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Thread started 11/10/17 12:08pm

MickyDolenz

News #15

A Muslim's Michael Jackson Obsession in Egypt's 'Sheikh Jackson'
11/9/2017 by Alex Ritman The Hollywood Reporter

Egypt's best foreign-language film submission caused the director to come under fire from all sides in a country where two recent revolutions and the dramatic rise and fall of the Muslim Brotherhood have cut deep divisions through society.

Director Amr Salama had a hunch that Sheikh Jackson might stoke a fire or two in his native Egypt. Not that it would ever stop him (his previous films have dealt with AIDS and sectarian strife), but in dealing with the somewhat sensitive subject of hard-line Islam, he managed to — at least initially — draw criticism from both sides in a country where two recent revolutions and the dramatic rise and fall of the Muslim Brotherhood have plowed deep divisions through society.

"People are so polarized when it comes to Islamists in the Middle East," says Salama. "Both sides just condemn and judge the other."

Sheikh Jackson, which bowed in Toronto and will see an early 2018 release in the U.S. (following an awards-qualifying run starting Nov. 4) via Cleopatra Entertainment, centers on an ultra-conservative Islamic preacher and former Michael Jackson fan who suffers a crisis of faith and identity after the King of Pop's 2009 death. The emotional, character-driven drama isn't as far-fetched as it may sound. Salama himself was a serious Jackson obsessive at school (where his nickname was "Jackson" and he had long hair) before becoming "extremely religious" in college, banishing the arts — including music — from his life. After a year and a half, Salama says he "started shifting the other way," adding that there are many other Egyptians of his generation who had their own periods deeply entrenched in Islam. The experience, coupled with him being born and raised in Saudi Arabia — "the world champion of orthodox Islam" — gave Salama the confidence he could "live in both islands."

But in his portrayal of the film's central character — a man with white robes and a beard and someone Salama says is usually shown on Arab film and TV as a terrorist — the director came under fire from the country's liberals.

"After I wrote the first couple of drafts of the script, many told me I was being too sympathetic with the Islamists," he says. " 'You can't humanize these people' — I literally heard that a couple of times. One said, 'Listen, this film is just you trying to make us love those guys more, and this is risky.' "

At the other end of the spectrum, Salama says he was also told the film was insulting to Islam.

Sheikh Jackson's central character, Sheikh Khaled Hani (played by Ahmad Alfishawy) is from the Salafist movement, an ultra-conservative and puritanical strain of Islam. "A Salafist is just a guy who believes we should go back to the foundations of Muhammad," he says. "But actually, these orthodox Muslims were less aggressive than the liberals when it came to this film."

Thankfully, with Sheikh Jackson having moved from script to screen (it was released across Egypt on Oct. 4, topping the local box office), people have been able to see the film as Salama intended, and the criticisms have disappeared. "I haven't gotten any comments anymore, either from outside Egypt, inside Egypt, from liberals, from anybody," he says. "Even if they don't like the film artistically, they don't have a problem with me humanizing the character, because they understand that I'm not sympathizing with the ideology as much as I'm sympathizing with the journey of one man."

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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Reply #1 posted 11/10/17 12:13pm

MickyDolenz

New interviews by Little Richard

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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Reply #2 posted 11/10/17 1:28pm

MickyDolenz

You Can Now Buy a Beatles ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Jukebox
Jeff Giles November 10, 2017 Ultimate Classic Rock
https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1416/6238/files/beat45-jukebox-1.png?10730726808618144578
Looking for a pretty place to put your vinyl — and got plenty of extra money to spend? You may wish to invest in Sound Leisure's new jukebox, decked out in officially licensed Sgt. Pepper's regalia.

The company, which bills itself as the last remaining manufacturer of vinyl jukeboxes in the world, partnered with the Beatles' Apple Corps to secure official licenses for the limited edition unit, described as an "analog dream machine." Built with "all the skills and knowledge of their in house research and development team that produced their original vinyl mechanism back in the late '70s," the jukebox boasts a "unique rotating vinyl mechanism" capable of spinning either side of the 70 45" singles it can hold, as well as software for producing personalized title labels.

