISLAND AERIAL TRAM: Fast, fun and cheap. Ride over the East River to the island, which once housed the city's hospitals for the criminally insane. Now a community of apartment complexes, shops and parks, the island is ideal for a picnic or walk enjoying the view. Tram rides cost $1.50 and depart every 15 minutes from Second Avenue and 60th Street. Just don't go at rush hour (7 to 9 A.M. and 5 to 7 P.M.). For more information, call 212-832-4543.

ROCKEFELLER CENTER: Channel Gardens-summer performances, skyscraper, window shop, beautiful parks and plaza, Guided walks from Visitors Bur.

UNITED NATIONS: Admission to official meetings is free. Pick up tickets at UN Information Desk. Tour the marvelous gardens along the East River.

EMPIRE STATE BUILDING: The proud sentinel of Art Deco architecture is as sleek and modern as ever in its second half-century. The sky-high observatories on the 86th and 1-2nd floors have been completely refurbished. The 86th floor observation area has a light, airy, uncluttered look. Up on the 102nd floor, visitors enter a space ship environment, complete with special lighting.

MUSEUMS: Many museums have a pay-what-you-wish or suggested donation policy. Among these are the Metropolitan (including the Cloisters), American Museum of natural History, Brooklyn Children’s Museum, Bronx Museum, Hall of Science, New Museum of Contemporary Art, Pierpont Morgan and Museum of Broadcasting. On Tuesday, the New York Historical Society, and on Thrusday evenings, the Museum of Modern Art is pay what you wish. Absolutely free are the Museum of the city of New York and the Museum of American Illustration, and on Tuesday evenings, the Whitney, Guggenheim, Cooper-Hewitt, American Craft and national Academy of Design. The American Museum of natural History is free Friday and Saturday evenings.

SIGHTS BY WATER: the Hudson, East and Harlem. Best seats are aboard Circle Line’s 3hr sightseeing cruise around Manhattan. A 20-minute ride on the Staten Island Ferry lets you set foot in 2 boroughs, get a spectacular view of the Statue of liberty, the harbor for 75 cents (roundtrip). While in Staten Island, visit the Snug Harbor Cultural Center. Free. Enter at Battery Park at Whitehall Street. Boats leave every hour on the half hour. 718-815-BOAT or 718-390-5253.
SUG HARBOR CULTURAL CENTER, STATEN ISLAND: 80 beautiful acres with 26 landmark buildings overlooking the Bay; easily reached via the Staten Island Ferry.

THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE This Gothic wonder was once the world's largest suspension bridge and the first to use steel cables. Start from City Hall Park, near sunset and don't look back until you're midway—the view of metropolis will wow you. Combine this walk with a trip to South Street Seaport (drop by the revitalized Fulton Fish market area), stroll the cobblestone streets of 19th century historic port district--the indoor-outdoor museum, the pier with concerts, daily street entertainment amid the shops, ships, galleries, cafes, landmark buildings and eateries.

NEIGHBORHOODS: Chinatown, Greenwich Village, SoHo, TriBeCa, Yorkville, the Lower East Side, Little Italy, Brooklyn Heights -- see the “small towns” that make up the Big Apple.

CHINATOWN. Stop at a bakery for almond cookies, shop for rice bowls in one of the big Canal Street indoor markets, check out the fresh fish and vegetables or stop for a dim sum lunch, Colorful streets, unusual shops, interesting people and superb cuisine (at budget prices).
GREENWICH VILLAGE & SOHO The Villgae, with its gracious old houses, landmarks, friendly restaurants and interesting shops, provides an historic setting for the arts. In SoHo, cast iron buildings have been transformed into galleries, restaurants and trendy boutiques.

HARLEM: Not only a famous neighborhood but also a state of mind. Afro-American boutiques, museums, residences, historic sites, even a self-help center for drug addicts--all are covered on tours listed in the Visitors Bureau’s free Harlem guide or in A. Peter Bailey’s book ‘Harlem Today’.

LITTLE ITALY: The neighborhood right next door to Chinatown is filled with an enticing array of cappuccino stops and bakery delights. Perfect for a leisurely dessert after a Chinese lunch.

SOUTH STREET SEAPORT: cobblestone thoroughfares, see restored Federal buildings and historic ships. Seaport is 12 Fulton Street. Free. For more information, call 212-732-7678.

BEACHES:15 miles of beaches in NYC. Coney Island and the Rockaways are most popular--and just a subway ride away. In any season, stroll along the 3-mile boarwalk at Coney Island to Brighton Beach, the Russian enclave called “Odessa by the Sea”

THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE: 30-minute daily tours Monday - Friday from 9A to 4:30P. Trading hours are from 9:30A to 4P. Go early to the Admission Window in front of 20 Broad Street (between Exchange Place and Wall Street) for tickets. 212-656-5165.

