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Forums > Music: Non-Prince > When a generation loves a previous musical era: Millennials' recognition of 1960s-1990s songs is notable
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Reply #30 posted 02/18/19 6:12pm

Hamad

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rdhull said:

Scorp said:

The music was simply better back then, everyone knows this.

Closes piano top. Unplugs cord from geetar. Leaves mic in stand.

Amen! And not just American/UK music either, back home too.

Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future...
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Reply #31 posted 02/18/19 10:36pm

MotownSubdivis
ion

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One of the main turnoffs of the bulk of music today is the production. There's been many articles over this decade addressing how modern techniques are flatlining the personality of a song. It's all about loudness and it's done at the expense of the range, dynamism and other related qualities that made songs of the past such treasures.

Here's the most recent article on this subject: https://www.nytimes.com/2...ref=oembed

Props to a mainstream publication like the Times to actually address this instead of pandering to the LCD.
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Reply #32 posted 02/19/19 8:26am

jaawwnn

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alphastreet said:

And now it’s songs with a sample of a sample being sampled. Like a Chris Brown song using swv right here/human nature

I'd rather hear a well done sample in a decent song than the endless funk jams of Snarky Puppy or Vulpeck. Being a good player doesn't mean you make good records.

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Reply #33 posted 03/10/19 9:46pm

MickyDolenz

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MotownSubdivision said:

One of the main turnoffs of the bulk of music today is the production. There's been many articles over this decade addressing how modern techniques are flatlining the personality of a song. It's all about loudness and it's done at the expense of the range, dynamism and other related qualities that made songs of the past such treasures.

Considering what many people listen to music on today, the sound quality of a recording doesn't matter that much lol Even in the past most people had cheap component sets from K-Mart or Mongomery Wards. It wasn't expensive audiophile equipment. The sound quality on old records varied anyway, depending on the record company, the producer, or the engineer. I have the original pressing of the debut album by Sugarhill Gang, and it sounds thin & flat compared to something produced by Quincy Jones or a Steely Dan record. There's the original Beatles records with the music on one speaker and the vocals on the other. By turning one speaker off, you could have an acapella or instrumental. I've seen interviews where some records were recorded in a bathroom with a 4-track recorder.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #34 posted 03/18/19 10:15am

Cinny

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MickyDolenz said:

CynicKill said:

Have you noticed how the 2000's decades seem to be non-defining? Young people are supposed to be the ones coming up with new, ground breaking ideas. They've seemed to stop doing that after the 90's.

MTV sort of started the reality trend with The Real World in the 1990s.


I know this is true, but by all accounts the real game changer was The Osbournes - a family sitcom without a script. Other than starring Ozzy, it was not music related at all, but gave MTV viewer ratings they had never seen before.

By the way, Ozzy's guitarist Bernie Torme passed yesterday. He was 66.

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Reply #35 posted 03/18/19 10:31am

Cinny

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MotownSubdivision said:

Here's the most recent article on this subject: https://www.nytimes.com/2...-wars.html


Thanks for posting! biggrin

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Reply #36 posted 03/21/19 7:09am

DaveT

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I think some of the generalisations are a bit unfair ... there is good modern music today (The XX, Haim, Chrvches to name three of my current faves) and there was bad music back then (Mr Blobby, Black Lace, Napoleon XIV, Ray Stevens, Disco Duck, etc). But there does seem to be alot more vacuous music about today.

Life is more comfortable now for alot of people, with more distractions and more instantly available gratification. As such I don't think the passion is there for a lot of potential artists. Take Prince for example; I'm guessing music for him was such a big passion simply because there wasn't much else to be passionate about. And it wasn't just a passion for him, it was an escape to something better, a more comfortable life.

How many of the people on today's chart can say that? How many of them had a tough upbringing where making it in the music business was that life or death? I'm willing to bet nowhere near as many, and the music they make doesn't hold as much value as a result ... it isn't as urgent, as passionate ... its just business.

Look at the likes of Prince, Madonna, the Foo Fighters, Springsteen. They all could have retired years ago but they haven't, because performing is their passion ... if they hadn't have made it big, even now I bet you could find them on a small stage somewhere in America doing their thing. I don't look at modern artists and see that ... hence their music holds less value and, quite simply put, isn't as good.

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Reply #37 posted 03/21/19 9:23pm

MickyDolenz

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DaveT said:

there was bad music back then (Mr Blobby, Black Lace, Napoleon XIV, Ray Stevens, Disco Duck, etc).

What's wrong with Ray Stevens? Although that's what he's known for with general audiences, Ray didn't just make comedy records. He had straight country songs and gospel too. There's nothing wrong with funny songs anyway. Weird Al wouldn't have a career without them. Mississippi Squirrel Revival is one of my all time favorite songs. I like Disco Duck & They're Coming To Take Me Away too. I've never heard of Mr. Blobby & Black Lace.

For 65 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Forums > Music: Non-Prince > When a generation loves a previous musical era: Millennials' recognition of 1960s-1990s songs is notable