In addition to old-fashioned vinyl sound, the jukebox includes Bluetooth capability for streaming, as well as auxiliary input/output options and an on-board amp that powers a five-way speaker system making sure "splendid quality sound is guaranteed for all from needle to ear." To add the finishing touch, the whole unit is decked out in a Sgt. Pepper's-inspired design that should make any Beatles fan happy — and extends Sound Leisure's streak of building Fab Four-licensed jukeboxes, including a Yellow Submarine machine and one inspired by the band's cartoon series.

That kind of craftsmanship doesn't come cheap. According to Sound Leisure's site, the jukebox is made to order for £8995 — or roughly $11,900 — plus delivery and installation. That's pretty steep, but if you can swing it, it may not be a bad investment; either way, it's free to take a look at the building of the unit below.

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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Reply #3 posted 11/10/17 3:56pm

purplethunder3
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MickyDolenz said:

A Muslim's Michael Jackson Obsession in Egypt's 'Sheikh Jackson'
11/9/2017 by Alex Ritman The Hollywood Reporter

Egypt's best foreign-language film submission caused the director to come under fire from all sides in a country where two recent revolutions and the dramatic rise and fall of the Muslim Brotherhood have cut deep divisions through society.

Director Amr Salama had a hunch that Sheikh Jackson might stoke a fire or two in his native Egypt. Not that it would ever stop him (his previous films have dealt with AIDS and sectarian strife), but in dealing with the somewhat sensitive subject of hard-line Islam, he managed to — at least initially — draw criticism from both sides in a country where two recent revolutions and the dramatic rise and fall of the Muslim Brotherhood have plowed deep divisions through society.

"People are so polarized when it comes to Islamists in the Middle East," says Salama. "Both sides just condemn and judge the other."

Sheikh Jackson, which bowed in Toronto and will see an early 2018 release in the U.S. (following an awards-qualifying run starting Nov. 4) via Cleopatra Entertainment, centers on an ultra-conservative Islamic preacher and former Michael Jackson fan who suffers a crisis of faith and identity after the King of Pop's 2009 death. The emotional, character-driven drama isn't as far-fetched as it may sound. Salama himself was a serious Jackson obsessive at school (where his nickname was "Jackson" and he had long hair) before becoming "extremely religious" in college, banishing the arts — including music — from his life. After a year and a half, Salama says he "started shifting the other way," adding that there are many other Egyptians of his generation who had their own periods deeply entrenched in Islam. The experience, coupled with him being born and raised in Saudi Arabia — "the world champion of orthodox Islam" — gave Salama the confidence he could "live in both islands."

But in his portrayal of the film's central character — a man with white robes and a beard and someone Salama says is usually shown on Arab film and TV as a terrorist — the director came under fire from the country's liberals.

"After I wrote the first couple of drafts of the script, many told me I was being too sympathetic with the Islamists," he says. " 'You can't humanize these people' — I literally heard that a couple of times. One said, 'Listen, this film is just you trying to make us love those guys more, and this is risky.' "

At the other end of the spectrum, Salama says he was also told the film was insulting to Islam.

Sheikh Jackson's central character, Sheikh Khaled Hani (played by Ahmad Alfishawy) is from the Salafist movement, an ultra-conservative and puritanical strain of Islam. "A Salafist is just a guy who believes we should go back to the foundations of Muhammad," he says. "But actually, these orthodox Muslims were less aggressive than the liberals when it came to this film."

Thankfully, with Sheikh Jackson having moved from script to screen (it was released across Egypt on Oct. 4, topping the local box office), people have been able to see the film as Salama intended, and the criticisms have disappeared. "I haven't gotten any comments anymore, either from outside Egypt, inside Egypt, from liberals, from anybody," he says. "Even if they don't like the film artistically, they don't have a problem with me humanizing the character, because they understand that I'm not sympathizing with the ideology as much as I'm sympathizing with the journey of one man."