GRAND CENTRAL STATION: Take a behind-the-scenes look at New York's landmark rail hub. Striking architecture and the fabled constellation ceiling. The station recently underwent a top-to-bottom refurbishing, and the lower levels, where the noted and noisy Oyster Bar is located, have been transformed (great ice cream stand serving creamy custards). For more info-212-340-2345.

TIMES SQUARE: Bright lights and excitement, theater district, Visitors Bureau (42nd St. at Broadway. Lincoln Center (handsome buildings that play host to the greatest names in opera, music, dance and theater (usually free performances).

STATUE OF LIBERTY: The lady in the harbor is still the city’s truest symbol. She continues to welcome all who make up the hearty, invigorating, ever-changing mix that is New York City.

CENTRAL PARK:. 840 acres. A favorite family place - watching people, boats at the pond at 72nd St off Fifth Avenue,. monuments The Alice in Wonderland group, Belvedere Castle, Bethesda fountain, “Cleopatra’s Needle”, Wollman ice rink, Hans Christian Andersen statue, story telling, Delacorte Musical Clock .Take your own boat and string, picnic lunch..THE CENTRAL PARK CAROUSEL: A special landmark, this old-time merry-go-round is still a deal to ride. Located at 63rd Street, inside the Park., Row Boats on the Lake around Central Park - 10:A - 5:30P at the Loeb Boathouse on East Side between 74th and 75th $10 first hr, Tai Chi in the Park - every Sat between 10:A and 11:30 - $7

VEST POCKET PARKS: in the heart of Manhattan, complete with feathery honey locust trees and an urban waterfall, just east of Fifth Ave. on 53rd St. Others: Greenacre park on 51st St. off 3rd Ave; the mini-park on Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, 47th St. off 1st Ave; Exxon park (with waterwall) at 50th St.; McGraw-Hill Park (with walk through waterfall) at 49th St, both in Rockefeller Center on Ave. of the America’s. For a beautiful garden within a great park, visit the Conservatory Garden in Central Park, Fifth Ave. at 105th St.

GARDENS: FORMAL & NATURA - cultivated gardens and wildlife preserves. Check the Bureau for locations in Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island and The Bronx. The Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s 52 acres, adjacent to the Brooklyn Museum are free. The New York Botanical Garden, a magnificent oasis in The Bronx is open free daily and on Saturdays - 10-12, the Crystal Palace Haupt Conservatory is free.

PLAYGROUNDS: Hippo Park, on Riverside and 89th St, where kids climb on hippos, do art, swing... the playground at 67th St in Central Park (off Central Park West across from Tavern on the Green) has two areas: one for little kids and one for bigger. Carl Schulz Park on East End Avenue and 84th Street has great views of the East River and a nice promenade.

PEOPLE WATCHING: along Sixth Avenue and 49th St, past the Time and Life Building and the McGraw Hill Building. Booming waterfalls. Sit and sample street food. Times Square (two Columbus Circle, Broadway and 42nd Street, Rockefeller Center (at Fifth Avenue and 5lst Street) and the Paramount Building (on Broadway and 50th Street),

MUSIC: Check out the clubs in Greenwish Village, SoHo, Harlem, the Upper West Side...all over town. Pick up a copy of the latest weekly news paper or the various rags that can be found around the clubs for club listings.

FREE SHOWS: TV Tapings - same-day tickets at the Visitors Bureau. Special exhibits at the IBM Gallery of Science and Art, 56th Street at madison Ave., AT&T’s InfoQuest at 56th Stret and Madison; Nikon House, 620 Fifth Ave.; and at satellite branches of the Whitney and International Center of photography. Watch the Bureau’s calendar of events for street festivals. For a complete list of freebies, pick up “Free Things To Do” at the Visitors Bureau Centers,
TV SHOWS & DISCOUNT TICKETS: Free tickets to TV shows are offered on a day-to-day basis at the NYC Visitors Bureau; also pick up “twofers” (discount theater coupons) and discount tickets to trade shows and special exhibits. Half-price tickets for Broadway and off-Broadway shows are sold (on day-of-performance) at the TKTS Booths: Broadway at 47th St. The Music & Dance Booth in Bryant Park at 42nd St. just east of Ave. of the Americas offers half-price day-of-performance tickets for music and dance events.

FORBES MAGAZINE GALLERIES: features more than 500 antique toy ships, as well as 12,000 toy soldiers and Lincoln memorabilia. 62 Fifth Avenue at l3th Street. Tues-Wed, Fri and Sat from 10A. to 4P. Reservations one month in advance. No strollers. 212-206-5548.

BIRD WATCHING: Grab binoculars, a guidebook, maps and sketching materials for bird watching, and take an expedition through the urban woodland, known as the Ramble, or other locations in Central Park. Call to reserve a kit. Tues - Sunday, l0A. to 4:30P, at The Henry Luce Nature Observatory at the Belvedere Castle, mid-Park at 79th Street. 212-772-0210.

ZOOS: Pay-what-you-wish on Tuesdays thru Thrusdays, the Staten Island Zoo (free Wednesdays), the Prospect park Zoo in Brooklyn and Flushing Meadow park Zoo in Queens (free daily), Manhattan’s new Central Park Zoo is free for toddlers, 25 cents children and $1 for adults.

FAMOUS SIGHTS: bus or subway to Battery Park at the tip of Lower Manhattan for a view of the harbor and the Statue of Liberty. Walk up Broadway to City Hall. In midtown, look up (1,454 feet!) the Empire State Building. Further north - Grant’s Tomb and in the Bronx, the Hall of Fame.

THE FIRE MUSEUM: 278 Spring St between Hudson and Varick, two floors of memorabilia, buckets, uniforms, horse-drawn fire wagons etc.. For kids seven and older. For 212-691-1303.

FAO SCHWARTZ: Great Free Fun - wandering a child's dreamland full of every toy imaginable. 767 Fifth Avenue between 58th and 59th Streets. For more information, call 212-644-9400.

WINDOW SHOPPING: Treasure-hunt along Fifth Avenue, Madison Avenue, Herald Square, 34th and 57th Streets. Browse the antique shops and boutiques along the Upper East Side, along Columbus Avenue, down in SoHo and Greenwich Village, and on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. See New York City Tours: 1-866-868-7786 or have hotel arrange.

For Discounted Theatre Tickets head to a TKTS booth 47th Street & Broadway, in the heart of Times Sq.; also a booth located downtown at 2 World Trade Center. Day-of-performance tickets are 25% - 50% off (plus a $2.50 service charge), and payment is cash or traveler's check only. Available Broadway and Off-Broadway shows are posted on boards outside the ticket windows, and changes in availability may occur almost hourly as cooperating theatres supply or withdraw tickets, depending on box office demand. Tickets for sold-out shows are, of course, not available.

and the brand new New York Sports Museum of America just opened last week (26 Broadway). http://www.sportsmuseum.com/

have fun,
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Reply #23 posted 05/27/08 2:05pm

DevotedPuppy

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Red said:



MUSEUMS: Many museums have a pay-what-you-wish or suggested donation policy. Among these are the Metropolitan (including the Cloisters), American Museum of natural History, Brooklyn Children’s Museum, Bronx Museum, Hall of Science, New Museum of Contemporary Art, Pierpont Morgan and Museum of Broadcasting. On Tuesday, the New York Historical Society, and on Thrusday evenings, the Museum of Modern Art is pay what you wish. Absolutely free are the Museum of the city of New York and the Museum of American Illustration, and on Tuesday evenings, the Whitney, Guggenheim, Cooper-Hewitt, American Craft and national Academy of Design. The American Museum of natural History is free Friday and Saturday evenings.


The things in bold are definitely wrong. I work at one museum, volunteer at a second, and go to several others on a regular basis. Very few are open late on Tuesdays OR free on Tuesdays. MoMA, Guggenheim and maybe the Whitney are free after 6pm on Fridays. If you are thinking of going to a museum, it is always best to check that museum's website to get the most accurate info on cost, hours, etc. I can't tell you the number of people who get pissed that we aren't free or open late on Tuesdays because they didn't check our website. no no no! (And we haven't been open late/free on Tuesdays for over 3 years...)
"Your presence and dry wit are appealing in a mysterious way."
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Reply #24 posted 05/27/08 3:54pm

Wonderwall

RodeoSchro said:

LOL. First of all - I'm from Houston! Born and raised. I do consider Wrigley Field the Mecca of Baseball, but I live in Houston. FWIW, I despise the Cubs on general principle, and despise/envy (sorry) the White Sox, since they beat us in the World Series!

But your advice is GREATLY appreciated. And if you aren't using your tickets Friday or Saturday, I'd be happy to buy them from you!

Wonderwall said:

I have Yankee season tickets and am actually born and raised in Chicago...South Side tho...so I really shouldn't even be helping you since you are a Cub fan (GO WHITE SOX!) wink, but here you go...