This looks really intrigueing.

Find strength in that which remains...
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Reply #4 posted 11/10/17 4:07pm

MickyDolenz

London Scraps 'Racist' Live Music Regulation That Critics Said Targeted Grime and R&B Artists
11/10/2017 by Richard Smirke Billboard

A controversial U.K. regulation which critics say unfairly targets grime, garage and R&B artists has been abolished by London’s Metropolitan Police.

Since 2005, promoters in the British capital have been asked to complete a "Form 696 Risk Assessment" document when staging live events predominantly involving DJs and MCs.

The form requires promoters or licensees to provide the name, address, date of birth and phone number for each artist performing. Until 2009, when the process was revised, it also requested information about the type or genre of music being played and, most controversially, the ethnic make-up of the audience that an event was likely to attract.

Those questions were removed amid complaints that the form was being used to racially profile audiences and unfairly discriminate against music popular with black and Asian audiences.

A number of artists have also claimed the information provided to police via Form 696 has led to shows being cancelled at the last minute. In 2010, British rapper Giggs -- who’s long been a vocal critic of the regulation -- had his tour cancelled following police advice. London grime MC P Money has also stated that he’s had gigs pulled as a direct result of Form 696, which was originally introduced by the Metropolitan Police following a spate of shootings at club nights across London.

Earlier this year, London mayor Sadiq Khan called for a review of Form 696 in response to repeated concerns from promoters and artists.

“There is no doubt that over the last decade a number of serious incidents have been prevented through the effective exchange of information, advice and intelligence between the Met, promoters and venue managers as part of this process,” said a statement from the Metropolitan Police announcing that, after a review with stakeholders and representatives from across London’s live music industry, Form 696 was finally being scrapped.

In its place, Met Police will “develop a new voluntary partnership approach for venues and promoters across London,” said superintendent Roy Smith.

“This decision will help London’s night-time economy thrive, ensure the capital is a welcoming place for artists and DJs of all music genres and that Londoners are able to enjoy live music safely,” said Khan.

News that Form 696 was being abolished was also welcomed by British trade bodies the Musicians Union and umbrella organization UK Music.

“It’s great that Mayor of London Sadiq Khan and London’s Night Czar Amy Lamé have listened to the concerns of the music industry," stated UK Music CEO Michael Dugher, who said the development would help ensure that “London remains a world beater when it comes to our cultural music mix.”

Earlier this year, New York City lawmakers repealed the so-called Cabaret Law, which had also been accused of racial discrimination. First enacted in 1926, the anti-dancing law originated as an attempt to police Harlem's 1920s jazz clubs and continued to be enforced unfairly, critics argued.

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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Reply #5 posted 11/13/17 5:44pm

MickyDolenz

2017 reunions

Blossom

https://78.media.tumblr.com/4cb747527865e104218859154f3415e9/tumblr_ozdwqt9a6D1rw606ko3_1280.jpg

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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Reply #6 posted 11/13/17 5:45pm

MickyDolenz

Family Matters

https://78.media.tumblr.com/ce41c982393dec9067337d7463dccd1c/tumblr_ozdwqt9a6D1rw606ko2_1280.png

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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Reply #7 posted 11/13/17 5:51pm

MickyDolenz

Perfect Strangers

https://78.media.tumblr.com/3f0d51ceffeab90bcb3b3bbfa05ba3f7/tumblr_ozdwqt9a6D1rw606ko4_1280.jpg

Sabrina The Teenage Witch

https://78.media.tumblr.com/ec06b96633de08fbf22392e37356362b/tumblr_ozdwqt9a6D1rw606ko1_1280.jpg

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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Reply #8 posted 11/15/17 6:43am

Identity




Pop Prodigy Khalid Opens Up About Being Young in the Industry


https://is.gd/w1dVqo

Fear no evil.
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Reply #9 posted 11/15/17 11:33am

MickyDolenz

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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Reply #10 posted 11/20/17 7:49pm

MickyDolenz

Don Pedro Colley, 'Dukes of Hazzard' Actor (August 30, 1938 - October 11, 2017)
by Mike Barnes • November 17, 2017 • The Hollywood Reporter
https://78.media.tumblr.com/20995b8b187e603c8b62ad7e2e011911/tumblr_ozqcgaQncE1rw606ko1_r3_1280.jpg
The Oregon native also appeared in George Lucas' first movie, 'THX 1138,' and in several blaxpoitation films.