Neighourhood around Yankee Stadium SUCKS and is NOTHING like Wrigleyville (even Bridgeport where the W Sox play is better). Nothing to see or do around the stadium and you are going to want to leave as soon as the game is over. There are a couple of bars we go to before the game (the Dugout or Stanleys) but since your son is with I say high tail it outta there and head South after the game. Stay at a hotel in Midtown or even downtown and take the #4 train to the game. Hotel rates are not bad in Midtown...more than Michigan Ave hotels...but not by much. But there is so much to see and do that its worth the extra $$ to stay in a good place in a good spot.

A very cool neighbourhood to check out esp for out of towners is the Seaport area. Its way downtown, not far from World Trade Center...We go to this one place in this area called Nelson Blue...its a New Zealand bar and grill. Very good food and beautiful views of the Brooklyn Bridge...its literally underneath it. We've been going after the game and keep going back because of the great food, relaxed atomsphere, AND because not a lot people know about it so it has yet to get over-crowded. Plus prices are reasonable for New York. I have been taking Chicago friends there who say nasty things about NYC and they always leave impressed of the Nelson Blue AND Seaport. Nelson Blue has a website so check it out if you want.

Another cool spot to check out is Top of the Rock. A cool observation deck on top of 30 Rockefeller Center. Not near as touristy as Empire State Building and the views are spectacular.

DO NOT take a cab...rates are ridiculous. Use the subway as much as possible. I actually think NYC subways are better and cleaner than the El/CTA in Chicago.

The airport question? Personally I like JFK better...its more like O'Hare. Where LaGuardia is more like Midway if not a little worse. Being a Chicagoan I think you know what I mean.

Hope this helps!!


Saying you hate the Cubs more than made up for the fact that you love Wrigley OR that you hate the White Sox because we beat yo ass in the 05 World Series!! LOL smile.

I am going to all 3 games in the series...so maybe I'll see ya there! Look out for 1 of two people with a White Sox jersey and cap (the other person being my buddy from Chi-town who is coming in for the weekend)
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Reply #25 posted 05/27/08 4:22pm

Red

thanks for pointing this out Puppy, the page is at least 3 years old. Are there any free museum nights anymore in NY?


DevotedPuppy said:

Red said:



MUSEUMS: Many museums have a pay-what-you-wish or suggested donation policy. Among these are the Metropolitan (including the Cloisters), American Museum of natural History, Brooklyn Children’s Museum, Bronx Museum, Hall of Science, New Museum of Contemporary Art, Pierpont Morgan and Museum of Broadcasting. On Tuesday, the New York Historical Society, and on Thrusday evenings, the Museum of Modern Art is pay what you wish. Absolutely free are the Museum of the city of New York and the Museum of American Illustration, and on Tuesday evenings, the Whitney, Guggenheim, Cooper-Hewitt, American Craft and national Academy of Design. The American Museum of natural History is free Friday and Saturday evenings.


The things in bold are definitely wrong. I work at one museum, volunteer at a second, and go to several others on a regular basis. Very few are open late on Tuesdays OR free on Tuesdays. MoMA, Guggenheim and maybe the Whitney are free after 6pm on Fridays. If you are thinking of going to a museum, it is always best to check that museum's website to get the most accurate info on cost, hours, etc. I can't tell you the number of people who get pissed that we aren't free or open late on Tuesdays because they didn't check our website. no no no! (And we haven't been open late/free on Tuesdays for over 3 years...)
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Reply #26 posted 05/27/08 4:29pm

RodeoSchro

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Great advice! Thanks, and keep it coming!
Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's Palladin
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Reply #27 posted 05/27/08 4:36pm

DevotedPuppy

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Yes, there are still free nights...see my post. wink (I get myself & at least one guest into pretty much any museums for free with my staff ID so I don't really pay attention to when all the free nights are.)

And a little secret---if you buy a membership to the American Association of Museums (AAM) you can get into any US museum that is a member of the AAM for free. And most museums are members of AAM--it's like being accredited. So just buy one membership to AAM and you're good to go for museums from NYC to LA, for much less than if you paid admissions at each museum or bought individual museum memberships; and you don't have to wait for crowded free nights. smile


Red said:

thanks for pointing this out Puppy, the page is at least 3 years old. Are there any free museum nights anymore in NY?


DevotedPuppy said:



The things in bold are definitely wrong. I work at one museum, volunteer at a second, and go to several others on a regular basis. Very few are open late on Tuesdays OR free on Tuesdays. MoMA, Guggenheim and maybe the Whitney are free after 6pm on Fridays. If you are thinking of going to a museum, it is always best to check that museum's website to get the most accurate info on cost, hours, etc. I can't tell you the number of people who get pissed that we aren't free or open late on Tuesdays because they didn't check our website. no no no! (And we haven't been open late/free on Tuesdays for over 3 years...)
"Your presence and dry wit are appealing in a mysterious way."
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