Don Pedro Colley, an actor who appeared in Beneath the Planet of the Apes, in the first film directed by George Lucas and on the 1980s CBS series The Dukes of Hazzard, has died. He was 79.

Colley died Oct. 11 in his hometown of Klamath Falls, Oregon, following a long battle with cancer, his friend William Sowles said.

Colley also had roles in The World's Greatest Athlete (1973), Herbie Rides Again (1974) and Piranha (1995) and in blaxpoitation films including The Legend of Nigger Charley (1972), Black Caesar (1973) and, playing a voodoo lord of the dead, Sugar Hill (1974).

The 6-foot-4 Colley portrayed the mutant Ongaro in Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970), the second of the five original films in the franchise, and was the hologram SRT in Lucas' maiden directorial effort, THX 1138 (1971).

He is perhaps best known for playing the straight-shooting Sheriff "Big Ed" Little of Chickasaw County on the 1979-85 action comedy Dukes of Hazzard.

Colley also recurred as Gideon, a friend of Fess Parker's lead character, on NBC's Daniel Boone and appeared on other shows including Daktari, The Wild Wild West, Adam-12, Night Gallery, Ironside, The Streets of San Francisco, Little House on the Prairie, Starsky and Hutch and The A-Team.

Colley attended Klamath Union High School and the University of Oregon and attempted to qualify for the 1960 U.S. Olympic team in the discus throw.

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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Reply #11 posted 11/20/17 8:04pm

MickyDolenz

Legendary Actor Earle Hyman Dead at 91
by Shantell E. Jamison, November 20, 2017 Ebony
https://78.media.tumblr.com/4375be54a66ef858053dfe62d835ac98/tumblr_ozr1y4cpTm1rw606ko1_540.jpg
Veteran actor Earle Hyman has died. He was 91.

According to the New York Times, the classically trained Broadway star passed away at the Lillian Booth Actors Home in Englewood, New Jersey, last Friday.

Hyman, who was blessed to have a career on and off of Broadway, was an actor for more than six decades. Although he is known for a plethora of Shakesperean roles performed at Joseph Papp’s New York Shakespeare Festival, it was playing Russell Huxtable, the father of Dr. Cliff Huxtable, on The Cosby Show that got him access to his largest audience.

Hyman embodied the role of Huxtable’s sympatico father so well that he was nominated for an Emmy for the role in 1986.

He also portrayed roles in classics such as Othello, Henrik Ibsen’s The Master Builder and even Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night during his lengthy career on stage.

The Lady From Dubuque was one of his more memorable performances in contemporary works. It was a play that not only featured Hyman as a soft-spoken, karate-chopping enforcer but also one that left critics and audiences stunned by the work of art. The role earned the actor his only Tony nomination.

Hyman, a native of Rocky Mount, North Carolina, was biracial, born to an African-American father and Native American mother. His family moved to Brooklyn, New York, when he was a child.

His interest in acting was piqued after being exposed to theatrical plays of Ibsen. As a lifetime member or The Actors Studio, Hyman would go on to perform in the U.S. and Norway, where he made his second home after falling in love with the country.

The role of Panthro in the ’80s cartoon series Thundercats, as well as appearances in Julius Caesar, Coriolanus and Macbeth are among Hyman’s notable film and television performances.

His last NYC stage appearance took place in 2009, where he played Ferapont in Anton Chekhov’s Three Sisters.

Rest peacefully, Mr. Hyman.

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. If you don’t know your business, you’re in trouble! ~ Johnnie Taylor
Each generation has their music that they fall in love with, that makes it special to them ~ Ralph Tresvant
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